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Full text of "Hardware merchandising August-October 1912"



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CANADA'S ONLY WEEKLY HARDWARE PAPER 

HARDWARi»»METAL 



Published Weekly by 



Vol. XXIV. 



THE MACLEAN PUBLISHING COMPANY, LIMITED 

Publication Office : Toronto, Canada 
Aug. 3, 1912 



No. 31 




I 



1 
I 
1 



I 



Si 



1 
1 



% 






Tin, Terne and 
Canada Plates, Gal- 
vanized Iron and Black 
Sheets, Tinned Sheets 
Angles, Tees, An- 
chors, Bar Iron 
Hoops 
Etc. 



Pig and 
Sheet Lead 
Tin, Copper 
and Spelter. All 
Brands of Pig Iron 




HENRY ROGERS, SONS & CO., Limited 

Wolverhampton, Liverpool and Sheffield 



CANADIAN BRANCH : 
6 St. Sacrament Street, Montreal 



I 
I 

% 



& 




HARDWARE AND METAL 



We're Overtaking the Rush of Orders 
For GILLETTE Razors and Blades 



Our apologies to those Dealers whose GILLETTE shipments have not 
been arriving as promptly as usual of late. 

We always endeavor to ship the goods the same day the order is 
received — and usually we succeed, as you know. But the rush of orders 
received the last few weeks has, we must admit, got a little ahead of us. 
We had planned to take care of a good, healthy increase over last year, but 
the actual growth has far exceeded our expectations. 

However, this embarrassment (which is not unwelcome) is only tem- 
porary. Now that we are settled in our new building, with plenty of room 
to spread, we are rapidly increasing our equipment and output. Four new 
machines are now running smoothly, we are overtaking the rush, and 
hope soon to be able to make shipments as promptly as ever. 

At the same time, sales always run very heavy in the last four months 
of the year, taxing our capacity to the limit — and the Dealer who orders 
first gets the goods first. 

Our new Electric Hardening and Tempering Machines are turning out 
GILLETTE Blades which are, if possible, keener, harder and more uniform 
than those on which the GILLETTE reputation has been built. You can 
recommend them as strongly as you like, for they will certainly make good. 

Dropping business for a moment, do your holiday plans include a trip to 
Montreal? If they do, don't forget that you will be very welcome at the 
New GILLETTE Building. We are only a five minute drive or a ten minute 
walk from the G.T.R. or C.P.R. Stations, or from the Wharf, and if we can 
help in any way to make your stay in Montreal more pleasant we will be 
delighted to do it. Look us up. 




Gillette Safety Razor Co. 



of Canada, Limited 

Office and Factory : 

The New Gillette Building 



67-71 St. Alexander St. 



-GHMte 



Montreal 



world ovcm 



HARDWARE AND METAL 




Strike 



Lift 



Drive 



Double Claw Hammer 

Nails Higher Without Strain. 
Worth ten times more than 
the Common Hammer, costs 
three times more to make. 
Spend a little more for the tool 
and Save Money. 

Get it of your Canadian Jobber 



Start 



Out 




Pulls the 

nail out 

straight 

without 

a block 




HICAC 




A SUGGESTION 

Have you a stock of Spring Hinges that have 
distinctive selling features which your salesman 
can offer and which would make the prospective 

purchaser buy them and no 

other? 

Chicago "Triplex" 
Spring Butts 



offer this advantage to you. 
The appearance, durability and 
finish of this article are unsur- 
passed, and in consideration of 
prices that are conservative in respect to value, 
the up-to-date dealer cannot afford to neglect 
this profitable business. 

S.'nd for Catalogue M 26. It fully illustrates and describes 
the most complete line of Spring Hinges manufactured. 

Chicago Spring 'Buti.Compau&e 




CHICAGO 




NEW YORK 



A New Line 

"Yankee " Plain Screw Drivers 

Strong, durable, well balanced tools, of the same high 
quality of material and workmanship as other "Yankee" 
Tools, which to day are without equal. 

The blade and ferrule are highly polished, the 
handle of hardwood, finished in dull black, 
making a handsome appearance. 

Each tool is thoroughly tested and the 
blades positively guaranteed not 
to turn in the handle. 

Your Jobber Will Supply You 

No. 90, Standard Style, Four- 
teen Sizes, 2 to 30 in. 

No. 95, Cabinet Style, 

(Slim Blade) 

Eleven Sizes, 1\ 
to 15| in. 




Made by 

North Bros. 
Mfg. Co. 

PHILADELPHIA, PA 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



The "ECLIPSE" PUMPER 



INCLUDES PUMP JACK AND 
GASOLINE ENGINE COMPLETE 




Th^fW Way f 

..-pi 'Ssii^vi 




EVERY UP-TO-DATE FARMER WILL BUY ONE 

There is no longer any excuse for not having a good supply of water anywhere at any time. 
The Eclipse Pumper has been designed especially for this service, to pump water when you want 
it to, and at small expense. It is independent of wind or weather, and will pump from even the 
deepest wells — in fact, it will pump as much water as a 10 or 12-foot windmill running in a 
20 mile wind. It uses about one pint of gasolire per hour. Think of it, over 1,000 gallons of 
water pumped against a head of over 80 feet on one pint of gasoline. 

This pump should be sold by every dealer — th'i profits are consistent and reliable, and the 
demand is certain to increase. 

Write for full particulars. Keep one in stock. 



The Canadian Fairbanks- Morse Co., 

LIMITED 



MONTREAL 
ST. JOHN 

OTTAWA 



TORONTO 

WINNIPEG 

CALGARY 



SASKATOON 
VANCOUVER 

VICTORIA 

I, 




THE 



S. M. P. Royal Tea and Coffee Pots 



NICKEL PLATED, 



Nos. 
Pints 



OF ATTRACTIVE DESIGN, HANDSOMELY FINISHED, 

WITH ENAMELLED WOOD HANDLES 



HEAVILY NICKELLED, 




Prices 

on 

Application 




Packed separately in cardboard boxes. 



Put up 1 dozen in a case. 



THE SHEET METAL PRODUCTS COMPANY 

OF CANADA SUCCESSORS TO LIMITED 

Kemp Manufacturing Company 

Montreal TORONTO Winnipeg 



HARDWARE AND METAL 




« 



The Destiny that Shapes Our Ends 



» 




and he that 



Saves Our Soles 



is the old reliable Cobbler. 

Every Hardware dealer should 
keep his stock complete with such 
items as go to make up 



COBBLERS' 

SHOE REPAIR 

OUTFITS 



The Cobbler is the real destiny that shape our ends." 








We Can 

Supply You 

With 




'- V. REPAIRI NG OUTFIT N£ 1 

DoptSho^HarnesVandIinwareKe&iring. 



COBBLERS' REPAIR OUTFITS-HALF SOLES-HEEL TAPS-RUBBER HEELS-SHOE LASTS- 
SHOE HAMMERS— SHOE PINCERS— SHOE THREAD— SHOE BRISTLES- 
SHOE WAX— PEG BREAKS— HEEL SUPPORTS. 

Look over Your Stock and see if you are supplied with all these items. 

If not, write us. 

LEWIS BROS. Limited, Montreal 



OTTAWA 



TORONTO 



VANCOUVER 



FT ARDWAEE AND METAL 



You'll Do A Big Fall Business 

In Gas And Electric Glassware 

By Featuring These Pilabrasgo Lines 

Canada's due for a big business in gas and electric goods this year. 
And these lines are just the ones to get a lot of it for your store. They're 
brand new — now. 

Havana Glass. 

It's hard to describe this wonder Jul shade of brown. Took a lot of 
experimenting to get the precise color- rich in the daytime — clear 
and mellow at night. That it's going to be one 0} the "best sellers" 
is proven already by the Way orders are coming. 

Translux Glass. 

At last a pure white light. It's the most practical shade your 
customers can buy for it softens the glare of high power lamps 
Without throwing a shadow. Beyond a doubt, it will be a trade 
builder for you. You '11 want it as soon as you see it. 

Snappy New Designs. 

Show both Havana and Translux. Many of them original this 
year. They '11 help you sell— more than that, they '11 make customers 
for you. 

Send for our man with photographs — while the season's young. 

The Pittsburgh Lamp, Brass & Glass Co. 

General Offices and Factories ; PITTSBURGH, Pa., U.S.A. 



n 



Canadian 
Branch 



fflibrao N H9WortleyRoad, 

IK 



London, Ont. 



R. E. DAVIS, Special Representative. 



Every Rifleman 
Wants These — 



Because they will help him 
shoot better ! 

You have but to show either or both 
these Marble utilities to interest any 
man who uses a rifle! When he hears 
the little price, he will promptly buy 

MARBLE'S 

Rifle Cleaner and Rifle Rod 

Cleaner, of softest brass gauze 
washers threaded on a spiral spring of 
tempered steel wire, attaches to any 
standard rod, and will thoroughly clean 
any rifle without harm. Rod is made 
in 3 brass sections with steel joint con- 
nections, as shown at left. Has swivel 
tip. Each is priced low and advertised 
widely. 

You ought to push all the 
Marble Ingenuities 

Our 60 rapid-selling specialties for 
marksmen and sportsmen, all liberally 
advertised for your benefit. 

Ask for New Catalogue and details 
before big hunting season begins. Sold 
by leading jobbers. 

MARBLE ARMS & MFG. CO. 

5350 Delta Ave., Gladstone, Mich. 

Pacific Coas* Branch : 

BAILEY SPECIALTY CO. - SAN FRANCISCO 



J> 



25% 



6 



TRADE DISCOUNT 



list 'AH 7 



» 



METAL CEILINGS & WALLS 

WRITE US FOR THIS LIST 
The Gait Art Metal Co., Limited ( Dept'C") 

GALT, ONT. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Attractive Display Cabinets Are Efficient Silent Salesmen 

Most up-to-date progressive dealers prefer cabinets of this sort, not only because they give the store a better 
appearance, but because they assist in making sales, keep the stock in good condition, and eliminate the 

necessity of continually dusting, thus reducing labor. 
PRINT NO. 8 




BERLIN HARDWARE 
DISPLAY CABINETS 



are so constructed that the goods are displayed 
behind glass doors or display front compart- 
ments. 

Made of good quality oak and neatly finished. 
Cut illustrates print No. 8, being the second sec- 
tion of a large case. 

Did you cut print from last issue ? 

If not it will pay you to do it now, if possible. 
Save all the prints with numbers for reference 
in designing a case to meet your particular re- 
quirements. Then write us for specifications 
and prices. 

Write for circulars on complete line of store 
fixtures or any special line in which interested 



The Walker Bin & Store Fixture Co. 

Limited 
Manufacturers and Designers of 

Modern Store Fixtures Berlin, Ontario 





A NEW VALVE 

JENKINS BROS.' 

GUN METAL AND IRON BODY 

GATE VALVES 

"TYPE K" 

Special Features: 

Highest Quality Steam Metal. Perfect Interchangeability. Double Compensating Bronze Wedges. 
Metal Gland in Stuffing-Box. Great Strength of All Parts. Carefully tested to 250-lbt. Water Pressure 

UNRIVALLED IN DESIGN AND WORKMANSHIP 

Thoroughly Reliable Gate Valve for Steam, Water, Oil, Gas or Air. A trial will convince you that it 
will pay you to use these valves on all your work. 

Stamped with TRADE MARK like cut. 

Stocked by Machinery, Hardware and Supply Dealers throughout the World. 



Catalogue and Full Particulars Cheerfully Furnished on Application. 

JENKINS BROS., Limited 

Head Office and Works: And at 

103 St. Remi St., Montreal, Canada 95 Queen Victoria St., London, E.C. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



THE 

STEEL COMPANY OF CANADA 

LIMITED 



WIRE NAILS 



HAY BALING WIRE 



BALE TIES 



Book Your Order Now 

for 

Fall Shipment 



DISTRICT SALES OFFICES : 

HAMILTON, TORONTO, MONTREAL, WINNIPEG 

W. A. MacLennan, Vancouver, B.C. H. G. Rogers, St. John, N.B. 

J. B. H. Rickaby, Victoria, B.C. Geo. D. Hatfield, Halifax, N.S. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 




i KtAD* 






Adapted To All Buildings 

' I A HE excellence of Samson Ready Roofing as a 
protection for all kinds of buildings has been 
repeatedly demonstrated. Samson Ready Roofing 
is the kind that gives positive satisfaction and brings 
your customers back for more. It is ideal for Bunga- 
lows, Porch Roofs, Garages, Barns and, in fact, on 
any roof where a neat and attractive appearance is 
desired. Samson Ready Roofing is easy to lay, 
waterproof and fire-resisting, and carries with it the 
Samson guarantee of absolute satisfaction. 



'MIS END »P 

i READY 






SEND US YOUR ORDERS 



H. S. Rowland, Sons & Co., Limited 

Wholesale Hardware 
TORONTO 



WE SHIP PROMPTLY 



OUR PRICES ARE RIGHT 



GRAHAM NAILS ARE THE BEST 



.7 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Cre»cent 




Brand 



Crescent Brand HARDWARE 




Butt Hinges 



Strap Hinges 



Tee Hinges 



Barn Door Hangers Parlor Door Hangers 
Trolley Hangers Hinged Hasps Shelf Brackets 



Wrought Staples 



Rollston Pulleys 



Gate Hooks Wagon Hardware 



Steel Sheets 



Bands 



Etc. Etc. Etc. 



Bars 



Rods 



Wire 



CANADA STEEL GOODS CO., Limited 

HAMILTON - - - CANADA 




Davidson's "Queen" Oil Tanks 

For Storing Goal Oil, Linseed Oil, etc. 



Made of Heavy Galvanized Iron. 
Handsomely Japanned and Ornamented. 
The bottom is protected from damage by 
an inset stand of wood, one inch thick. 
Fitted with interchangeable pump. Also 
Measure tray with hinged cover and 
padlock hasp. 



3 SIZES 

Vi Bbl. 1 Bbl. 
Approx. | 

Capacity \ 25 50 

Gallons J 

Writ* for prices 



2 Bbls. 
100 



THE THOS. DAVIDSON MFG. CO. Limited 



MONTREAL 



WINNIPEG 



TORONTO 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Who seeks and will not take when once tis 
offered shall never find it more. 

Antony and Cleopatra. 




EVERY WORKMAN in our factory has absolute confidence in the Babbitt Metals we 
manufacture. 

EVERY WORKMAN in our factory knows that nothing but the purest raw material is 
used, this and the knowledge that his efforts are appreciated inspires him to do his best. 

EVERY WORKMAN in our factory is proud of the reputation attained by 

HARRIS HEAVY PRESSURE 

"The Babbitt Metal without a fault" 

and of assisting to produce a Babbitt Metal which is acknowledged by all engineers as the 
best for all general machinery bearings. 

MOST HARDWAREMEN CARRY IT IN STOCK 
Do You ? If not, write for prices 

The Canada Metal Co., Limited 



Head Office and Factory: 



Fraser Avenue, 



TORONTO 



Branch 
Factories : 



Brennan St., 
MONTREAL 



Chambers St., 
WINNIPEG 



Wholesale Agents Wanted in Toronto and Winnipeg 

FOR 

"F.M." PRESSED STEEL MILK CANS 

The Standard Cans of the World 

APPLY :— 

Burmeister & Wain's Export Company, Limited 

COPENHAGEN F. DENMARK. 
Cable Address: Burwain, Copenhagen 

The most hygienic and practical cans made. Pressed from a 
single sheet of steel, they are stronger than ordinary cans. After 
years of wear they may be re-tinned equal to new. Fitted with 
a new rust preventing device which prolongs the life of the can 
and prevents contamination of the milk. 

HIGHEST AWARDS RECEIVED AT ALL EXHIBITIONS WE HAVE TAKEN PART IN 





HARDWARE AND METAL 



The name "Yale" helps make the sale 




Are you getting yours? 

TTERE, waiting on the sidewalk for the 
-^ -*• express, is one single day's output of 
our free Window Display Service, 

The photograph shows pretty graphically 
how hardware dealers everywhere realize 
the tremendous value of Yale & Towne 
co-operation in the building up of their 
business. 



C-84 



10 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Our part consists in the continual prepara- 
tion of window displays, newspaper adver- 
tisements, booklets, etc., all for the dealer's 
use — and all free if he stocks Yale products 
iri sufficient quantity, no matter from whom 
he buys them. And, of course, beyond this 
we are constantly stimulating public interest 
in Yale Products by our advertising in the 
magazines. 

Are you interested in these? 





^alD 



speculation! if 

you lock them up 



this 





Newspaper Advertising 

Strong, straight-f rom-the-shoulder ad- 
vertisements that will bring buyers to 
your store — furnished all set up and 
in plate form, ready for you to use in 
your home papers- 



Lantern Slides 

A new advertising feature that will 
popularize your name throughout 
your community Attention-com- 
pelling slides, bearing your store 
name, to be shown between films in 
your local moving picture shows. 



Printed Matter 

Booklets and Leaflets that tell inter- 
esting stories of the Yale Products 
you have in stock — stories that will 
turn casual visitors or one-time cus- 
tomers into regular buyers. For 
mailing or counter distribution. 



Are you one of the dealers who are getting the benefits of 
this systematic merchandising activity? If you aren't, 
simply address 

Dealers'* Advertising Service 

Canadian Yale & Towne Limited 

Makers of Yale Products in Canada: Locks, Padlocks, Builders' Hardware, Door Checks and Chain Hoists 
General Offices and Works : St. Catharines, Ont. 



11 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Just Show This and The Sale is Made 

MXIaryfc 

WATER COOLERS 

White Enamelled - or 

Galvanized Lined 

Sizes 2-3-4-6-8-10 Gallon 




You can suit any requirement with a beautifully finished 
absolutely perfect water Cooler.— THAT'S WHY 

Delay will mean lost business— Order at once 

* * V^JIQlJr W London, Ont. 

Toronto Montreal London Vancouver St. John, N. B. Hamilton Winnipeg Calgary Saskatoon 




Armstrong Ratchets 

The Best and Most Complete Line Made 

Made entirely from Drop Forgings and Bar Steel. 

Hardened all over — Outwear Two of the Soft Kind. 




SRMSTRONG- SHORT RATCHET 



D 



SHORT RATCHET 
For Morse Taper. 



Each Ratchet 
is packed in a 
Cardboard Box. 



DEALERS ! 



UNIVERSAL RATCHET 



Two inches of motion at end of 
handle, IN ANY DIRECTION, 
, will drive the Drill. 

Patented Nov. 8, 1898, 
Sept. 29, 1900. 




Do you want the 
Best Made, Best 
Packed and Best 
Advertised 
Ratch ets? 




When the 

other ratchets you 

have are useless for 

lack of room to move the 

handle, get an "Armstrong 

Universal" and it will do the job. 



LET US SEND YOU A CATALOG 




"STANDARD" REVER- 
SIBLE RATCHETS 



"Hard-to-Please" 
USERS prefer 
ARMSTRONG 
RATC H ETS 



They stand 
the racket. 



SLEEVE RATCHET 



Armstrong Bros. Tool Co. 

"The Tool Holder People." 



306 N. Francisco Avenue, Chicago 
U. S. A. 




12 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



The"KELSEY" 

WARM AIR A 
GENERATOR 




USED IN OVER 40,000 HOMES 

Pays A Splendid Profit and Is 
Absolutely Guaranteed 

These are not the only reasons why you should spe- 
cialize the "Kelsey." It has many advantages over 
the ordinary furnace — advantages that mean economy 
of fuel to the user and an increasing furnace trade 
for you. 

The Zig-Zag Tube, as shown on right, is a section f 
fire pot and combustion chamber. 

There are from eight to sixteen in each heater accord- 
ing to its size and capacity. 

The Zig-Zag corrugations give the heating tubes of the 
"Kelsey" some peculiar advantages to be found in 
no other heater. They increase the heating surface 
and the rays of heat impinge upon much more readilj 
and effectively than they would a smooth surface, or 
one with perpendicular corrugations. 

Let us show you many other good selling points that 
prevail in "The Kelsey." 

Write for Catalogue and full particulars. 



The James Smart Mfg. Co., Ltd. 



WINNIPEG, MAN. 



BROCKVILLE, ONT. 




CUPPERS 

But only one quality 



OF ALL 
KINDS 




BURMAN'S 



They still hold that 
reputation and there 
are no clippers manu- 
factured to-day that 
can compare in quality, 
and BURMAN'S cost no 
more than inferior 
lines. 



B. & S. H. THOMPSON & CO., 

LIMITED 

Sole Agents for Canada MONTREAL 



13 



Clippers have been known 
for over 40 years as the best 



STOCKED BY 
ALL JOBBERS 




HARDWARE AND METAL 



The Extra Long Fire Travel of 

The Pilot 
Success Furnace 




Is one of the many quick selling features of this high grade furnace. It 
prevents heat from going to waste up the chimney — keeps the home 
comfortable at a saving in fuel. 

The Pilot Success gives a trade winning satisfaction. Every 
user is an enthusiastic advertiser. 

Write at once for full description. 

The Hall Zryd Foundry Co., Ltd, 

HESPELER, ONTARIO 



14 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



For Quick and Satisfactory Sales Try 

"EMPIRE" 

HOT AIR REGISTERS 

These are two popular and very neat designs that are sure 
to attract those who are interested. 

The "Empire Special" Register meets the demand for a 
register with a large opening. Has all the qualities that are 
required to assure the complete satisfaction of the user. 





MOORISH DESIGN CAST REGISTER 
Made in full sizes from 7x10 to 12x15 



EMPIRE SPECIAL 

New design, made in full sizes from 7 x 10 

to 12 x 15 

Made in Japanned, nickel-plated and oxidized 

Write us to-day for full particulars, catalogue 
and discounts. 

Others dealers are making good profits by handling 
this line — you can do the same. We guarantee to 
please you. Do not Delay. 

THE 

Canadian Heating & Ventilating 
Company, Limited 

OWEN SOUND ONTARIO 

Or The Canadian Heating and Ventilating Co. Branch : 
521 Henry Avenue, Winnipeg, Man. 



"EASY TO SELL AND PROFITABLE" 

is the story of the 

ENTERPRISE BLAZER 
HOT AIR FURNACES 

These features : 

Fisher Patent Fire Pot. 

Low Down Construction. 

Cup Joints and Outside Rods. 

Extra Large Radiating Surface. 

Clean out Doors. 

Removable Grate Bars. 

Extra Deep Ash Pit. 

Large Feed Doors. 
MAKE the ENTERPRISE BLAZER easy to sell, and 
give results to the users in the way of great economy, 
durability, ease of management and large heating- 
capacity. 

Every sale means a satisfied customer, with several 
more to follow. 

WRITE US TO-DAY. 

Enterprise Foundry Co., Sackville, N.B. 

DISTRIBUTING AGENCIES. 
\V. T. McArthur * Co. Reynolds & Jackson. Marlatt & McKenzie 
Vancouver. Calgary. Moose Jaw. 

Enterprise Hardware Co. F. J. Cox & Co. 

Saskatoon. Winnipeg. 




15 



«3 



HARDWARE AND METAL 





WE MAKE THE 
MOST COMPLETE 
LINE OF OPENING 
TOOLS inthe WORLD 

TWENTY-THREE STYLES 

Send for colored supplement 
illustrating this.fine line. 




*«.ri^-T-a.T-:i:™*. 




THE BRIDGEPORT HARDWARE MFG. CORP., BRIDGEPORT, CT., U.S.A. 

CANADIAN REPRESENTATIVE— MR. PRESCOTT W. ROBNISON, 288 ST. PAUL ST.. MONTREAL. QUE. 



The CHAMPION RANGE Pays a Splendid Profit 

(Satisfaction Guaranteed) 

This range is designed and constructed by experts, 
and made from the best qualities of iron. The mount- 
ings are artistically designed and the whole range is 
finely finished. 

THE CHAMPION GRATE 

saves an enormous amount of FUEL. 

Its durable and service-giving qualities insure a 
good value to every buyer. 

Write for oatalogue to-day — it gives full description. 

D.J. BARKER & COMPANY, Picton. Ontario 






Here is YOUR Chance 

to make your range department more 
profitable and more satisfactory. 

Happy Thought "Ranges 

are known from one side of the 
continent to the other and re- 
commended by every house- 
wife who ever used them. 

The "HAPPY THOUGHT" 

works equally well with coal 
or wood and gives a longer 
and more reliable service 
than any other. 

This is not a claim, but a 
fact, and we can prove it. 

Get a "HAPPY THOUGHT" 

Catalog at once. Each sale 
brings a good profit. 

The William Buck 
Stove Co., Limited 

Calgary Saskatoon Vancouver Brantford Montreal Winnipeg 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



CANADIAN TUBE & IRON CO., 



LIMITED 
Montreal, Canada 



OUR NEW BOLT AND NUT DEPARTMENT is now in operation, 
and we are fully equipped for the manufacture of: 



CARRIAGE BOLTS, COACH AND LAG SCREWS. 

TIRE BOLTS, MACHINE BOLTS, 

SLEIGH SHOE BOLTS, PLOW BOLTS, 

TRACK BOLTS, SQUARE NUTS, HEXAGON NUTS, 

BOILER RIVETS, TINNERS' RIVETS, 

ETC. 



ASK YOUR 
JOBBER FOR 




TRADE MARK 

BRAND 



OUR WROUGHT PIPE 

Black and Galvanized, Sizes 1/8 in. to 4 
in., is thoroughly inspected and tested to 
600 lbs. pressure, and every length is 
branded with our trade mark. 



Also NIPPLES 

Black and Galvanized 
All Sizes. 




CANADIAN TUBE & IRON CO., LIMITED, MONTREAL, 



Works : 
Lachine Canal 



IT'S QUALITY AND ADVANTAGES THAT MAKE 



CANADIAN HOWARD 



DOUBLE 
RADIATOR 



FURNACES 




THE CHOICE OF MOST BUILDERS 



The "HOWARD" Furnace means an enormous economy in fuel to the user, 
as the heat and gases have to pass through two radiators, thereby greatly 
reducing the heat by the time it reaches the smoke pipe, which, in the ordinary 
furnace woulo. go up the chimney. 

We employ only the most skilled mechanics and use only the best materials in 
the manufacture of this furnace. 

Mr. Dealer, if you want to handle a line that will prove completely satisfactory 
to your customers, and a money-maker for yourself, investigate the HOWARD. 
Remember it is absolutely guaranteed. Write us for particulars. 

The C. N0RSW0RTHY CO., Ltd., St. Thomas, Ont. 



MAPLE LEAF 

"Improved Racer" Cross Cut Saw 

This saw has proved itself to be the fastest cutting saw in use to-day. 
The cut illustrates the w T ide blade, but we also make this saw in 
a narrow pattern, thin back, which is especially well suited for small 
timber or pulpwood. All "MAPLE LEAF" saws are fully guaranteed. 

WHEN ORDERING SPECIFY "MAPLE LEAF." 

Shurly-Dietrich Co. 3 Limited 




GALT, ONTARIO 



and 



VANCOUVER, B C. 



17 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



—THE DEFIANCE 

THE MOST POWERFUL 
REGISTER IN THE WORLD 




Fits a stack head EIGHT INCHES deep, and accom- 
modates either a 12 in. or a 14. in. supply pipe. 
Write for prices. 

Canadian Ferrosteel Co., Limited 

BRIDGEBURG, ONTARIO 




1186 Coal Grate 



MANUFACTURED BY 



The Ohio Foundry & 
Manufacturing Co. 

STEUBENVILLE. OHIO, U.S.A. 



Manufacturers of all styles of coal 
or gas burning fire-place goods, 
as well as andirons and wrought 
fire-place trimmings. 



IMPERIAL — STANDARD — SCALES 

400 Varieties Accurate, Durable, Well Finished 
Send for the large 128 page catalog and prices, No. 66 



Butchers' Scales 

Bathroom Scales 

Confectioners' Scales 

Dairy Scales 

Druggists' Scales 

Foundry Scales 

Grain Warehouse Scales 

Grain Elevator Scales 

Grocers' Scales 

Tea Scales 




Platform 
Scales 

All Capacities 

300 Lbs. to 
3000 Lbs. 



Letter and Postal Scales 

Railway Depot Scales 

Railway Track Scales 

Rolling Mill Scales 

Salt, Meat and Fish Scales 

Stock Scales 

Steelyards 

Weigh Beams 

Union Scales 

Etc. 



The Burrow, Stewart & Milne Co., Limited 

HEAD OFFICE AND WORKS : HAMILTON 
Offices and Warehouses at Toronto, Montreal and Winnipeg 

_ 



^ 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Galvanized Cornices 




Skylights 



Ventilators 



Curved Eavetrough 

Special Galvanized Iron Work of All Kinds 

WRITE US FOR ILLUSTRATED CATALOGUE AND PRICE LIST 

THE METALLIC ROOFING GO. OF CANADA, Limited 



TORONTO, ONT. 



MANUFACTURERS 



WINNIPEG, MAN. 

C 92 



Pink's 

Lumbering 

Tnnls 

MADE IN CANADA 

The Standard Tools in every province of the Dominion, New Zealand, Australia, Etc. 
We manufacture all kinds of lumber tools. Light and Durable. 

Send for Catalogue and Price List. Long Distance Phone No. 87. 

Sold throughout the Dominion by all Wholesale and Retail Hardware Merchants. 




Manufacturers 
of 






The Thos. Pink Company, Ltd., 

PEMBROKE, ONT. 



Lumber Tools 



19 



HARDWARE AND METAL 




GREENING'S 



COW TIES 



ARE THE 



Lightest, Strongest and Best Chains on the market. 

Made in six sizes and six styles. 

Also Halter, Dog, Kennel, Tie Out and Trace Chains. 




MANUFACTURED BY 



The B. Greening Wire Co. 



LIMITED 



HAMILTON, Ont. 



■!■«-«"« -jMr'aia pBOQBBaO 



MONTREAL, Que. 




aappnapi ppaeaaaapg CT Q 

Trace Chains. 




Halter, Dog and Kennel Chains. 



A Necessity to EVERY DEALER Who Handles Sheet Metal ! 

Our Combined Lever Punch and Slitting Shears 



T 



SAVE MUCH TIME AND LABOR 

HIS is a machine that is constructed of the best 
material and made to stand years of hard service. 



If you handle sheet metal and are not now using one of 
these machines you should install one at once. You 
will find it indispensable after a trial. 

They slit any length or width of sheet required up to 
their capacity. Made in two sizes, viz. — Nos. 10 and 11. 
No. 10 will slit No. 12 gauge sheet iron, soft steel or bar 
iron 1/4" x 2" or 3/8" round, and will punch a 5/16" hole 
in 1/4" iron or its equivalent in lighter metal. 

No. 11 is the same as No. 10, only heavier and will cut 
No. 10 gauge sheet iron or punch a 3/8" hole m 1/4" iron. 

Write for Full Particulars and Discounts. 

The Brown-Boggs Co., Limited 

HAMILTON, ONTARIO, CAN. 




HARDWARE AND METAL 



Preston Metal Garages 



have met with such favor among automobile owners that 
they are becoming known all over the country. In order to 
handle inquiries coming in we want agents all over the 
country. 

Every auto owner is a prospect. Write to-day for full infor- 
mation in regard to the agency for your territory. 



MENTION HARDWARE AND METAL 



Metal Shingle&Sidind C 

PRESTON ONT. MONTREAL QUE 



w 



i 

W'lU 



m 



I 
M 



You Can Sell These Machines NOW! 

They're hot weather washers because they wash clothes thoroughly without any labor 



They Run Themselves 





MADE BY 



Agents: 

W. L. Haldimand & Son, 

MONTREAL 

H. F. Moulden & Son, 

WINNIPEG 



mer-Dowswellj Limited 

HAMILTON, ONTARIO 



21 



HARDWARE AND METAL 




Is this salesman 
working for you? 



/^VNE of our dealers wrote us re- 
^-^ cently. He was new in the 
business of handling Cement. 



IN the first car of cement he ordered was one of the handsome Canada Cement 
signs which we send free to all our dealers. 

HE immediately hung the sign up on the front of his warehouse, where it 
would be seen by all passersby. 

In two hours he had sold 
eighty bags of Canada Cement. 

HE says the sign was entirely responsible for this business, because the car 
arrived before he had had time to advise his customers that he intended 
to begin selling cement. 

Is one of these signs working for you ? 

If not, write our nearest sales office for details of 
our proposition to dealers. 

Canada Cement Company Limited 




Montreal 



HERALD BUILDING, MONTREAL 

Sales Offices at 

Toronto Winnipeg to 



Calgary 




11 



HARDWARE AND METAL 




STANLEY CENTER PUNCHES, NAIL SETS and SCREW DRIVER BITS 

are oil tempered and fully guaranteed. 
STANLEY EXTENSION BIT HOLDERS enable the user to boret hrough 

walls, floors, etc., where an ordinary bit will not reach. Will follow up 

a % inch bit. 
STANLEY ADJUSTABLE BIT GAUGE will enable one to bore any number 

of holes to a given depth. Can be attached to any size of bit up to one 

inch. 
STANLEY COUNTERSINKS are suitable for every variety of wood screws. 
These are all saleable tools and should be carried in stock of every 
hardware dealer. SEND FOR CATALOGUE. 

ttul* St JUvel to. 

"New Britain.Conn.U.SA 



COPYRIGHTED, 1909, BY THE STANLEY RULE & LEVEL CO* | 




TOWNSEND MOWERS 

HAND MOWERS and HORSE MOWERS 

All Our Hand Mowers 
Are Ball Bearing 



SENT ON THEIR MERITS 



Write for Catalog 

S. P. Townsend (EL Co. 

ORANGE. N. J. 




Be Careful ! ! 



The hardwareman is making a great mistake if he overlooks the 




HAMILTON RIFLE 



accurate, with few working parts, which can 



when restocking his gun department. 

This 22 calibre rifle is safe, strong and 
sasily be kept in perfect condition. 

It is the choice of the people who know, as it never fails to give the highest satisfaction. 

A Hamilton sale brings the dealer excellent profits an d protects him against come-backs. 
Do not hesitate — get our circulars and prices at once. FOR sale by all jobbers. 



C. J. Hamilton & Son 



Plymouth, Mich. 



.sew 




Our Conductor Pipe and Eavetrough is the Fit Easy kind. 

Corrugated iron, skylights, elbows,' ridge roll, valleys and ventilators. 




^^Pv^fW^^^ff 







WHEELER & BAIN 

The Quick Shippers 
TORONTO 



23 



3€ 



HARDWARE AND METAL 
W p=q W pr- U 









S 



AXES, HAMMERS, PICKS, 
MATTOCKS, LUMBERING TOOLS, ETC., 

of the Highest Quality. 






MATTOCK 



Write For 

CATALOG 

It contains cuts of our 
complete line. We have 
spent much time in pro- 
ducing it so as to give the 
trade a fair impression as 
to the attractiveness of our 
manufacture. 

ALLAN HILLS' GOODS PAY 
AN ATTRACTIVE PROFIT 

Our Guarantee 

We guarantee to re- 
place free of any charge 
any tools that prove 
defective in material or 
workmanship. 



H 



N 



CLAY PICK 



Allan Hills Edge Tool Co., Limited, 



**t3€~ 



9H^3H6= 



Gait, Ontario, Canada 



3CZZ3C 

24 



3H^3H€ 



>J 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



M c CIary£ "kootenay" **i Range 

A Household Favorite 
from Atlantic to Pacific 

A GREAT SELLER 

Add it to your lines and 
increase your business 




1912 
DESIGN 

Has many improve- 
ments and 
advantages of value. 



The Features that Count 

The GRATES and LININGS are SEMI-STEEL and Everlasting. The Burnished 
Top only requires a rub with a cloth or piece of paper occasionally — no Blacklead 
or Brushes. The SASK-ALTA direct draft damper is the best known and has been 
added to the Kootenay Range. The Nickelled Oven is a recognized advantage. 

MXIaryS 



"McClary" on Goods 
is a Quality Name. 



Order from our near- 
est branch to-day. 



Toronto, Montreal, London, Vancouver, St. John, N.B. 
Hamilton, Winnipeg, Calgary, Saskatoon 



25 






HARDWARE AND METAL 





THE TRINIDAD-LAKE-ASPHALT 




Genasco has more than attractive surface-appearance to 
appeal to customers — it has the lasting waterproof quality of 
Trinidad Lake asphalt, through and through. This NATURAL 
asphalt cannot be equalled for making roofing last. 

Don't you see how Genasco makes satisfied customers, and 
increases your volume of sales and profits? 

Mineral or smooth surface. Several weights. 

The Kant-leak Kleet, for smooth-surface roofings, prevents nail-leaks, 
and makes seams water-tight without cement. 
Order Genasco Eoofing from your jobber. 

THE BARBER ASPHALT PAVING COMPANY 

Largest producers of asphalt, and largest manufacturers of ready roofing in the world 



PHILADELPHIA 
NEW YORK SAN FRANCISCO 

Caverhill, Learmont & Company, Distributing Agents— Montreal, Winnipeg and Vancouver. 




CHICAGO 

D. H. Howden & Co., Ltd., 200 York St., I ondon, Ont. 




BORER C& CO.'S 

"TREE" BRAND CUTLERY 



H. 



Noted For Their Superior Cutting Edge, Beautiful Finish 

and Lasting Qualities. 




Every piece of cutlery that bears the famous ' ' Tree ' ' is warranted hand forged from 
highest quality steel. The hardening, tempering and honing is by our own process. 
That's why w^ guarantee the Quality — and we know that guarantee will never be 
called into action. The Merchant displaying a well chosen assortment of Tree Brand 
is reasonably sure of all year cutlery sales. Order of your jobber. 

FOR SALE BY ALL LEADING WHOLESALE HARDWARE HOUSES. 



26 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Probably 99 o 

of your business 

comes from the great middle class, so-called, and 
it is these people who do at least a large part of 
their own housework, and "who read most of the 
millions of magazines and newspapers. C,As in 
other things, the general demand in cleaning de- 
vices is for one which is moderate in price, 
yet efficient in operation and easy to use. 

BISSELUS 

"Cyco" BALL BEARING 

Carpet Sweeper 

is the only carpef sweeping machine meeting all these re- 
quirements. It "weighs but five or six pounds, requires no 
effort to operate, makes no noise, and readily picks up such 
miscellaneous litter as ravelings, hair, scraps of paper and 
cloth, matches, etc. that other cleaners cannot gather — it sells 
at a popular price and has been so extensively advertised 
that a woman "wanting a carpet sweeper calls for a "Bissell." 
CLBissell sweepers are sold at fixed retail prices that assure 
a definite profit. d»Write for our special Fan Offer — in 
force until August 1st. 



Bissell Carpet Sweeper Co. 

(Largest Exclusive Carpet Sweeper Manufacturers in the World.) 

Grand Rapids, Mich. 

Branches— NEW YORK (Eastern Branch, Salesroom and Export Dept.) 25 Warren St. 
NIAGARA FALLS, ONT. (Factory). LONDON. PARIS. 




SCHRAMBERGER UHRFEDERNFABRIK G.m.b.H. 

Manufacturers of Safety Razor Blades 

Made from the finest grade of Sheffield Crucible Cast Steel. 
Highest Quality as regards Cutting Power and Durability. 

Agents Wanted SCHRAMBERG (Wurttemberg) Germany 



27 



BE PROTECTED KS 

against dissatisfied customers and 
small profits by selling the 

Delta Special 



FILES 

OF 
QUALITY. 



m\ 



f 



These files are 
made of S. and C. 
Wardlow's Finest 
English Steel, 
have deep teeth, 
vniform temper 
and give a long, 
economical s er - 
vice. 

They are absolute- 
ly guaranteed to 
completely satisfy 
both the dealer 
and the user. 

START 
RIGHT NOW 

Other dealers are 
procuring excel- 
lent profits by sell- 
ing the Delta — 
why don't you? 

Send us a trial 
order and be con- 
vinced as to their 
selling and satis- 
faction giving 
qualities. 

Write to-day. 




DELTA 

DELTA FILE WORKS 

PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

CANADIAN AGENTS: 
H. S. Howland, Sons & Co., Toronto; 
Stark, Seybold, Montreal; Wm. Stairs, 
Son & Morrow, Halifax. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 




36 YEARS 

AND GOING STRONG 



Magnolia Metal commonly runs ten and fifteen years, and sometimes twenty 
years, but here is a record that tops them all. Estimating nine hours as an aver- 
age working day, the time that the Magnolia bearings have run in the Ice Ma- 
chine mentioned below is equivalent to thirty-six years service and they are still 
running in good condition. 

THE BRYN MAWE REAL ESTATE CO., 
ENGINEER DEPARTMENT. 

Bryn Mawr, Pa., May 13th, 1912. 
Gentlemen : — 

In answer to yours of May 8th, I wish to say that I have been using Magnolia Metal 
for about twenty years. 

I have an Ice Machine on which the main bearings and crank pins were filled with 
Magnolia Metal sixteen years ago. 

The Main bearings are still in first-class shape, but two years ago our Engineer tried 
to run without oil on the main crank, and we had to rebabbitt it. 

This machine runs continuously (or five months during Summer, and averages eighteen 
hours a day the rest of the year. The principal use I have made of Magnolia Metal is for 
bearings on Ice Machines, High Speed Engines, Air Compressors and bearings on some 
Pumps, and I find that it gives satisfaction wherever used. 

Yours truly, 

WM. SCHOCH. 



SPECIAL OFFER 

PRACTICAL ENGINEER POCKET 
BOOK— 700 pages, over 2,000 subjects. 
Price 40c post paid. We import these 
books, in large numbers, from England, 
as an advertising medium, and give En- 
gineers benefit of low price. They are 
highly spoken of. Address Montreal 
Office. 



Sold by leading dealers everywhere or 

MAGNOLIA METAL CO. 

Office and Factory : 

225 St. Ambroise St. - MONTREAL 



Not an Enterprise for the "Quitter" 

Tf "If there is one enterprise on earth," says John Wanamaker, "that a 'quitter' should, leave 
severely alone, it is advertising. To make a success of advertising one must be prepared to stick 
like a barnacle on a boat's bottom. 

If "He must know before he begins it that he must spend money — lots of it. 

^ "Somebody must tell him that he cannot hope to reap results commensurate with his expendi- 
ture early in the game. 

Y "Advertising does not jerk; it pulls. It begins very gently at first, but the pull is steady. It 
increases day by day and year by year, until it exerts an irresistible power." 



Why Practical Men 
Demand Amatite 

R< 
can't hold the market against Amatite — which 
needs no paint whatever. 

Practical men know the great advantage of a roof 
that needs no painting. They know what a nuisance 
the painting is. They know how much it costs. They know how liable they are to neglect to paint their roofs at 
the proper time. Painted roofings are waterproof only where the paint is. Amatite is waterproof all the way through. 

Amatite is sold in the usual convenient rolls of no square feet with a smooth lap where the mineral surface 
is omitted, so as to secure a tight joint. Nails and cement are packed in the centre of each roll. 

Free sample and booklet on request to nearest office. 





ROOFING 



THE PATERSON MANUFACTURING CO., Limited 



MONTREAL 



TORONTO 



WINNIPEG 



VANCOUVER 



ST. JOHN. N.B. 



HALIFAX. N.S. 



no 



28 



HARDWARE AND METAL 




New Model 1911 Self-Loading Shot Gun 



Quick as lightning in action, has all good points of other recoil operated shot guns, but none of their 

faults. 12 gauge, '26 inch, nickel-steel barrel, choke bored, plain 

walnut pistol grip stock, rubber butt plate, takes down in two 

pieces, adapted for factory loaded black or smokeless powder 

shells, weight about 7% lbs., five shot capacity. Take 

down pattern. 



FOR SATISFIED 

CUSTOMERS 

SELL 



Select 
Your Guns, 
Rifles and 
Ammunition 
From 1912 
Sporting 
Goods 
Catalogue. 
Now Ready. 




FOR LARGE GAME 
IT IS NOW THE MODERN 

SELF-LOADING RIFLE 



.351 OR .401 CALIBRE 

Fitted with 20 in. round blued finish nickel steel bar- 
rel, sporting front and rear sights; magazine holds 5 
cartridges, and by placing one in the chamber before in- 
serting the magazine, gives 6 at the disposal of the user. 




The recoil from the exploded cartridge ejects the empty shell, cocks 
the hammer, and throws a fresh cartridge into the chamber; blued finish 
receiver and parts, plain walnut stock and fore-end, not checked, full pistol grip, 
rubber butt plate, takes down at frame into two parts by removal of a screw. 



CAVERHILL, LEARMONT & COMPANY 

MONTREAL, CANADA 



29 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



r &RARMS(b 



€][ Right in every hardware store is the most logical place for a line of reliable, accurate, and 
moderate-priced single guns. 

For ridding premises of pests — snakes, rats, chucks and the many kinds of crop and poultry de- 
stroyers, the Harrington & Richardson single guns are specially suited. 

f| There is a large and growing demand for an economical and efficient weapon for just that 
purpose, as well as for occasional hunting. 

Here's the gun : 






Specifications, 12 to 28 gauge — 26 to 32 inch barrel — ejecting or non-ejecting— f.'ne black walnut stock — hard 
rubber butt plate — weight 5% to 6% lbs., according to gauge and barrel. For black or smokeless powder. 

€J These guns are quick sellers. They are made and sold under the broad H. & R. guarantee of 
quality, reliability and satisfaction. With a few of these H. & R. guns in stock, the hardware 
dealer is equipped for a profitable and increasing trade. 

Our 40-page catalogue is yours for the asking. It contains valuable selling points for every hard- 
ware dealer, and shows the complete H. & R. line. Ask for it now while you think of it. 

Harrington & Richardson Arms Co., wl'V."™^ 



LUNDY 




SHOVELS 



Have All The Qualities That Are Essential to Rapid Sellers 

Our shovels are not experiments, but products that have been proven superior to otherjbrands. 

They are made from Open Hearth Crucible Steel. The strap is extra strong, being double ply and carefully welded. The 
point of the blade is never heated during the process, adding extra strength there also. 

LUNDYISHOVELS IN VARIOUS STAGES OF CONSTRUCTION _ _, . . ... . 

Our Shovels yield a splendid profit 

and are the best insurance against dissatisfied cus- 
tomers — theyjare the kind that bring larger business. 

LUNDY SHOVELS are excellently finished and 
are very attractive. 

We make three grades so as to completely meet 
the requirements of the trade. 

If your jobber does not handle them, write us 
direct. 

We guarantee quick shipments and complete 
satisfaction. 

GIVE THEM A TRIAL. 

The LUNDY SHOVEL 
AND TOOL CO., Ltd. 

General Office and Works : 

PETERBORO, ONTARIO 

SELLING AGENTS : 

Delorme Bros.. Montreal ; Tees & Persse, Ltd.. Winnipeg; 

Tees & Persse of Alberta, Ltd., Calgary ; E. E. Crandall, 

Vancouver, B.C. ; N. B. Misener, Toronto. 




30 



HARDWARE AND METAL 




CANADA 



"QUEEN'S HEAD" 

Galvanized Iron 



Sells quicker than the so-called 
"Just As Good" Brands 

The World's Standard 



John Lysaght, Limited A. C. Leslie & Co., Limited 
Makers MONTREAL 

Bristol, Newport and Montreal Managers Canadian Branch 




"DOMINION' 



GALVANIZED 
CANADA PLATES 

Extra heavily galvanized. 
Soft, tough and pliable. 



A. C. LESLIE & CO., Limited 

MONTREAL 



Sell GLUE in packages-it means less handling-more profit 




BRANTFORD 

ALL AROUND 

GLUE 

weighed and wrapped ready to 
hand over the counter. 

NO MUSS— NO FUSS- 
NO LOSS OF TIME 
Va, pounds, 1 2 pounds, pounds. 
Everybody's Glue Size, in pounds 
only. 

The quality is there and will be 
maintained. 

ASK YOUR JOBBER FOR PRICES 
AND DISCOUNTS 

PROTECT your show-cases by 

using the 

BRANTFORD COIN 
MAT 

same as cut at left in Blue 

and Orange. 

WRITE US FOR ONE. 

CANADA GLUE CO. 

LIMITED 
BRANTFORD, ONT. 

Manufacturers of Glue and 
Gelatine of all kinds and for 
all purposes. 



31 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



NOT A BIG "AD." 





The Remington Cubs 

demonstrate the only 

bottom ejecting pump gun 



Solid breech. Hammerless. Safe 



T 



THE WAY TO SELL THIS MOST MODERN ARM IS TO LET IT 
TALK TO YOUR CUSTOMER ITSELF 

Just let a man see and handle the Keinington — UMC Pump Gun — feel its perfect hang — note its simple 
action — and he buys. 

The gun itself is a far better salesman than you or we can be with spoken or written word. It's eye 
knowledge — the actual handling of the arm that really makes the sale. 

Your customer can see for himself how the bottom ejection throws empty shells downward — how smoke 
and gases must go the same way, too, insuring uninterrupted sight — how three safety devices prevent acci- 
dental discharge — how simple the take-down ; in fact, what a wonderfully easy acting, comfortable gun it 
is to shoot. 

Every Pump Gun you sell means increased business in ammunition sales for you. Don't risk the loss of 
a sale through not being able to demonstrate the arm itself. 

With this gun and "Arrow" Steel Lined Shells, J. R. Graham won the individual clay bird championship 
at the Olympic Games. Score, 96 ex 100. 

Order one from your jobber to-day. 



299 Broadway 



REMINGTON ARMS-UNION METALLIC CARTRIDGE CO. 



New York City 



32 




Methods Adopted by a Successful Dealer Are Outlined — Stock Must be Given a 
Chance to Sell Itself — Stoves Cleaned Every day — A List of Purchasers and 
Prospects Kept — Advertising Done on Systematic Basis. 

Written for Hardware and Metal by Wm. J. Keyes, Mgr. Soo Hardware Co. 



Our scheme of handling stoves is sim- 
ple in the extreme. Really it merely 
consists of having a good line; of show- 
ing this prominently, and in as attrac- 
tive manner as possible. There are 
some details which we have kept con- 
stantly in mind, however, and to this we 
attribute a large measure of the success 
which has come. Success, of course, is 
a somewhat hard thing to define, but I 
feel that our stove department has been 
successful. When last December we 
succeeded Mr. Symen, there were 75 
ranges in stock. These have been sold. 
Two car loads have been ordered since, 
and sold, and already a number of models 
recently secured have been disposed of. 
We did a bigger business in this line 
than we expected, we hope to do more 
this year, for we are satisfied that the 
methods used are the right ones for us. 
Keep Stoves in Plain Sight. 

The one thing we have aimed to ac- 
complish above all others is to keep our 
samples in a prominent place. We have 
tried to give the stoves a chance to speak 
for themselves, and they have spoken. 
Perhaps twenty feet back from the door 
we divide our store longitudinally, using 
shelves of paint specialties to form the 
partition. The space on one side of this 
division is given over to stoves, and there 
are ranged our samples. 

Every style of stove we carry is there 
displayed, and there is nothing but stoves 
shown. I have been in stores where ket- 
tles and tea pots were placed upon stoves 
— -where the range was made more of a 



The above illustration shows the 
stove department in the store of the 
Soo Hardware Co. 

Giving stoves such prominence and 
attention is a paying venture. Wit- 
ness, the first order of the Soo Hard- 
ware Co. has been 175 ranges for the 
fall trade. This is indeed "big busi- 
ness." 

There are many points in the ac- 
companying article which all dealers 
should carefully consider. — Editor. 



selling counter than an article to be 
sold. We have nothing like that. I have 
been in stores where an inquiry for a 
range necessitated a general disturbance 
of the stock. The samples are buried 
under other articles, and excavations 
have to be made before they can be 
shown. Such a state of affairs we have 
avoided. Our display is simple, but it 
is orderly and that is the great thing 
with showing stoves. 

Clean Stoves Every Morning. 
One point I might mention in this con- 
nection. We have been particularly 
careful to keep our models looking their 
best. Every morning each stove on dis- 
play is polished and cleaned. Custom- 
ers see their shining black surfaces from 
the front of the door, and often have 
been led to look at our models just be- 
cause of their clean appearance. A cus- 
tomer, moreover, can try the various 
parts without getting dirty. Some may 
33 



hold that purchasers do not mind getting 
a little dirty over a stove deal. Perhaps 
they never do protest against this, but 
they are impressed when they find they 
can make a careful investigation without 
getting hands or gloves at all soiled. It 
pays to impress people that way. 

There may be a difference of opinion 
on this point, but I have found it ad- 
visable to carry one make of stoves and 
one make only. We hold this one line 
before the people as the only line made. 
We have faith in it ourselves and show 
this by guaranteeing the stoves. Always 
we install the stoves and make every ef- 
fort to see that this is working proper- 
ly. Any complaint has only to be made 
once. We send immediately to see what 
the trouble is and to rectify it. 
How Good Service Pays. 

All this means a good deal of work, 
but it surely does pay. Women are 
most interested in stoves, and as every 
one knows women discuss their house- 
hold affairs with one another. Evidently 
they tell one another of the care we take 
of the stoves we install, for sever;il 
have mentioned hearing of this from a 
friend. 

Even in the little time we have been 
in business here the benefits of keeping 
a list of those to whom stoves are sold 
has been apparent. This is done not only 
that we will know when a stove was in- 
stalled, and what model it is — facts 
which are of value in making the repairs 
which may be necessary in the future, 
but also because we have found this list 



II ARDWARE AND METAL 



one more way in which we can show our 
faith in the article which we are trying 
to sell. A woman is doubtful about 
making a purchase. "Do you know Mrs. 

: — ?" we ask. "She has one of 

these models and seems thoroughly sat- 
isfied." Now the woman will go away 

and ask Mrs. about her stove, and 

hearing that it has given perfect satis- 
faction she will come back and make her 
purchase. 

Even if the prospective purchaser 
does not know immediately any of the 
purchasers of models, she will know of 
them, and the fact that these have 



bought makes it seem more likely that 
she will get satisfaction from a purchase 
too. 

But all the stove sales can not be made 
by work inside the door. We advertise, 
and find we get good results. We send 
letters to people whom we know will 
need new stoves. We make a point to 
find out these prospective purchasers. 
In all these ways trade has been secured, 
but first last and all the time I believe 
it is necessary to give the stove itself 
a chance — give it the space and light 
which it needs to advocate its own 
cause. 



Supplying the Needs of the Factory 

The Trade of the Factories is Well Worth Trying for— In- 
dustrial Requirements are Many and Dealers Should Endeavor 
to Secure as Large a Share of it as Possible — Methods Adopt- 
ed by Successful Dealers. 



It is the fond dream of the hardware 
man, who carries on business in a manu- 
facturing centre, that he will some day 
go out and corner the factory trade. It 
is a phrase of great promise, "factory 
trade." Factories are always needing 
supplies — Tools, belting, nails, screws, 
paint, varnish, glue, glass, rope, twine 
and so on ad infinitum. Of course, it 
does not do to stop with the factory it- 
self. There are the employes, the hun- 
dreds of mechanics who require tools on 
their own account and who have homes 
of their own with multifold needs. Truly 
the hardwareman who could, to use a 
western phrase, "rope and throw" the 
trade of a few live factories would be 
in clover. His financial worries would 
become mere troubled dreams of the 
misty past. 

Most dealers are content to dream and 
leave it at that. It is not the easiest 
thing in the world to get the factory 
trade and they know it. Some dealers 
have tackled the problem, however, and 
have come out victorious. 

The experience of an eastern hard- 
wareman comes to mind. In the town 
where he was located there were quite 
a number of growing industries — 
a couple of saw-mills, a stove foundry, 
an implement manufacturing plant and 
others of considerable size. Occasionally 
they would run out of something and 
then Brown (we'll call him Brown) 
would be handed out a small order. The 
total amount of business that he did 
with the factories in the course of a 
year was very small indeed. 

"What I need is a chance to show 
these people just what I could do for 
them," he said to himself, one day. 
"They don't think local dealers are 
worth bothering with. If I went to 



them direct, they would probably put 
me off and refuse to talk business. ' ' 

One day he was passing one of the 
factories when he noticed that a great 
many windows were broken. It was 
getting on towards the end of the fall 
and it was quite apparent that the 
absence of the glass in so many windows 
must be a source of trouble in the fac- 
tory. This, he concluded, was the oppor- 
tunity he had been looking for and he 
secured an interview with the manager. 

"You have quite a number of broken 
windows in the factory and it is getting 
cold," he stated. "Let me give you an 
estimate on the cost of replacing all 
broken panes, I will look after the work 
of putting the glass in and save you 
that trouble." 

"Alright," said the manager. "Take 
a look though the plant and see what is 
needed. Then give me a figure." 

The hardwareman went out and count- 
ed the windows where glass was needed. 
Also he kept his eyes open and noted 
quite a few things. When he submitted 
his figures for the glass, the manager ac- 
cepted them. 

"By the way," said the dealer, "you 
use a lot of belting. Ever run short of 
certain sizes when you are in a hurry?" 

"Sometimes," was the reply. 

"I carry a large stock," said the 
dealer, "and could supply you at any 
time. In fact. I could look after your 
needs completely and make it worth 
your while. Then you use a lot of 
emery wheels. And paint and varnish. 
I would like a chance to figure on these 
goods for you." 

"We are very busy here," began the 
manager, "and we cannot give very 
much time to matters of detail." 

"Let me have a few minutes of your 
time every Monday morning," urged the 
34 



hardwareman. "Tell me then what you 
are going to require during the week 
and I'll send in my figures. It will be 
worth your while." 

He was given the opportunity and gra- 
dually brought the trade of the company 
around his way. His connection with 
the one company helped him very con- 
siderably with others and in time he 
had a steady business with the fac- 
tories. 

Have Secured the Trade. 

The Geo. Taylor Hardware Co., New 
Liskeard, Cobalt and Cochrane, have 
made it a practice to work for the fac- 
tory and mill trade and have succeeded 
in getting a large share of the business 
in that part of the country. They have 
accomplished this by carrying a good 
stock of the supplies especially adapted 
to factory purposes and by giving a 
thoroughly good service. They have re- 
cently installed a mining supply depart- 
ment. 

Getting Trade of Employes. 

One of the most satisfactory features 
in connection with the securing of the 
factory trade is the increased trade that 
it brings with the employes of the fac- 
tories. It is the most natural thing in 
the world for the mechanic to buy what- 
ever he needs for his own private use 
from the store which supplies the shop 
where he works. He becomes familiar 
with the firm name and familiar with 
their goods. 

Personal Attention Needed. 

The personal touch is what is needed 
to secure factory trade. The writer is 
of the opinion that it would pay the 
dealer to make a tour among the fac- 
tories every few weeks, or even oftener 
if he could find the time. Letters ad- 
dressed to the firms may bring business 
but the personal call is the surer method 
of the two. 



HAVE SECURED AGENCY. 

The Canadian Fairbanks-Morse Com- 
pany, Limited, has secured the Canadian 
agency for the Orenstein- Arthur Koppel 
Co., of New York, consulting engineers 
and manufacturers of portable railways, 
industrial railways, narrow gauge sid- 
ings, narrow gauge public railways, and 
railway equipment of all descriptions. 

The works of the Orenstein-Arthur 
Koppel Company are located at Koppel, 
Pa. They have been in business thirty- 
five years, and have built and developed 
industrial and narrow gauge railways of 
every description in all parts of the 
world. Their catalog No. 400 covers 
their line very comprehensively, a copy 
of which no doubt can be obtained from 
the Canadian Fairbanks -Morse Co., 
Limited, of Montreal. 



Live Sales Methods of Toronto Dealer 

P. H. Finkle Takes Advantage of Civic Ordinance and Sells 200 Garbage Cans — 
Goes Strong After Apartment House Trade — Has Made Specialty of Tinning 
and Repair Department — Shows Shrewdness in Buying. 



A display of harvesting tools in the 
window of a city hardware store, and 
on one of its main thoroughfares too, 
may seem somewhat unusual and per- 
haps rather out of place, especially to 
the uninitiated who would wonder that a 
store so far removed from the real field 
of use of such articles would find a de- 
mand for them. 

Some dealers, knowing that there must 
be considered waste interest as a 
large number of city people who pass 
the window would necessarily seldom, if 
ever, prove purchasers, would doubt 
whether it was a paying proposition, but 
P. H. Finkle, who last week Lad such 
a display at his store at 1520 Queen St. 
west, Toronto, believes that it was a 
profitable move. 

He believes that sales would fully 
warrant the giving up of his window 
to such lines, especially as these goods 
at the present are extremely seasonable. 
Which all goes to show that there is 
business to be reaped where many a 
business man would rather doubt if it 
were possible. Again, if a dealer in a 
large city finds it profitable to give 
prominence to harvesting tools at this 
time, how much more so must it be to 
the merchant situated more closely to 
the centre of harvesting activity, namely 
the hardwareman in smaller towns and 
villages. 

Much, however, can be accomplished 
by the use of aggressive business getting 
methods and it is the use of such that 
has done much to woo success for the 
Finkle store. Started only eight years 
ago with a small capital only, but back- 
ed with additional valuable assets in the 
shape of genuine endeavor and the abili- 
ty to do a good day's work, growth has 
been gradual but steady with the result 
that a prosperous business in a double 
store on Queen street, west, now stands 
to the credit of the owner. 

Underlying the success of the business, 
one of the outstanding features has 
been the ability to recognize an oppor- 
tunity when it presented itself; and not 
only to recognize it, but to grasp and 
take full advantage of it. One instance 
of this took place in the early stages of 
the business. 

When Mr. Finkle moved into Park- 
dale, he realized that people were not 
getting as quick service in tinsmithing 
or repair lines as they could wish. His 
knowledge of human nature taught him 
that, when people want work done, they 



want it in a hurry. Now, if he were 
able to do this work in a hurry, it 
would stand to reason that he would 
get that trade. He began to sift the 
problem to see just why it was not pos- 
sible to give rapid service in these lines. 

After investigation, he came to the 
conclusion that the reason dealers could 
not give rapid service was that they did 
not keep a large enough staff for this 
work and that the reason that they did 
not keep large enough staff was the fear 
that, if they put on more men, they 
would not be able to keep them all busy 
during the whole season. In fact, it 
seemed that they preferred to keep a 
small staff and be sure of enough work 
even if it did inconvenience them some- 
times. They were afraid to take a 
chance. 

But Mr. Finkle took a chance. He be- 
lieves it is necessary many times in busi- 
ness to secure the best results. He put 
on a staff of men who could look after 
the work quickly. At first there were 
periods of slackness but then the men 
were put to work preparing surplus 
stock. Soon, the people in that district 
began to recognize that, when they want- 
ed something done in a hurry, he could 
meet their wishes. They told their 
neighbors and their friends, and soon 
Finkle 's repair and tinsmithing depart- 
ment was being kept busy and more 
men had to be added. This has gradu- 
ally continued until now 16 men are en- 
gaged in this department while in the 
fall six or seven more are added to the 
staff. He still believes in keeping 
enough men to do all work quickly, 
turning them on preparation of surplus 
stock during slack periods. 

Value of Repair Department. 

Here, it might be mentioned that Mr. 
Finkle lays particular attention on the 
repair department as a means of attract- 
ing other trade. People who have been 
accustomed to go to a certain place for 
repairs, naturally go there when they 
want some regular goods. People who 
come to give repair orders see other 
goods which they require or which they 
may become interested in. 

Sold 200 Garbage Cans. 

Another example of recognizing and 
grasping an opportunity was shown in 
the Finkle store when Toronto's medical 
health officer ordered that all garbage 
cans must be covered. This came into 
force on May 1, and Mr. Finkle knowing 

35 



that many garbage cans in the neighbor- 
hood had no tops, at once began to push 
garbage cans. That he wheeled them 
into prominence at the proper time is 
shown by the fact that he has sold over 
200 garbage cans this year. The apart- 
ment houses proved particularly good 
customers and to five of these he suc- 
ceeded in selling a total of 81 cans. 

Apartment House Trade. 

In fact, now that there are so many 
apartment houses being erected in the 
city, Mr. Finkle makes a specialty of 
getting after their trade. Especially to 
the residents of these has he featured 
gas stoves this year with the result that 
he has succeeded in selling 14 of these — 
the selling price being $32 each. 

Keen Buying. 

Another point which Mr. Finkle lays 
emphasis on is the extra profits to be 
gained by purchasing goods at the right 
time and in large enough quantities, if it 
is possible to get the best price. Of 
course, there is an element of risk in 
this but he maintains that the business 
man must occasionally take a chance. 
He recalls that after sizing up the mar- 
ket, he concluded that galvanized sheets 
were a good purchase. He put in 12 
tons and made an extra $24 by the rise 
in values — which all goes to help the 
profit account. Recently he put in a 
good supply of glass. Time will tell if 
he bought wisely. 

If it is possible to get a better price 
for a quantity of any article and he 
thinks it is possible to dispose of that 
quantity, he purchases. One little item 
of this nature was the saving of $15 on 
a purchase of 500 pound of wax. The 
price in small quantities is 36 cents. He 
purchased a 500-lb. lot at 33 cents. 



ANNIHILATION SALE. 

Ponoka, Alta. — This describes better 
than any other phrase what is being car- 
ried out at hardware store of L. B. 
Courtright. The Evely Sales Co., are 
closing out the stock and a big effort is 
being made to clear the entire contents. 
Full page advertisements are being used 
and the sale is being advertised in many 
other ways. 'Nevermore prices" have 
been fixed on all goods. In fact, the 
word "Nevermore" has been chosen as 
the slogan of the sale. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Phone Main 1255. 

Phone Main 7324. 

Phone Garry 2313. 

Hartney Chambers. 

Phone Central 12960 

, Phone 2009 Rector 

. Phone Rand 3234. 

Montmartre, Paris. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 

(ESTABLISHED 1888.) 

THE MACLEAN PUBLISHING CO., LIMITED 

JOHN BAYNE MACLEAN - President. 

Publishers of Trade Newspapers which circulate in the Provinces 
of British Columbia, Alberta, Saskatchewan, Manitoba, Ontario, 
Quebec, Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, P. B. Island and New- 
foundland. 

CABLE ADDRESSES 

CANADA: Macpubco, Toronto. ENGLAND: Atabek, London, Bng. 

OFFICES 

Montreal - 701-702 Eastern Tp. Bk. Building 
Toronto - - 143-149 University Avenue. 
Winnipeg 34 Royal Bank Building. 

Vancouver, B.C. - - - H. Hodgson, 18 
London, Eng. - E. J. Dodd, 88 Fleet St. E.C. 
New York R. B. Huestis, 115 Broadway, N.Y. 
Chicago A. H. Byrne, 140 South Dearborn St 
France John F. Jones & Co., 31bis Faubourg 

SUBSCRIPTION 

Canada, $2; United States, $2.50; Great Britain and Colonies, 8s 
6d; elsewhere, 12s. 

PUBLISHED EVERY SATURDAY. 



THE CRYING NEED OF THE WEST. 

There is only one thing wrong with the West. It is 
growing too fast for its facilities. 

In this issue is printed an interview with a Western 
hardware man, in which he states that the farmers of 
the West have lost large sums in past years through the 
inability of the elevators to store their wheat and the 
congestion on the railways. These losses have been shared 
in by all classes and the merchant naturally has suffered 
to no inconsiderable extent. 

However, the men of the West are broad-minded en- 
ough to put past reverses behind them and concentrate 
their attention on the future. Instead of asking redress 
for the past, they are demanding that something be done 
to prevent similar losses in the future. What of the com- 
ing fall, they are asking, what is being done to provide 
sufficient elevator accommodation and enough cars to 
handle the enormous yield of the wheat fields ? The crons 
will be bigger than ever, from present indications. But 
will the country at large benefit from this providential 
condition to the fullest degree? 

This is one of the most important and pressing prob- 
lems before the country. National prosperity is bound un 
to a great extent in the success of the Western cron. 
Check the crop movement and the country receives p 
corresponding check. Providing facilities for the harvest- 
ing and moving of the wheat has become, therefore, a 
paramount consideration. 

What is being done? 

@ 

OPPORTUNITY FOR HARDWAREMEN. 

In London, Ontario, the health authorities have taken 
exception to the inauguration of a fly swatting campaign, 
claiming that this leads the eager swatters to frequerj, 
garbage heaps, and other filthy places where the flic 
abound, and where more germs are to be encounter^ 
than are encountered on many hundred flies. 

There is some reason in the contention, though it 
might be expected that the London health experts, realiz- 
ing the danger of garbage heaps, would install some sys- 
tem of garbage removal to do away with these. How- 
ever, that is a problem for the municipal authorities. 
The point is that the London authorities have drawn at- 
tention to the garbage heaps, both as places where the 
flies congregate, and where infection is to be secured 
direct. 

36 



In bringing out this fact — for a fact it is — the London 
authorities have given the hardwaremen another tip. Let 
them lead the fight on the garbage heap — the flies' incu- 
bator—as well as on the fly direct. Let the hardwaremen 
bring out the uses of the garbage cans, which now are 
to be secured so reasonably. Let him show that these cov- 
ered receptacles prevent infection spreading. Let him 
carry on educational work along this line in conjunction 
with the fight on the fly. At this season a special sale 
of garbage cans might be a good thing. The profit on 
each can, would perhaps be less than if the goods were 
sold at the ordinary profit, but the aggregate profit would 
be larger. Moreover something would be done toward 
paving the way for future sales, and the general cause of 
health would be given another boost. 

© 



THE MAN BEHIND. 

"A great institution is the lengthening shadow of one. 
man." 

Emerson, who said a great many true things in his 
day, never said a truer one than that. How absolutely 
have some men dominated certain works. How bayg, 
their plans been carried out! How have their ideals 
entered into, and become a part of those who work for 
them ! 

Carnegie is said to have gathered thirty of his leading 
young men about him some time ago. "Stay with me." 
he said, "and I'll make you all millionaires." Twenty- 
nine stayed and are millionaires to-day. The one want"- 1 
immediate recompense. 

But Carnegie had not his mind on the millions when 
he made that promise. He was thinking of his work. He 
knew if these men would stay he could fill them with hi= 
spirit — could build, through them, for even greater things. 

Carnegie, of course, carried on operations on a hu?e 
scale. His lengthening shadow is easily perceived. But 
in the lesser organizations there is also a lengthening 
shadow. It depends upon the man whether this reaenr;, 
far or short. The clerks, for instance, are much wb;t 
the employer is. If he makes his business a passion they 
will make it such too. Nothing spreads like enthusiasir- 
nothing unless it is lassitude. The wide awake dealer 
will have wide awake, hard working clerks. The dealer 
who lets his business slip is likely to find his business slin- 
ping. At the head of every concern, be it large or smri'. 
is needed A MAN. 

® 

INNOCENT WITH THE GUILTY. 

Again there have been a number of killings in Mont- 
real, and again there is an outcry against the indiscrim- 
inate selling of revolvers. That such should be the case 
is correct, but the flaw lies in the fact that the law, which 
may be passed, would not stop the trouble. 

In every case, if the purchase of the revolver could 
be traced — and in many cases it has been traced — it would 
be found that the weapon was secured from a pawnshop. 
Here the poorest style of second hand weapons are on 
sale. They are a menace to the one shooting as to the 
one shot at. These places are allowed to sell to any who 
come. It has been shown that drunken men and fourteen- 
year-old boys have purchased revolvers here. 

No wonder, then, that in drunken rows there are shoot- 
ing affrays, some of them with fatal endings ; but the best 
means of stopping these would be to regulate the sale 
of revolvers in the pawnshops. The hardwaremen regu- 
late the sale of these themselves. They will not sell to 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



a suspicious looking character. They cannot afford to 
have their store get a bad name. 

There has been talk, in the Montreal City Council, of 
establishing a municipal pawnshop. If this would do 
away with many of the places now operating, it would 
be a splendid thing. It would deter theft— and it would 
largely solve the revolver trouble. 

@ ■ 

POINTED EDITORIALS. 

Give stoves proper prominence. 

, # * * 

A swatted fly gathers no germs. 

* * * 

The time is getting close at hand when stoves must 

"go up ahead." 

» » * 

The fall special number of Hardware and Metal will 
appear soon. It is going to break all records. Watch 

for it. 

* * * 

The establishment of the Canadian Society of Sani- 
tary and Heating Engineers has done much to improve 
conditions in the plumbing and heating trades. 

* * * 

If the West can get all the men and the flat cars 
needed to move the crops, the fear of hard times will be 
shoved farther than ever into the background. 

* * # 

To speak mildly and conservatively, business at the 
present time is good. No wonder that Canadian business 
men are just chockful of confidence and optimism. 

* * * 

To speak metaphorically, a steady blow from the bel- 
lows of energy and initiative will fan the dying embers 
of sluggish business into the crackling flame of activity. 

* * * 

Another party of British financial men reach Canada 
on the 23rd of August. This is but another sign which 
indicates that this country is coming into her own. 

* # * 

It is interesting to note that Webster's dictionary 
defines a clerk as one who serves in a store and a salesman 
as one who sells things. There's the difference in a nut- 
shell. 

* * * 

Apropos of the western situation, a correspondent 
rises to enquire : Why should business interests stand idly 
by while the wings of prosperity are being clipped by 
the scissors of a car shortage? 

* * * 

Keeping expenses down is not the secret to success in 
the retail hardware business. Nevertheless, the man who 
can get the results on the lowest possible expenditure is 
the man who spends his declining years clipping coupons. 

* * * 

The death of the Japanese Mikado, which occurred on 

Tuesday July 30, was correctly reported in Canada on 

July 29. Probably the Mikado was the first person to 
gain the distinction of having died to-morrow. 

Wearing a fall overcoat on a late July evening, one 
concludes that old Probs. has got the wires twisted some- 
where. Still, the hardwareman is not inclined to com- 
plain very seriously. He has had a pretty good summer. 



The Blue Store 



TN a current number of an American magazine, Mc- 

Clure's, appears a story which every hardwareman 
should read. It is the story of the upbuilding of a paint 
business and, although it may seem that the writer has 
tinctured his facts with a view to making the article 
more readable, it is still a striking evidence of what can 
be done when a man has really grasped the possibilities 
of the paint business. 

Space does not permit more than a cursory mention 
of the many plans this progressive paint dealer inaugur- 
ated. 

Henderson was his name, and his family had been in 
the paint business for several generations. Returning 
from abroad, he bought the store from his uncle for the 
princely sum of one hundred and fifty dollars. He found 
it — we quote the description — "a melancholy old place — 
worn, unpainted and dingy. Dusty window-panes blinked 
in a senile way upon the passing crowd and over it an 
almost illegible sign feebly whispered 'Paint'. 

Henderson decided that his place must be different 
from all other stores, so different that every man, woman 
and child in the city would know it. He finally— "got 
out a can of paint and a ladder. In half a day his store 
exterior had taken on a most astonishing hue. There 
wasn't another shop in the city that wore a blue dress — 
presently a new sign extended itself over the sidewalk. 
It was painted in great blue letters and it said PAINT 
in a voice that made the old sign hang its head in con- 
fusion." His store became "the Blue Store." 

He painted the interior, the barrels and oil cans, the 
show cases, everything, blue. He wore blue shirt, can- 
vas coat and cap himself and made the store boy do like- 
wise. Blue letter-paper, billheads and blotters were sent 
out. Everything about the rejuvenated shop was as 
blue as indigo; except the proprietor and he was brim- 
full of confidence in the prospect of increased profits. 

His next step was to pick out a good quality line of 
paint and to secure the exclusive agency. Then he start- 
ed to improvise selling ideas and put them into effect. 
He lured a near-artist to paint scenes on one of his store 
windows, the pictures always having reference to some 
local event. A blue booth was one of the features at the 
county fair. Inside the booth was a blue fishing pond, 
from which people fished up parcels and each parcel con- 
tained a blue coupon entitling the holder to a discount 
on goods at the blue store. He gave gauges free with 
every first order for gasoline from an automobilist. 
Teamsters Avere supplied with blue wagon umbrellas, 
school children received glistening blue rulers. When a 
baby was born in the town, it got a blue ribbon from 
Henderson, tied in a, beautiful bow; its parents received 
an invitation to call and buy some paint or varnish or 
furniture polish, at a discount. A blue coupon was in- 
closed, to make the opportunity real. These are but a 
few of the hundred and one ideas that he introduced. 

He systematized everything, cut down his expenses, 
raised the efficiency of his staff. His store became as 
full of wonderful schemes and short-cuts as the cave of 
AH Baba was of riches. 

Result : — He became the leading paint man of the city 
and worked his income up to $8,000 per year. 

Moral : — Every hardware and paint dealer can get cor- 
responding results if he really tries. 



37 



Has the Half Holiday Come to Stay? 

Opinions Secured From Hardwaremen in Many Sections — The Majority are 
Distinctly Favorable to the Holiday Ideea But Some Dissentient Views are Se- 
cured — The Movement is Gaining Ground. 



Every summer the retail dealers have 
a troublesome question to decide; wheth- 
er or not to give half-holidays during the 
mid-summer months. 

Do half-holidays pay, or do they on 
the contrary, entail a loss? This is the 
vexed problem, and a great many diverse 
answers can be secured. Some dealers 
are enthusiastic advocates of the week- 
ly afternoon of recreation. They enjoy 
it as much as their clerks and unhesitat- 
ingly declare that they do not lose a 
cent by it. Others will tell you gloomi- 
ly that the half-holiday makes a hole 
in the weekly sales and that profits are 
literally "shot to pieces." 

In many cities and towns the half- 
holiday has been abandoned after a 
year's trial. The number of places 
adopting it is becoming larger all the 
time, however. That is the one outstand- 
ing feature — the idea is steadily gaining 
favor. 

In order to find out what the majority 
of hardwaremen think on this subject, 
Hardware and Metal recently addressed 
letters to quite a number of dealers in 
places where half-holidays have been 
observed this year. Many replies were 
received. The opinions expressed vari- 
ed, of course. 

Tested His Sales. 

One hardwareman sends in the result 
of a test which he conducted. "I was 
determined.'' he writes, "to find out 
if the half-holidays were having any ef- 
fect on sales. I wanted to know definite- 
ly because I had resolved to refuse them 
if I found that they interfered with 
business. 

"I kept track of weekly sales for a 
month prior to the time that the holi- 
days began. The first week there was a 
small falling off, a matter of a few dol- 
lars. This may have been due to any 
other cause, of course. The next week 
there was a corresponding loss. After 
that, however, there were slight gains 
some weeks. On the whole, I guess, we 
broke even. 

"The stores closed on Wednesday 
afternoons. I noticed that our sales on 
Thursdays were heavier than before dur- 
ing the months that the holidays were 
given. This increase did not quite bal- 
ance up what we lost on the Wednes- 
days but the trade came back on the 
other days of the week." 

Smaller Places Favorable. 

Practically all opinions received from 
towns and places of similar size were 
favorable. 



IN A NUTSHELL. 

The idea is steadily gaining favor. 

The main drawback is that farmers 
forget about the half -holidays. 

Test conducted by hardware dealer 
showed that no business had been 
lost. 

Opinions from dealers in small 
places are almost unanimous in favor 
of half-holidays. 



The following reply from G. A. Binns, 
of Newmarket, sums up the opinions ex- 
pressed by a large majority of dealers 
in towns and villages: 

"Replying to your favor of the 23rd 
re the half-holiday proposition, beg to 
say we have for the past four years 
been allowing the Wednesday half holi- 
day during July and August. The first 
year it was rather difficult on account of 
the country people forgetting that stores 
would be closed. But after the first 
season, people became educated to doing 
business in that manner and there has 
been no difficulty since. The main thing 
is to have all the merchants strictly ob- 
serve the rule. If such is the case, I 
cannot see where there would be anj 
business lost. It is merely a matter of 
educating the people when and how to 
do their buying. I think the time is 
fast approaching when the retail busi- 
ness man will not be required to be con- 
tinually at the job from 7 a.m. until 10 
or 12 every night. If such is the case 
it is the merchants' own fault." 

"G. A. Binns." 
The Main Drawback. 

The fact that farmers do not always 
learn of the custom and thus drive into 
town when the stores are closed up, is 
pretty generally regarded as one of the 
main drawbacks. It is p"retty generally 
stated, however, that after the first 
year the farmers make it a point to find 
out when the stores will be closed. 

In the Cities. 

Dealers in the cities are not nearly so 
unanimous in their support of the idea. 
A hardwareman in Peterboro writes as 
follows: "The hardware trade, not find- 
ing half holidays satisfactory, have not 
kept them for years." 

The experience in Berlin has been 
somewhat the same. A large number of 
stores closed last year, but the propriet- 
ors were not satisfied with the results 
and the idea was not followed out this 



38 



In St. Thomas, the holiday scheme 
finds favor. The Geo. A. McMurty Co. 
write : 

"It works very nicely in St. Thomas. 
The merchants are well satisfied to be 
able to have this breathing spell. Wed- 
nesday half-holiday has become an oc- 
casion to which everyone looks forward. 
At first some of our country customers 
were inconvenienced but now there is no 
trouble. We do not see that it inter- 
feres with business. On the other hand, 
it allows the merchants as well as the 
clerks a half a day when he can take 
his family to a picnic or ball game with- 
out neglecting business. 

"Yes, we heartily endorse the Wed- 
nesday half-holiday. Yours truly, 

"Geo. A. McMurty Co." 

Where the Dealer Benefits. 

This letter brings up an interesting- 
point. Many merchants are inclined to 
regard the half-holiday as a benefit for 
the clerks only, forgetting that it bene- 
fits themselves as well. The proprietor 
needs a rest as well as the clerk; and 
the half-holiday gives him the opportuni- 
ty. 

A Toronto dealer puts the seal of his 
approval on the holiday idea in the fol- 
lowing wise: "We have not lost any- 
thing by it. People soon accustom them- 
selves to any new idea— and they gener- 
ally remember that we close on Wednes- 
day afternoons. Trade before and 
after evens up on what we lose on the 
one afternoon." 

Another Toronto dealer, however, 
takes a distinctly opposite view. "It 
cuts our week in two," he declares. 
"Business may not be lost but the holi- 
day is extremely unsettling." 

In Montreal, where a number of the 
hardware stores are closing at 1 o 'clock- 
on Saturdays, during July and August, 
the results have been found satisfac- 
tory. Mr. Philbin, who has been follow- 
ing this practice for years, seems to 
speak for all when he says: 

"We have found the Saturday half 
holiday during July and August a good 
thing. It gives us all a chance to get 
away for a time, and I do not think that 
it has meant any loss of business. To 
begin with, Saturday afternoon in the 
summer is not a great time for shopping 
in our line. People know we are going 
to close. We announce it through our 
windows. Moreover, we have been clos- 
ing for some years now, and our cus- 
tomers expect it of us. Some said this 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



June, ' You'll soon be closing Saturday 
afternoons now, won't you"?' 

"Those who want anything on Satur- 
day come for it in the morning or tele- 
phone for it. I think closing for that 
half day has really done us good. It 
shows our customers that we are willing 
to make things agreeable for our clerks. ' ' 
Has It Come to Stay? 

Yes, opinions differ pretty widely but 
the tenor of the majority of the letters 
received was distinctly favorable. 

Has the half holiday come to stay? 



In some localities, it has undoubtedly be- 
come permanent. It has grown to be 
one of the established features, like the 
Saturday holidays in the factories. 
People have come to recognize that the 
merchant deserves a holiday as well as 
the rest of mankind and that they should 
adjust their shopping to suit his con- 
venience in this respect. 

From all available information, the 
conclusion is reached that this sentiment 
is growing. The half-holiday movement 
seems to be substantially gaining ground. 



Rope's Recent Advance and the Reason 

Raw Hemp Insufficient to Meet the Demand— Its Price There- 
fore Has Soared, Soared Higher Than the Price of Rope. 
Still Higher Figures are Far From Unlikely— This Seems a 
Good Time to Buy. 



Following a rise in rope prices of y± 
tent a pound, struck during the last days 
of June, there has now come an advance 
of l 1 /! cents. The jump is sudden en- 
ough and large enough, to cause the 
hardware man to wonder what it is that 
has made this upward movement neees 
sa ry ? 

Lest some might go away with the 
wrong impression it might well be stat- 
ed at once that the last advance is but 
natural results of conditions affecting 
the raw material. The upward move- 
ment is not a scheme of the manufac- 
turer to secure more profits. Indeed, it 
seems very doubtful if, even at the pres- 
ent price, the manufacturer's margin of 
profit is as large as it has been in by- 
gone days. Moreover let there be no 
mistake as to the immediate future., 
That the recent rises will be followed 
by corresponding declines is far from 
likely. A movement in the other direc- 
tion — a movement toward still higher 
prices — is far more likely. Even since 
this last advance the cost of raw ma- 
terial has gone up still higher. What is 
there for the manufacturer except to 
maintain his present prices, and possibly 
look toward fixing a still higher level in 
the future? 

Recent Advances. 

In the last week of June prices were 
quoted as follows: Sisal, 8%c; pure 
Manilla. 10y 2 c; British Manilla 9c; Lath 
Yarn. 8c. 

Then came the change. Manufactur- 
ers were paying more for their hemp. 
They felt compelled to raise the price 
of the product made from hemp. So, 011 
the 27th of June, the following prices 
came into force: Sisal, 8 3 /4c: Pure Man- 
illa, mic; British Manilla, 9y 4 c; Lath 
Yarn. 8c. 

There had been an advance in every 
line except Lath yarn. 



But the price of the raw material did 
not remain steady at its new high fi- 
gures. It rose. During the last two or 
three weeks Manilla fibre has generally 
been advanced from 1 to l 3 /4 cents a 
pound. "Fair Current" went up lc; 
Midway Manilla rose 1*4 cents; "Good 
Current" Manilla was quoted l 3 ^ cents 
higher. The margins of profit had been 
small before. This advance made them 
ridiculously small, and the second ad- 
vance in a month had to be fixed by the 
manufacturers. How much this advance 
would be was a question, but this was 
finally fixed at sums varying from y 2 c to 
ly^c. No smaller amount would at all 
cover the higher prices asked for the raw 
hemp. 

At present, therefore, quotations are 
as follows: Manilla, 12y 2 c; British Man- 
illa, 10c; Sisal, 914c; Lath yarn, 8y 2 c. 
Large Consumption of Hemp. 

But what, it may be asked, has made 
the raw material advance? It is easy 



to see that an advance in the raw ma- 
terial will make the finished product 
rise. But what was behind the rise in 
the price of raw hemp? What is likely 
to be its future course? 

It seems that the answer is found in 
the old law of supply and demand. There 
is, at the present time, a tremendous 
consumption of hemp. Immense quan- 
tities of binder twine are now being- 
used in Canada and the United States. 
These take hemp. For ships and for 
building operations rope has been re- 
quired. The supply of raw hemp, in- 
deed, has been insufficient to meet the 
demand. The rise, therefore, has been 
natural. 

As to the future — well it can merely 
be said that the causes which have made 
the supply of hemp inadequate still ex- 
ist. Even higher prices of raw material 
are likely. Indeed, since the rope has 
been advanced, there has come another 
rise in the raw material. A rise of about 

Chances For Gain. 

When considering what is likely to 
happen in the future there is another 
side of the question which is worthy of 
note. Since July 1911 hemp has ad- 
vanced slightly over 2y 2 c a pound. The 
finished product, on the other hand, has 
advanced only a little more than lc. 
Moreover it must be remembered thai 
rope is not now at its high level. It is 
not a S'reat while since it sold as high 
as 13%c. There are many things more 
unlikely than another rise in prices. This 
would seem a good time for dealers to 
lay in an adequate supply. Many anti- 
cipated this last advance and have pro- 
fited. There may still be time for oth- 
ers to get ahead of the market. There 
is practically no chance that they would 
lose by reason of a decline, and they 
are quite likely to gain. 



The West Demands Relief 



Winnipeg, Man. — During "Fair 
Week" Winnipeg was visited by numer- 
ous hardware dealers, and amongst the 
number was J. J. Heinrichs, of Osier, 
Sask. Mr. Heinrichs reported the crops 
in his district as being by far the best 
and finest for years, and nothing bad, 
such as frost occurring, he said, the 
question will arise, "How can we dispose 
of it all?" 

"With 25 per cent, more acreage," he 
said, "and outlook for far bigger re- 
turns than 1911, it looks like a very seri- 
ous proposition, not only for the far- 
mers, but also the merchants. 

"Last year I saw farmers bring into 
Osier No. 2 grade wheat, and the ele- 
vator people would not be able to take 
39 



it on account of all the bins for that 
grade being full, but they could accept 
it as No. 5 or No. 6 grade, paying 36c 
per bushel, when the wheat was worth 
No. 2 grade, or 84c per bushel. 

"This is a most serious proposition 
for all of us, and I wish I could only get 
some way for letting the public know 
how much money we all lost in our dis- 
trict on account of the shortage in cars. 
If 'Hardware and Metal' had time or 
the inclination to look into this I know 
the manufacturers and others interested 
would have their eyes opened in such a 
way that they would become so actively 
interested that a remedy would soon be 
discovered." 



Hardware Store Publicity 



Chapter 12— 
The Special Sale 



How Advertising for Special Sales Should be Treated — Big Space Should be 
Used — The Large Typed and Highly Exaggerated Form of Advertisement Should 
be Avoided — Prices Should Always be Given. 



The necessity of conducting special 
sales arises frequently in the course of 
every hardware dealer's experience. He 
may perhaps see an opportunity of work- 
ing up a big sale in some special line. 
Perhaps he has been carrying rather too 
heavy a stock and has been caught at 
the end of the season with more goods 
on his hands than he cares to carry 
over. Or mayhap he finds that his 
shelves are loaded with too much old 
and shopworn stuff, and he wants to 
clean it all out. Whatever the reasons, 
the average dealer is periodically called 
upon to plan and carry out a big sale. 

A special sale necessitates special ad- 
vertising efforts. To attempt to stage 
a sale without investing a certain 
amount of coin of the realm in printers 
ink is highly fatuous and short-sighted. 
The idea behind the sale is to stir up 
trade from everyday proportions and 
create a largely increased demand for 
certain lines. It stands to reason that 
if the dealer expects the public to take 
an enlivened interest in his store, he 
must do something to arouse that inter- 
est. 

Use Big Space. 

This is one case where it is possible 
to lay down a hard and fast rule. Ad- 
vertising for a special sale should be 
done in big space. The merchant can- 
not afford to have anyone overlook his 
announcement. To make the sale a suc- 
cess, every person who might be interest- 
ed in the articles offered must see the ad- 
vertising. Hence the necessity for big 
space. 

Still there is no reason why the special 
sale advertiser should go to the extreme 
in this respect. It is a common practice 
for sale announcements to be written in 
lurid style and printed in type of enor- 
mous size. The headlines seldom vary. 
Here are some of them: 

Unprecedented Opportunity ! 

Selling Below Cost! 
Immense Stock Reduction ! 

Advertisements of this nature often 
serve to defeat their own ends. They 
are too flamboyant in style and too 
heavy in construction. An exaggerated 
claim is never accepted at its face value. 
While the special advertiser must make 
a certain amount of noise in the com- 
mercial world, he need not become sten- 
torian and raucous. 

Yes, good-sized space should be used 
and bold type should be pressed into 
service. The announcement must 



"stand out." At the same time, the 
announcement should not be entirely 
lacking in dignity and, what is even 
more important, it should possess the 
elements of originality. Nothing origin- 
al results when a man tries to write a 
headline which will impress on the pub- 
lic that the sale is to be wonderful and 
peculiarly epochal. Unable to find words 
to adequately tell of the stupendous bar- 
gains he intends to offer, he generally 
ends up with something like this : — 
"Unprecedented Opportunity!" — set up 
in 96 point Mammoth. 
Why not a sane statement of the real 
facts of the case. Originality can then 
be obtained and the announcement has 
more weight. The headline and intro- 
duction of a recent advertisement by an 
Ontario hardwareman might here be 
quoted. It reads thus : Buy hardware 
when it is cheap. 

It has been said of a certain 
millionaire that he made his for- 
tune by buying straw hats in win- 
ter time. In other words he saved 



\ 



"Ok 



'%■ 



148 HASTINGS ST. EAST 

C.B.KERNAN 






5c 



30c 



10c 



I D« tt'u CtUtt 



20c 



10c 



25c 



40c 



30c 



25c 



c^ 



4? 



HARDWARE 



,e4 \i ttiun (^ bpotimi In rawA lo» roar 
i ** W f»« fl,tflR4U.«tt«-M-«'»* 

A GENUINE SALE 

not . pe'»4lc»l «.tn»proaip!d>y • 4"l« » «•" 
o o' rtoddy «ood. ihttt ** * Vj* oiuntwf at 

cnt. ...i Iht JHI.r. I in Kltmi tvcrvAlBf (Trtif 



ON SALE 10 A M. TOMORROW 



♦ (■yi.f..- :r:i» 




SHOP EARLY 



OPEN FOR BUSINESS EVERY NIGHT 



C. B. KERNAN 

148 HASTINGS ST. EAST 



5c 



15c 



15c 



E SU»l»| inmttm 



30c 



tDDItaiOM 



$1.45 



ii m r«t« bha 



50c 



fl-tl Hu-Jg*. V4 



70c 



95c 



45c 






A special sale advertisement with 

some original features — Note 

the prominence of the prices. 

40 



money by purchasing when prices 
were lowest. Now is the time to 
buy summer hardware. We are 
prepared to clear out our summer 
stock at a reduction in price, in or- 
der to make room for fall goods. 
You will never be able to buy these 
goods to better advantage. We 
won't make millionaires of all who 
take advantage of this sale, but we 
guarantee to make them well satis- 
fied customers. 

Quote Prices. 

It is, of course, absolutely essential 
that prices should be quoted. In a spe- 
cial sale it is the price which attracts. 
Prices should, therefore, be made the 
real feature of the advertisement. No 
amount of descriptive matter, telling of 
the great value of the goods, will take 
the place. Prospective purchasers want 
figures, not figures of speech. 

Use Illustrations. 

It is advisable to use illustrations. 
Cuts brighten an ad. and, in the case of 
a special sale advertisement, they help 
to make it attractive. 



ANNUAL MEETING OF ONTARIO 
LANTERN & LAMP CO. 

The annual meeting of above company 
was one of the best attended meetings 
in its history; every shareholder being 
represented. The president, in laying 
before them his annual report, said that 
the financial statement showed a most 
satisfactory net profit, whilst the busi- 
ness done was considerably in advance 
of any previous year. Mr. Ginder also 
spoke of the severe loss the company 
sustained in the death of their secretary, 
P. D. Crerar, K.C. It was moved and 
seconded that a letter of condolence be 
sent to the late secretary's family. The 
Board of Directors was increased from 
five to eight and an executive board of 
four members was also elected. The re- 
sult of the election of officers was as 
follows: — President, W. H. Ginder; 
vice-president, F. W. Gates; secretary, 
G. H. Levy, and Mr. Goodwyn was 
again appointed treasurer. 

Several improvements and additions 
were decided on and, although the busi- 
ness done last year showed a net in- 
crease of 45 per cent, over the previous 
year, the company starts their new year 
with every prospect of beating this in- 
crease in the coming year. 



Bicycles Selling Largely. How About Future? 

Dealers State That the Demand This Year is Larger Than for Many Seasons 
Past. Wheels are Being Used at the Fashionable Resorts, Which Seems to Indi- 
cate They Will Return to Their Old Place Even With the Ladies. Great Im- 
provements Have Been Made in Bicycles of Late, Yet They Sell Much Cheaper 
Than in the Days of the Boom. 



In the days when some of us were 
very young, indeed when some of us 
weren't at all, roller skating was a popu- 
lar amusement. It went out of style. 
Roller skates were practically unheard 
of. Then one day the pastime became 
popular once more. How it started back 
toward public favor is hard to tell, but 
back to favor it came. Roller skating 
once more became the most popular of 
amusements. Many skates were sold, 
and many are still sold. 

All of which simply indicates that 
when an article loses favor there is no 
surety that it will not return to popular 
demand. The Jim Jeffries of com- 
merce are hard to pick. It is difficult to 
tell which lines will not "come back." 
Indications for the Future. 

All of this is interesting at the pre- 
sent time because of the light it throws 
upon the sale of bicycles, which, after 
being sold right and left for three or 
four years, went practically out of fash- 
ion, but which are now giving signs of 
rejuvenation. Bicycles sold better last 
year than the year before, and they have 
sold much better this year than they did 
last. What then for the future? That 
indeed is the question. If bicycles are 
going to return to favor, many hard- 
waremen who do not now carry them 
might well add this line to their sport- 
ing goods department. 

A certain fashionable set in the States 
sets a good many fashions for us here 
in Canada. These people took up the 
automobile and made it popular. They 
put their stamp of approval upon the 
bicycle in the early days, and seem to 
be doing something for the wheel once 
more. In the famous winter resorts — 
Florida and Bermuda — bicycles are be- 
ing much ridden. In Bermuda, of course, 
motor cars are not tolerated, which may 
have something to do with the popu- 
larity of the bicycle, but in Florida, 
where motor cars abound, many of the 
winter visitors use wheels. 

Wheel's Commercial Value. 

This is but one sign. Exactly what it 
indicates is a little hard to say, but as- 
suredly it denotes that the bicycle busi- 
ness is far from dead — that it is, indeed, 
in a healthier state now than for some 
time past. 

But suppose this use of wheels by the 
fashionable is only for the holidays. 
Supposing it does not influence others, 
who can not take these long and expen- 
sive trips, to buy bicycles. What then? 



Well there is still the commercial value 
of the bicycle to count upon. Perhaps 
more and more this is being appreciated. 

A Winnipeg dealer has something to 
say along this line. He is a dealer who 
has carried bicycles in connection with 
his sporting goods department for years. 
He sold bicycles during the days of the 
boom, and he says that the business In 
this line has been better this summer 
than at any time since the good old days. 
Bicycles Down in Price. 

"We are selling bicycles to all man- 
ner of people," declared this man. "We 
have sold a great many to boys, who 
want them to fly about on in their holi- 
days. Men too are buying — and evi- 
dently for a variety of reasons. Some 
are getting them merely for pleasure. 
There are others who find the bicycle 
helps them reach their home. They can 
wheel to and from the store or office in 
less time than it takes them to make the 
trip on the car. Moreover, in this way 
they are saving money. A bicycle costs 
much less now than it did in those late 
ninety's, when the demand was so large. 

"Town travelers are using wheels. 
Young men who keep canoes out on the 
river are using them to make a quick 
trip to the river possible. There is a 
big call for men's wheels, but for wo- 
men's wheels the demand is practically 
dead. Whether the use of bicycles by 
the lady visitors at the fashionable sum- 
mer resorts will bring this mode of loco- 
motion back into popular favor among 
women I cannot say." 

Big Country Trade. 

A Quebec dealer too states that the 
call for bicycles is large. That this 
should be so in Quebec — which is a city 
set on a hill, and therefore hilly — is 
somewhat strange. Yet this dealer 
states that the sales have been large. 
He has not only sold in the city, but in 
the country surrounding. 

This country trade, by the way, is a 
feature to be considered at present. 
More than ever the bicycle is of value to 
the farmer, and to those who have deal- 
ings with the farmer. At present many 
fruit buyers are scouring the country. 
They have to travel far. To hire a horse 
and carriage costs money. In a months 
work it amounts to well nigh $100. On 
the other hand a good bicycle can be 
bought to-day for $35 or $40. No wonder 
the fruit firms are buying their "field- 
ers" bicycles — either of the old style 
or of the motor variety. 
41 



But the farmers themselves can use a 
bicycle to advantage, and are so using 
them. Horses, at the busy season, are 
needed on the farm. A wheel, therefore, 
enables a quick trip to town for any 
article which may be found necessary. 
Roads Better Than Ever. 

From several sources it is learned that 
there is now a good sale of bicycles iji 
the country communities. And it is not 
surprising that this should be so, for 
roads are more fitted for riding now 
than ever before, and wheels are much 
cheaper. 

To those handling bicycles, or those 
thinking of handling them, this question 
of price is worthy of some consideration. 
In Hardware and Metal is appearing a 
series of articles relating to the price of 
certain goods sold in the hardware 
store. These articles either explain the 
advance in prices as being due to the 
advance in cost of the raw material, or 
show that the higher price is rendered 
necessary because the people are de- 
manding a higher quality of goods. With 
bicycles, however, there is an even more 
startling tale to tell. There can be no 
doubt that the wheels turned out to-day 
are ahead of those sold in the ninety's. 
They are equipped with many modern 
features. Not only have they the coas- 
ter brake, which minimizes the amount 
of effort required to propel the wheel, 
but many of them are fitted with a three 
speed gear equipment — a high, low, and 
intermediate — much as is fixed upon an 
automobile — gears which enable a change 
to make hill climbing easy and riding 
on the level easier. And with all these 
changes the prices asked have decreased 
— decreased greatly. What the cause 
of this decrease is may be somewhat hard 
to determine. Probably the plant ; s 
cheaper now, and improvements in this 
plant have made production more rapid. 
Anyway the fact remains that prices 
have dropped tremendously, and this is 
worth remembering by those thinking 
of adding bicycles to their stock. It is 
worth advertising by those who are al- 
ready dealing' in bicycles. 



Burglars Got Two Years. 
Brampton, Ont. — Magistrate Crawford 
sentenced Frank Taylor and John Brown, 
who pleaded guilty to breaking into J. A. 
Henderson's Hardware store a week ago, 
with intent to steal, to tw.) yvifs less 
one day, and one year in the Central 
Prison respectively. 



Have Sporting Goods Risen in Price ? 

The Seventh Article in The Price Series Shows That Articles as Good as Those 
Used Twenty Years Ago are Much Cheaper Now Than Then. Any Higher 
Prices are Paid for Improvements. Some Lines — Such as Ammunition — Are 
Both Better and Cheaper. 



"Ah for the good old clays," sighs the 
pessimist, "when the boys played base- 
ball and lacrosse on the back lots and 
at the agricultural park, and when we 
did not have to hire men to play our 
games for us." 

That old chestnut has done duty for 
a good many years now. It has been ut- 
tered from pulpit, and political plat- 
form. There seems to be something in it 
until one pauses to consider the facts. 
How disconcerting facts sometimes are! 
In this day, when professional sport is 
supposed to be killing amateur competi- 
tion, what is to be found? Why, the 
most cursory examination of the statis- 
tics, as they are to be had, shows that 
instead of decreasing, the followers of 
amateur sport are increasing rapidly. 
Perhaps the professionals do draw the 
crowds which formerly attended the am- 
ateur games, but even in places where 
this is so the amateur games are being 
played. 

How Demand Has Grown. 

It would seem, indeed, that the spirit 
of professionalism which has entered into 
sport has done good rather than harm. 
The professionals are becoming the 
teachers of the amateurs. Boys and 
play," and the "delayed steal," just 
Then they play themselves, and try to 
work the "hit and run," "the squeeze 
plays," and the "delayed steal," just 
as do the men, who, gathered from far 
and near, represent the home team. To 
make these plays good equipment is need- 
ed, and so there has grown a demand for 
a better class of goods. 

Professionalism in Canada has only in- 
vaded three fields to any extent — base- 
ball, lacrosse and hockey. These games 
have boomed of late years, but so have 
the other sports — the sports which from 
time immemorial have been the joy of 
the amateur — cricket, tennis, golf and 
rugby football. The demand for a high- 
class of sporting goods is felt in these 
strictly amateur sports as it is in the 
more professional lines. 

Prices Have Not Advanced. 

When these facts are considered, then, 
what is to be said on the question of 
prices? Have the prices asked for 
sporting goods advanced? Unhesitating- 
ly it may be said they have not. The 
prices now demanded for some classes of 
sporting goods are higher than were ask- 
ed for the line which was thought to 
take the same place, but the higher pric- 



ed article of to-day is a very different 
one to that sold ten, fifteen, or twenty 
years ago. 

Take baseball goods for instance. 
Baseballs themselves have been improved. 
They have been made more "live" by 
the use of a cork centre. They are bet- 
ter sewn. What of the price then? Well 
the time was, some twelve or fifteen years 
ago, that these balls — that is the better 
class of them — cost $1.50. Now they are 
selling for $1.25 in the United States, 
and though there is a 25 per cent, duty 
against these goods, they sell for $1.25 
here. Here, then, is a case where there 
lias been an improvement in the product, 
with a drop in the price, and that in spite 
of the higher cost of leather. 

Cheaper Lines Dropped. 

As far as gloves go the change is not 
so noticeable. A dozen years ago there 
were some exceedingly cheap gloves put 
upon the market. Gloves were to be had 
then for sums as low as 10c. There is 
no mitt to be secured at that price now. 
About the lowest price is 25c, and on 
that the manufacturers claim — and with 
some reason — that they lose money. 

Generally fielders' gloves, catchers' 
mitts, etc., are fully as expensive now as 
in the "good old days, when town boys 
played on the town team." But the rea- 
son is that players to-day demand a bet- 
ter glove. They want the best made, 
and do not object to paying the price. 
The high price is paid for the improve- 
ment which has come with the years, not 
as an advance in the cost of the article. 
Better Made Mitts. 

The old catchers' mitts were shapeless 
things until long usage put a "pocket" 
in them, 'and enabled the catcher to clutch 
the pitcher's offering. To-day all gloves 
are shaped. They have a pocket when 
they are bought, and need but little 
breaking in. 

It is hard to get this question of 
cloves down to rock bottom, but cer- 
tainly high prices are paid to-day be- 
cause a higher grade of goods are being 
sold than was known ten, fifteen, or 
twenty years ago. 

Drop in Ammunition. 

Then consider the question of rifles 
and shot guns. The prices asked have 
changed little as the past score of years 
have flown. This means, therefore, that 
considered by any fair basis the price of 
guns and rifles has dropped. A model 
similar to that sold a decade ago could 

42 



be bought for much less now than then. 
It is the modern improvements which 
keep the prices for the best models up. 
Modern rapid fire rifles — magazine guns 
— these are the things which sportsmen 
are paying out their money for. 

A drop in prices, however, is noted in 
ammunition. "What," some will say, 
"ammunition advanced in price about 
seven years ago." So it did, but the 
advance was small, and not by any means 
equal to the drops which had occurred in 
the preceding five or ten years. 

Shells Have Been Perfected. 

So material has been the reduction in 
the price of ammunition that sportsmen 
generally are buying this made up now, 
and are not purchasing shells which they 
fill themselves. The manufacturers, 
moreover, have been carefully studying 
the question of filling shells, and have so 
perfected this work that it is hard for 
an amateur to attain anything like as 
good results. 

Smokeless powder, moreover, has come 
clown in price, and consequently has 
come to the front. Fifteen years ago it 
was all but unknown. It was so expen- 
sive that sportsmen passed it by and 
bought the black. But the price fell, and 
even with the last advance the smoke- 
less cartridges are so reasonable that a 
large percentage of the sportsmen use 
these in their arms. 

In tennis goods the price question has 
been somewhat inconspicuous. This, 
perhaps, is because many of those who 
buy rackets do not have to think over an 
extra dollar. They want the good racket 
no matter what it costs. But rackets 
have not changed materially. The first- 
class article is about the same price to- 
day as it was two decades ago. The bal- 
ance of the rackets have been improved. 
New methods of reinforcing the frame 
have been adopted. The gut is strung 
a little differently. But the price is 
much the same. 

Tennis Rackets Have Dropped. 

There are some cheap lines to be se- 
cured now, however, which were not on 
the market those years ago. At least 
the grade was to be had, but at a higher 
price. Tennis rackets, it may be stated, 
have dropped in price. Not risen. 

Then there is golf — that game which 
someone has said will be the cause of 
the disintegration of the British Empire, 
should such disintegration come. Infin- 
itely rrrre money is spent on golf to-day, 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



than was spent a score of years ago. 
This only shows that the number playing 
is greater. Not that the clubs are really 
more expensive. It is true, however, 
that some do cost good sums. Probably 
the average golfer's outfit costs much 
more now than it did in the early nine- 
ties. But he uses more clubs now — and 
better clubs. The game has been more 
specialized. 

Sporting goods are perhaps the very 
hardest lines to examine in a compara- 
tive way. As far as efficiency goes the 
goods of to-day, despite the higher cost 
of material, are much better than those 
of by-gone days. But prices are in cases 
higher. In other cases they are lower. 
Generally it may be stated that the ad- 
vances have been due entirely to improve- 
ments — and that the same grade of goods 
being considered, sporting goods are 
cheaper to-day than they have ever been. 

© 

PRESENTATION TO H. A. GUNN. 

On Wednesday, Hugh A. Gunn sever- 
ed his connection with the firm of H. 
S. Howland Sons & Co. Mr. Gunn has 
been with the firm for a period of eigh- 
teen years and for a large portion of 
that time has been sales and warehouse 
manager. The fact of his personal po- 
pularity was clearly demonstrated when 
on Wednesday afternoon all employes 
of the company, numbering considerably 
over one hundred, assembled and pre- 
sented hitn with tangible remembrances. 

Mr. Jenkins, the oldest employe of the 
house who began his connection at the 
same time as the late Thomas G. Dexter, 
read an address on behalf of the ware- 
house staff, and Geo. Gilmour made the 
presentation of a gold chain and locket. 
The address was as follows : — 

"It was with profound regret that we 
learned of your severing your connec- 
tion with us. You have, by your cour- 
teous manner and fair-mindedness won 
a place for yourself in the hearts of 
your employes not attained by many. 
Not only in business but in social life as 
well, we have always found in you a 
helper and a friend. 

"We would ask you to take this loc- 
ket and chain, not for its intrinsic 
value, but as a token of the esteem in 
which you are held. 

"We sincerely trust and hope that 
you will do well and prosper in your 
new field of labor." 

T. B. Williamson then spoke on behalf 
of the departmental managers and tra- 
veling staff. He explained that they all 
recognized the great help their wives 
were to them and, as the warehouse em- 
ployes had presented him with something 
for his own personal adornment they had 
decided to give something in which Mrs. 



Gunn would share. He then presented 
a handsome Crown Derby tea set. 

Mr. Gunn responded fittingly, referr- 
ing to the happy relations which had al- 
ways existed between himself and all 
members of the staff. The proceedings 
were brought to a close by a hearty 
chorus of "For he's a jolly good fel- 
low.'' and three cheers and a tiger. 

Mr. Gunn is joining the firm of John 
Stark & Co., and will be engaged in 




Uvgl 



real estate. However, he does not in- 
tend to sever his connection with the 
hardware trade entirely for he asserts 
that he will continue a subscriber to 
Hardware and Metal, and in that way 
will keep in touch with old associates 
and friends. 



GOOD QUALITY TALK. 

Red Deer, Alta: — In advertising tools, 
the Day Hardware Co., who have taken 
the motto "we stand for progress," 
say: 

"Nobody can do good work with 
poor tools. A poor mechanic can 
do better work with good tools than 
a good workman can do with poor 
tools. So much or more depends 
on the tools as on the man ; besides 
good tools save time. ' ' 

"Realizing this as we do, all of 
our goods of this kind are of the 
best standard makes and fully 
guaranteed. You can pay less of 
course, but you get cheapness and 
not satisfaction." 



Areola, Sask. — W. A. Youngblud, who 
recently disposed of his hardware and 
furniture business to John R. Mears, 
has bought it back again. 
43 




The following items are taken from the 
issue of July 30, 1892: 

"A deputation representing a 
group of persons contemplating the 
formation of a company for the 
manufacture of binder twine and 
agricultural implements, inter- 
viewed Sir Oliver Mowat regarding 
the purpose of his government to 
establish twine works in the Cen- 
tral Prison. The deputation con- 
sisted of John Hope, Joseph Strat- 
ford, F. T. Chalcraft, Thos. Brooks 
and Jacob Mott, all of Brantford. 
They were desirous of finding out 
to what extent the Government 
was going into the manufacture of 
twine." 

Editor's Note.- — The Farmer's Binder 
Twine and Agricultural Implement 
Manufacturing Company was subse- 
quently formed and is still engaged in 
the manufacture of binder, twine. 
Joseph Stratford is manager. Fred. T. 
Chalcraft is well known to the hardware 
trade through his connection with the 
Brantford Roofing Co., of which he is 
manager. 

* * * 

"Paints and leads are quiet, the 
only lines moving to any extent 
being mixed and carriage paints. A 
fair jobbing trade is being done in 
leads." 

Editor's Note. — Conditions at the pre- 
sent time present a contrast' to this. 
Business is good in all lines of paint. In 
fact, the present year is breaking all 
records in the matter of paint consump- 
tion. 

* * * 

"W. H. Evans, of the Canadian 
Paint Co., is passing the heated term 
at the Lawson House, South Harps- 
well, on the Maine Coast. ' ' 
Editor's Note. — Mr. Evans severed his 
connection with the Canada Paint Co. 
last year, but is still connected with the 
hardware trade in the capacity of manu- 
facturers' agent. 

William Verity, Robert Verity, 
William Verity, all of Exeter; Hart 
Massey, of Toronto, and Edmund 
W. H. VanAllen, of Brantford, are 
asking to be incorporated as the 
Verity Plow Co., Ltd. 
Editor's Note.— The Verity Plow Co. 
are now among the largest plow manu- 
facturers in Canada. They have a bi^ 
plant at Brantford. 



Complete Course of Sheet Metal Work 



Example No. 3 shows how to draw an- 
ellipse by a large and a small circle. 

The large circle represents the length 
of the ellipse, and the small circle repre- 
sents the width. 

Draw the line A-B the desired length, 
and through the centre — draw the lines 
C-D the desired width. 

With as centre and O-A as radius 
describe the large circle. Then with 
as centre and O-D as radius describe the 
small circle. 

Begin at A and step the large circle 
off into any number of equal spaces. 

Then begin at S and step the small 
circle off into the same number of equal 
spaces. Drop verticle lines from each of 



By L. W. KOSER 

the numbers on the large circle and in- 
tersect them by horizontal lines drawn 
from the corresponding numbers on the 
small circles. For example, drop verti- 
cal i lines from 2, 3, and 4 on the small 
circle. A line traced through the points 
of intersection completes the ellipse. 

Another method of drawing an ellipse 
is shown by example No. 4, Figs. 1 and 
2; the reason that the different radii for 
describing the different arcs lies within 
a given plane or boundry. 

There is one fact, however, that must 
be kept in mind in regard to this method, 
and that is, that the length of the el- 
lipse must be one-half times greater than 
the width: or to put it the other way, 



the width must be two-thirds that of the 
length ; this proportion gives a very good 
ellipse. 

In order to make example No. 4 as 
plain as possible we show two drawings 
in developing it, but of course the stud- 
ent can finish it in one. 

First draw the line A-B of Fig. 1 the 
desired length, then through the centre 
draw the line C-D two-thirds the 
length of A-B. The easiest way to get 
this is to lay off the line A-B in three 
equal spaces, then lay off one of these 
on either side of the centre as O-D 
and O-C. 

(Continued on page 45.) 



£x AMPkE * ■& 





"■.•/' \*y 

'-K V 



fic 7 ^ 



Fi<f. 4 



3 <t r 



> — 


r\° 


c 


r 


S j 


^S 


/ ! 

Fit 


' ^ 



H F>5 3 



44 



New Hardware Goods 



SEWING MACHINE GRINDER AT- 
TACHMENT. 

A handy little attachment is a sharp- 
ening- device that attaches to a sewing- 
machine. This is put out by the Luther 
Grinder Mfg\ Co., of Milwaukee. It at- 
taches to any sewing- machine and is ad- 
justable to take up any slack in the belt. 
The wheel is of Dimo-Grit, the new arti- 




Luther Sewing Machine Attachment. 

ficial sharpening substance now being- 
used on Luther Grinders. 

This little grinder furnishes a quick 
and easy means of sharpening knives, 
scissors, needles and practically all 
household tools. A woman will make 
use of this when she would not think 
of using a whet-stone. 

HIGH POWER MARLIN RIFLE. 

The Marlin Firearms Co. are just plac- 
ing on the market in their Model 1895 



(lie solid frame rifle and $22.00 for the 
take-down style. 

This new .33 caliber rifle is a quick 
handling rifle, has special smokeless steel 
barrel, made especially to stand the con- 
tinued use of high power smokeless loads 
and jacketed bullets. Rifle holds 5 cart- 
ridges : 4 in magazine and one in cham- 
ber. It has case-hardened frame, made 
of special smokeless steel; case-hardened 
hreeehbolt and finger lever; black walnut 
I uttstock and forearm: shotgun butt, 
rubber buttplate: Rocky Mountain (ad- 
justable) rear and front sights. Uses 
any standard make of .33 caliber high 
power cartridges. The take-down rifle 
I lacks in a space 24 inches long. 



ALL STEEL HATCHETS. 

The Burgess-Norton Mfg. Co., Geneva, 
111., are manufacturers of a full line of 
the Bur-Nor all steel hatchets, the unique 
feature of which is the steel handle. 
These tools comprise a line of hatchets, 



of the tool. These handles will stand a 
strain of over three hundred pounds. 
The blades are tempered in oil and will 
take and maintain a keen cutting edge. 
All parts are firmly riveted under tre- 
mendous pressure. 



COMPLETE COURSE OF SHEET 
METAL WORK. 

(Continued from page 44.) 

Now draw the horizontal lines E-D-F 
and G-C-H, and the vertical lines E-A-G, 
and F-B-H. 

Draw a line from C to the corners 
E and F, and from D to the corners 
G and H. 



Where th 
line A-B as 
for drawing 
the points C 
drawing the 

Now refer 
of the comp 
radius equal 



ese lines intersect on the 

S and R, will be the centres 

the ends of the ellipse, and 

and D are the centres for 

sides. 

to Fig. 2. With the point 
ass placed at S. and with a 
to S-A we draw the arc 1-2. 




made in nine different styles. The No. 
100 shown herewith is a new addition and 
was made especially as a barrel or pack- 
ing hatchet. The checked case hardened 
head and nail pull milled to an edge in 
side of blade makes this style partieu- 




Cartridge Release Button 
and Matted Barrel on all 

2%ar/isi Hammerless Shotguns 



New Model Marlin Rifle. 



a new .33 caliber high power repeating 
rifle made in special light weight style 
with 24 inch round, special smokeless 
steel barrel, half magazine, giving 5 shots 
at one loading. The rifle weighs about 
7% pounds and will sell at $18.50 for 



larly adapted for that use. 

A reinforcement is placed inside the 
handle next to and running over the 
blade, giving doubled weight and strength 
where it is needed without adding to the 
weight or affect ins- the balance or hang 

45 



In like manner with the point at R we 
draw the arc 3-4. 

Then with C as centre and the radius 
C-l we draw the arc or side 1-3, and in 
like manner with D as centre we draw 
the arc 2-4, thus completing the ellipse. 

In Prob. 31 we show the method of de- 
veloping the patterns for an elliptical 
shaped article. 

First draw the outside elliptical line 
by the method shown in example 4. Then 
the base line A-B of Fig. 2. Then tbe 
vertical centre line C-D high enough to 
give the desired pitch to the sides of the 
vessel. 

Then draw a line from A to D and 
from B to D. 

Draw the line S-R the desired distance 
above the base line A-B, or the height 
it is desired to make the vessel. 

Then the outline A-B-S-R represents 
the elevation of the article. 

Now in drawing the patterns for an 
elliptical article by this method, we as- 
sume that it is simply two cones of dif- 
ferent heights. For instance, the side'5 
having the large curve are considered as 
two parts of a large cone, and the sides 
having the small curve are considered as 
two parts of a small cone. 



H A R D W A R E A ND METAL 



Catalogues 

and 

Booklets 



Ready to Issue. 

The new catalogue of the Enterprise 
Foundry Co., Sackville, N.S., is now 
ready to issue and will be sent to all 
interested. 

Green Book On Tools. 
The Smith Hardware Company, Mon- 
treal, have just issued the second edi- 
tion of "the Green Book, of Hardware 
Specialties." This deals especially 
with "Red Devil" tools, manufactured 
by them. It shows designs of chain 
drills, screw drivers, pliers, spark 
plugs, hack saws, and quotes prices. 
The book is a mine of information. 

Coopers' Tools. 

The L. and I. J. White Co., Buffalo, 
N.Y., have issued a catalogue of their 
coopers' tools, including all varieties of 
turpentine tools. It is a very creditably 
prepared and printed booklet, each ar- 
ticle being fully described and illustrat- 
ed. The line of tools shown is complete 
in every detail. 

The tools shown include : broad axes, 
turpentine broad axes, haxes, gutter pull- 
ers, turpentine dippers, herty cup dippers, 
hand axes, coopers' adzes, shaves of all 
descriptions, chamfer knives, howeling 
knives, scrapers, froes, drivers, dowel 
machines, dowel forms and bits, raising 
and flagging irons, pincers, pulleys, ham- 
mers, anvils, beakhorns, borers and ream- 
ers, spoke-shave irons, howel irons, wing 
compasses, rivet sets, vises, punches, lock 
cutters, levelers, crozes' head floats, 
jointers, heaters. 

Wire Rope And Fittings. 

An advance copy of the new Wire 
Rope catalogue of the B. Greening Wire 
Co, Limited, Hamilton, has been re- 
ceived, and the company are to be con- 
gratulated upon the very handsome 
brochure they have issued. It is evident 
that no pains whatever have been spared 
in the production of the work. The 
cover, which was evidently specially de- 
signed for this issue, presents a striking 
design. The color scheme throughout is 
gray and black, and the issue is fully 
illustrated. 

The B. Greening Wire Co., Limited, 
issue different catalogues for their dif- 
ferent lines of business, and this cata- 
logue relates to their Wire Rope Dept. 
Wire Ropes of all descriptions are 
shown from the heavy 2% inch diameter 
(8% inch circumference), composed of 



114 wires with a breaking strain of 305 
tons, weighing 12 pounds per foot, down 
to the finest copper cord 1-16 inch diam- 
eter composed of 42 wires with a break- 
ing strain of 100 pounds, weighing .007 
pounds per foot. We find in wire ropu 
of V2 inch diameter there are no less 
than twenty-five different kinds listed. 
Wire ropes of various constructions 
from galvanized strand for guying pur- 
poses, composed of seven wires, to the 
extra pliable hoisting ropes composed of 
six strands of thirty-seven wires each 
with a hemp centre, or 222 wires, are 
shown. In addition to the ropes there 
are a very large number of wire rope fit- 
tings and accessories such as blocks, 
pulleys, sheaves, wheels, turnbuckles, 
devices, hooks, thimbles, rope grease 
and a very explicit description of splic- 
ing wire rope, and njtes on how to care 
for and use wire rope, showing tin bc&t 
kind of rope to use for different pur- 
poses. 

It will be ready for distribution in a 
few davs. 



UNANNOUNCED BARGAINS. 

A correspondent writes: "Has it oc- 
curred to you that the successful dealer 
is the one who studies human nature 
and knows his customers? Here is an 
illustration. It was forcibly impressed 
upon me some time ago that a person 
who finds a bargain is infinitely more 
pleased than if the bargain had been 
advertised in the usual way. 'Some- 
thing I picked up the other day,' people 
like to say. Accordingly, I placed here 
and there through the store articles 
priced quite low. I made no effort to 
have them conspicuous or to call at- 
tention to them. People just stumbled 
on them. It did not take long for them 
all to be snapped up and it surely was 
a caution the way those people went 
through the store looking for more bar- 
gains of the same kind. It was, I be- 
lieve, a good stroke of business." 

Editor's note: It is customary, and 
wise, to advertise bargains, but our 
correspondent has raised an interesting 
point. Anything which will induce 
people to look through the store care- 
fully is well worth trying. 



HARDWARE CLEARING HOUSE. 

In a late number of the Ironmonger, 
a leading hardware journal of Great 
Britain, there appears a short discussion 
of the feasibility of establishing in Lon- 
don a mercantile institution which 
should make it a business of handling 
odd lots of hardware. We take it that 
the class of goods referred to is similar 
in character to that quoted in the bar- 

46 



gain sheets and exchange lists issued by 
American retail hardware associations. 

Moving Odds and Ends. 

Attention is called to the fact that in 
London there are other lines of trade 
such as books, dry goods, clothing, etc., 
where there are stores that make a busi- 
ness of handling odds and ends in their 
respective lines. These firms employ a 
man whose business it is to travel 
around among the merchants and pick 
up goods such as the latter have found 
unsuited to their trade. 

The Ironmonger thinks that dealers 
might realize more from such wares 
through this outlet than they do from 
the auction stores where the dealer often 
realizes no more than he would from so 
much junk or scrap iron. 

It is not so very often that there is 
anything in a job lot of hardware that 
would not be worth something to some- 




STANLEY "BED ROCK" PLANES. 

The Stanley Rule and Level Co., New 
Britain, Conn., have issued a leaflet des- 
cribing their "bed rock" planes. 

The absolute solidity and one-piece ef- 
fect of the "Bed Rock" plane is as much 
a fact as if the parts were all one, for the 
reason that the entire under surface of 
the frog is in perfect contact with the 
solid seat cast in the plane bottom. The 
frog and the bottom are so perfectly fit- 
ted together, that from the plane iron to 
the bottom, the plane is as one solid piece 
of metal. 

The frog is made with a tongue on 
the under side, which fits in a groove in 
the plane body. This tongue and groove 
are made to conform, so that when ad- 
justment is necessary the tongue of the 
frog travels in the groove, which insures 
its being square with the mouth of the 
plane, thus preventing any shifting or 
"wobbling." It is held to its seat by 
means of two pins of large diameter, each 
of these having a tapered hole near the 
lower end. The two frog clamping 
screws have tapered points. These 
points fit in the holes in the pins. The 
center of the tapered hole in these pins 
is slightly above the center line of the 
frog clamping screws, so that when these 
screws are driven in, they produce the 
effect of a wedge, drawing the pins down- 
ward, and clamping the frog absolutely 
rigid in its place. If, for any reason, 
these frog pins should be taken out of 
the plane, care must be used in replacing 
them to see that the tapered holes come 
in line with the points of the frog clamp- 
ing screws. 



Current News of Hardware Trade 



Appointed Sales Manager. 

The Remington Arms — U. H. C. Co., 
New York, have established a new sales 
manager for their Canadian business in 
the person of J. H. Ross, whose office 
will be Room 604 Standard Bank Build- 
ing, Toronto. 

C. C. Lee Injured. 

Goderich, Ont. — C. C. Lee, hardware 
dealer, and proprietor of the Summer 
House, was seriously injured in an auto- 
mobile accident. Mr. Lee, accompanied 
by his wife, was driving at a good rate 
when he lost control of his machine, and 
turned turtled into a ditch. Mrs. Lee 
escaped with minor injuries, and her 
daughter, Marion, who was pinned under 
the machine was only slightly hurt, but 
Mr. Lee had five ribs broken, was injured 
internally and received a bad shaking up. 

Big Demand in West. 

F. W. Hollingsworth, sales manager 
of the Ontario Lantern & Lamp Co., 
Hamilton, is on his annual trip to the 
coast inspecting the branches of the 
company. 

He writes that the present season bids 
fair to be the best the West has ever 
had in all branches. He finds buyers 
placing orders freely and for larger 
quantities than in past years, — prompt 
deliveries being seemingly the most in- 
sistent demand of the buyer. 

Death of J. B. Allen. 

Toronto, Ont. — The death occurred 
here of Joseph B. Allen, who was in the 
hardware business on King street east 
for a great many years, being head of 
the firm of Ross and Allen. Mr. Allen 
was born in Carlisle, Cumberland, Eng- 
land, seventy-one years ago, and came to 
Canada when about eighteen years of 
age. He had been a resident of Toron- 
to for over half a century at the time of 
his death. He succeeded to the business 
in King street on the death of his wife's 
father, the late Mr. John Mead, and on 
his retirement the business was carried 
on by his son-in-law. 

No American Competition. 

Winnipeg, July 31. — Tn view of the 
recent reduction in the duty on cement, 
tenders for cement just opened by the 
city council are thought remarkable. 
Last year the Lehigh Portland Cement 
Company tendered and received the con- 
tract, their price of $2.10 per barrel 
net being the lowest received. This year 
the lowest tender came from the Canada 



Cement Company, which agrees to deliv- 
er from 15,000 to 25,000 barrels at $2.40 
per barrel, including sacks. This works 
out at approximately $2.25 per barret 
net. 

Tinsmiths Form Union. 

Moose Jaw. — At a meeting of Moose 
Jaw tinsmiths in the Oddfellows Hall, a 
trades union was formed. Meetings 
will be held every two weeks. About 
thirty members were present at the meet- 
ing. The number of the local lodge is 
414. 

Burglars at Work. 

Sault Ste. Marie, Ont. — Robbers play- 
ed havoc among the Soo merchants last 
Saturday night or Sunday morning and 
got away without leaving a clue for the 
police to follow. The places visited by 
the burglars were the premises of How- 
ard Best, dry goods merchant; Fulton's 
hardware store, and the Soo Hardware 
Company. The Soo Hardware Com- 
pany's premises were entered by prying 
off the steel bars that protected a rear 
window. A quantity of small hardware. 
such as rifles, pocket knives, safety raz- 
ors, steel tapes, etc., were taken. The 
safe showed signs of having been tamp- 
ered with, but the men were unable to 
open it. At Fulton's Hardware, wrench- 
es, razors, screw drivers, etc., are miss- 
ing. 

Personal Notes. 

A. D. Kennelly, of McClary Mfg. Co., 
Toronto, is holidaying at Muskoka 
Lakes, 

John F. Hemmenway, of Smith and 
Hemmenway, New York, is in Montreal 
on a short visit. 

J. L. Reade, of the Kennedy Hard- 
ware Co., Toronto, is on a two-week 
holiday at Bobcaygeon, Kawartha Lakes. 

W. F. Kelly, the Ontario representa- 
tive of the Canadian Tungsten Lamp 
Company leaves for an extended yacht- 
ing cruise through the Thousand Islands 
and lower St. Lawrence. He expects to 
be absent two or three weeks. 

Business Changes. 

Rostburn, Sask. — Mattock and Cham- 
bers have disposed of their hardware 
stock to Mansell Bros. 

Carnduff, Sask. — Sparling and Shore, 
hardware dealers, are negotiating the 
sale of their business. 

Trail, B.C.— H. A. Klinefelter has 
purchased the stock of paints of the 
Trail Hardware Co. 

47 



Stoughton, Sask. — A. L. Halley, form- 
erly of Three Hills, has purchased the 
hardware and furniture store of Doull 
and Banbury. 

Outlook, Sask. — The Reid Hardware 
Co., have taken over the hardware busi- 
ness of J. C. Neff, one of the pioneer 
business men of this place. Fred S. 
Reid, who for some time traveled for 
Peart Bros., of Regina, will have the 
management of the business. The new 
firm has taken possession. Although Mr. 
Neff has disposed of his hardware busi- 
ness, he announces that he will remain 
in Outlook. 

New Retail Firms. 

Winnipeg. — C. Cook has started in the 
tinsmithing business here. 

Prince Albert, Sask. — Curry Bros, 
have started in the plumbing business 
here. 



HARDWAREMEN HELPING IN 
SWATTING CAMPAIGN. 

Montreal, July 24. — Nearly two mil- 
lion flies have met death, in the city dur- 
ing the week, according to the official 
count. This, it must be remembered, 
does not include the many hundred 
which meet death owing to the skilled 
swats of the many bald heated men. It 
is merely an estimate of the flies brought 
to the Star office, that they may be 
counted in the three weeks' campaign 
which the Star is conducting. 

These flies have met their end by 
various means — most of which means are 
sold by hardwaremen. A number of 
these dealers have entered into the con- 
test — not by joining the swatters, but by 
displaying the means of swatting. M. 
Philbin, on St. Catharine street, has de- 
voted an entire window to a display of 
the various exterminators. In this are 
shown fly papers, pyramids, the wire 
contrivances which enable the clearing 
of a room of flies in short order; these 
and screen windows which keep the germ 
carriers from gaining entrance to the 
house. The display is attractive and 
seasonable, and is bringing direct sales, 
and indirect ones by making the store at- 
tractive. 

Editor's Note. — In many cities fly- 
swatting campaigns are being conducted. 
This, is undoubtedly a splendid oppor- 
tunity for the hardwareman to work up 
large sales in the goods required for 
swatting purposes. 



Weekly Market Report — Metals 



METAL NOTES. 




Shortages are noted in 


many 


lines. Lead is particularly 


scarce 


but it is also difficult to 


obtain 


soil pipe, iron pipe and galvaniz- 


ed pipe. 




Metal men say that the 


short- 


age is likely to become more acute 


in the fall. 




Tin has regained strength 


on the 


primary markets. 





MONTREAL. 

Montreal, August 1. — A scarcity of 
lead, which has existed for weeks, be- 
coming more acute as the days have 
passed, is causing a good deal of anxiety 
here. Other metals are perhaps high 
in price. But they are to be secured. 
Lead, however, is exceedingly scarce. Nor 
is there a great deal in sight. The Eng- 
lish dockers' trouble has made it almost 
unposible to get this metal out, and what 
little there is coming is eagerly snatched 
up. 

No price changes locally have been 
noted, but some are promised. It was 
stated last week — indeed in the issues 
of several weeks back — that the present 
would be a good time to lay in supplies 
of soil pipe and iron pipe. Those who 
have acted upon this suggestion have 
reason for a feeling of thankfulness to- 
day. They have a supply at a time 
when many dealers are experiencing diffi- 
culty in getting their orders filled. 
Prices Sure to Advance. 

Soil pipe especially is scarce. The 
demand has been large, and the produc- 
tion does not seem to have been suffici- 
ent to meet this. A big shortage 
threatens. Prices are certain to ad-> 
vance shortly. What the new figure will 
be cannot be stated yet. 

Iron pipe, too, is scarce. Here also 
there promises to be a shortage, and an 
advance in prices is expected. The high- 
er cost of raw material, and the ad- 
vance in prices in the United States, 
makes this seem practically certain. The 
rise will likely be one of about five per 
cent. 

Galvanized pipe also is scarce, as are 
galvanized sheets. Indeed the scarcity 
of material is the only worrying feature 
of the present market. The high prices 
do not seem to be hurting business at 
all. Indeed the orders are piling in. 
The trouble is to fill them. 

Plan Your Work, Then do Opposite. 

Tin: — "I am coming to think," re- 
marked one metal man on Wednesday, 



' ' that the best way to act with regard to 
tin is to figure out what the metal will 
do, and then do the exact opposite. For 
some time now it has been acting in the 
most amazing style. Take the present 
time for example. A decline starts. The 
Banea sale is coming along and it seems 
that the syndicate, or interest, or what- 
ever you choose to call it, is trying to 
force down prices in order to make a 
good buy. Then tin starts up again. 
The decline is all off, and though the sale 
is yet to come the market advances £9, 
regaining all that it had lost. 

Undoubtedly this rapid change has left 
some handlers in rather a bad position, 
but it has made no change in prices lo- 
cally. 

Iron Goes Higher. 

Copper: — The market is rather quiet. 
There has been a good deal of selling on 
the part of speculators, and prices have 
dropped, but these do not affect the local 
situation to any great extent. Stocks of 
this metal are good. 

Lead : — There has been an advance on 
the primary market, which would be of 
some importance here if the question of 
supply were not of such gravity as to 
overshadow all other features. Nothing 
of any account is yet coming through 
from British Columbia, and shipments 
form England are still exceedingly poor. 

Iron: — The market is high, Wednes- 
day's quotation reaching 58s 6d. It is 
small wonder that the prices of some 
iron products are scheduled to advance. 

TORONTO. 

Toronto, Aug. 1. — Demand for metals 
and metal commodities continues heavy 
but as has been the case for some little 
time, trade is hampered by shortage of 
supplies in certain lines, and the bad 
feature is that situation is showing no 
improvement, but on other hand is 
even worse in some directions. 

"As for metals," said one man this 
week, "I believe that money won't buy 
some lines this fall." If situation is 
accurately reflected in this statement, it 
would seem that, aside from high prices 
that seem probable in some lines, there 
is also the possibility of some articles 
being unobtainable. Sheets, bars and 
kindred lines appear to be the commodi- 
ties in which this is most probable. 

Attention was drawn by one dealer to 
fact that situation in regard to iron and 
steel is yearly becoming more acute. On 
all sides we see instances of iron and 
steel displacing other commodities in 
all kinds of building operations and 
while there has been an enormous in- 
crease in the use of these metals, pro- 
4R 



duction has not been showing a propor- 
tional increase. Such a state of affairs 
can only have one result and it is now 
becoming evident. 

Lead. — It is the scarcity of this metal 
that is causing trouble at present time. 
Local supplies are far from adequate to 
supply the demand and to make matters 
worse shipments continue to come along 
very slowly. For instance one local 
man says he has had a shipment at the 
dock in London since June 26. Freight 
rates on lead are low as compared with 
foods and other commodities, and steam- 
ship lines naturally move the most pro- 
fitable lines first. 

Copper. — While there has been weak- 
ness in foreign markets, on this side of 
water a fairly strong front has been 
maintained. American producers say 
that as far as they are concerned, there 
can't be any concessions as they can't 
now supply the demand. While this 
metal is high compared with past year's 
level, still it is cheap when contrasted 
with 25-cent mark of a few years ago. 

Tin. — Tin also has recovered a fair 
share of the ground lost recently. There 
appears to be a normal and even de- 
mand. 

Plates and Sheets. — From present in- 
dications dealers would not go far 
wrong by securing their supplies of 
sheets now. Stocks are pretty well de- 
pleted and it seems as if there were a 
scarcity of developing in nearly all 
grades of sheets. Shipping troubles in 
England will not help to improve mat- 
ters either. 

Spelter. — There is little new to report 
regarding spelter. There is an appre- 
ciable demand but prices are unchanged. 

Pig Iron. — Market continues firm. The 
big demand continually increasing is an 
important factor. Business (is active 
and stocks not large. 

WINNIPEG. 

Winipeg, July 29. — Interviewed this 
morning as to the situation in metals, 
John McKechnie, president of the Vul- 
can Ironworks, said that the city gener- 
ally was suffering from the difficulty of 
obtaining supplies. The supply of plate 
especially, of all kinds, was altogether 
inadequate to meet the rapidly increas- 
ing demand. He knew that sheet metal 
workers were greatly handicapped and 
that supplies of heavy metal, such as is 
used in his business were hard to get. 
"I hate to have to turn down orders," 
said Mr. McKechnie, "but it has to be 
done the way things are." 

Copper and lead lines are very firm, 
but there are no further advances re- 
ported. 



Weekly Market Report — Hardware 



ACTIVE MARKET. 

The hardware market is un- 
doubtedly enjoying an unusual 
degree of activity at the present 
time. All jobbers report that 
business has been exceptionally 
good and that there is every pros- 
pect of it remaining so. 

A change in the basis of quot- 
ing steel wire nails is noted. 



MONTREAL. 

Montreal, August 1. — The one price 
change which has lent great interest to 
the market has been in rope, a rise of 
1}4 cents being announced. That this 
change should come is not remarkable, 
seeing that raw material is high, the de- 
mand great, and the supplies low. It is 
interesting also to note that rope has not 
yet reached a price level as high as the 
average prices of recent years. That 
there will be other advances before many 
weeks pass is more than likely. Indeed 
this is a time when the buyers who expect 
a good demand for rope would do well 
to lay in their stock. They could have 
saved themselves a good deal by buying 
a few we'eks ago. But there may still be 
time to get the benefit of a subsequent 
rise. 

Business is keeping up well, although 
there are some lines which have become 
rather quiet. Still there is some call for 
sporting goods, but the heavy ordering in 
this line is over for a time. It is for fall 
goods that the large demand is being felt. 

Seasonable Goods : — Still the preserv- 
ing goods are being ordered largely. 
Small wonder, for the retailers are begin- 
ning to sell this class of goods to many 
stay-at-homes who are preserving the 
early fruits. The demand for this class 
of goods is for immediate delivery. Oth- 
er orders, however, are for late fall lines, 
and no immediate shipment is needed. 
Weather strip is just starting to move. 
Tt is early, but many had trouble getting 
all the supplies they wanted last year, 
and they intend to lay in a stock early. 

Lanterns are being largely ordered, 
though here too the deliveries are for 
the future. Horse blankets are being ord- 
ered, while there has been a surprising- 
ly large demand for skates. That this 
should be so is remarkable in many ways. 
It is early — very early — for one thing. 
Then skates sold rather badly last winter, 
and it was thought the dealers would 
have such large left over stocks that they 
would not need new stocks. However, 
this was evidently not the case with all 
dealers. 



Probable Advances. 

Builders Hardware : — Large orders for 
this class of goods are now being placed. 
xlrchitects are buying. So are individual 
builders. No further price changes have 
been noted. 

Heavy Hardware : — Soil pipe, of course 
is a good buy at the present time. Those 
who do not order now are hardly likely 
to get all they want later on. Iron pipe 
too, might well be purchased. There is 
a great probability that the price of this 
will advance within a very short time. 

Sporting Goods : — Slimmer supplies 
have been largely bought now. Balls are 
still wanted. Balls always are wanted 
while a game is being played. They are 
so to speak, the cost of upkeep, while 
the glove, bat, racket, or club, is the ini- 
tial cost. 

No heavy demand for sporting goods, 
however, will now be felt until the fall 
games start. Another month and rugby 
goods will be selling. Dealers handling 
this line will have to place their orders 
shortly if they are to have the supplies 
for an early display. 

Rope: — A variety of causes are respon- 
sible for the advance in rope, but this 
subject is treated at greater length else- 
where. The new quotations are : — pure 
Manilla rope. 1214c ; Sisal rope 914c ; 
British Manilla rope 10c; and hall yarn 
single. 8V2C. 

TORONTO. 

Toronto, Aug. 1. — Some encouraging 
and rosy reports are given out by hard- 
ware jobbers regarding trade conditions. 
A lull in business is not unusual at this 
season but this year trade appears to 
have been maintained particularly well. 

As the seasons come and go, so must 
the lines in demand from the hardware 
dealer. Harvesting tools have been in 
prominence but now jobbers are find- 
ing only a sorting trade while thresh- 
ing supplies are moving into the lime- 
light. Interest is also beginning to be 
awakened in those goods which will 
be needed for the fall trade and even 
winter lines are being given some atten- 
tion. 

There are no important price changes 
but general steadiness is evident, being 
particularly marked in screws. 

Farm Tools. — With harvesting now in 
full swing, retail hardwaremen are find- 
ing a good sale for all harvesting neces- 
sities, but the harvest of the jobbers in 
these lines is about at an end, although 
there are some sorting orders to be 
cared for. 

We are now on the verge of the be- 
ginning of threshing anl supplies for 

49 



these operations will shortly be called 
for and already retailers are anticipating 
their wants. 

Seasonable Goods. ■ — While trade in 
screens and screenings is now of a 
"pick-up" character, volume of business 
this year has been appreciable. The 
waging of the fly campaign more strenu- 
ously than ever has been responsible for 
marked activity in fly traps, swatters, 
etc. Retailer is now finding a good call 
for Paris green and associated lines. 

Household Goods. — Preserving neces- 
sities are still holding a prominent posi- 
tion on the stage of demand. Dealers 
should push these lines while the time is 
ripe. 

Builders ' Hardware. — Building is pro- 
gressing rapidly and a heavy demand 
for hardware is the result. Extensive 
building operations also indicate a good 
demand later on for various lines of 
finishing goods. 

Heavy Hardware. — A change has 
been made in the basis in which steel 
wire nails are sold. Up to this time 4y 2 
inch as well as 5, 5V 2 and 6-inch have 
been sold at the base price but list 
adopted by Canadian wire nail manufac- 
turers puts 4V2 inch. 5 cents above 
base price. Advance over base price 
on new scale of 3 to 314 inch is 10 cents, 
on 2V 2 to 2%, 15 cents, on 2 and 2% 
inch, 30 cents ; on iy 2 and 1% inch, 40 
cents; on iy 4 inch, 65 cents, and on 1 
and 1% inch $1. 

Market on screws is regarded as par- 
ticularly firm, recent low figures have 
been caused by price war by United 
States firms that Canadian houses had 
to follow. A reaction is now looked for. 

Sporting Goods. — This is the fag end 
of season for lacrosse and baseball 
goods but dealers are preparing for the 
fall sports. Bicycle and motor boat 
supplies and repairs are in demand. 

WINNIPEG. 

Winnipeg, July 29. — The demand for 
general hardware continues active, and 
the aggregate volume of business 's 
large. The demand for farmers tools, 
machinery and repairs from country 
points is still heavy, and although build- 
ing permits are now well on the road 
to $15,000,000. 

Manilla rope has advanced Vi of 1 
cent, and there is fear of a short sup- 
ply of binding twine to meet require- 
ments. Recent wet weather will ac- 
count for much heavier straw than was 
expected in late sown crops, and the re- 
quirements in the United States being 
unusually heavy. 

The crop outlook is eminently satis- 
factory, and collections are fairly good 
for this time of the vear. 



Weekly Market Reports— Stoves 



ACTIVITY STARTS. 

The active fall season may be 
said to have begun. Shipments 
are being made now, particularly 
to the West, where there is a 
good demand. 

Furnaces are booking briskly. 

An all round record season is 
anticipated. 



MONTREAL. 

Montreal. August 1. — Travellers, what 
of the crops? That is the question which 
the heads of the manufacturing houses 
are asking. All business depends large- 
ly upon the crops, but especially does the 
stove industry thrive or shrivel accord- 
ing as the yield is large or small. 

From what can be learned at this early 
date there seems little reason to doubt 
the future. The season has not been 
perfect. The early rains did some harm, 
but despite this the general verdict is 
that, the yield will be large — larger than 
last year, unless some untoward circum- 
stance arises. 

The situation in the east is consider- 
ably different from that in the west. In 
the east crops are backward. The man- 
ager of one concern, who has just been 
on a tour of inspection, states that 
through Quebec crops generally are 
about two weeks late. The hay has been 
good, but grain is behind. The great 
part of this will not be harvested for 
some time. 

Ahead in the West. 
In the west, on the other hand, the 
crops are said to be ahead — two weeks 
ahead. That means that there is just 
that much less chance of frost. 

On the whole the situation is satisfac- 
tory, and the manufacturers who are now 
on the threshold of their rush season, 
see every indication of a fine year — a 
finer one even than last. 

Furnaces : — This line, from a state of 
comparative inactivity, has leaped into 
the spot light. Contractors want their 
furnaces at once, and dealers, who sell 
these to the small builders, are getting 
in their supply early. "We are receiv- 
ing furnace orders by every mail," stat- 
ed one manufacturer. "These call for 
immediate delivery. We are giving fu- 
ture datings for stoves, but not for fur- 
naces." 

Good Refrigerator Trade. 
Refrigerators: — Activity in this line 
is not quite over, but the business is 
now largely in the hands of the retailer. 
A few sorting orders are being- received, 
but these are getting fewer and fewer. 



The year, however, despite its cool start, 
and the cool weather which has followed 
that one excessively hot spell, has been 
a good one for refrigerators. 

Kitchen Ware: — The demand for this 
class of goods is now exceedingly low. 
There have been no further price 
changes. Neither tin ware nor copper 
goods have taken new advances, and it 
is said that no such advances are to be 
expected within any short time. 
Special Sales Bring New Orders. 

Oil Stoves : — The call for these stoves 
started late, but has been keeping up 
well. Now, as the end of the season is 
approaching, many dealers are holding 
sales. The reduced cost of the stoves 
is attracting so many purchasers that 
supplementary orders have been neces- 
sary. 

Ranges and Heaters : — Orders are be- 
ing given, but many of these call for 
future delivery. There is a good deal 
of shipping taking place now, but the 
great rush will not start for two or three 
weeks. The heaters are evidently not 
wanted quite as soon as the ranges, 
delivery of these being specified usually 
for late August or even early Septem- 
ber. 



TORONTO. 

Toronto, Aug. 1. — Last year was con- 
sidered a record one in the stove trade. 
Now, when we hear manufacturers pre- 
dicting even greater things for this year, 
we can glean an idea of volume of de- 
mand that can be expected. General 
prosperous conditions exist throughout 
Canada and with large increase in popu- 
lation, a big demand for stoves appears 
in order. 

The West is already calling for ship- 
ments to be sent forward. This is as 
manufacturers would like it because it 
will remove to some degree possibility of 
freight congestion when rush season com- 
mences. Ontario dealers, especially in 
near districts, while holding back some- 
what, are nevertheless displaying inter- 
est. 

Coal Ranges : — With the family alman- 
ac indicating that summer is still with 
us, interest in stoves for fall trade is 
developing rapidly. Dealers are already 
booking, and everything points to a big 
fall trade. Fall shipments are already 
beginning to go forward to the West, 
from which direction demand for ranges 
has been heavy. There is also a good 
demand for stove accessories. 

Furnaces: — With the healthy strides 
that building trade has been making, 
dealers are looking forward to a good 
50 



season in furnaces. It looks as if manu- 
facturers would be taxed to full limit. 
At least, certain of them believe it will 
be so. Along with furnaces will come 
a corresponding demand for radiators. 

Gas Stoves : — This has been an excel- 
lent gas stove year. Increasing number 
of apartment houses in the cities has ac- 
counted for no little portion of this. 
Major part of summer business has, how- 
ever, been reaped, but there is still a 
considerable volume of sorting orders. 

Oil Stoves : — Even those people who 
in their city homes use gas stoves must 
fall back upon the oil stove when they 
betake themselves to their summer resi- 
dences. There has been an appreciable 
business since early summer and demand 
even now is of fair volume. 



WINNIPEG. 

Winnipeg, July 29. — There was a very 
satisfactory business done in ranges 
during exhibition week, and severnl 
large orders were placed during that 
time for cooking and heating apparatus 
for delivery later before the chilly fall 
weather begins to intimate to customers 
that winter is near at hand. 

Within the city limits all houses now 
going up are equipped with steam or 
warm air furnaces, and the work of in- 
stallation is now going on and will in- 
crease during the next two months. 

There is an increasing interest in gas 
and electrical cooking apparatus where- 
ever conditions favor their utilization. 



BINDER TWINE SHORTAGE. 

Reports from the West are to the 
effect that there is shortage of binder 
twine developing. The demand has been 
exceptionally heavy this year. 

In the eastern provinces, the season 
has been a brisk one, but the companies 
have been able to supply all demands. 

WHITE LEAD FAMINE. 

Winnipeg, Man. — There is a white lead 
famine in the west. The grinders re- 
port that they have practically none on 
hand and earnest efforts are now being 

made to secure fresh supplies. 

CLEANED OUT REFRIGERATORS. 

Ottawa, Ont. — The Central Hardware 
Company, Ottawa, held a special sale of 
refrigerators last Saturday, a 20 per 
cent, discount being given. As a result 
of the sale the remaining stock was al- 
most cleaned out. and many other lines, 
such as preserving goods, moved well. 



Methods of Retailing Paints and Varnishes 



Paint Posters Are Good Salesmen 

Dealers Should Make Use of the "Helps" of This Kind Sup- 
plied by the Manufacturers — A Poster Catches the Eye in the 
Store and Directs Attention to the Stock — Why This is Neces- 
sary. 



Since the electric sign was first ex- 
ploited as a means of advertising, the 
main streets of the big cities have been 
converted into pretty fair imitations of 
the "great white way." All prominent 
firms more or less have recognized the 
value of the electric sign as an advertis- 
ing medium. They spend thousands of 
dollars each year in the operation of a 
lighted sign that they know will catch 
the eye of the evening crowds. That 
is the reason for the popularity of the 
electric sign. It is sure to catch the 
eye. When the darkness overhead is 
suddenly broken by a flashing represen- 
tation of a waterfall, depicted by lights 
of many colors, followed by a glowing 
'literally speaking) tribute to Black- 
stone drinking water, (or some such com- 
modity), the words outlined in incandes- 
cent lights, the eye is irresistibly attrac- 
ted. 

One of the primary objects of adver- 
tising is to catch the public eye. 
"Copy" is prepared with that object 
in view, posters are made as picturesque 
or sensational as possible with the same 
purpose and the merchant arranges his 
windows and goods in the way that he 
believes will be most likely to arrest the 
eye of the prospective customer. 

Which brings us to the main theme of 
our discourse. It pays the dealer to so 
arrange his paint department that it will 



catch the eye. Nay, more, it is impera- 
tive that he should do so. If he is 
anxious to boost his sales, he must see 
to it that the stock is plainly in view — 
so plainly that none will miss it. 

So much has been said on the score of 
paint that it is hardly necessary to point 
out why it is that paint must be featur- 
ed. Every dealer recognizes that neces- 
city now. With few exceptions, hard- 
waremen are displaying an intelligent 
interest in their paint departments and 
are reaping bigger and better profits than 
ever before. 

There is a growing demand for paint, 
brought about largely by an awakening 
appreciation on the part of the public 
of the value of paint and fostered by 
the wide-spread and forceful advertising 
of the manufacturers. The dealer, there- 
fore, finds the normal demand both 
steady and large. There are still, how- 
ever, vast new fields to conquer. The 
demand has not yet by any means ap- 
proached the maximum. There are hun- 
dreds of property owners in every local- 
ity allowing their houses to prematurely 
depreciate through lack of paint. Sta- 
tisticians inform us that only a small 
percentage of paintable surfaces have 
felt the touch of the painters' brush. 
Ignorance and neglect are the two 
causes which conspire to thus limit the 
output of paint. 



The property owner who neglects to 
use paint does so through a common 
form of carelessness. He has not troub- 
led himself to get the facts. He does 
nod know that by neglecting to protect 
his property, by the application of paint, 
lie is losing money hand over fist. If 
that idea ever got under his thick crust 
of carelessness, he would make a bee 
line for the hardware store. It is most 
distinctly the duty of the dealer, there- 
fore, to drive that idea home. 

There are numerous ways of doing it. 
One of the most effective is to have 
something to do with paint catch that 
man 's eye every time he enters the store. 
It will set him thinking. Follow it up 
with a talk or two and give him some 
literature and before long he will be a 
firm paint believer. 

Now, to direct the eye of every cus- 
tomer to some one part of the store is 
not, after all, the hardest thing in the 
world. The manufacturers have solved 
that problem. It is not always sufficient 
to keep the stock in a prominent place 
and attractively arranged. A store on 
Broadway may be prominently situated 
and modernly fitted up, but it needs 
something else to catch the eye ; and the 
electric sign solves the difficulty. The 
paint department may be thoroughly up- 
to-date, but it needs something else; 
and that is where the manufacturers ' 
lithograph comes in. A bright colored and 
attractively printed hanger will attract 
attention inevitably. In the opinion of 
the writer, a paint department is not 
complete unless it has one or more of 
these selling helps prominently displayed. 



A GOOD SALESMAN. 

The accompanying illustration shows the good 
use made of a manufacturer' s "help" in the Bond 
Hardware Co., Guelph. Placed near the front of 
the store the poster catches the eye of every person 
who enters. It becomes, therefore, a good salesman. 

The electric sign was devised when big business 
firms discovered that they must adopt unvsual meas- 
ures to "catch the public eye." It compels attention. 
And so, in the store, the merchant must devise un- 
usual means to direct the eye of the customer to the 
particular line of goods that they will be interested 
in. The illustrated poster or hanger is the best means 
that he has at his disposal to accomplish that purpose. 



51 




HARDWARE AND METAL 



Everybody Sees It. 

The accompanying illustration shows 
the good use of a lithograph made in 
the store of the Bond Hardware Co., 
Guelph. The rack, with the poster 
above, is placed near the front of the 
store and everyone who enters sees it. 
There is no getting away from that fact. 

There are a large number of dealers 



who make a little or no use of the 
' • helps ' ' supplied by the manufacturers. 
Posters and hangers are not put up or 
are allowed to flap disconsolately from 
a rear shelf or post. This is a mistaken 
policy, for the hanger has a distinct bus- 
iness value. It is a salesman of consid- 
erable merit, a salesman who is not on 
the pay roll. Why not give it a chance ? 



Scarcity of Lead Affects Paints 

There Does Not Seem to Be Any Possibility of Increased Sup- 
plies of Pig Lead — This Will Not Seriously Threaten the Paint 
Industry But it Means That the Price Will Remain High. 



So serious has become the shortage of 
lead that the paint men are worrying a 
little as to the future. They have been 
reviewing the situation, trying to see 
just what is the cause of the present 
high prices and low stocks. From what 
they find they have attempted to draw 
conclusions. These conclusions, as far 
as can be learned, are that the scarcity 
will not threaten any paint industry, 
but that it will continue to a certain ex- 
tent and will help keep the price of mix- 
ed paint high. 

The history of lead, as it has been re- 
viewed by the paint men, is one of 
many changes. The present price, how- 
ever, is not by any means the highest 
that has been attained. The present 
£18 15s. is low as compared with £24, 
the average figure for 1856. 

Control Made Possible. 

In 1872, also, lead rose to £22, but in 
1885 the bottom fell out of the market. 
Pig was sold for £10; But the low figure 
brought unexpected results — not all at 
once, for the price in '93 fell still lower 
— but still this decline made possible 
the control of the market, for which cer- 
tain interests had long been struggling. 

Lead had been plentiful. In England 
alone there were reserves of 60,000 
tons, and 30,000 tons were known to be 
held in the States. Small wonder that 
prices were low. But this low-priced 
lead of the late '80 's and early '90's— 
low-priced because of the large supplies 
—caused those very supplies to dimin- 
ish. Lead was so low that it could not be 
mined profitably in Spain. Trouble in 
Mexico prevented any mining there. So 
a large part of the supply was cut off, 
and a call began to be made on reserves. 

These dwindled, and finally the re- 
serves in England fell to 600 tons. That 
was nothing compared to the reserves 
which had existed. It gave the manipu- 
lators their chance to get control of the 
lead market, and they were not slow to 
grasp the opportunity. 

No Likely Decline. 

The higher prices which have resulted, 
have of course, made it profitable again 
to mine in Spain, and in Mexico too, 



operations have been resumed. But still 
there is little likelihood that a large re- 
serve will pile up again — at least not for 
some time. The syndicate is powerful 
for the time, and will see that the mar- 
ket is not flooded. 

So it seems that prices will not fall 
very far, if indeed they fall at all. Of 
course the present starved condition is 
partially the result of the English dock- 
ers' strike, which has prevented ship- 
ments reaching here from England; but 
even without this trouble the prices 
would have been too high. 
— ®— 
SALESMEN'S CONVENTION. 

The Salesmen's Convention of Robert 
Ingham Clark & Co., varnish makers, of 
London, Paris and Hamburg, the Asso- 
ciates of Pratt & Lambert Inc., varnish 
makers, was held at the firm's head- 
quarters, London, England, July 30 to 
August 1, inclusive. 

Bringing together the representatives 
of the four main factories and offices of 
Robert Ingham Clark & Co., at London, 
Paris and Hamburg, as well as those 
of their branch houses in the Australian 
Colonies, New Zealand, Japan, China, 
South Africa and India, this Convention 
was indeed cosmopolitan in its scope. 

The Convention was opened by the 
roll call, followed by an address of wel- 
come by the chairman, F. W. F. Clark 
managing director, after which W. H. 
Andrews, president of Pratt & Lambert- 
Inc, delivered a short address. 

Those who talk of the conservatism 
of John Bull and the -continent, Avould 
find it interesting to look over the pro- 
gram of this convention. 

The following topic taken from the 
program were typical of the many which 
were discussed during the convention: — 
Closer co-operation of representatives, 
with the office and the works; System of 
dealing with inquiries and sample 
orders; Advice of building contracts, and 
how they should be followed up; Adver- 
tising; Limitation of Credits; Com- 
plaints. 

Besides the discussion of important 
questions, the program included a trip 
52 



through Robert Ingham Clark & Co's. 
London Plant, where practical demon- 
strations of different goods were given 
by the works manager, and examples of 
finished work inspected. 

During the convention, prizes were 
awarded the winners in the three sale 
men's competitions — the general results 
competition, the specialties competition, 
and the estimate competition. 

In the general results competition, the 
results are based on the all round effi- 
ciency and gain in efficiency of the man 
— on the percentage of the sales, which 
it is estimated that he should make, that 
he attains — on his increase in sales over 
the previous year — on the amount of his 
total sales — on the percentage of his bad 
debts — on the number of new accounts 
which he opens, etc. There are three 
prizes in this competition. 

The results in the specialties competi- 
tion are based on the highest total sales 
in gallons of certain specialties, which 
it is particularly desirable to push. 

The estimates sales competition is 
really not a competition at all. It is 
called a competition because it is an in- 
centive — the idea is that every man who 
attains the amount in sales, that it is 
estimated he should make, is given a sum 
of $50. 

The convention was not devoid of its 
social features — every day of the con- 
vention saw "play time" as well as its 
work. To top it all off, the convention 
ended with a river trip down the pic- 
turesque Thames on the steamer "Royal 
Thames," and a banquet long to be re- 
membered, at the celebrated Tagg's 
Thames Hotel. 



IMPROVEMENT NOTED. 

Cleveland, O., July 30.— The Iron 
Trade Review to-day will say: — The iron 
and steel market, in nearly all finished 
lines, is in the hands of the sellers, the 
question of deliveries being the para- 
mount issue rather than price. Fin- 
ished lines are steadily advancing and 
premiums are being paid for prompt de- 
liveries. Semi-finished steel is scarce 
and higher. The plate market is delug- 
ed with new tonnage and new inquiries, 
while specifications are heavier than in 
June, the record month. Light rails 
have been advanced and sheets and tin 
plate are higher. Steel bars are at a 
premium. Structural material .makers 
are four and five months behind on de- 
liveries. 

There is a marked improvement in the 
tone of the pig iron market. Inquiries 
have been more numerous with larger 
sales. The extreme scarcity of basic and 
Bessemer pig iron is becoming more ap- 
parent. A small sale of Bessemer was 
made this week at $14.50, vallev, for 
prompt shipment. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Step in with the 

Maple Leaf 

Fall Painting 
Campaign ? 



We are advertising to the consumer this 
fall — plans all laid now — to do Fall 
Painting. Why? Woodwork is drier — 
less daily rain — cool fall weather bet- 
ter than summer heat for new paint. 
You help our campaign along, because 
the successful results with M L Paint 
will help you with the local decorator 
and consumer. 

Have you a full stock of M L Paint, 
M L Elastilite, M L Floglaze, and M L 
Flat Wall Color? 

IT HELPS YOU ! 

Our line carries with it our help in 
selling as well as the high quality in 
all our products that helps you. Every 
cent's worth is sold by retailers. We 
turn over hundreds of dollars in busi- 
ness to our trade, opened up by us 
from correspondence started through 
our advertising. 

If you do not carry our Maple Leaf 
Line. 

WRITE US NOW 





The Paint Question hinges 
on quality. Paint Service must 
be given by paint sold by the re- 
tailer. Poor paint hurts his sales. 
We know one right answer — handle the 
Maple Leaf Line. This M L Line has the 
quality in it that carries trade growth for 
the retailer. Backed by our Guarantee 



V 



Paint 

is the best and purest 
oil paint, ready mixed 
with high-grade pig- 
ments perfectly ground. 
Good covering power — 
high protective and last- 
ing power — handy size 
tins tor local trade ot 
every class. 



M. L. Floglaze 

is hard, weather-proof 
and wear-proof. A ready- 
to-use finish for floors, 
if a i n s c otings, imple- 
ments, furniture, bug- 
gies, etc., indoors and 
outdoors. No limit to 
its uses. Easy to ap- 
ply. Send for cards. 



M.L. Flat Wall Colors 

An excellent finish for 
plaster interiors. Easily 
applied. Many shades. 
Shows no brush marks. 
Flat finish. Can be 
washed. Helps the re- 
tailer sell material for 
interior decoration. 



fc 



DECORATIVE AID TO HELP YOU GET BUSINESS 

This department gives dealers free help in color schemes, with 
stencils for sale, etc. It also turns over local business to dealers, 
helping their sales. Questions answered about paint problems. 
All help free to M. L. Retailers. Color Cards, Samples, etc., 



V 



free to Retailers. Write now. Help to push Fall Painting 

IMPERIAL VARNISH & COLOR CO., Limited 
TORONTO (6-24 Morse St.) 



4 




J 



Y'YYt^YF^YtYPt^YYYPPYYPff^^Y' 



Y 
Y 



Y 
Y 
Y 
Y 

Y 
Y 

Y 



HOT WEATHER SERMONS 

Short sermons are the most popular kind in August weather. 
Our sermonette for to-day is 

Lowe Brothers' " High Standard" Liquid 
Paint spreads easier — uniformly covers 
more surface — wears better and retains 
that look of newness longer than any 
other paint on the market. 

We have been making this assertion for nearly fifty years. Only 
the truth will bear this repetition. 



Y 
Y 



Y 
Y 



Lyon-Monkhouse 
Limited 

Salter and Flora 
Sts., Winnipeg. 



Y 

Y 

Y 
Y 

Y 
Y 

Y 




TORONTO 

Dayton New York 

Kansas City 
Boston Chicago 



Weekly Market Report — Paints 



PAINT NOTES. 

The chief feature is the scarcity 
of lead, which is affecting the 
situation in regard to paint. 

Linseed oil has dropped in price 
both in Montreal and Toronto, at 
the latter point 4 cents. 

There is a splendid demand 
noted in all sections, and there do 
not seem any signs of the usual 
summer slump. 



MONTREAL. 

Montreal, August 1. — Though there 
have been a few minor changes in prices 
this week, the vital interest in the mar- 
ket relates more to the scarcity of pig 
lead, which is making the work of manu- 
facture difficult. The manner in which 
the demand is keeping up is also worthy 
of especial note. 

Oils are the materials in which fluc- 
tuations of price are noted. Linseed is 
generally quoted at 2c lower than last 
week, although still there is no great 
desire manifested on the part of manu- 
facturers to sell this. Turpentine is off 
a cent. No great reason for this drop 
is apparent. 

Generally the volume of orders is re- 
markably large. Many calling for July 
delivery are still unshipped. The rush 
has been so great that the shippers have 
been unable to keep up. From now on, 
of course, there will be a little quietness, 
but every indication seems to be for a 
heavy Fall business. 

Linseed Oil. — The drop in prices to 
95c and 98c has been brought about large- 
ly because of the better supply of flax- 
seed. There is still a good deal of this 
rolling from the West. More than 50 
cars have passed through Winnipeg this 
week, a remarkable number for this 
season. 

The coming crops give promise of 
being larger than those of last year, and 
from present indications they will be of 
better quality. This means that Canada 
will have flax to export in large quanti- 
ties, and will tend to keep prices mod- 
erate. 

But it must be remembered that a 
good crop in Canada does not mean 
everything as far as Canadian prices of 
oil are concerned. The shortage of flax- 
seed has not been local. It has been a 
world's shortage. For years Canada ha? 
grown more flax than is needed for 
domestic consumption. The amount 
available for export this year will, there- 
fore, only do so much in relieving the 
general shortage. It will only do a 
small part in bringing prices to a lower 
level. 



Future Uncertain. 

That there will be any great drop in 
the price of linseed does not seem likely. 
Indeed, when the Plata and Indian crops 
are unknown, it is far from certain that 
there will be a drop at all. 

Turpentine. — The fall to 66c. is really 
of little importance. It indicates a fluc- 
tuation of the market at Savannah and 
nothing more. This drop can not be 
taken as indicative of future move- 
ments. 

White Lead. — Still the pig is exceed- 
ingly hard to get, even at the high price 
being asked for it. The corridors, there- 
fore, and the paint manufacturers gen- 
erally are having a difficult time. The 
trouble with lead seems to be that a syn- 
dicate has finally got firm hold of the 
market, and as well as holding up the 
price, is holding down the supply. 
Old Mines Producing Again. 

Some of the Spanish mines, which 
have been idle owing to the low prices 
obtained for lead, are starting produc- 
tion again; but they will not add enough 
to the world's supply to bring down 
prices much. The syndicate will see to 
that. 

Prepared Paints. — Only the continued 
large demand need be noted here. There 
have been no price changes, and the 
likelihood of any price change is remote. 

Glass. — Still the situation in Belgium 
is somewhat unsettled, and still local 
handlers are uncertain about future 
prices. These will hardly be dropped, 
and there is a good possibility that an 
advance will be necessary. Stocks are 
none too large, but the handlers are 
hopeful that they will secure their new 
shipments in time to prevent any serious 
shortage. 



TORONTO. 

Toronto, Aug. 1. — Trade does by no 
means follow set lines. For instance, 
this is usually a slack season in paints, 
and in face of this fact paint firms are 
extremely busy, many of them being 
unable to catch up with orders. 

Linseed oil lias supplied the only 
news item as far as price changes are 
concerned, another drop of 4 cents hav- 
ing been registered. English market 
has been weak. White lead continues 
extremely scarce and firm. It is not so 
much a matter of price just now as of 
getting the goods. 

Linseed Oil. — Linseed oil has taken 
another slump, this time a 4-cent drop 
being registered which brings local 
prices down to 96 cents for raw and 99 
cents for boiled. As reported in last 
issue, English market has been weak, 
and easiness has been reflected in local 
values. It can trulv be said bottom has 

54 



dropped out of market, a total decline 
of 12 cents having taken place in less 
than a month. Approach of new season 
weakened holder's ideas in England, and 
pulled down prices there. Opinion is 
still expressed by certain of local trade 
that prices are going lower than condi- 
tions warrant. 

White Lead. — There has been little or 
no relief to scarcity existing in white 
lead on this market, nor can acute situa- 
tion be expected to be cleared up for 
some little time. Demand is heavy, and 
dealers are far behind in orders. Al- 
though at a high price now, market is 
firm, and there are those dealers who 
are inclined to believe that further ad- 
vances may develop without there is 
some change in situation. 

Turpentine. — Turpentine market ?s 
steady at 67 cents. Steady to firm feel- 
ing is reported from Savannah. 

Glass. — A seasonable trade is being 
done in glass. Greater activity is ex- 
pected to develop as season advances. 
Even at present time there is no over 
plentitude of glass, and steadiness seems 
apparent. If trouble should break out 
in Belgium, prices are certain to jump. 
There is unrest in that country, but only 
time will tell the tale. One instance is 
given of a retailer who has put in enough 
glass to last him until next spring. He, 
at least, must expect a steady market. 

Paints. — A brisk demand features the 
paint trade at this, a season which is 
generally looked upon as a rather quiet 
one. Most firms report that they have 
yet to catch up with orders. "Particu- 
larly is the city demand good," said one 
man this week. "There being a lot of 
building, which means a demand for 
paint." 

Gasoline. — Motor gasoline rests at the 
22 cent mark. This is 5^> cents above 
price of last winter. Dealers say it has 
been too low in price all along. Will it 
go still higher? One man to whom this 
question was put said, "I am not look- 
ing for any further advances, at least in 
near future." 

WINNIPEG. 

Winnipeg, July 29. — The present' sea- 
son is no doubt going to sum up as the 
best ever known in the West, for those 
handling paints, oils and kindred lines. 

Advances in white lead have not had 
any effect in reducing demand which is 
as brisk as ever, although the amount 
of work done this summer has been very 
large there is an immense amount in 
sight, and the daily list of permits for 
residences shows no signs of diminution. 

Prospects for a good fall trade were 
never better. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



TWO 
WHITE LEADS 



BRANDRAM'S 

B. B. GENUINE 

WHITE LEAD 

Made by the Brandram's 
process for practically two 
centuries. 

It is the standard White 
Lead of the world. 

By it others are judged. 

It combines all the good 
points of the Old Dutch 
process, with scientific 
improvements by which 
the body and color are 
perfected. 



ANCHOR 

DECORATORS' PURE 
WHITE LEAD 

The base of which is 
made by the Old Dutch 
Process. 

It is the best White Lead 
that can be produced by 
that method. 

Next to the Brandram's 
process of corroding White 
Lead, there is none equal 
to the Old Dutch pro- 
cess. 



BEFORE PLACING YOUR ORDER FOR WHITE LEAD, 
WRITE FOR PRICES AND FULL PARTICULARS TO 

THE ONLY WHITE LEAD CORRODERS AND GRINDERS IN CANADA 




55 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



CURRENT MARKET QUOTATIONS 



These prices are (or such qualities and 12 
quantities as are usually ordered by re- 
tail dealers on the usual terms oi 
credit, the lowest figures being for 
larger quantities and prompt pay. 
Large cash buyers can frequently make 
purchases at better prices. The 
Editor is anxious to be informed at once 
of any apparent errors in this list, as 
the desire is to make it perfectly ac- 
curate. Retailers desiring to get in 
touch with firms selling any articles on 
which quotations are made can do so by 
writing the editor. 

METALS AND METAL PRODUCTS. 

ANTIMONY. 

Cookson's or Hallett's. per lb. .8 50 8 26 

BABBIT METAL 

Canada Metal Company— Imperial, 
genuine, 50c.; Imperial tough, 60c; 
White Brass, 48c ; Metallic, 45c ; Special, 
33c; Harris heavy pressure, 25c; Her- 
cules, 20c; White bronze, 15c; Star 
frictionless, 10c ; Alluminoid, 9c ; Mogul, 
6c; No. 3, 5%c; No. 4, 6c per lb. 

Tallman Brass & Metal Co.— Arctic 
Metal.— XXX Genuine, 50c; Superior, 
45c; A Special, 35c; Hoo Hoo, 25c; 
••A," 20c; "B," 18c; "O," 15c; "D," 
12c; No. 1. 10c; No. 2, 8c; No. 3, 6c 

Magnolii Metal Co.— Magnolia. 25c; 
Defender, 20c; Mystic, 17c; Kosmic, 
15c 

BOILER PLATES AND TUBES 

Montreal. Toronto 
Plates, % to % inch, per 

100 lbs 2 20 2 20 

Heads, per 100 lb 2 45 2 46 

Tank plates, 3-16 inch 2 30 2 40 

Tubes per 100 feet, 1% in. 9 50 9 00 

2 ". 8 25 8 60 
2% ". 10 60 10 00 

3 ". 12 00 12 10 
3% ". 15 00 15 30 

4 ". 19 25 19 45 
BRASS. 

Spring sheets, up to 20 gauge... 26 
Rods, base % to 1 inch, round.. 22 
Tubing, seamless base, per lb.. 25 
Tubing, iron pipe size , 1 inch 

base 25 

Copper tubing, 4 cents extra. 

BRASS GOODS, VALVES, ETC. 
Ground work, 65 p.c. 
Standard Compression work, 66 p.c 
High grade compression work, 60 p.c 
Cushion work, 55 per cent. 
Fuller work, 70 p.c; No. 0, 75 p.c, and 
1 and 2 basin cocks, 70 p.c. 
Flatway stop and stop and waste cocks, 

65 p.c. ; roundway, 60 p.c. 
J.M.T. Globe, Angle and Check Valves, 

55 p.c; Standard, 65 p.c. 
J.M.T. Radiator Valves, 60; Standard, 

65; patent quick-opening valves, 70 and 

10 p.c. 
Jenkins' Valves— Quotations on applica- 
tion to Jenkins' Bros., Montreal. 
COPPER 

Per 100 lb. 

Casting ingot $19 00 

Cut lengths, round bars. % to 2 

in 26 00 

Plain sheets, 14 oz„ 14x48 

inches, 14x60 inches 28 00 

Copper sheet, tinned, 14x60, 

14 oz 29 00 

Copper sheet, planished, 14x60, 

base 36 00 

Brazier", insheets, 6x4 28 00 

COPPER AND BRASS WIRE 
Brass, 60 p.c; copper, 62% p.c 
IRON AND STEEL 
In car lots. Montreal. Toronto 

Canadian foundry, No. 1 19 50 

Canadian foundry. No. 2 19 00 

Middlesboro, No. 3 pig iron 18 00 19 00 
Summerlee, No. 2 pig iron 20 00 22 60 

Carron, special 20 00 

Carron, soft 19 75 

Cleveland, No. 1 18 76 20 60 

Clarence, No. 3 18 00 20 76 

Jarrow 17 75 20 50 

Glengarnock 22 50 

Radnor, charcoal iron 32 00 32 60 

iyresome, No. 3 18 76 

Ferro Nickel pig iron (Soo) 26 00 

Steel billets, Bessemer or 

open hearth, f.o.b. Pitts- 
burg 27 60 

Angles} base 2 60 2 60 

Common bar, per 100 lb. 1 90 2 05 
Forged iron, per 100 lb. 2 05 2 20 
Refined iron, per 100 lb... 2 15 2 30 
Horseshoe iron, per 100 lb... 2 15 2 30 

Mild steel 195 2 16 

Sleigh shoe steel 190 2 15 

Iron finish machinery steel 

(domestic) 195 2 15 

Iron finish steel (foreign).. 2 25 2 26 

Reeled machinery steel 2 85 3 00 

Tire steel 2 00 2 35 

Sheet cast steel 15 15 

Toe calk steel 2 85 2 90 

Mining cast steel 07% 08 

High speed 66 65 

Capital tool steel 50 

Cammell Laird 15 

Black Diamond tool steel.. 08 08 

Corona tool steel 06% 

Silver tool steel 12% 

Cold Rolled Shafting. 

9-16 to 11-16 Inch 06 

% to 1 7-16 inch 05% 

1 7-16 to 3 inch 65 

Montreal, 26 and 2. Toronto, 30. 
BLACK SHEETS 

Montreal. Toronto 
10 gauge 2 30 2 50 



gauge 2 30 2 55 

14 gauge 2 20 2 35 

17 gauge 2 20 2 45 

18 gauge 2 20 2 46 

20 gauge 2 20 2 45 

22 gauge 2 25 2 56 

24 gauge 2 25 2 65 

26 gauge 2 35 2 65 

28 gauge 2 40 2 80 

CANADA PLATES 

Ordinary, 62 sheets 2 90 2 90 

All bright, 62 sheets .... 3 70 4 00 

Galvanized— Apollo D. Crown Ordinary 

18x24x52 4 45 4 45 4 36 

60 4 70 4 70 4 60 

20x28x80 8 90 8 90 8 70 

20x28x80 9 40 9 40 9 20 

GALVANIZED SHEETS (CORRU- 
GATED) 

22 gauge, per square 6 10 

24 gauge, per square 5 00 

26 gauge, per square 3 85 

28 gauge, per square 3 65 

Less 10 p.c 

GALVANIZED SHEETS 
B.W. Queen's Fleur- Gordon Gorbal's 
gauge Head de-Lis Crown Best Best 
16-20.... 3 60 3 35 3 60 3 60 
iB-24.... 3 65 340 365 365 

26 4 05 3 80 4 05 4 05 

28 425 400 425 425 

Colbome Crown— 3.65, 3.70, 3.76, 4.00. 
Less than case lots 10 cents per hd. 
extra. 
"Comet" sheets— 

22 

24 



28. 



3 65 
3 70 

3 76 

4 00 



Apollo brand — Montreal Toronto 

24 gauge, American.... 3 60 345 

26 gauge, American 3 85 3 50 

28 gauge, (26 English) 4 10 3 95 

10% oz., equal to 28 

English 4 35 4 25 

IRON PIPE 

List Black Galv. 

%-inch and 

%-inch $ 5 50 66 p.c 51 p.c. 

%-inch 8 50 71 p.c. 60 p.c 

%-inch 11 50 75 p.c. 65 p.c. 

1-inch 16 50 75 p.c 65 p.c 

1%-inch 22 50 75 p.c. 65 p.c. 

1%-inch 27 00 75 p.c. 65 p.c. 

2-inch 36 00 76%p.c 66%p.c. 

2%-inch 57 50 76%p.c 66%p.c 

3-inch 75 50 76%p.c 66%p.c. 

3%-inch 95 00 75 p.c. 65 p.c. 

4-inch 108 00 75 p.c 65 p.c 

IRON PIPE FITTINGS 
Canadian malleable, 40; cast iron, 65; 
standard bushings, 70; headers, 60; 
flanged unions, 65; malleable bushings, 
65; nipples, 75 and 10; malleable, lipped 
unions. 65. 

SOIL PIPE AND FITTINGS 
Medium and extra heavy pipe up to 6 
inch, 65 p.c, 7 and 8 in. pipe, 50 p.c. 
Light pipe. 60, fittings. 70 p.c. 

RANGE BOILERS 
30-gallon, Standard, $4.75; extra heavy, 
$7.00. 

KITCHEN SINKS 
Cast iron. 16x24, $1; 18x30, $1.15; 18x36, 

$1.95. 
Flat rim enameled sinks, 15x24, |2; 
18x30. $2.35: 18x36. $3.50. 

HEATING APPARATUS 

Sot Water Boilers— 47 and 15 p.c. 
dt Water Radiators— 45 and 15 p.c. 
Steam Radiators — 46 and 15 per cent. 
Warl Radiators — 40 and 15 per cent. 
Specials— 25 p.c 

OLD MATERIAL 
Dealers' buying prices: 

Montreal Toronto 
Heavy ocpper and 

wire, lb 11 11% 

Light copper bottoms.. 09 09% 

Heavy red brass 10 10% 

Heavy yellow brass 08 08% 

Light brass 06 06% 

Tea lead 02% 02% 

Heavy lead 02% 02% 

Scrap zinc 03 04 

No. 1 wrought iron . . 02 10 00 
Machinery cast scrap, 

No. 1 16 00 14 50 

Stove plate 12 50 13 00 

Mallenhle 9 00 9 00 

Miscellaneous steel 5 00 6 00 

Old rubbers 09 08% 

LEAD. 

Montreal 

Domestic (Trail) pig, 110 lbs 5 50 

Imported pig, per 100 lb 5 50 

Bar pig. per 100 lbs 5 75 

Sheets, 2'/ 2 lb. sq. ft., by roll 5 75 

Sheets. 3 to 6 lb., ft 6 00 

Cut sheets He. per lb. extra. 

Cut sheets to size. %c per lb. extra. 

LEAD PIPE. 
Lead Pipe and Waste. 15 per cent. 
Caulking lead, 4%c per pound. 
Traps and bends, 40 per cent. 
SOLDER. 

Per lb. 
Montreal. Toronto 
Bar, half-and-half, guarant'd 27% 27% 

Wiping 24% 25 

SHEET ZINO. 

5-cwt. casks 8 25 8 00 

Part casks 8 50 8 60 

SPELTER. 
Foreign, per 100 lb T 60 T 26 



TIN AND TINPLATES. 
Lamb and Flag and Straits— 

56 & 28-lb. ingots, 100 lb... $52 00 $50 00 
Redipped Charcoal Plates— Tinned 
MLS, Famous (equal Bradley) 

Per box 

I C, 14x20 base $7 00 

I X, 14x20 base 8 25 

I X X, 14x20 base 9 50 

Raven and Murex Grades— 

I C, 14x20 base 6 00 

I X, 14x20 base 6 00 

I X X, 14x20 base 7 00 

I X X X, 14x20 base 8 00 

"Dominion Crown Best"— Double. 
Coated, Tissued. 

I C, 14x20 base 7 00 7 00 

I X, 14x20 base 8 25 8 25 

I X X, 14x20 base 9 50 9 60 

"Allaway's Best"— Standard Quality. 

I C, 14x20 base 4 50 

1. X., 14x20 base 5 50 

I. X. X., 14x20 base 6 50 

Bright Cokes 
Bessemer Steel— 

I C, 14x20 base 4 25 

20x28, double box 8 60 

Charcoal Plates— Terne 
Dean or J. G. Grade— 

I C, 20x28, 112 sheets 7 50 

I X, Terne Tin 9 00 

Charcoal Tin Boiler Plates. 
Cookley Grade— 
XX, 14x56, 50 sheet bxs.) 
XX, 14x60, 50 sheet bxs.) .... TOO 
XX, 14x65, 50 sheet bxs.) 
Tinned Sheets. 
72x30 up to 24 gauge, case 

lots 8 00 7 35 

72x30 up to 26 gauge, case 

lots 7 85 

WIRE. 
Annealed Cut Hay Bailing Wire. 
No. 10, $3.80; No. 11, $3.90; No. 12 and 
13, $4; No. 13%, $4.10; No. 14, $4.25; No. 
15, $4.50; in lengths 6 inches to 11 
inches, discount 30 per cent.; other 
lengths 20c per 100 lbs. extra; if eye or 
loop on end adds 25c per 100 lbs. to the 
above. 

Clothes Line Wire. 
No. 7 wire solid line. No. 17, $4.90; 
No. 18, $3; No. 19. $2.70; 6 wire solid 
line, No. 17, $4.45; No. 18, $3.10; No. 19, 
$2.80. All prices per 1,000 ft. measure; 
6 strand. No. 18, $2.60; No. 19. $2.90. 
F. o. b. Hamilton, Toronto, Montreal, 
London. 

Coiled Spring Wire. 
High Carbon. No. 9, $2.00 in cars. 
Fine Steel Wire. 
Discount 25 per cent. List of extras. 
In 100-lb. lots: No. 17, $5; No. 18, 
$5.50; No. 19. $6; No. 20, $6.65; No. 21, 
$7; No. 22, $7.30; No. 23, $7.65; No. 24. 
$8; No. 25. $9; No. 26, $9.50; No. 27, 
$10; No. 28, $11; No. 29, $12; No. 30. 
$13; No. 31, $14; No. 32, $15; No. 33. 
$16; No. 34, $17. Extras net. Tinned 
wire, Nos. 17-25, $2; Nos. 26-31, $4; 
Nos. 30-34, $6. Coppered, 75c; oiling, 
10c; in 25-lb. bundles, 15c; in 5 and 
10-lb. bundles, 25c. : in 1-lb. hanks. 25c ; 
in %-lb. hanks, 38c. ; in %-lb. hanks, 
50c. ; packed in casks or cases, 15c ; 
bagging or papering, 10c. 

Hay Wire in Coils. 
$2.35 base f.o.b.. Montreal, Toronto, 
Hamilton and London. 

Galvanized Wire. 
From stock, f.o.b. Montreal— 100 lbs. 
Nos. 4 and 5. $2.80; 6, 7. 8, $2.75; 9, 
$2.30; 10, $2.80; 11, $2.85; 12, $2.45; 13, 
$2.55:14, $3.15. In car lots straight or 
mixed. 

Poultry Netting. 
2-in. mesh, 19 w.g.. 60 and 2% p.c off. 
Other sizes. 60 and 5 p.c. oft". 
Poultry netting staples, 55 per cent. 
Smooth Steel Wire. 
No. 0-9 gauge. $2.25 base; No. 10 
gauge. 6c. extra: No. 11 gauge. 12c. ex- 
tra; No. 12 gauge. 20c extra: No. 13 
gauge. 30c extra: No. 14 gauge, 40c ex- 
tra: No. 15 gauge, 55c extra: No. 16 
gauge. 70c extra. Add 60c for copper- 
ing and $2 for tinning. 

Extra net per 100 lb.— Oiled wire lie. 
spring wire $1.25, bright soft drawn 15c. 
charcoal (extra quality) $1.25. packed 
in casks or cases 15c, bagging and 
paperings 10c. 50 and 100-lb. bundles 
lOc, in 25-lb. bundles 15c, in 5 and 10- 
lb. bundles 25c. in 1-lb. hanks. 50c. In 
%-lb. hanks, 75c. in %-lb. hanks. $1. 
Wire Cloth. 
Painted Screen, in 100-ft. rolls. $1.65 
per 100 sq. ft.; in 50-ft. rolls, $1.70 per 
100 sq. ft. 

Wire Fencing. 

Galvanized barb 2 45 

Galvanized, plain twist 2 75 

Car lots and less. 
Dominion special field fencing, 33 1-3 
p.c. small lots; extra 5 p.c 
F.O.B. Montreal. 

Wire Rope. 
Galvanized. 1st grade. 6 strands, 24 
wires. %, $5; 1 inch. $16.80. 

Black. 1st grade. 6 strands. 19 wires. 
«t. $5. 1 inch. $15.10. Per 100 feet f.o.b. 
Toronto. 

Wrought Staples. 

Galvanized 2 80 

Plain 2 60 

PAINTS, OILS AND GLASS. 
Barn Paint. 

Tn rmrrels. 1-gal. tins 80 AM! 

T i barrels. 5-gal. tins 80 0R5 



Beeswax. 
Per lb 40 

Chemicals. 

In casks per lb. 
Sulphate of copper (bluestone) . . 07 

Litharge, ground 05 

flaked 05% 

Green copperas (green vitrol) 01 

Sugar of Lead 09 

Colors in Oil. 

Venetian red, 1-lb. tins pure 09 

Chrome yellow, pure 18 

Golden ochre, pure 11 

French ochre, pure 09 

Chrome green, pure 11 

French permanent green, pure.. 15 

Signwriters' black, pure 17 

Marine black, 25 lb. irons 05 

Enamels. 
Per gallon in quart tins. 
M. L. Floorglaze (Imperial V. & C. 

Co 180 

Cee Pee Co. enamel 4 60 

Sterling Enamels 3 20 

Anchor Floorlustre 1 80 

Glue. Per lb. 

French medal 10 

German common sheet 10 

German prima 15 

White pigsfoot 15 20 

Brantford medal 10 

golden medal 11 

brown sheet 10 

solder sheet 13 

gelatine 22 

white gelatine 20 

white glue 12 

100 flake 10 11 

Perfection amber ground, No. 1230 13 
Ground glues at same prices. 
Brantford all-round glue, %-lb. pack- 
ages, 10c. %-lb., 15c; 1-lb., 25c Dis- 
count. 

XXL 13 

XL 11% 

CL 12 

C 11 

Paris Green. 

Montreal Toronto 

Drums, 50 and 100 lbs 18% 18% 

Packets, 1-lb., 100 in case.. 20% 20% 
%-lb. " . . 22% 22% 

Tins, 1-lb., 100 in case 21% 21% 

Paris White. 

In bbls 6 90 

Pigments. 

Orange Mineral, casks 09 

" 100-lb. kegs 09% 

Prepared Paints. 

Per gallon 
in qt. tint 
Sherwin-Williams paints, base... 2 00 
Canada Paint Co. 'a pure .. 1 75 2 00 
Globe house paint (Windsor).. 1 6C 
"New Era" house paint (Wind- 
sor 185 

Benj. Moore Co.'s "Egyptian" 

Brand 150 

Moore's pure linseed oil, H.C.. 1 65 
Brandram-Henderson's "English" 2 00 

Ramsay's paints, pure 170 

Ramsay's paints. Thistle 1 40 

Martin-Senour, 100 p.c. pure .... 2 00 

Senour's floor paints 1 69 

Sterling Pure 1 60 

Maple Leaf Paint (Imp. V. & 

C. Co.) 

Jamieson's Crown and Anchor 

brand 160 

Plaster of Paris. 

Per barrel OSS 

Pine Tar. 

Half-pint tins, per dozen 60 

Putty. 

Standard 

Bulk in casks 2 20 

" 100-lb. drums 2 65 

Bladders, in bbli. 2 75 

Red Dry Lead. 
Genuine. 560 lb. casks, per cwt 4 75 6 75 
Genuine, 100 lb. kegs " 5 25 6 50 

No. 1 casks, per 100 lbs 4 25 4 25 

No. 1 kegs, per 100 lbs 4 75 4 75 

Shingle Stains. 

In 5-gallon buckets 75 

Turpentine and Oil. 

Montreal Toronto 
Can. Prime white petroleum. 

gal 014 013 

U.S. Water white " 15% 14V 

U.S. Tratfs astral " 19 16% 
Castor oil, per lb., in bbls. 08 09 

Motor Gasoline single bbls 22 

Benzine, per gal. single bbls 20% 

Pure Turpentine, single bbls 66 67 

Wood Turpentine 60 

Turpentine, second run 60 

Linseed Oil " Raw.... 95 96 

boiled. 98 99 
Rosin. "Q" grade, bbl, lots, 

100 lbs 3 26 

Varnishes. 

Per gal. cans. 

Carriage, No. 1 1 50 

Pale durable body 3 60 

" hard nibbing 3 00 

Finest elastic gearing 3 00 

Elastic Oak 160 

Furniture, polishing 2 00 

Furniture, extra 1 20 

No. 1 95 

Union 90 

Light oil finish 1 SB 

Gold size Japan 2 00 

Turps, brown Japan 1 60 

No. 1 brown Japan 1 10 

Baking black Japan 1 35 

No. 1 black Japan 95 

Benzine black Japan 75 



56 



IT A RDWARE AND M E T A L 







The maximum of profit in your Paint Department can only be obtained by handling a 
clean-cut, stock of quality paints, backed by the manufacturer's forceful co-operation in 
direct support of the dealer. 

Minerva Paints and Paint Specialties 

The Famous British Brand 

have proven a fast-moving, satisfactory and profitable line to handle wherever featured. 
There is no skimping in the measure put in every "Minerva" Can. Full Imperial Measure 
every time — not wine or short measure. 
Investigate our proposition. It will pay you well. 

Ask any Minerva Agent. 




377-387 Carlaw Ave., TORONTO 

Established in England in 1834. 




WINNIPEG— Pinchin, Johnson & Co. (Canada) Ltd. 
128 Princess Street. 

REGINA— Peart Bros. Hardware Co., Ltd., Distri- 
butors for Southern Saskatchewan. 

SASKATOON— The Saskatoon Hardware Co., Ltd., 
Distributors for Northern Saskatchewan. 



CALGARY — The Western Supply & Equipment Co., 
Ltd., Distributors for Southern Alberta. 

EDMONTON — The Western Supply & Equipment 
Co., Ltd., Distributors for Northern Alberta. 

VANCOUVER— Wm. N. O'Neil Co., Limited, Dis- 
tributors for British Columbia. 

(N-13) 




HOW ABOUT 
YOUR PAINT OIL DEPARTMENT ? 

If you could find a way to increase the profits in your paint oil de- 
partment you would at least investigate it, wouldn't you ? Then why 
not take the time NOW to increase your paint oil profit by in- 
vestigating the 

BOWSER PAINT OIL SYSTEM 

We have installed systems for many of your fellow merchants — 
it pays them — it will pay you. 

You can get one outfit or a dozen, just as your requirements de- 
mand. You don't have to invest much money but you get enormous 
returns. 

The Bowser not only prevents all waste and over-measure, but it 
gives your store tone and attractiveness. It draws trade because you 
can give better service and cleaner oil. The pumps measure the oil 
directly into the customer's can — no measures nor funnels. It com- 
putes the charge and counts the gallons. 

Send a card to-day for free book No. 15. 

S. F. BOWSER <& COMPANY, INC., TORONTO 

66-68 FRASER AVENUE 

For Twenty-seven Years Manufacturers of Self-measuring Pumps, Gasoline and Oil Storage Systems, 

Dry Cleaning Systems, etc. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Crystal Damar 2 BO 

No. 1 '• 2 25 

Pure asphaltum 1 40 

Oilcloth 150 

Lightning dryer 85 

Elastilite varnish 2 25 

Copaline varnish 2 25 

Granitine floor finish 2 25 

Jamieson's floor enamel 1 75 

Sherwin-Williams kopal varnish. 2 60 
Canada Paint Co.'s sun varnish. 2 25 

"Kyanize" Interior Finish 2 40 

"Flint-Lac," coach 1 B0 

B.H. Ltd. "Gold Medal," in 

case* 2 25 

Dependon Lt H. Oil Finish 1 55 

Everlastic Floor 2 65 

Flattine floor finish 3 00 

Elastics exterior finish 4 25 

Stovepipe varnish, 14 pints, per 

gross ( 00 

Pure white shellac varnish, in 

barrels 175 

Pure orange shellac varnish, in 

barrels 1 60 

No. 1 orange shellac varnish, in 

barrels 1 JO 

Window Glass. 
Size United Double 

Inches. Star Diamond 

Under 26 1 4 25 $ 6 26 

26 to 40 4 65 6 75 

41 to 60 6 10 7 60 

61 to 60 6 35 8 60 

61 to 70 5 75 975 

H to 80 6 28 1100 

81 to 85 7 00 12 60 

86 to 90 15 00 

81 to 95 17 60 

S6 to 100 20 60 

Toronto, 25 p.c 

Montreal prices, no discount. 
Size United Inches Star 

Under 26 $3 05 

26 to 40 3 25 

« to 60 j 65 

61 to 60 j m 

«1 to 70 ] lU 

White Lead Ground in Oil. 

Montreal Toronto 

... , Per 1( X> lb. 

Anchor, pure 7 65 7 80 

Brandram's B.B. Genuine.. 8 65 8 80 
C.P.C. decorators, pure ... 7 65 7 65 
Crown and Anchor, pure. . 7 65 7 80 

Elephant Genuine 7 90 8 05 

Essex Genuine (Windsor) 7 40 

Island City Decorators' 

P ur e 765 780 

Lily Pure 7 65 7 80 

Moore's Pure White Lead 7 80 

Monarch (Windsor) 7 90 

Munro's Select Flake White 7 90 8 05 

Purity, CO. Co.'s Ltd 7 50 

Ramsay's Pure Lead 7 65 7 80 

Ramsay's Exterior 7 40 7 55 

Sterling Pure 7 80 

Tiger Pure 7 65 7 80 

Western Schedule. 

Terms— 2 p.c 30 days or net 3 months 
from date of shipment. Packages 25 
lbs. and over. 600-lb. kegs, 15c per 100 
lbs. lower. Delivery— F.O.B. Toronto 
or Hamilton; London, 6c per 100 lb9. 
extra. Contracts as required until 15th 
May, 1911. 

White Zinc (Dry) 

Extra Red Seal, V.M 0714 

White Zinc In Oil. 

Pure, in 25-lb. irons 10 

No. 1 " " 07 

No. 2 " 05% 

Whiting. 

Plain, in bbls 70 

Gilders bolted in barrels '. l 00 

HARDWARE. 
Adzes. 

Carpenters', per doz. 12 50 14 00 

Plain ship " is oo 22 00 

„. , ... Axles and Hatchets. 

Single bit, per doz. 6 00 9 00 

Double bit •• 10 00 12 00 

Bench Axes 6 76 10 00 

Broad Axes 22 75 26 00 

Hunters' Axes 5 00 6 00 

r ?J? ^^ 6re SM 

of ?* . hateh et» 4 70 10 00 

Shingle hatchets 1 46 6 75 

Claw hatchets 1 70 6 00 

Barrell hatchets 6 50 6 85 

Anvils. 

Buckworth, per lb 1014 

Ammunition. 
Dominion" Rim Fire Cartridges and 
C.B. caps 50 10 & 2* p.c; BJB. caps, 
60 10 and 24 p c ; Centre Fire Pistol 
Cartridges, 25 and 214 p.c. ; Centre Fire 
Sporting and Military Cartridges, 10 
and 10 p.c; Primers, 10 and 2% p.c: 
Brass Shot Shells. 45 and 12% p.c- 
Shot Cartridges, discount same as ball 
cartridges, f.o.b. any Jobbing point east 
of Manitoba. Net 90 days. 

"Crown" Black Powder, 30 and 10 
£' C-; ., "Sovereign" Bulk Smokeless 
Powder, 30 and 10 p.c; "Regal" Dense 
Smokeless Powder, 30 and 10 n c ■ 
"Imperial" Shells, both Bulk and Dense* 
Smokeless Powder, 30 and 10 p.c Empty 
Shells, 30 and 10 p.c. 90 days net. 

Ordmary drop shot, AAA to dust, 
$7.50 per 100 lbs., net list, 
cash discount, 2 per cent. 30 days' 
net extra as follows, subject to 
cash discount only; Chilled. 40c; buck 
and seal, 80c; no. 28 ball, $1.20 per 100 
lbs. ; bags less than 25 lbs., %c per lb.; 
F.O.B. Montreal, Toronto. Hamilton, 
London, St. John and Halifax, freight 
equal ized. 

Augers and Bits. 
Fords auger bits 30 and 10 



Irwin's auger 47% 

Gilmour's auger 60 

Rockford auger 60 and 10 

Gilmour's car 47% 

Clark's expansive 40 

Jennings' Gen. auger, net list. 
Tobin High Speed Bits, 50 and 10. 
Tobin Never Choke, 60 and 10. 
Bam Door Hangers. 

doz. pairs. 

Steams wood track 4 50 6 09 

Zenith 9 00 

Atlas, steel covered 6 00 t 00 

Perfect 8 00 11 00 

New Milo, flexible 6 00 

Double strap hangers, dozen 

sets $60 

Standard jointed bangers, 

dozen sets 6 46 

Steel King hangers, doz. sets .... 6 40 
Storm King and safety hang- 
ers 6 26 

Storm King rail 4 26 

Crown 4 85 

Crescent 6 60 

Sovereign 7 26 

Chicago Friction, Oscillating and Big 

Twin Hangers, 5 per cent. 
Steel, track, 1 x 3-16 in. (100 ft.). 3 26 
Bam Door Latches. 

Challenge, dozen 2 25 

Defiance, dozen 2 T6 

Gem, dozen 7 60 

Bells. 
Door bells, push and turn, 46 and 10 

p.c. 
Cow bells, 65 p.c. 
Sleigh bells, shaft and hames, pair, 

22c up. 
Sleigh bells, body straps, each, $1.15 

up. 
Farm bells, No. 1, $1.65. 

Belting. 
Extra, 60, 10 and 10 per cent. 
Standard, 60, 10, 10 and 10 per cent. 
No. 1, not wider than 6 in., 60, 10, 

10 and 10. 
Agricultural, not wider than 4 in., 76 

per cent. 
Lace leather, per side, 80e; cut laces, 

85c 

Bird Cages. 
Brass and Japanned, 40 p.c 

Bolts and Nuts. Per cent. 
Carriage Bolts, common, new, 

$1 list. 
Carriage Bolts, 94 and smaller 70 
Carriage Bolts, 7-16 and up 
Carriage Bolts, Norway Iron 

($3 list) 60 

Machine Bolts, 96 and less.. 60.10*10 
Machine Bolts, 7-16 and up.. 60 

Plough Bolts 55,5*10 

Blank Bolts 60 

Bolt Ends 60 

Sleigh Shoe Bolts, 96 and 

less 60 and 10 

Sleigh Shoe Bolts, 7-16 and 

larger 55 and 06 

Coach Screw, new list 7 

Nuts, square, all sizes, 414c per lb. off. 
Nuts, hexagon, all sizes, 4%e per lb. off. 
Stove rods, per lb., 5% to 6c 
Stove Bolts. 80. 

Building Paper, etc 
Tarred Slater's paper, per roll.... 70 

O. K. paper, No. 1, per roll 75 

O. K. paper. No. 2, per roll 70 

Plain Fibre, No. 1, per 400 ft roll 45 

Plain Fibre, No. 2, " 27 

Tarred Fibre, No. 1, per 400 ft 

roll 65 

Tarred Fibre, No. 2 " .. 0S6 

Tarred Fibre Cyclone, 25 lb., per 

roll 55 

Dry Cyclone. 15 lbs 46 

Plain Surprise, per roll 40 

Resin sized Fibre, per roll 40 

Asbestos building paper, per 100 

lbs 4 00 

Heavy straw, plain and tarred, per 

ton 37 50 

Carpet Felt, per 100 lbs 2 60 

Tarred wool roofing felt, per 100 lb 1 80 
Pitch, Boston or Sydney, per 100 

lbs 70 

Pitch, Scotch, per 100 lbs OSS 

Heavy Fibre, 32' & 60', per 100 lb. 3 00 

2 Ply Ready Roofing, per sq 70 

3 Ply Ready Roofing, per sq 95 

2 Ply complete, per roll 1 15 

3 Ply complete, per roll 1 35 

Liquid Roofing Cement, brls., per 

gal 015 

Liquid tins Cement 20 

Crude Coal Tar, per barrel S 60 

Refined Coal Tar, tins, per doz... 1 25 
Refined Coal Tar, per barrel .... 4 60 

Shingle vamish, per barrel 4 60 

Caps, per lb OS 

Nails, per lb 05 

Mop cotton, per lb 016 

Butts. 
Plated, bower barff & Nickel, No. 241, 

45 per cent. 
Wrought brass, 45 p.c. off revised list 
Cast iron loose pin. 60 p.c. 
Wrought steel fast joint and loose pin, 

70 p.c. 
Crescent brands, 70 per cent. 

Cement and Firebrick. 
Canadian Portland, bags, per 

bbl 1 55 1 70 

White Bros. English 2 00 2 05 

"Lafarge" cement, in wood 3 40 

Fire brick, Scotch, per 1,000 23 00 28 00 

English 17 00 21 00 

" American, low... 23 00 25 00 

high.... 27 50 35 00 

Fire clay (Scotch), net ton 6 60 

Chalk and Pencils. 
Carpenters Colored, per gross 65 80 
" lead pencils, p. gr 2 40 6 76 



Chisels. 

Cold chisels, 5 x 6 in., doz 2 20 

Bevel edge, 1 inch, doz. 2 60 

Chain. 
Proof coil, per 100 lb., 14 in., $6.00; 
5-16 in., $4.85; 96 in., $4.25; 7-16 in., 
$4.00; % in., $3.75; 9-16 in., $3.70; % in., 
$3.65; 94 in., $3.60; % in., $3.45; 1 in., 
$3.40. 

Stall fixtures, 35; trace chain, 45; Jack- 
chain, iron, 50; jackchain, brass, 60; cow 
ties, 40; halter chains, 50 and 6; tie outs, 
75; coil chain, 50 and 6; hammock chains, 
galvanized, 36 and 6. 
Churns. 
No. 0, $9; No. 1, $9; No. 2, $10; No. 
3, $11; No. 4, $13; No. 5, $16; f.o.b. To- 
ronto, Hamilton, London and St Marys, 
40 per cent; f.o.b. Ottawa, Kingston 
and Montreal, 37% and 10 pec cent 
Clamps. 

Malleable swivel head, 4 in. 2 60 

adjustable. 4 in. 7 60 

Carpenters, 3 feet 3 60 

Conductor Pipe. 

2 inch, in 10 foot lengths S 30 

j •• " " 4 00 

4 " " " 5 28 

6 " " " 7 28 

b " " " 8 80 

Cotter Pins. 
Cotter pins, 90 p.c Montreal. 

Copper and Nickel Ware. 
Copper boilers, kettles, 40 and 5 p.c. 
Copper tea and coffee pots, 40 & 5 p.c. 
Copper pitts, 30 and 5 p.c 
Foundry goods, hollow ware, 46 p.c 

Door Knobs. 
Canadian knobs, 45 and 10 per cent 
Porcelain, mineral and jet knobs, net 
list. 

Door Sets. 
Canadian, 45 and 10 per cent 
Door pulls, 60 per cent 

Door Hangers (Parlor) 
Single sets, each (Easy brand) .... 1 80 

Double sets, each 3 26 

Unbreakable rail, 100 feet 6 00 

Door Springs. 
Chicago (coil), 25 per cent 
Reliance (coil), 20 per cent 
Draw Knives. 

Carpenters 6 inch, doz 6 26 

Folding handles, 8 inch, doz 1 80 

Drills. 

Bit stock drills, 2-32 in,, doe 67 

Escutcheon Pins. 
Steel, discount 50 per cent 
Brass, 55 per cent. 

Eavetroughs. 

8 inch in 100 foot lengths 2 90 

10 " " " 3 15 

12 " " " 3 68 

15 " " " 6 25 

Add extra 10c per 100 ft. O.Q. Round 
Bead Trough. 

Factory Milk Cans. 
Milk cans and pails, 35 p.c 
Hand delivery and creamery cans, 40 p.c 
Railways cans, 45 p.c 
Cream cans, 40 p.c. 
Creamery trimmings, 75 and 1214 p.c 

Faucets. 
Common, cork-lined, 35 per cent 

Farrier Knives. 
Buckworth, 50 p.c. 

Files and Rasps. Per cent 

Disston's 70 and 18 

Great Western, American .... 70 and 10 

Kearney St. Foot, Arcade 70 and 10 

J. Barton Smith, Eagle 70 and 10 

McClellan, Globe 70 and 10 

Black Diamond 60 and 10 

Delta Files 60 

Nicholson 62 2-3 

Jowett's (English list) 2714 

Spear & Jackson (English list) 35 
Forges. 

Blacksmiths portable. 135 lbs (86 

Galvanized Ware. 
Dufferin pattern pails, 45 per cent 
Flaring pattern, 45 per cent. 
Galvanized washtubs, 45 per cent 

Grindstones. 
Over 40 lbs. and 2 in. thick, per 100 

lbs 110 

Smaller sizes extra. 
Hammers. 

Tack, iron, doz 35 

Ladies claw, handled, doz 60 

Adze eye nail hammer, 10 oz., doz. 1 25 

" hickory handle, 1 lb., doz. 6 26 

" straight claw, 1 lb., doz. 7 00 

Farriers hammers, 10 oz., doz.... 5 60 

Tinners setting, 14 lb., doz 4 60 

Machinists, 14 lb., doz 3 20 

Sledge, Canadian, 5 lbs. and over. 06 
Sledge, Masons, 5 lbs. and over. 08 

Sledge, Napping, up to 2 lbs 09 

Harvest Tools. 
50 and 5 per cent. 
Sidewalk and stable scrapers, net $2.25. 
Wood hay rakes, 40 and 10 per cent. 
Lawn rakes, net. 

Halters (Snap and Ring). 

Jute Rope, 94-inch, per gross 8 00 

" 14-inch, per gross ....10 60 

" " 96-inch, per gross 13 60 

Leather, 1-inch, per doz 4 00 

Leather, 114 -inch, per doz 5 20 

Web 2 45 

Sisal Halters (Snap and Ring). 
96-in„ $9.00; 7-16-ln„ $10.20; 14-in., 
$11.40; 9-16-in., $13.20; 96-in., $15.00. 

Hinges. 
Blind, discount 50 per cent. 
Heavy T and strap, 4-in., 100 lb. 

net 7 26 

Heavy T and strap, 5-in„ 100 lb. 

net 100 

Heavy T and strap, 6-in., 100 lb. 
net 6 76 

58 



Heavy T and strap, 8-in„ 100 lb. 

net 6 60 

Heavy T and strap, 10-in. and 

larger 6 26 

Light T and strap, discount 66 p.c 
Screw hook and hinge- 
under 12 in., per 100 lb. 4 00 

over 12 in., per 100 lb 3 60 

Crate hinges and back flaps, 65 and 6 

p.c. 
Chest hinges and hinge hasps, 65 p.c 

Hinges (Spring) 
Spring, per gross— No. 5, $16.10; No. 10, 

$16.10; No. 20, $9.50; No. 50, $17.68; 

No. 51, $7.76; No. 120, $16.10. 
Screen door sets— No. 2250, $14.95; No. 

2260, $19.55; No. 2275. $21.85; No. 1192. 

$19.55. 
Chicago hold back screen door, iron, 

gro„ $12. 
Chicago spring hinges, 15 p.c 
Triplex spring hinges, 40 p.c 
Chicago surface floor (6,000), 46 p.c 
Garden City fire house hinges, 1214 p.c 
"Chief" floor hinge, 60 p.c. 

■ Hooks. 
Wrought iron hooks and staples— 

14 x 5, per gross IS 

5-16 x 5, per gross Sit 

Bright wire screw eyes, 60 p.c. 
Bright steel gat* hooks and staple*. 
Iron screw hooks, 60 and 20 p.c 
Iron gate hooks and eye*, SO * 20 p.c 
Crescent hat and coat wire, 60 p.c 
Stove pipe eyes, kitchen and square 

hooks, 60 p.c 

Horse Nails. 

M.R.M. cold forged process list 10th 
January, 1912. Price par 

Size Length 25-lb. box. 

Nos. 3 194-inch $4 10 

4 194-inch 3 75 

5 1 15-16 3 60 

6 214 3 19 

7 2 6-16 2 90 

8 214 276 

9 2 11-16 2 69 

10 2% 2 60 

11 3 1-16 2 46 

12 314 2 46 
Horseshoes. 

Iron shoes, light, medium and heavy. 
No. 2 and larger, $3.90; No. 1 and 
smaller, $4.15; snow pattern, No. 2 and 
larger, $4.15; No. 1 and smaller, $4.40; 
"X.L." steel shoes, new light pattern, 

1 to 6, No. 2 and larger, $4.35; No. 1 
and smaller, $4.60; "X.L." steel show, 
feather weight, pattern all sizes. No. I 
to 4, $5.76; special countersunk steel, all 
sizes, 0-4, $6.25; toe weight steel shoes, 
all sizes, No. 1 to 4, $6.75. F.O.B. 
Montreal. 

Toecalks Standard, J. P. & Co.. 
"Blunt" No. 1 and smaller, $1.60; No. 

2 and larger, $1.25; "Sharp" No. 1 and 
smaller, $1.75; No. 2 and larger, $1.50 
per box. Put up in 25-lb. boxes. 

Horse Weights. 
Taylor-Forbes, 414c 

Ice Cream Freezers. 
White Mountain, 5c per lb. 

Knives. 
Hay knives, net list 
Clauss, 50 and 25 per cent 

Kitchen Enameled War*. 
White ware, 75 per cent. 
London and Princess, 50 per cent 
Canada, Diamond, Premier, 61 and II 

per cent. 
Pearl, Imperial, and granite steel. SO 

and 10 per cent 
Premier steel ware, 40 per cent. 
Star decorated steel and white, 26 per 

cent. 
Hollow ware, tinned steel, 46 per eeat. 

off. 
Enamelled street signs, 41 per wait 

Kitchen Sundries. 
Asbestos mats, 50 p.c 

Can openers, per doz (41 Iff 

Mincing knives, per dss. ... (61 ( 91 

Potato mashers, wire, per d*a. 6( ( 7( 

" wood, per do*. ( K ( 8( 

Tegetable slicers, per doz 2 26 

Universal meat chopper, No. 1 .... 1 16 

Enterprise chopper, each 1 M 

Spiders and fry pans, 66 and 

5 per cent. 
Star Al chopper, 5 to 3! ... 1 36 (II 
100 to 101.... 1 36 J 01 

Kitchen hooks, bright ( It 

Toasters, 50 per cent 
Fire shovels, 60. 

Oil stoves and ovens, 61 and II. 
Ladders. 

3 t* 6 feet, 12e per foot; 7 t* I ft.. 13*. 
Extension ladders, 15c per fact s». 

Lanterns. 
Japanned ware, 45 per cent. 
No. 2 or 4 Plain Cold Blast, per 

doz 176 

Lift Tubular and Hinge Plain, 

per doz IM 

Japanning. 50e per dozen extra. 
Prism globes, per dozen, $1.21. 
Lamp wick, 50 per cent. 
Lawn Hose. 
Competition grade lawn hose. 71 and I. 
Lawn Mowers. 

D. Maxwell & Sons.— 8-inch open 
wheel, 3 knives, 12 in., $5.10; do., 4 
knives, $6.25; 9-inch wheel, 3 knive*. 
12 in. sizes, $6.76; do., 4 knives, $7.25; 
1014-inch wheel, 4 knives, 12 in. size*. 
$8.50; ball bearing do., $10; do., 6 knive*. 
$10.50; 56 per cent, f.o.b. factory. 

Locks and Keys. 
Canadian, 45 and 10 per cent 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Cut Down Your WRAPPING PAPER Expense 

Let Us Quote You Prices 

Why keep down your profits by paying more for your Wrapping 
Paper than is absolutely necessary? We manufacture a complete 
line of all lines of high grade papers and offer them at a price that 
will effect a saving to every dealer. 

WRITE US AT ONCE. 

ALEX. McARTHUR & CO., Ltd., 



82 McGILL STREET, 
MONTREAL 



F. J. COX, Winnipeg— Sole Agent for the West 



RED 



S 



BRAND 

WINDOW 

GLASS 










GLASS 

BENDERS 

TO 

THE 

TRADE 



THE TORONTO PLATE GLASS IMPORTING CO., Limited 

PLATE, WINDOW, FIGURED, STAINED, WIRED, BENT, MIRROR 

and ORNAMENTAL GLASS 

DON ROADWAY TORONTO 



Good Profits and Entire Satisfaction are Assured 



the dealer who handles and boosts 



HEINISCH Tailor Shears 



They are made from the highest quality materials and 
by skilled workmen, and have a finish and temper that 
have enabled us to gain a reputation for which our 
competitors are continually striving. 

We also manufacture Scissors, Tinners' Snips, Trim- 
mers — and guarantee them inferior to none. 

Get them from your jobber. 

R. Heinisch's Sons Co., Newark, N. J., U.S.A. 



/ 





"WORLD" 
BABBITT METAL 

FOR GENERAL MACHINE SHOP, MILL OR FOUNDRY USE 



or any place where a good metal is required. 



25c.net perlb 



Freight paid on 100. lb lots to 
■ your nearest railway station. 



We know "World" Brand to be a good Babbitt 
and will give you satisfaction, even if you are pay- 
ing a higher price. 



T. McAVITY 6& SONS, Limited 

ST. JOHN, N. B. and WINNIPEG 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Lumbermen's Supplies. 

Cant hooks, ««zeu, from 12 88 

Axes, dozen, ft»m CM 

Axe handles, dozen, from 1 15 

Cross cut saws, per foot .... 25 43 

Axe wedges, dozen 25 

Ball and heel calks 4 00 1 25 

Mallet*. 
Tinsmiths', 2%x5% in., per doz.. 1 25 
Carpenters', round hickory, 6 in., 

per doz 1 (5 

Lignum Vitae, round, 5 inch, per 

doz 2 48 

Caulking, No. 8, oak, per doz.... 15 Ot 

Mats. 
Wire door mats, standard, 16x24, 

doz 9 08 

Metal Polish. 

Tandem metal polish paste 6 05 

Axoline brass cleaner, 100 in pkge S 50 

Miners Supplies. 
Mattocks, 6 lb., 18 inch, $6 dozem. 
Picks, 6 to 7 lb., $4.65 dozen. 
Pick handles, $1.85 dozen. 
Prospectors' hammers, 16V4c per Ik. 
Drilling hammers, 6 cents per lb. 
Crowbars, $% cents per lb. 

Mops and Ironing Boards. 

Mops, per doz 1 20 1 60 

Folding ironing boards 16 25 18 60 

Nails. Wire 

1—1% inch 3 30 

IV! inch 3 00 

1%— 1% inch 2 75 

2—2% inch 2 65 

2Vi— 2%. inch 2 50 

J— 3% inch 2 45 

J%— 4 inch 2 40 

4% inch 2 35 

5, 5%, 6 inch (base) 2 30 

Cut nails— Montreal, $2.40; Toronto, 

12.60. 

Miscellaneous wire nails, T5 per cent. 

Coopers' nails, 33 1-3 per cent. 

Pressed spikes, % diameter, per 101 

lbs 2 85 

Oakum. 

Plumbers.... per 100 lb 4 5* 

Oilers. 

Kemp's Tornado and MeClary's 
Model galranized oil can, with 
pump, 5 gallon, per dozen II M 

Davidson oilers, 40 per cent, 

Mine and tin, 50 per cent. 

Coppered oilers, 50 per cent. •ff. 

Brass oilers, 50 per cent. 

Malleable, 25 per cent. 

Plated Goods. 

Holloware, 40 per cent, discount. 

Flatware, staples, 40 and 10; fancy, 10 
and 50. 

Hutton's "Cross Arrow" flatware, 42% 

per cent. "Singalee" and "Alask," 

Nevada silver flatware, 42 per cent. 

Pieced Ware. 

Discount, 35 per cent. 

10-qt. flaring sap buckets, 35 p.c 

6, 10 and 14-qt. flaring pails, 35 p.c. 
Copper bottom tea kettles and boilers, 

35 per cent. 
Coal hods, 40 per cent. 
Boiler and tea kettle pitta, 35 p.c. 

Planes. 
Wood bench, Canadian, 40, American, 

25 per cent. 
Wood, fancy, 30 to 35 per cent, 
Stanley planes, $1.55 to $3.60, net list 
prices. 

Pliers and Nippers. 

Button's genuine, 37% to 40 per cent. 

Plough Lines. 

Russian snap per gross 30 00 

Indian snap •« a> 00 

Pumps. 
Berg's wing pump, 76 per cent. 
„ . , Razors. per doz. 

Boker's 7 50 11 00 

Boker's King Cutter 16 00 

£n nc . kel,, „ 7 60 20 00 

Gillette Safety, each 3 7B 

Star Safety Razor, 33 1-3 p.c 
Rope and Twine. 

Sisal rope 09% 

Pure Manila Rope 12% 

"British" Manila 10 

Cotton, 3-16 inch and larger 24 

Russia Deep Sea line, % in. diam. 

and over, 17; under % in., 18. 
Jute, % and upwards, 10c; under %, 

10%c. 

Lath yarn, single 08% 

Lath yarn, double 08% 

Sisel bed cord, 48 feet, per doz.. 65 
Sisel bed cord, 60 feet, per doz. 80 
Sisel bed cord, 72 feet, per doz. 95 
Cotton clothes line, 18 per cent. off. 

Bag, Russian twine, per lb 8 27 

Wrapping, cotton, 3-ply twine... 26 
„ .. . . " 4-ply twine... 30 

Mattress twine, per lb 45 

Staging " •• 135 

Refrigerators. 
Sanderson-Harold, 40 per cent, 
Galranized, 45 per cent. 

Rirets and Burrs. 
Iron Rirets, black and tinned, 60 10 

and 10. 
Iron Burrs, 60 and 10 and 10 p.c. 
Copper Rirets, usual proportion burrs, 

35 and 7% per cent. 
Copper Burrs only, 22% per cent. 
Extras on Coppered Rivets, %-lb. pack- 
ages lc per lb.; %-lb. pkgs., 2c lb. 
Tinned Rirets, net extra, 3c per lb. 
Coppered Rirets, net extra, 2%c per lb. 

Rivet Sets. 
Canadian, 35 to 37% per cent. 
Rules. 

Boxwood, No. 68, 2 foot, doz 1 15 

Ivory, No. 1282, 2 foot, each .... 3 50 

Sad Irons. 
Mrs. Potts, No. 55, polished, per 

set 80 

Mrs. Potts, No. 50, nickel-plated, 

per set 85 



Mrs, Potts, handles, japanned, per 

gross 8 40 

Common, plain 4 25 

" plated 5 50 

Asbestos, per set 1 50 

Sand and Emery Paper. 
Sand and emery paper, 40 per cent. 

Sash Weights. 
Sectional, 1 lb. each, per 100 lb... 2 25 
Sectional, % lb., each, per 100 lbs 2 40 

Solid, 3 to 30 lbs 155 

Sash Cord. 

No. 8, per lb 33 

Saws. 
Atkins Hand and Crosscut, 25 p.c. 
Disston's Hand, 15 per cent, 
Simonds Hand, 15 per cent, 
Shurley & Dietrich, 40 and 35 p.c 
Spear & Jackson, 40 per cent. 

Saw Sets. 
Canadian discount, 40 per cent. 

Screen Doors and Windows Doz. 
Common doors, 2 or 3 panel, wal- 
nut stained, 4-in. style 7 80 

Common doors, 2 or 3 panel, grain- 
ed only, 4-in. style 8 10 

Beaver window screens, 14x18, open 

28% inohes 160 

Perfection window screens, 14x15, 

open 22% inches 1 80 

Model window screens, 14x22, open 

36% inches 2 25 

Scales. 
Gurney Standard, 35; Champion, 60 
per cent. 

Burrow, Stewart & Milne — Imperial 
Standard, 35; Weigh Beams, 35; Cham- 
pion Scales, 45. 

Fairbanks Standard, 30; Dominion, 
50; Richelieu, 50. 

Warren new Standard, 35; Champion, 
45, Weigh Beams, 30. 

Scythe Snaths. 
Canadian, 40 per cent. 

Screws. Per cent. 

Wood F.H., bright and steel.85 10 15 2% 

R.H., bright 80 10 15 2% 

F.H., brass 75 10 15 2% 

R.H., brass 70 10 15 2% 

F.H., bronze 70 10 15 2% 

R.H., bronze 65 10 15 2% 

Drive screws 85 10 15 2% 

Set, case hardened 60 

Square cap 50 and 05 

Hexagon cap 45 

Bench, wood, per doz $5 00 

" iron, per doz 4 25 

Screws (Machine). 

Flat head, iron and brass, 35 per cent. 

Fillister head, iron, 30; brass, 25 p.c 

Screw Drivers. 

Sargent's, per dozen 65 100 

North Bros., No. 30, per doz 16 80 

Scissors and Shears. 
Clauss, nickel scissors and shears, 60; 
Japan, 65; tailors, 40; pruning, 70. 
Seymour's, 50 and 10 per cent. 
Acme Shear Co., nickel-plated and 
Japanned, 40 per cent. 

Shelf Brackets. 
No. 140. 65 and 10 per cent. 

Skates and Hockey Sticks. 
Starr skates, 37% per cent. 
Boker, hockey, 30c upwards; spring 
Empire hockey sticks, $3.00, $3.50. 
Micmac and Rex sticks, $4.00, $6.00. 
Pucks, net, $1.50. 

Shovels and Spades. 
Canadian No. 1 grade, 60 and 2% p.c 
off; No. 2 grade, 55 and 2% p.c off; 
No. 4 grade, 45 and 5 p.c. off. 
Canadian, No. 1 and 2 grade, 60 and 
2% p.c; No. 3 and 4 grade, 50 and 
2% per cent. 

Scoops. 
Grade 1, 2, 3, 50 and 6 per cent. off. 
Grade 4, 50 per cent. off. 
Squares. 
Disston's, 60 and 10 per cent, 
Stanley Try Squares, size 7%, doz. 

net JJ85 

Snaps. 
Harness, 25 per cent. 

Soldering Irons. 
Base, per lb., 28 cents. 

Stamped Ware. 
Plain, 75 and 12% per cent. 
Returned, 75 and 5 per cent. 
Tinners' trimmings. 75 and 5 p.c 

Sap Spouts. 
Bronzed Iron with hooks, per 1,000 7 50 
Eureka tinned steel, hooks, per 

1,000 .„. goo 

Staples. 

Poultry netting, 100 lb 5 70 

Bed, 100 lbs., No. 14 6 75 

Blind, per lb 12 

Coopers' staples, 45 per cent. 
Bright spear point, 75 per cent. 

Stable Fittings. 
Dennis Wire & Iron Co., S3 1-3 p.c 

Stove Boards. 
Lithographed, 60 and 10. 
Stovepipes. 

5 and 6 inch, per 100 lengths 7 62 

7 inch, per 100 lengths 8 18 

Nestable, 40 per cent. 

Stovepipe Elbows. 
b and 6-inch, common, per doz... 1 22 

7-inch, per doz 1 35 

Polished, 15c per dozen extra. 
Thimbles, 70 per cent. 

Stocks and Dies. 

No. 20 Beaver Die Stock 18 75 

Stones— Oil and Scythe. 

Washita per lb. 25 37 

Hindostan " 06 10 

slip " 18 20 

Axe " .... 10 

Deer Creek " .... 10 

Deerlick " 25 

Axe " .... 15 

Lily white " 42 

Arkansas " .... 1 50 



Water-of-Ayr " .... 10 

Scythe per gross 3 50 6 00 

Tacks, Brads, Etc 
Carpet tacks, blued, 80 and 10 p.c; 
tinned, 85; (in kegs), 40; cut tacks, 
blued, in dozens only, 80 and 10; % 
weights, 60; Swedes cut tacks, blued and 
tinned, bulk, 85 and 5, in dozens, 75 
and 10; Swedes, upholsterers', bulk, 90; 
brush, blued and tinned, bulk, 70 and 
10; Swedes, gimp, blued, tinned and 
japanned, 82%; zinc tacks, 35; leather 
carpet tacks, 35; copper tacks, 45; cop- 
per nails, 50; trunk nails, black, 65 
and 10; trunk nails, tinned and blued, 
65 and 10; clout nails, blued and tinned, 
65 and 10; chair nails, 35 and 10; 
patent brads, 40 and 10; fine finishing, 
40 and 10; lining tacks, in papers, net; 
lining tacks, in bulk, 15; lining tacks, 
solid heads, in bulk, 75; saddle nails, in 
papers, 10; saddle nails, in bulk, 15; 
tufting buttons, 22 line in dozens only, 
60; zinc glaziers' points, 5; double point- 
ed tacks, papers, 90 and 10; double 
pointed tacks, bulk, 55; clinch point 
shoe rivets, 45 and 10; cheese box tacks, 
87%; trunk tacks, 80 and 20; strawberry 
box tacks, 80 and 10. 

Tape Lines. 
Universal, ass skin, N». 714, It ft., 

doz. JN 

Luf kins, linen, No. 404, 66 ft., ea. 94 
steel. No. 264, (6 ft,, each 3 50 
Chesterman's linen, No. 1822, (t ft. 

each 1 10 

Chesterman's Metallic, N«. 1821.. 1 K 

Steel, No. 1(40, H ft 

Trowel*. 
Disston's, 10 per cent. 

Thermometers. 
Tin case and dairy, 75 to 75 •ad U p.a. 

Tinners' Snip*. 
Discount 35 per cent. 

Tinners' Trimming*. 
Discount, 45 per cent. 
Plain and retinned, 75 and 19%. 

Traps (Steel Game). 
Newhouse, 30 per eent. 
Hawley & Norton, 46, 19 and f •.«. 
Victor, 69 and 6 per cant. 
Oneida Jump (Star), 59, 19 and 6 p.e. 
Traps (Rat and Mouse) Dos. 

Out O' Sight Mouse Traps 9 18 

Rat Trapa 1 29 

Easy Set Mouse 45 

" Rat 96 

Blizzard Mouse Traps 9 45 

Rat Traps 9 95 

Hold-Fast (formerly Devil) Mouse 

Traps 9 25 

Hold-Fast (formerly Devil) Rat 

Traps 80 

5-Hole Tin Chokers 8 80 

Tises. 

Per pound 9 11 9 12% 

Hinged pipe vise, 25 lbs 3 65 

Saw vise 4 69 i 80 

Blacksmiths', 60; parallel, 45 per cent. 
Washing Machines. 

New Ontario 4125 

Round, re-acting, per dos 81 £5 

Square, re-acting, per dos 77 60 

Dowswell 52 60 

New Century, Style A 101 25 

Ideal Power 180 00 

Daisy 73 25 

Stephenson 74 00 

Puritan Motor 165 00 

Connor, improved 52 60 

Ottawa 55 00 

Connor Ball Bearing 112 60 

Connor Gearless Motor Washer... 180 00 
20 per cent. 

Wringers. 

Royal Canadian, 11 in,, do* 47 76 

Eze, 10 in., per doz 46 75 

Bicycle, 11 inch 60 60 

Trojan, 12 inch 100 00 

Challenge, 3 year, 11 Inch 63 25 

Ottawa, 3 year, 11 Inch 68 25 

Favorite, 5 year, 11 inch 81 75 

20 per cent. 

Wheelbarrows. 

Navvy, steel wheel, dozen 21 28 

Garden, steel wheel, dozen 32 40 

Whiffletrees. 

Tubular steel whiffletrees, 28 in... 70 

34 in... 1 00 

36 In... 1 26 

" ' neckyokes, 36 in.... 1 05 

" doubletrees, 49 in.. 95 

" " lumbermen*, 44 in.. 1 15 

Wood Handles. 

Second growth ash fork, hoe, rake and 

shovel handles, 40 per cent. 
Extra ash fork, hoe, rake and shovel 

handles, 45 per cent, 
Nos. 1 and 2 ash fork, hoe, rake and 

shovel handles, 50 per cent. 
Carriage neckyokes and whiffletrees, aah 

35, hickory, 40 per eent. 
Team neckyokes, oval and round whiffle- 
trees, hickory and ash, 35 per cent. 
All other ash goods, 40 per eent. 
All hickory, maple and oak goods, 35 
per cent. 

Wrenches. 
Agricultural, 67% per cent. 

Wrought Iron Washers. 
Canadian, 50 per cent- 

WINNIPEG HARDWARE 
QUOTATIONS. 

Ax Handles— Oval and octagon, s.g. 
hickory, $3.50; No. 1, $2.40; 2, $1.95; 
p.g. oak, $2.90. 

Augur Bits— "Inrin" bits, 47%; other 
lines, 70 and 10 per cent. 

Barb Wire— Lyman 4 pt., $1.36 f.o.b. 
Fort William; $2.26 per spool of 80 rods 
f.o.b. Winnipeg: Guidden 2 pt., $1.74 
f.o.b. Fort William; $2.12 per spool of 
80 rods f.o.b. Winnipeg; Baker 2 pt.. 



$1.73 f.o.b. Winnipeg; Waukegan 2 pt.. 
$1.74 f.o.b. Fort William; $2.12 per spool 
f.o.b. Winnipeg; Alberta 2 pt,, $1.73 
f.o.b. Fort William, $2.05 per spool 
f.o.b, Winnipeg; American special, 2 
pt,, $1.45 f.o.b. Fort William; $1.73 
per spool f.o.b. Winnipeg; plain twist, 
$2.80 f.o.b. Fort William, $3.20 per 100 
lb., f.o.b. Winnipeg; coil spring wire. 
No. 9, $2.07 per 100 lbs., Fort William; 
$2.50 at Winnipeg. 

Bolts— Carriage, % and smaller, 65: 
7-16 and larger, 55; machine, % and 
under, 60 and 5; 7-16 and over, 56; ma- 
chine set screws, 65; plough bolts, 50; 
square and hexagon nuts, cases, J 
small lots, 2%; stove bolts, 77%. 

Bar Iron— Bar iron, $2.50; Swedish 
iron, $4.25; sleigh shoe steel, $2.65; 
spring steel, $J.40; machinery steel, 
$3.50; tool steel, Black Diamond, 100 
lbs., $8.50; Jessop, $15. 

Blocks— Steel, 50 per cent.; wood, 60 
per cent. 

Cut Nails— $3.15 per keg base. Wire 
nails, base, $2.80 Winnipeg; $2.35 Fort 
William. 

Copper— Sheet and planished copper, 
30c per lb. Tinned, 24c. Copper wire, 
3-inch gage. 24c to 20-inch gage, 29c 

Crowbars— 4%c per lb. 

Corrugated Iron and Roofing, etc— 
Corrugated iron, 28 gauge, $3.87; 26 
gauge, $4.18; pressed standing seamed 
roofing, 28, painted, $2.84; 26, $3.24. 

Canada Plates— Half -polish, 6 and 7- 
inch, $3.40; 8-inch, $3.60: full polish, 6 
and 7-inch, $4.25; 8-inch, $4.50. 

devices— 7%c per lb. 

Enamelware— Canada, 50 ; Imperial, 
60; Premier, 50; Colonial, 60; white, 70 
and 5; diamond, 50; granite, 60 per 
cent. 

Files— American, 75 p.c. ; Black Dia- 
mond, 60 p.c; Nicholson's, 65 p.c. 

Galvanized iron — Apollo, 16 gauge, 
$3.80; 18. $3.85; 20, $3.90; 22 and 24, 
$4; 26, $4.29; 28, $4.60; 30 gauge or 
10% oz., $4.80; Queen's Head, 20, $4; 
24, $4.20; 26, $4.60; 28, $4.80. 

Galvanized Ware — 37% per cent. 

Grindstones— Per 100 lb., $1.65. 

Horseshoes— "M.R.M." and "Bell" 
iron. No. to 1, $4.90; No. 2 and larg- 
er, $4,65; snowshoes. No. to No. 1. 
$5.15; No. 2 and larger, $4.90; steel No. 
to 1, $5.35; No. 2 and larger, $5.10; 
featherweight, $6.50. 

Horse Nailu— "M.R.M." cold process 
—No. 3, $4.30; 4, $3.80; 5, $2.75; 6, 
$3.30; 7, $3.05; 8, $2.85; 9, $2.75; 10, 11 
and 12, $2.65, in 25-lb. boxes. 

Harvest Tools— 50, 5 and 5 per cent. 

Hinges— Light T and strap, 65 per 
cent. 

Hooks— Brush, heavy, per dozen, $8.75; 
grass, $1.70. 

Iron Washers— Full box, 40 per cent.; 
smaller lots, 35 per cent. 

Iron Pipe, Black— %, $2.25; %, $2.30; 
%, $3.10; %, $3.66; 1, $5.3u; 1-,, *,.. , 
1%, $8.60; 2, $10.90; 2%, $17.40; 3, $22.86; 
3%, $30; 4, $34.35; 4%, $38.80'; 5, $43.30; 
6, $56.10. 

Galvanized-%, $3.10; %, $3.20; %, 
$4.10; %, $4.90; 1, $7.05; 1%, $9.60; 1%, 
$11.50; 2, $14.80. 

Logging Chain— % in., $7.50; 5-16 in., 
$6; % in., $5.50. 

Lanterns— Cold blast, per dozen, $7; 
coppered, $9; dash, $9. 

Poultry Netting— 67% per cent. 

Pig Lead— $6. Lead Pipe— Full coil, 
$7.00 per cwt. ; cut coil, $8.00 per cwt. 

Lead Waste— $7.00. 

Rivets and Burrs— Iron rivets, 65 per 
cent.; copper. No. 8, 32c; 10, 34c; 12, 
36c; copper burrs, No. 8, 44c; 10, 47c; 
12, 61c; copper rivets and burrs. No. 8, 
44c; 9, 32c; 10, 47c; coppered. No. 8, 
17c; 9, 17%c; 10, 18c. 

Rope— Sisal, 8%c; Pure Manila, 12%c; 
British Manila, 9V4c; lath yarn, 9c. 

Staples— Bright wire, $2.50 f.o.b. Fort 
William; $2.90, Winnipeg. 

Steel Squares— 40 off new list. 

Shovels— Discounts on No. 1, No. 2, 
60 and 2% per cent.; No. 3, No. 4, 60 
and 2% per cent.; No. 1 scoops, 50 and 
6 per cent.; all other grades, 45 and 
6 per cent.; fifty cents per dozen net 
is added to equalize eastern freights. 

Solder— Half and half, $32 per cwt. 

Screws— Bright iron round head, 82% 
and 10 p.c; flat head, 87% and 10 
per cent.; round head, brass, 72% and 
10 per cent.; flat head, brass, 77% and 
10 per cent. ; coach, 65 per cent. 

Staples— Bright wire per cwt., $2.50 
at Fort William; $2.90, Winnipeg. 

Linseed Oil— Raw, per gal., $1.05; 
boiled, per gal., $1.08. 

Turpentine— Per gal., barrel lots, 80c. 

Dry Colors— White lead in ton lots, 
decorators' pure $7.75; decorators' spe- 
cial, $7.25; in small lots advance price 25 
cents per cwt.; red lead, kegs, $6.50; 
yellow ochre, in barrel lots, 2%c; less 
than barrel lots, 3c; golden ochre, bar- 
rels, 3%c; less than barrels, 4c; Vene- 
tian red, barrel, $2.50; less than bar- 
rels, $3.00; American vermilion, 15c; 
English vermilion, $1.00 per lb. ; Cana- 
dian metallic oxides, barrel lots, 3a, 
3%c; English purple oxides, in casks, 
3%c; less quantities, 4c per lb. 

Putty— Casks, $2.90 per cwt.; blad- 
ders, in ban-els, $3.15; bladders, 100-1 u. 
cases, $3.40. 

Paris Green— 22 cents per 112-lh. 

Paris Green— 21% cents per 112-lb. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



RESULTS 

Count more than does 
LOUD TALK 

DEALERS who handle 

JAMIESON'S 




PURE 

PREPARED PAINTS 

AND VARNISHES 



Brands : 

CROWN AND ANCHOR 

ISLAND CITY 

RAINBOW 



GET AS RESULTS:— 
Satisfied Customers. 
Satisfactory Profits. 
A Satisfactory reputation. 

For they have our rep- 
utation of over fifty years 
standing behind them. 

Why not get the benefit ? 



R. C. Jamieson & Co., 

Limited 

ESTABLISHED 1858 
Owning and Operating 

P. D. Dods & Co., Limited 
Montreal and Vancouver 



MURESCO 

30,000,000 POUNDS SOLD IN 1911 

WHY? 



BECAUSE 



It covers more surface and covers it better with 
one coat than any other similar material on the 
market. 

Of the nature of its ingredients it is highly sanitary. 

It does not rub off, crack, peel, blister or show laps 
when properly applied. 

It is so easily applied. 

Every lot manufactured is carefully tested before 
shipping. 



Send for Color Cards and Literature 



Benjamin Moore & Co., Limited 



TORONTO 



NEW YORK 



CLEVELAND 



CHICAGO 



£tS£2§6kv RE-ORDERS 



ARE PROOF OF 
SATISFACTION 

And every mail 
brings many of them. 
This House Paint has 
gained great popular- 
ity in the West. 

Its covering and en- 
during qualities place 
it in a class bv itself. 




If you are not selling Stephens' 
House Paint investigate it at onc>?. 
Many Western dealers will gladly 
give their verdicts as to its relia- 
bility. Write us for names of these 
dealers, then write them. 

Do it NOW 

Write for agency proposition — it's 
very attractive. 



G. F. STEPHENS & CO., Limited 



WINNIPEG 



Paint and Varnish Makers 



BRANCH AT CALGARY 



CANADA 



61 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Condensed or "Want" Advertisements 



Those who wish to sell or buy businesses or stocks, obtain 
competent help, connect with satisfactory positions or secure 
aid in starting new enterprises, should not fail to use the 
Want Ad. Advertisement Page of HARDWARE AND METAL. 

It is the central market place of the hardware trade 
throughout Canada. 



There is always someone somewhere looking for just 
such proposition as you have to offer. 

RATES (payable in advance : — 

2c. per word first insertion. 

lc. per word subsequent insertion. 

5c. additional each insertion when Box Number is required 



BUSINESS CHANCES 

FOR SALE— A BOWSER COAL OIL PUMP 
in good condition, also 3 bbl. galv. tank. D. 
S. Archer, Campbellford, Ont. 



FIRST-CLASS HARDWARE BUSINESS FOR 
sale — on C.P.R. main line, Eastern Alberta. 
Stock $8,000.00. Yearly profits $6,000.00 to 
$7,000.00. Apply Box 1661, Saskatoon, Sask. 
(35) 

FOR SALE.— A LONG AND WELL ESTAB- 
lislied hardware business in Woodstock, N.B. 
Corner Main and Connell Streets. This is the 
best paying proposition on the market to-day 
for any interested. Satisfactory reasons will 
be given for selling. Enquire of H. E. Burtt. 
(31) 

OLD ESTABLISHED HARDWARE, STOVES 
and plumbing in Eastern Ontario city; steady 
increase of sales at good prices; business al- 
ways showing a good return on investment; 
exceptional opportunity, stock being particu- 
larly well bought. Box 693, Hardware and 
Metal. 



THRIVING HARDWARE BUSINESS FOR 
sale, consisting of shelf and heavy hardware, 
stoves, etc. Located in central part of On- 
tario; three railroads; turnover $50,000; stock 
$10,000, which is being reduced. Excellent 
chance to buy at rate on dollar. Retiring 
from business. Box 618, Hardware and Metal, 
Toronto. (52tf) 



FOR SALE.— A. 1 HARDWARE BUSINESS 
in good Manitoba town on two lines of rail- 
way. Stock .$7,000. Terms to suit. Good reas- 
on for selling. Apply to Box 692, Hardware 
and Metal. (32) 



FOR SALE 1 NO. 282 W. PEASE HOT 
Water Boiler in good condition ; used two 
seasons, $90.00 f.o.b. Berlin. P. Hymmen Co., 
Ltd., Berlin, Ont. (34) 



SITUATIONS WANTED 

AMBITIOUS YOUNG MAN WISHES Posi- 
tion as travelling salesman; has both lan- 
guages and can give best references. Write 
Box 24, Crysler, Ont. 

TRAVELLER HAVING PROVED HIS ABIL- 
lty by greatly increasing his firm's business 
in the territory covered and being an aggres- 
sive salesman wishes to secure a position with 
manufacturing concern. Box 668. Hardware 
and Metal, Toronto. 18— 21t 



SITUATIONS VACANT 

WANTED— A RELIABLE, AMBITIOUS MAN 
in every town to look after the entire circu- 
lation of our thirteen publications. Work 
very remunerative. MacLean Publishing Com- 
pany, 143-149 University Ave., Toronto, Ont. 
(tf) 

WANTED — FIRST - CLASS HARDWARE 
clerk for retail hardware store; must be good 
salesman, good stock keeper, one well up on 
builders' hardware. State experience, wages 
expected, married or single. Steady job to 
the right man. Address in own handwriting. 
J. B. Kernaghan, Prince Albert, Sask. (32) 



HARDWARE CLERK WANTED — MUST 
be good wndow dresser and able to speak 
both English and French. Applicants please 
state salary required, and experience, with 
references. The George Taylor Hardware Co., 
Limited, Cochrane, Ontario. (31) 



PRICE TICKETS 



PRICB TICKETS FOR WINDOW SHOW 
eo«d». Black lettering on white card marked 
25e, 56c, 75c, $1, $1.25, S1.5S, $1.75, $2, $2.5«, $3, 
$3.50, $5. Doaen in set, per set 25 cents post- 
paid. Technical Book Dept., 143 University 
Avenue, Toronto. (tf) 



TECHNICAL BOOKS 

HINTS FOR PAINTERS, DECORATORS, 
and paperhangers — Practical and useful book 
treating on the preparation of surfaces, ma- 
terials used, mixed paints, operations, taste 
in color, graining, paperhanging, estimating 
cost of work, useful recipes, etc. Price 15 
cents postpaid, or two sets for 25c while thev 
last. MacLean Publishing Co., Technical Book 
Dept.. 143-149 University Ave.. Toronto. 



MISCELLANEOUS 

ADDING TYPEWRITERS WRITE, ADD OR 
subtract in one operation. Elliott Fisher, 
Limited, Room 314, Stair Building, Toronto. 

COPELAND - CHATTERSON SYSTEMS — 
Short, simple. Adapted to all classes of busi- 
ness. Copeland-Chatterson Co., Ltd., Toronto 
and Ottawa. (tf) 

DOUBLE YOUR FLOOR SPACE— BY IN- 
stalling an Otis-Fensom hand-power elevator 
you can use upper floors as stock room or 
extra selling space, and increase space on 
ground floor. Costs only $70. Write for cata- 
logue "B," Otis-Fensom Elevator Co., Traders 
Bank Building, Toronto. 

FIRE INSURANCE — INSURE IN THE 
Hartford. Agencies everywhere in Canada. 

THE NATIONAL CASH REGISTER COM- 
pany guarantee to sell a better register for 
less money than any other house on earth. 
We can prove it. Make us. The National 
Cash Register Co., 285 Yonge Street, Toronto. 

WAREHOUSE AND FACTORY HEATING 
systems. Taylor-Forbes Company, Limited. 
Supplied by the trade throughout Canada. 

(tf) 

YOU CAN 
from us. 
writers of 
built and 
and $20.00 
of better 
Write for 
Co., Ltd., 
Canada. 



BUY A REBUILT TYPEWRITER 
We have about seventy-five type- 
various makes, which we have re- 
which we will sell at $10.00, $15.00 
each. We have also a large stock 
rebuilts at slightly higher figures, 
details. The Monarch Typewriter 
46 Adelaide St. West, Toronto, 
(tf) 



Keep in mind the domin- 
ant fact that mankind from 
its first appearance on the 
earth has been schooled by 
nature to look for signs ; 
for invitations to taste; for 
suggestions as to what to 
wear. Tell your story 
briefly, forcibly, truthful- 
ly, and address it through 
the proper media and you 
can successfully apply ad- 
vertising as a means to 
increased distribution. 



Interested ? 



In Buying a Business 

In Selling a Business 

In Engaging a Clerk 

In Securing a Position 

In Buying a Typewriter 

In Selling a Showcase 

In Disposing of a Desk 

In Selling Tinsmith's Tools 

In Securing Shelf Boxes 

Then Use 

A Hardware and Metal Want Ad. 

It should find for you among 
the thousands of Canadian 
hardwaremen AT LEAST 
ONE individual who is vitally 
interested in your proposition. 

HARDWARE AND METAL reaches the 
retailer, the wholesaler, the manufac- 
turer, the clerk and the traveller, the 
men to whom you wish to sell or from 
whom you would buy, 

No Other Paper Reaches 
All These Men 

RATES : 
(PAYABLE IN ADVANCE) 
2c. per word, first insertion, 
lc. per word subsequent insertion, 
5c. extra per insertion for box number 
if desired. 

Hardware and Metal 

MONTREAL TORONTO WINNIPEG 



/"\NE of the most successful 
retailers of late years 
says : "When a firm advertises 
in trade papers it is getting 
into good company. As I pick 
up one of a dozen of these 
periodicals here in my office, 
and glance through it, I find 
that the best people, the suc- 
cessful firms, are represented 
in such a way as to reflect 
their importance in the trade." 



62 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Not 
To-morrow 

But 

To-day 

is the time to lay in your stock 
of "ERMALINE" cooking 
bags. 

Since their introduction some 
months ago the Ermaline sys- 
tem of cooking with paper bas;s 
has made many friends, because 
it means 

NO WASTE 
NO SMELL 
NO HEAT 

NO DIRT. 

Its other advantages are 

MORE FOOD 

BETTER FLAVOR 
LESS WORK 
NO WORRY 

If you have not got a stock of 
"ERMALINE" Bags, someone 
else in your district is getting 
the business which by right 
should be yours. 

Drop us a card to-day and we 
will send you without charge, 
samples for your own use and 
for distribution. 

EDWARD LLOYD, Lim».« 

508 EASTERN TOWNSHIPS BANK BLDS. 

MONTREAL 



"RUSSWIN" 

BUILDERS 1 HARDWARE 

We are jobbing agents for the famous "RUSSWIN" 
line of builders' hardware. Our stock contains the lat- 
est and most artistic designs on the market to-dav. By 
selling "RUSSWIN" LOCK SETS you will be in the 
best position to get the CONTRACTORS' business in 
your town. 

COAL CHUTES 

Agents for Manitoba and Saskatchewan for the DOWN 
DRAFT COAL CHUTE. A large stock always on 
hand. 




WINNIPEG 



EDMONTON 



b: 



•JB 




EW EE A WAWf 



US eBAKAHT EE® 



/ T S HE increasing demand for New Era Paint 
and its past record of service enable us to 
place a guarantee that it will outlast, cover 
more surface, hold its color better, stand more 
weather changes, and give a more brilliant fin- 
ish than any high-priced paint you can buy. 
It is made to meet the requirements of the most 
critical painter. AVrite at once for prices. 



STANDARD PAINT & VARNISH CO., LIMITED 

WINDSOR - - ONTARIO 



b: 



33 



TWO CENTS PER WORD 

You can talk across the continent for two cents per word 
$$ with a WANT AD. in this paper &$? 



<w 



63 



HARDWARE AND METAL 




■ ■ i ' ■ ' 



t''Hf!IHI'i|iV|i i! '|ijill|" l |'.' , - r lii' •?■!!■■ : ' "'-- -A ■■ -. '.V ■ ■ .V'-.'H — 



1 ■ ; ■ ; ' 



wmml ifnamA\m mm- 



;- wyi.ifctei»i*wiwwi^| 



^ 



BM »,»'■» 



A Sign for You 

not to neglect the part of your paint business that calls for a cheap outside paint for 
barns, fences, sheds, roofs, etc. Every year the demand for 

Ramsay's Outside Paints 

increases and we are making tons and tons of this cheaper line because 
the consumer hesitates about putting a high-grade paint on this lesser 
outside work. 

There's satisfaction for the consumer in every can and satisfaction for 
you in the profit there is in the same can. 

Write for color cards, posters and prices. 

A. Ramsay & Son Co., Montreal 

Paint Mukerm Sine* '42. 

Western Distributors — Revillon Wholesale, Limited, Edmonton : A. McBride & Co., 
Limited, Calgary ; F. R. Begg & Co., Limited, Vancouver. 



»iip^;;i , %hy'iffl¥ji'iH^'i^'\%i«»^ i a!^iA- 




Paint and Varnish Removers 

MR. DEALER: When you buy Paint and Varnish Remover remember that QUALITY la more important than Price. 
A good Paint Remover is a help to the painter; a poor Paint Remover is a nuisance. The fact that all the leading 
manufacturers of paint and varnish in Canada and the United States who handle paint removers at all are licensees 
of this company and manufacture under our patents Is the strongest possible testimony that the only practical, 
satisfactory and efficient removers on the market to-day are those covered by our patents. 

SEE THAT EVERY CAN IS MARKED "LICENSED UNDER CANADIAN PATENT No. 78,586" 

The above Canadian patent corresponds to our U.S. pate nt No. 714,880, which Is the basic patent under which modern 
paint removers are manufactured. The following well-kn own and highly respected Canadian companies sell paint 
and varnish remover manufactured In Canada under our patents: 

NAME OF BRAND 



The Sherwin-Williams Co., Montreal, Canada 

International Varnish Co., Ltd., Toronto Canada 

Pratt & Lambert, Inc., Bridgeburg, Ontario, Canada 

British American Paint Co., Victoria, B.C. 

Mount Royal Color and Varnish Co., Montreal, Canada 

James Robertson Co., Ltd., Toronto, Canada 

Sanderson Pearcy Co., Ltd., Toronto. Canada 

Stewart & Wood, Toronto, Canada 

Martin- Senour Company, Ltd., Montreal, Canada 



'Taxite" 

"Klensa" 

"Expedite" 

"Bapoo" 

"Scrape-off" 

Robertson's Paint and Varnish Remover" 

"Devolite" 

"Solvo" 

"Martin-Senonr Paint and Varnish Remover" 



The character and standing of these companies is a guarantee to you that the paint remover sold by them Is the beat 
that can be produced. 

You take no risk when you buy one of the licensed brands of Removers. They are harmless and efficient. 
They contain no carbolic acid or alkali. They are neutral. 



. 



Chadeloid Chemical Company ; 



00 William Street 
NEW YORK, N.Y. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 




Do you ever consider the business value 
to you, in securing the agency for a well 
advertised, well known quality line 
of products? 

This kind of business proposition means that you have the opportunity to 
profit from the manufacturer's advertising. It means that all possible custom- 
ers who have become interested in a particular line through the advertising 
must go to your store to buy. This brings new customers to you, and if you 
can satisfy them with the service you render, they will not only buy the 
advertised line, but will buy other goods as well. 

This is just the kind of opportunity offered to you now, if there is . no 
Sherwin-Williams Agency in your town. There are only a very few towns 
where such is the case, and yours may be one of them; if so, take advantage 
of the opportunity open to you and write to us at once. It will not only mean 
big paint business for you, but it will mean new customers for the other lines 
of goods you handle. The Sherwin-Williams Agency helps your whole business. 



Sherwin-Williams 

Paints &Varnishes 

Address all inquiries to The Sherwin-Williams Co. oi Canada, Limited, Montreal, Toronto, Winnipeg, Vancouver. 



65 



HARDWARE AND ME T A L 



Proof Pratt & Lambert Varnishes 
Mean Increased Sales Every Year 

Here is a mighty good advertisement and we didn't have to write it ourselves 
either. It is merely a letter from aP.&L. dealer that is substantial proof how Pratt 
& Lambert Varnishes sell. Read every word of it : 

ESTABLISHED 1857 

WALTER LEIGHTON 

No. 1652 Ridge Avenue 




Interior of Walter Leighton's Store 



Philadelphia Agent for 






Robt. Ingham Clark 




Manufacturers of : 


& Co., Limited 


Jobber in 


Eureka Furniture 


Britannia English 


PAINTERS' 


Polish 


Varnishes 








SUPPLIES 


* * * 


Pratt & Lambert 






Manufacturers of 




Windowphanie 


Varnishes, Japans and 






Driers. 




Liquid Veneer 



Philadelphia. Bee. 15, 1911 



Messrs. Pratt & Lambert- 



Grentlemen; — We have marketed this year the greatest quantity of 
Pratt fe Lambert Products of any year in the existence of car House. 

As you know we have handled Pratt fc Lambert Varnishes for about 
twenty-five years and exclusively for fifteen years. The last few 
years have shown a marked increase in the sales of your line and we 
appreciate the fact that this is due. in a great measure, to your 
co-operation, your successful advertising and the policy of your 
entire organization. 

Spar Finishing Varnish, "81" Floor Varnish and Vitralite have 
been exceptionally good sellers to our trade, and we have great con- 
fidence in the quality of the entire line. 

Very truly yours, 

(Signed) WALTER LEIQHTON. 

How much did your varnish sales increase last year ? It will put you under 
no obligations to write for our Dealers' Proposition To-day. 

PRATT & LAMBERT, INC. 

VARNISH MAKERS 
24 COURTWRIGHT STREET, BRIDGEBURG, ONTARIO 

Factories : 

NEW YORK BUFFALO CHICAGO 

LONDON PARIS HAMBURG 

BRIDGEBURG. ONTARIO 

66 



HARDWARE AND METAL 





and C£ 

kint Store Hear 




cope 



"If you would succeed you 
"Quality" and "Profit" trip 
They get profit too high, 
der what was wrong 



MARTIN 
SENOUR 



is a real business insur 
a reasonable profit will 
The dealers who know say so 
and our proposition to insure your 




must mind your Ps and Qs." 

up too many business men. 

quality too low, and won- 

when the crash comes. 



PAINT 
00%PURE 



ance. Its quality and 
make your business boom. 
Write today for the proof 
business the same way. 



THE MARTIN-SENOUR CO., Limited 



MONTREAL 



Pioneers of Pure Paints 
CHICAGO WINNIPEG 



LINCOLN 



Just Consider for a Moment 

DOUGALL VARNISH is made in the most up-to-date factory • 

in Canada. 

DOUGALL VARNISH Co. employs only the highest paid skilled 

workmen, and all varnish is made under 
ideal conditions. 

DOUGALL VARNISH is guaranteed to be absolutely the best 

procurable, and the manufacturers will 
back up this guarantee. 

DOUGALL VARNISH is the most economical to use, as it goes 

further than any other. 

DOUGALL VARNISH owing to its superior qualities WILL 

NOT CEACK OR PEEL, and no ex- 
tremes of heat or cold will affect it. 

Is not DOUGALL VARNISH worthy of your recommendation 
and a prominent position on your shelves? 

The Varnish That Lasts Longest 

The Dougall Varnish Company, Limited 



305 Manufacturers Street, Montreal, Canada 



J. S. N. DOUGALL, President 



Associated with MURPHY VARNISH CO., U.S.A. 



67 



HARDWARE AND METAL 




No Dirt 
Can Lodge 

in the 
"All-Metal" 



It Stands to 
Reason 



that an all-metal washboard made 
in one piece will outwear the old- 
fashioned wooden kind many times. 
Then if this is a fact, the all-metal 
washboard is the most economical. 
This feature alone is one that 
prompts the housewife to buy 
MEAKINS' SANITARY WASH- 
BOARDS when the dealer shows 
her this modern production in 
the art of wash-board making. 
Meakins ' Sanitary Washboards 
give no chance for dirt to lodge or 
metal to loosen to scratch the 
hands. The "All-metal" has won 
favor for its practicability, and 
sanitary construction. It will not 
rust or corrode. Send for particu- 
lars and prices. 

Meakins & Sons 

Hamilton - Ontario 



FROM STOCK 




Only 20 lbs. Pressure Required 

The 

Supreme Test 

The supreme test of a Washer's worth 
is the way the Washer washes. Try it 
out^with the Dirty Shirt test. Take an un- 
usually dirty but originally white shirt, 
run it through the Portland Water Power 
Washer, and you'll find that the shirt itself 
is not only perfectly clean (provided, of 
course, that the dirtiness of the shirt isn't 
due to paints, etc.), but that the neck and 
wrist bands too are spotless. 

The Portland is a trouble-less washer — 
it relieves all washer worries. 

Made complete in our own factories — 
washer, motor, and furniture finished tub. 

If you're looking for a quality washer 
that's really worth while get after your 
hardware jobber, or write direct to us. 

HENDERSON & RICHARDSON 

Formerly J. A. HENDERSON 
Board of Trade Building, MONTREAL 

SOLE CANADIAN AGENTS FOR 



PORTLAND MFG. CO., 



Portland, Mich. 



The Largest Manufacturers of Washing Machines 
in the World 



G8 



HARDWARE AND METAL 




HIGHEST IN PUBLIC FAVOR 

A quarter of a century of favorable 
service has made 

"BANNER" BURNERS 



the recognized standard of excellence. 

Many burners with so-called improve- 
ments are a positive menace to their 
users. 

Can you afford to be identified with 
these? Your stove is judged by what 
you sell. Banner Burners ensure safety 
and satisfaction to your customer, and 
a good profit to you. 



LOOK FOR THE COVERED RASE 

A sure prevention from fire arising 
from the oil-soaked collection of dead 
insects, charred wick ends, etc., found 
in other burners. 



SOLD UNIVERSALLY AND BY ALL JOBBERS 



Ontario Lantern & Lamp Co., Limited 



HAMILTON, 

MONTREAL, P.Q. 
30 St. Dlzier St. 



BRANCHES: 



ONTARIO 

WINNIPEG, MAN. 
56 Albert St. 




QUALITY 



The word that explains the 
popularity of 

INTERNATIONAL 

VARNISHES AND VARNISH SPECIALTIES 

Regularly specified by architects 
and employed by the most dis- 
criminating consumers in Canada. 

Those best able to judge pronounce 
International Products UNAP- 
PROACHABLE IN QUALITY. 

Is anything else but the best good 
enough for you to feature ? 

Why not enhance your reputation 
and profit by handling the Inter- 
national Line ? 

Sold only in Cans containing Full 
Imperial Measure. 




TORONTO 



WINNIPEG 



Canadian Factory of Standard Varnish Works. 

NEW YORK CHICAGO LONDON 

BERLIN BRUSSELS MELBOURNE 

Largest in the world and first to establish definite 
standards of quality. 

N-12 



69 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



iSp 



"As nearly perfect as you could make 
them — This is what one of the largest dealers 
said a few days ago with reference to the polished 
handles on our 

Klondike and 
Jubilee Brooms 

The finest corn, high-class workmanship and 
a perfect handle will produce a Broom easy to 
sell and on which a good profit can be made. 

Now is the time to order a supply. 

Stevens- Hepner Co., Limited 

PORT ELGIN - - ONTARIO 



GRAND RAPIDS 




No. 12 
GRAND RAPIDS 



All-Steel 
Sash Pulleys 

SAVE THEIR ENTIRE COST 
IN 

Labor, Freight, Screws, &c. 

GRAND RAPIDS are the 
original— the STAND- 
ARD goods. Nearly ev- 
ery jobber in Canada and 
United States carries 
them in stock. 
Write for samples and 
descriptive catalogues 
We make thirty-seven 
styles. 

Largest Sash Pulley 
makers in the world. 



GRAND RAPIDS HARDWARE CO. 

100 Eleventh Street. GRAND RAPIDS, MICH., U.S A. 



STANDARD CHAIN COMPANY 




COIL, RAILROAD, LOGGING, DREDGE, STEAM SHOVEL, WAGGON and 

BRIGHT CHAIN of all kinds. 
EVERYTHING IN WELDED CHAIN. 
Write for prices Prompt shipment. 

ELECTRIC WELDED TRACES A SPECIALTY 

Selling Agents: ALEXANDER GIBB, St. Nicholas Building, MONTREAL 



THE 



MORRIS & BAILEY STEEL CO. 

PITTSBURG, PA. 



Manufacturer* of 



COLD ROLLED STRIP STEEL 

For Deep Drawing, Blanking, Forming, all kinds of Bending. Has Bright Finish 
for Nickel Plating, Rolled accurate to Gauge. Made in all tempers and in any 
thickness from .002" to .250. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 




MAPLE CITY 
OILERS 



-0— H- 



No. 600 A A 
Wide Mouth 



We manufacture the 
most complete line of 
oilers made in America, 
including Pump, Engin- 
eers', Machinists', Mow- 
ing Machine and Rail- 
road Oilers, Tallow Pots, 
Engineer Sets, Torches, 
Lamps, etc. 



MAPLE CITY MFG. CO. 

MONMOUTH, ILLINOIS, U.S.A. 




A few of our beautiful line of 

Cut Glass Knobs 



HIGH-CLASS BUILDERS' 

HARDWAREofall kinds for 

high-class buildings, banks, offices, 

residences, etc. 

The Belleville Hardware and Lock Manufacturing Go. 

LIMITED 



Head Office and 
Factory 



BELLEVILLE 
Canada 




[LJQuiD^MiSjffl For finishing floors in the 
■**"* most durable manner possible. 

There is no substitute. 

crrY| For the finest rubbed (dull) 
~~ or polished finish on interior 
woodwork. It has for upwards of 50 years 
been the standard. 

[[jjisTtTMiTEBiORl For interior woodwork expos- 

'""'" ed to severe wear. Stands the 

action of soap and water to an unusual degree. 

||IA|tjT3ut|IM] For front doors and all other 

" N "" surfaces exposedto the weather. 

Great durability under most trying conditions. 

For ship spars, decks, yachts. 

launches, canoes and all other 
surfaces exposed to wind, wave or weather. 
Has never turned white. It has stood years 
of test in actual service. 



THESE are but five out of the 
most complete and extensive 
line of Varnishes, Shellacs, 
Japans, Lacquers, Stains, Fillers, 
and Dryers offered by any man- 
ufacturer. 



The name at the top 
is always protected 
by the best known 
trade mark in the 
varnish field. 

If, for any reason, you have 
never given this line a prom- 
inent place on your varnish 
shelves, write us to-day for 
prices. 

Whether it is on one of the 
Big-Five listed at the left or an 
item of less extensive use — 

Whether it is in your interest, 
from a sales and profit point 
of view — 

The interest of the painter 
who does the work — 

Or the satisfaction of the 
"man who pays the bills" — 

The trade mark label of 
Berry Brothers, Ltd., has a 
deep significance that grows 
out of its continuous use for 
over fifty years, plus the wide 
publicity given to it by exten- 
sive advertising. 

That trade mark must ' 'make 
good ' ' — everywhere, every 
time. 



BERRY BROTHERS, Limited 

The World's Largest Varnish Makers 

WALKERVILLE, ONT. 



71 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



For Quick Sellers Try 

AMERICAN GRINDERS 

The American Grinder is of the enclosed gear type. 
Self-Oiling Bearings require no attention. 
Internal Friction loss exceptionally small. 
Gear Case sealed and will never leak. 

Bearings will not 
overflow oil. 
N o complicated 
parts. 

Pleasing in ap- 
pearance. 

Firmly construct- 
ed. 

Simple in design. 
Gears run in oil. 
Very compact. 
Noiseless. 
This is a perfect 
piece of mechan- 
ism that sells at 
a price that every- 
body can afford 
to pay. 




No. 1 
GET OUR PRICES AND PARTICULARS AT ONCE 

3-SIZES— 3 4, 6, 7 IN. WHEELS 
AMERICAN GRINDER MFG. CO. 

I 7~3 Milwaukee, Wisconsin 

MERCHANTS' HARDWARE SPECIATIES CO. 
LTD., 

Calgary, Alta., Agents for Western Canada 



The "Hygienic" 
COFFEE 



PERGOLATOR 

Makes an 

IDEAL CUP 
OF COFFEE 

It is beautifully 
finished and 
fitted with the 
new Monarch 
regulating 
lamp. 
The Hy- 
gienic has 
no near 
rival when 

it comes to point of adding pleasure and satis- 
faction to a home. Gift seekers buy it as the most 
appropriate and the most reliable gift. 

Write tor Illustrated catalog- 

The Buffalo Mfg. Co., Buffalo, N.Y. 

Canadian Representatives: 
H. F. McINTOSH & CO.. 28 Toronto Street, Toronto 




Ent h usi asm 



To sell goods and make profit 
you must develop this quality. 
Home made goods always did 
make you feel that way. That 
is why so many hardwaremen 
throughout Western Canada are 
selling our 

METAL CEILINGS, SHINGLES, 
SIDINGS AND CORRUGATED IRON 

and making nice profits. 

They have seen them made. They 

know they are right. They can 

get them in a hurry. 

All these things will be at your 

service when you hook up with'us. 

WRITE TO-DAY . 

Winnipeg Ceiling and Roofing Co. 



P.O. Box 2186 H. 



Winnipeg, Man. 



Good Pumps™ 
with Good Profits 

We are looking for the pump dealer who 
knows that selling good pumps pays in good-will. 

McDougall Pumps are 
well made, properly fitted, 
good through and through 
"Aremacdee" Brand. 

Every pump sold stays 
sold and stays in good order. 

Metal Hand or Motor 
Pumps— for Force or Lift 
use — every size, style, kind, in our big catalogue. 




Write 



The 



R. McDougall Co., limited 

GALT, CANADA 



72 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



is a line that never varies in quality. 
The consignments you receive from 
time to time are the same through 
and through — absolutely reliable in 
toughness, strength and workability. 
Economical and correct methods of 
production mean that you get a flaw- 
less product at the lowest prices. 

London Rolling Mill Co., Ltd. 

LONDON, CANADA 

Sales Agents, Ontario: Baines & Peckover, Toronto 
Manitoba: Bissett & Loucks, Limited, Winnipeg 



.hi Mi 



r 



Show your Cus- 
tomers This Up- 
to-Daie Bit Ex- 

tension 



V. 



The Ford Bit Exten- 
sion is not to be class- 
ed with the ordinary- 
Extension — Clumsy, 
hard to work and in 
general unsatisfactory. The 
Ford is a model of simplic- 
ity — simple in construction, 
simple to adjust and simple 
to use. It embodies the 
best points of other makes, 
and has several exclusive 
features that make it paramount 
No other Bit Extension contains 
so many practical features. N 
other can do the work so easily 
nor as well as the Ford and 

No other is as easy 
for you to sell 

For the Ford has more selling 
points than any other Extension 
and each Ford feature affords a 
convincing selling argument. You 
can hand a man a Ford and tell 
him positively and convincingly 
that no other extension equals 
the Ford in simplicity of con- 
struction, number of practical 
advantages, facility of operation, 
time and labor saving features, 
convenience, wearing qualities, 
and in the ultimate satisfaction 
desired through better results. 
The Ford comes to you highly 
recommended, fully guaranteed, 
and with a steadily increasing 
demand. We have an excelleut 
proposition. Will you write for 
circulars, prices, etc? 

FORD AUGER BIT CO. 

Holyoke, Mass. 




NICKEL 

The Canadian Copper Co. 

NICKEL FOR 
NICKEL STEEL 

The Orford Copper Co, 



WRITE US FOR 
PARTICULARS AND PRICES 



General Offices 

43 EXCHANGE PLACE 

NEW YORK CITY 




WHITE MOP 
WRINGER CO 

FULTONVILLE, 
N.Y. 



OAKEY'S 

The original and only 
Genuine Preparation 
for Cleaning' Cutlery, 
6d. and is. Canisters. 

'WELLINGTON' 

KNIFE POLISH 

JOHN OAKEY & SONS, Limited 

Manufacturer* of 

Emery, Black Lead, Emery, Glass 
and Flint Cloths and Papers, etc. 

Wellington Mills, London, England 




HARDWARE AND METAL 



STEEL 
BLADE 



jh^n, Clarke Go. 




TABLE CUTLERY 



THAT SELLS 
QUICKLY 



The blade of our No. 949 knife is made from a special High Carbon Sheffield Steel. The handle from the 
best English Grained Celluloid. This knife is the "King" of table cutlery, as it is unsurpassed in every 
respect. Give it a trial and increase your profits— we guarantee satisfaction. 

The McGlashan, Clarke Co., Ltd., Niagara Falls, Ont. 



AGENTS:— J. Mackay Rose. 88 McGill St.. Montreal. Qu«. 
David Philip. 291 Portage Ave.. Winnipeg. Man 



N F. GUNDY. 61 Albert St.. Toronto. Ont. 
Benj. Rogers, Charlottetown, P.K.I. 



Dealers! 



HERE'S YOUR CH ANCE 
TO MAKE A SPLASH. 



This Mantel or any of our "70" different designs, fitted with our Electric Grate 
requires no chimney, therefore anyone building a house can have a Mantel 
complete for less than the actual cost of a chimney. 

Write for the "dope" — Your contractors will fall for it. 
Don't forget — We have the best line of Gas and Coal Grates in the country. 

The Barton Netting Company, Limited 

38 Ouelette Avenue, Windsor, Ont. 

Our Motto -"QUALITY" 




44 



*> 



THERMO! 

The Washer 



Easy to Sell 



That makes the Washday Bright 

Its improved motion absolutely elim- 
inates washday drudgery caused by 
hard working ma- 
chinery. It is the 
easiest washer to op- 
erate and washes 
clothes thoroughly in 
shortest time. 
The Thermo Washer 
is built to last and is 
solid and substantial. 
Working parts are 
simple and cannot 
get out of order. 
Thermo Washers are 
attractively designed 
and well finished and 
find ready buyers 
everywhere. 
Before restocking 
your washer depart- 
ment get full descrip- 
tive matter and 
prices. 

Drop us a card NOW. 



THE LONDON FOUNDRY CO., LTD., S n a' 

F. J. Schuch (Western. Ontario Agent), 19 Jarvis Street. Toronto: 
MacPherson & Teetzel, Vancouver, B.C. (British Columbia Agents.) 




A Common Sense Talk 



AIR IS CHEAP. You do not pay rates for air like you 
do for water, yet a big fuss is made over the impurity of 
water and very often no thought is taken of the impurity 
of the air breathed from day to day and night to night. 
Crowded rooms, whether in public places, schools, opera 
houses or factories, require ventilation as well as the private 
dwellings. 

House Building is a Science Nowadays and no 
Building is Complete Without one of our J. W. 
Harris Ventilators. 



The Ventilator Itself is an Ornament 
and can be made to suit the character of the 
building, either as to size or as to quality 
of material. 

Montreal, Dee. 4th, 1905 
Messrs. J. W. Harris Mfg. Co., Ltd. 
City 

Dear Sirs,— 

In answer to your letter of the 25th ult.. 1 
must say that I am very much satisfied with the 
results of the"ZEPHYR" Ventilators. 

Yours truly, 

W Champagne, 

191 St. Paul St. 

Dealers everywhere will find a double profit 
in handling this ventilator. Write direct 
for catalogue and booklet to-day. 

Learn about our system of ventilating. A 
pleasure to send books. 



The J. W. Harris Mfg. Co., Ltd. 

General Contractors and Manufacturers 

Montrea I 




74 



WGTco 



dLUMINVO^ 



WILL OUlfltAR ANY WARE" 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



"OAKVILLE" PURE ALUMINIUM 
COOKING UTENSILS CZ1 

Each article made from a single piece of Aluminium. No cracks or seams, will not scorch 
or burn. Heat passes through aluminium two or three times as fast as through tin or 
iron, cooking food more quickly. Highly polished finish, making excellent displays on 
shelves or windows. Their fine appearance, backed by their finer quality, make them 
quick sellers. 



Our Guarantee — If the goods are not satisfactory, return them at our expense and we will return your money, or credit your account. 
WRITE FOR TERMS AND FULL PARTICULARS, PROMPT SHIPMENT. 

THE WARE MFG. CO., LIMITED, Offices: 220 King St. W., Toronto Factory at Oakville, Ont. 



We have the facilities for turning out 

The Highest Grade Baling Wire and Bale-Ties 

at a reasonable cost — a baling wire that allows the dealer good profits and .s certain to create 
enthusiasm among users. 

Before placing your order, write us for prices and lull information. 

We also manufacture WIRE NAILS and STAPLES, O. & A. WIRE, WIRE BARREL 
HOOPS, ETC., each having a quality that is unsurpassed. 

THE LAIDLAW BALE-TIE CO., Limited, Hamilton, Ontario 



GEO. W. LAIDLAW. Vancouver, B.C. 



HARRY F. MOULDEN, Winnipeg. Man. 







Each Basic Invention Brings 
New Wrench Demands 

The success of many inventions depends on the manufacturer's ability to present 
them in simplified forms to the consumer. Economy of space often places adjust- 
ments in almost inaccessible places. New shapes of wrenches are required both in 
construction work and as part of the equipment furnished. 

"W. & B." Diamond Trade Marked Wrenches have a design to meet the need 
of every branch of industry, manufacturing, agricultural, railroad building, etc. We 
are in touch with the World's progress in inventions and processes, and can fill 
your needs. 

Get them from your nearest jobber or send order direct. 

Write for Catalogues 74-B and 75-B. 

The Whitman &~, Barnes Mfg. Co. 

Established 1854 

Stocks Carried at Winnipeg and Montreal 




Trade 


Tools of 


waB^> 


, Quality 
'Bear These 


Mark 


Marks 



Trade 




Mark 



75 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



BLACK DIAMOND FILE WORKS 



ESTABLISHED 1863 

Twelve Medals of 
Award at 

INTERNATIONAL 

Expositions. 




INCORPORATED 1895 
Special Grand 
Prize 

GOLD MEDAL 

Atlanta, 1895 



Copy of Catalogue -will be sent free to any interested File User upon application. 

G. & H. BARNETT COMPANY, - PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

Owned and operated by Nicholson File Co. 




I 



Chorus of Plumbers 

Then let thy fragrant incense be 

An inspiration sweet to me 
And I will sing my songs to thee; 
FLUXITE. 



Anyone can use it. Plumbers and other mechanics will have 

FLUXITE 

the paste flux that 

SIMPLIFIES SOLDERING 

and lead jointing 
Easy to use. Easy to sell. 

Of the Jobbers and Factors in small and large tins. Remember it in your indents. 

Made by the AUTO-CONTROLLER CO., 211 Vienna Rd., Bermondsey, Eng, 

General Representatives: SAYWELL'S SALESMEN, 61 Albert Street. Winnipeg. 



I 



MAXWELL'S "FAVOURITE" CHURN 



has been known and used for nearly twenty years, and has given such 
thorough satisfaction that more "Favourites" are sold annually in Canada, 
than ail other makes combined. 

Barrel is of best imported oak, finished in natural wood, with silver 
aluminum hoops, exceptionally large roller bearings, easy running and 
durable. The illustration shows the convenience of the combined hand 
and foot drive, and the lightness and strength of the angle iron frame, 
made in either single or Bow lever. 

You'are at a disadvantage if you do not sell Maxwell's Favourite 



DAVID MAXWELL & SONS, 



ST. MARY'S, ONT. 




r*t 



McKinnon 

Electric-Welded 

Coil Chain 




257 

More Weld 



1 ~ 25% 
More Strength 



25% 
More Wear 



Perfect 
Stock 



Sales Office : 
BUFFALO, N.Y. 



+ 



Perfect 
Welding 



Perfect 
Product 

MADE BY 



McKINNON CHAIN COMPANY 



McKinnon 
Swell-Weld 
Coil Chain 




MADE IN 
CANADA 



See The 
Swell? 



Factory : 
ST. CATHARINES, ONT. 



76 



HARDWARE AND METAL 





Butchers' 
Saw Blades 

in Coils 



Your butcher trade will appreciate this 
very convenient way of supplying Butcher 
Saw Blades. 

These Blades are put up in 25 and 50 feet 
coils, enabling the butcher to cut off with a 
pair of snips just the size to fit his frame. 

This feature is not the only thing about 
these Blades. There's the quality, it is in 
every tooth, for every tooth cuts, and cuts 
clean and fast. 

Supply your Butcher Trade with Goodell- 
Pratt's Butcher Saw Blades. 



Goodell-Pratt Company 

GREENFIELD, MASS., U.S.A. 




Those Who Know 
Our 

TOOL SETS 

Insist on Having Them 
BECAUSE 

They give the very best of ser- 
vice, being made from the finest 
materials, and by men with long- 
experience in this line. 

Because they are absolutely 
guaranteed to be just as repre- 
sented or money refunded. 

Because they are British Made 
from start to finish, and abso- 
lutely reliable. 

Because they are the best value 
that money can buy, which has 
been proved time and time again 
through comparative tests. 

Place at once a sample order and 
see how many sales you can 
make. 

The results will please you. 
Write for full particulars. 

Spear & Jackson, Ltd. 

SHEFFIELD, ENG. 



FRANK H. SCOTT (Canadian Agent) 

Coristine Bldg., Montreal 




€!&-■" tm 111 

JlKte mm^-^. 



77 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



The"RENFREW Handy Two-Wheel TRUCK SCALE 



7 



44 



A Convenience and Protection for Farmers" 



^ 



-a scale that is becoming more 



This is a scale that pays the dealer A VERY ATTRACTIVE PROFIT 

and more popular every day with farmers. 

It is absolutely accurate and has many advantages over the common scale. 

With this scale in his possession the farmer knows the exact weight of the products he is selling — he 

is armed against short weights. 

The "RENFREW" TRUCK SCALES are GOVERNMENT TESTED and have been awarded their 

GOVERNMENT CERTIFICATE without question, and are backed by our WRITTEN GUARANTEE 

to be just as represented, and to give a long, reliable service. Capable of weighing anything from a 

single pound to 2000 pounds. 

The "RENFREW" TRUCK 

SCALES are rigidly built and will 

stand all kinds of rough usage. 

LET US SEND YOU ONE. Show 

it to every farmer who comes into 

the store, and see how many you 

can sell. 

Write for Circulars and prices NOW. 



Renfrew Scale Co, 

RENFREW, ONT. 




It PPasnt a Freak Pump, Either 




Fig. 444^ 



A man wrote us the other day thai 
he is still using a deep well pump he 
bought of us £9 years ago. 

He says: "In all that time I haven't 
spent one cent on it for repairs, and I 
have used it hard." 
(Name on request). 



Webster's Dictionary defines a 
"freak" as "a marked deviation from 
the normal type." 

This man's pump is, therefore, not 
a freak. 

We build 



Dem/m 



even better now than we did thirty years ago, because we know more about 
building them, and we have better equipment to do it with. 

The cog lever windmill force pump standard, shown in the picture, is a 
good example of Deming pump building. This is the kind of goods your 
customers prefer. 

The Deming Company, 110 Broadway, Salem, Ohio 

Manufacturers of Hand and Power Pumps for All Uses ^ 
GENERAL DISTRIBUTING HOUSES: 



Henion & Hubbeil, Chicago 



Ralph B. Carter Co.. New York Harris Pump & Supply Co.. Pittburgh 

OTHER HOUSES IN ALL PRINCIPAL CITIES ** " 

78 " 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



GET YOUR TRADE ACQUAINTED 
WITH THE 

FAULTLESS LADDER 



This is a ladder upon 
which every user can 
absolutely depend, as it 
is strongly and substan- 
tially built. 

It is made from clear 
stock and has wide steps, 
strong galvanized steel 
ears riveted to the top 
and bottom. 

Has iron rod under each 
step, having a galvanized 
steel washer at each end 
of sufficient size to 
cover the nails and 
hold the step, thereby 
preventing them from 
working out as is often 
the case. 
Equipped with BOYER'S 

FAULTLESS LOCK. 

Made regularly 4 to 10 
feet, and extra heavy 
10 to 16 feet. 

GET OUR COMPLETE CATALOG 
AND PRICES AT ONCE. 

The Stratford Mfg. Co., Limited 

STRATFORD, - CANADA 




PERFECT MITRES 

are always made with 

THE 
LANGDON 
ACME 
MITRE 
BOX 

When supplied 
with back saws 
fitted by ourselves, they are warranted to do 
perfect work. 




QUICKLY 
ADJUSTEO 
FOR ANY 
ANGLE. 



Some of the advantages over older models are : — In 
longer guides, which hold the saw steadier. These 
guides are provided with elevators to hold the 
saw stationary, when desired, above the work. In 
a graduated arc showing the various angles com- 
monly used. In supporting guides, to hold the work in place. 
In an appliance for quicker adjustment of extension lever. 
In a length gauge for duplicate lengths. 

These boxes are made in three sizes, and put up with varying sizes of 
saws, ranging from 22 x 4 in. to 30 x S in. 



Send for the FREE book 
"Tool Practice" l, 



Millers Falls Go. 

2^28 Warren Street «H 

New York] 





/:/■■■■; ■"■" :■■'■>■;■■ iiniii.i!iiiiiiiii ■ mil mi iii, ummiim.i , 

■■■■•■ 



Nicholson-made Files 

are the Standard of File Quality 

The entire output of the Nicholson File Company in 1864 was 100 dozen per 
day. At the present time 16,000 dozen Nicholson-made Files are sold every day 
and shipped to all parts of the civilized world. Unvarying good quality, coupled 
with progressive methods and strict specialization, is the cause. 

In Canada these are the well-known factory brands made by the Nicholson 
File Company: — 

"AMERICAN" "ARCADE" "GREAT WESTERN" "CLOSE" 

"EAGLE" "McCLELLAN" "KEARNEY & FOOT" "J.B.SMITH" 

Nearly every file user in Canada has a preference for one or more of these lines above all others. 
You can stake your reputation upon their absolutely uniform and satisfactory quality. 

YOUR JOBBER KNOWS! 



Nicholson File Co., 



Port Hope, Ont. 



79 



HARD W A K E AND M E T A L 




ELY'S 
JANITOR MOP 

IKirNo. 8 for men 
No. 21 for women^ 

Others are not just as good 




ELY'S DANDY 

Mop Wringer and Bucket 

COMBINED 

Others are not just as good. 

Be sure that each bears the name 

ELY'S DANDY 

Made in three sizes, 10 qt., 14 qt. 
and 22 qt. ; guides, posts and step 
of malleable iron; lever of wrought 
iron, finished in black enamel ; 
cedar buckets, three hardwood rolls. 
The most popular mop wringer on 
the market. 



THE O.J. ELY 
MFG. CO. 

ERIE, PA. 

Get our catalogue of 
Mop Sticks, Mop Wring- 
ers, Brush Holders, Car- 
pet Beaters, Broom Hold- 
ers, Etc. 




"Try Us for Service 
and Quality" 



We carry a 
large stock of 

Wholesale Plumbers' Supplies, 

from which we can 
make immediate ship- 
ments. 

Drop us a card and get 
FREE copies oj Blue 
Prints for septic tanks. 



The John Stevens Co., Ltd. 

WINNIPEG. 




VOUR sales 
will be ma- 
terially increased 
by handling the 
Aylmer Metallic 
Ring Sprayer, 
the best hand 
pump made in 
Canada. No soft 
packing to give 
you trouble, a 
pump that gives 

perfect satisfaction to your customer 

in every instance. 

Write for Prices and Discounts. 

The Aylmer Pump & Scale Co,, Limited 



CUTTPISS HAHU.' 



AYLMER, 



ONTARIO 



80 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



GET THE GENUINE 



DOES THE REPUTATION of GARLOCK 
PACKING mean anything to you ? 

Does the fact mean anything to you that 
GARLOCK PACKINGS are giving eminent 
satisfaction the country over and everywhere 
Engineers who know insist on the installation 
of Genuine GARLOCK? 

This big and insistent demand for GARLOCK 
PACKING is the demand for quality. 

Imitators are making Packings that look like 
GARLOCK and are trying to sell them because 
they look like GARLOCK. 

Sometimes these imitations are sold as being 
"just as good as GARLOCK." If they were as 



good, they would be sold on their own merits 
and not on the established reputation of 
GARLOCK. 

Sometimes these imitations are substituted 
when "GARLOCK" is asked for. To prevent 
you getting an imitation and assist you in 
identifying the genuine, we have marked every 
piece of Spiral Packing with this mark of quality 



TRADE 




MARK 



The GARLOCK Catalogue tells all about Genuine 
GARLOCK Products. WRITE FOR IT TO-DAY. 



THE GARLOCK PACKING COMPANY 

HAMILTON, - ONTARIO 

PIONEERS IN THE PACKING BUSINESS 



Copper Sheets 



M. & L. Samuel, Benjamin & Co. 

CORNER KING STREET AND SPADINA AVENUE 

TORONTO 



81 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



BEAR BRAND 

LAMP BLACKS 



Have The Quality ; 
That Customers Demand 

W« are the largest manufacturers of 

Lamp Blacks, Ivory Blacks, Bone 

Blacks. Drop Blacks, Mineral Blacks, and Cement Blacks in the world. 

lhese products are of one quality — the best, and we aim to keep them 

so. A trial order will eenvince you. 

WRITE TO-DAY 

WILCKES MARTIN WILCKES CO. 

NEW YORK, N.Y., U.S.A. 
Wm. H. Evans, 232 James St., Montreal; E. Fielding, 34 Youge St., 
Toronto; H. W. Glassco, Winnipeg. 



A Strong Selling Point 



m 




This combination Nut and Pipe Wrench has a 
very strong selling point— Double Efficiency. 
Its handiness and strength at once appeal to the good mechanic to 
save him time and trouble. You can sell a lot of these Wrenches- 
make a start by writing to-day for our catalog. 

BEMIS & GALL HARDWARE & TOOL GO 

Springfield, Mass., U.S.A. 




HARDWARE 
BUILDERS' 



SPECIALISTS 



Buyers and Exporters for Hardware, 

Metal, Heating, Paint and Oil 

Trades. 

STRACHAN, OSWELL & CO. 

22 St. Mary Axe, LONDON, E.C. 



Correspondence Invited. 



JOSEPH RODGERS & SONS 



LIMITED 



SHEFFIELD, ENG. 

Avoid imitations of our <CRED TR/\[)p- . 

CUTLERY * 



By seeing that this 
mark is on each blade. 



exact | ^(^ 



Wanted \^' 

SOLE AGENTS FOR CANADA 

James Hutton G& Company 

MONTREAL 



TANft LUGS 




For Round Rods, also Flat Bands on Silos, Tanks, Pen- 
stocks, etc. Malleable Iron, best quality, all sizes. 

OTTERVILLE MANUFACTURING CO., LIMITED 

OTTERVILLE, ONTARIO 



Cap Screws, Set Screws, Studs 

Special Milled Work 

Cold Pressed Nuts 

Uniform Product, Accurately Machined 

Canada Foundry Company 



MONTREAL 

HALIFAX 

OTTAWA 



LIMITED 

HEAD OFFICES 
TORONTO 
CANADA 



WINNIPEG 
VANCOUVER 

ROSSLAND 



BRASS TUBING, BRASS ROBS, 

SHEET BRASS, SHEET COPPER, 

METAL SPINNINGS 

150,000 Pounds 
We carry the Stock. You draw from it. 



ON 



w 



ESTERN 



Incorporated 
1851 



ASSURANCE 
COMPANY 



FIRE 

AND 

MARINE 



HEAD OFFICE, TORONTO, ONT. 

Assets over - $3,000,000 



Losses Paid Since Organization 
of the Company, over - 



55,000,000.00 



HON. GEO. A. COX, President 

W. R. BROCK, Vice-President 

W. B. MEIKLE, General Manager 

C C FOSTER, Secretary 



82 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



This Is UTICA'S 1909 Staple Puller 



Manufactured by the 



Utica Drop Forge Co. 

Utica, N.Y. 




UTICA QUALITY 

is known everywhere. 

TRADE 

<3XSx$> 

REG. U. 8. MARK PAT. omeE 

All goods carry this trade-mark. 



Sold in Canada by 



SMITH HARDWARE CO., Limited 



240 LEMOINE STREET 
MONTREAL 



" NEW IMPERIAL " CYCLES AND MOTORS 




World's best value. Over 2,000 
"New Imperial" cycles being 
now ridden in Canada. Write 
for full particulars. 



Special 

Models for 

Canada. 



Sole 

Makers : 



Wholesale Agents : Humphries Bicycle and Motor Co., Toronto. 
Henderson & Richardson, Board of Trade Bldg., Montreal. 

New Imperial Cycles, Ltd., Birmingham, Eng. 

Established 25 Years. 



O.K. TMIIVI 




These Thimbles are easilv adjusted and cannotget out of order because 
they have no springs. They are the only real good Stove Pipe Thimbles 
inthe market. For sale by leading jobbers, and manufactured exclu- 
sively by 



METAL 5HIN0LE&SIDINC C° LTD. 

PRESTON& MONTREAL 



ED. BRAND Machinery for 



Specialist in the Wire Trade 
for 15 years 

472 Moss Lane East 
MANCHESTER, ENG. 

Plants working in 
all parts of the 
world giving com- 
plete satisfaction. 



Cable 

Address 

"Filiares 

Manchester" 

Code Used 

A.B.C 
5th Edition 




Wire Nail Machine 



Wire Drawing Wire Netting 
Wire Cutting Wire Weaving 

Wire Testing 

AUTOMATIC MACHINES 
For making all kinds of articles from 
wire, such as : 
Barb Wire. Bolts, Coach Screws. 
Cotter Pins, Cut Naila and 
Ta cks. Electric 
Welded Chains, 
Furniture Springs, 
Hinges, Hooks, 
Locks, Nails, 
Rivets, Screws. 
Staples. Wire 

Nails. Etc.. Etc,. 
Etc. 



SCREW AND STRAP HINGES 

for Barn Doors, Gates, etc, 

Ours have GIMLET-POINTED Hooks, with CUT Coach-Screw Thread. 
Get our prices. 

NUTS 

We can ship immediately from stock, Square and Hexagon 
Sizes for bolts up to 1 1-2 inches thick. 

Send us your orders 



^hn^' 1 ^ 1 *^^ 




LONDON, CANADA 



BLACK JACft 



QUICK 

CLEAN 

HANDY 



K-lb. tins- 
3 doz. in case 




TRY IT 



SOLD BY 

ALL 
JOBBERS 



British America Assurance Company 

A.D 1833 

HEAD OFFICE, TORONTO 

FIRE ASSURANCE 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

Hon. Geo. A. Cox, President. W. R. Brock, Vice-President. 

Robert Bickerdike. M.P.. W. B. Meikle. E. W. Cox. 

S*Geo. A. Morrow, D. B. Hanna, Augustus Myers, 

John Hoskin, K.C., LL.D., Frederic Nicholls, Alex. Laird, 

James Kerr Osborne, Z. A. Lash, K.C., LL.D., 

Sir Henry M. Pellatt. E. R. Wood. 

IV. B. Meikle, General Manager 



Assets over - 

Losses paid since organization over 



$ 2,000,000.00 
35,000,000.00 



83 



HARDWARE AND METAL 

DIRECTORY OF MANUFACTURERS 

Hardware and Metal receives, almost daily, enquiries for the names of manufacturers of various lines. 
These enquiries come from wholesalers, manufacturers and retail dealers, who usually intimate they 
have looked through Hardware and Metal but cannot find any firm advertising the line in question. 
In many cases these firms are anxious to secure the information at once. This page enables manu- 
facturers to keep constantly before the trade lines which it would not pay to advertise in larger space. 



BATTERY ZINCS. 



Battery Zincs, Fuse 
Wire, Wire Solder 

The CANADA METAL CO., LTD. 
Fraser Avenue, Toronto. 



BABBITT METAL. 



SPOOLER'S No Hot BoxeS 

MACHINERY BEARING METAL 




JPPIEIRI 

mmm 



BUILDERS' SUPPLIES. 



Bell Phone 3033 



P.O. Box 367 



Bosse £§> Banks 

Steel Beams. Columns. Plates Gas 

and Water Pipes, Contractors', 

Municipal and Builders' Supplies 

Machinery and Specialties. 

Board of Trade Building 

36 ST. PAUL STREET, - QUEBEC 



CHAPLETS. 




ERIE GREY IRON 
CHAPLETS 

All Foundry Supply 
Jobbers. 

S. Cheney & Son, Manliu$,N.Y. 



CLIPPERS. 



JSfe# THAT'S 





SEND FOR CATALOGUE TO 

American Shearer Mfg. Co., Nashua, NH, US 
Wlebusch <& HUger, Ltd., special New York 
Representatives, IOfi-110 Lafayette Street. 



COAT HOOKS. 



Ask your Jobber for 

GOLD COIN WIRE HAT and COAT HOOKS 



Made by 

JAMES & REID 
Perth, 0n(. 



t 



^ 



^ 



EMERY WHEELS. 




Canadian 

Hart Wheels 

443 Barton St. East, Hamilton 

Corundum and Binary Whaala 

Grinding Maehlata, Bearer 

Oil Stonaa. 



FLOOR SPRINGS. 



The Beet Door Oloeer la 

Newman's Invincible Floor Spring 

Will close a door silently against any pressure of wind. 
Has many working advantages over the ordinary spring 
and has twice the wear. In use throughout Great Britain 
and the Colonies. Gives perfect satisfaction. Made only by 

W". NEWMAN & SONS 
Hospital Street Birmingham 



HOUSE NUMBERS. 



STEEL 



STAMPS 

LETTERS 

FIGURES 



HAMILTON STAMP & STENCIL WORKS. LTD.. 
HAMILTON. ONT. 



COAL BAGS. 



Coal Bags made of No. 2 or No. 6 heavy 

duck, well sewn with heavy twine and 

riveted. 

Waterproof Horse and Wagon Covers. 

WRITE FOR SAMPLES AND PRICES 

Raymond Bros., London, Ont. 



IRON. 



IRON and STEEL 

OF ALL DESCRIPTIONS 
Brass, Copper, Zinc, etc. 

David C. Mitchell & Company, 

118 Queen Street, Glasgow, Scotland. 



MANUFACTURERS* AGENT. 



Western Distributors, Limited 

CUSTOMS BROKERS 
Wholesale Commission Merchants and 
Manufacturers' Agents. Cars Distributed, 
Warehoused and Forwarded. Warehouse 
on Transfer Track. Business solicited. 
OUR POSITION IS YOUR OPPOR- 
TUNITY. 

SASKATOON, WESTERN CANADA 



ALEXANDER GIBB 

Manufacture™' A««»t and Metal Broker, 

St. Nicholas Bldg., Montreal 



RepresentingCanadian, British and Ameri- 
can Manufacturers. Correspondence in- 
vited from firms wishing to be represented. 



RIVETS AND STEEL PRODUCTS. 



The PARMENTER BULLOCH CO., Ltd. 

GANANOQUE, ONT. 

Iron and Copper Rivets, Iron and Copper Burrs, 
Bifurcated and Tubular Rivets, 'Wire Nails. 
Copper and Steel Boat and Canoe Nails. 
Escutcheon Pins, Leather Shoe and Overshoe 
Buckles, Felloe Plates, 



Keep in mind the dominant fact that 
mankind from its first appearance on the 
earth has been schooled by nature to 
look for signs ; for invitations to taste ; 
for suggestions as to what to wear. Tell 
your story briefly, forcibly, truthfully, 
and address it through the proper media 
and you can successfully apply advertis- 
ing as a means to increased distribution. 



HINGES. 



ATLAS STRAP 
HINGE 

Guaranteed stronger than any other strap hinge 
made from basic wire of the best quality. 
Japan finish. Large profit for you. 

Write for Samples and Prices. 

Atlas Mfg. Co,. 121 Water St.. New Haven, Conn. 



HARDWARE SHELF BOXES 




| Goods WeC Displayed are Half Sold ! 

, The most attractive.most dur- 
able and most serviceable shelf 
box on the market is the 

BENNETT STEEL 

HARDWARE SHELF BOX 



Write for Catalogue and frxtli* 
CAMERON Mil CRMfBELL 
"Xbronbaz 



JENKINS & HARDY 

Assignees, Chartered Accountants, Estate and Fire 

Insurance Agents. 
5% Toronto Street, Toronto. 52 Canada Life Bide.. Montreal 



84 



HARDWARE AND META 



Send For Our New Catalog 

Most complete line ol 

SCREW DRIVERS AND 
SMALL TOOLS 

PIONEER TOOLS 




The Southington Mfg. Co., 



Southington, Conn. 




root HOLDERS. 
OUR OFF-SET 
TOOL HOLDERS 



Have extra large head, 
' cutter and screw. A 
handy, rigid tool for Lathe or Planer. An 
sizes— Right and Left Band. 

Write for Catalog. 

ARMSTRONG BR08. TOOL CO. 

106 N. Francisco Aye. 

CHICAGO TJ. S. A 




ESTABLISHED 1849 



BRADSTRELTS 

Offices Throughout the Civilized World 



OFFICE8 IN CANADA: 



Calgary, Alta. 
Edmonton, Alta. 
Halifax, N.S. 
London, Ont. 
Ottawa, Ont. 
St. John, N.B. 



Vancouver. B.C 
Hamilton, Ont. 
Montreal, Que. 
Quebec, Que. 
Toronto, O t. 
Winnipeg, Man. 



Reputation gained by long years of vigorous, 
conscientious and successful work. 



THOMAS C. IRVING, $£ 

TORONTO 



General Manager 
stern Canada 




Reproduction of 

NEW SEYMOUR SHOW CARD 

12-in. by 15-in., in Handsome Colors. 

Shear and Hand stand out in high relief, being cut 

out. A show card will be sent to every dealer 

sending his business card with request to 

Henry T Seymour Shear Co. 

Selling Aeenls. WIEBUSCH & BILGEK. Lid., New York 




BUY THE BEST 

Star Brand Cotton Rope 
|| I D P I] | l V Star Brand Cotton Clothes Lines 



SASH CORD 



Star Brand Cotton Twine 

For Sale by All Wholesale Dealers 




The INFALLIBLE GLAZIER'S DIAMOND 

Just the Tool for Inexperienced Glass Cutters 



H 



r 




Made by 

A. SHAW & SON, London, Eng. 

GODFREY S. PELTON & SON, Canadian Agents, MONTREAL 



Sharratt & Newth's Glaziers' Diamonds 

are unequalled for cutting and wearing qualities. 




To be obtained from Dealers in Glass, Hardware and 
Painters' Supplies. 



GALVANIZED FENCE HOOK S?,^«S^S 9 Wooden p,cket8 *" 

.FENCE HOOKA 



WIRE NAILS, OILED SPRING 
BARB and PLAIN FENCE WIRE, 
OILED and ANNEALED CLOTHES 
LINE WIRE, STAPLES, etc 



The Western Wire and Nail Co., Limited, 



London, Ont. 



(• A |T II TTjl JJ are the strongest and sharpest low-priced Shears and Scissors 
IWj if 1 £j on the market. 

Why were 15,000 pairs of Acme Shears sold daily 5 years ago; and why are 30,000 pairs of Acme 
Shears sold daily to-day ? 

Because "Acme" on a shear or scissor spells satisfaction to the customer at a low price and a 
handsome profit to the dealer with greatly increased sales. 
Special Representatives, Wiebnseb & Bitter, Ltd., New York City. 
MR. DEALER: Write your jobber to-day for prices on the " Acme" line, supple- 
ment your high-priced shears with "Acme" shears and scissors and watch the 

Jobbers n sho r uld U wr'ite ^^ ^mtm M- 1^- 1 . . ^UU- 

for our W-2 Cata- -^ ^ I Qjgfej^ 

I o g u e , illustrating ^ ■— — — SSMMIM 
the most com pleteline 

of shears andscissors The No. 701 Oval Steel Screw Straight Trimmer 

manufactured. is one of our newest patterns. 

THE ACME SHEAR CO., (125-195 KdowIioo St.,) BRIDGEPORT, CONN., U.S.A 






WRITE FOR CATALOGUE & PRICES 

PEASE WALDON CO., Ltmited PEASE FOUN DR Y C0MPANY >£4S£ PACIFIC FOUNDRY, Limited 

WINNIPEG urtiTiD VANCOUVER 

TORONTO 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Peterboro Hardware 




Door Knockers add greatly to the appearance 
of a door. They are rapidly coming into 
vogue. Peterborough Door Knockers sup- 
plied to match any of our designs. A sample 
on your show cases will interest customers. 

Peterborough Lock Mfg. Co., Ltd. 

PETERBOROUGH, ONT. 



SHEET COPPER 

Prompt Shipment 
Stock or Import 

B. & S. H. Thompson & Co, 

LIMITED 

MONTREAL, QUE. 



H: 



m 



m 



Why not make 1912 the most profitable saw year in 

your history? 



ATKINS STERLING SAWS 

MADE IN CANADA 



THEY are Quality Saws. They appeal to the best 
mechanics and are backed up by an aggressive 
advertising campaign that pays! Write us for 
full information. It will cost nothing to at least investi- 
gate the merits of this important line; Address 

E. C. ATKINS & CO., 

MAKERS OF STERLING SAWS 

HAMILTON, ONTARIO 

Vancouver Branch, 109 Powell St. U.S. Factory, Indianapolis, Ind. 



86 




m 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Stand any old kind of racket! 

There's nothlnt so handy iround house, store 
or farm as the 

BUSTER BROWN 

CHILDREN'S EXPRESS WAGON 

They're strongly made, easy runn i n z and well 
finished, and are a splendid selling line. 



IN 4 SIZES 
Write for Prices 

Western Representatives: 

JAS. STEWART MFG. CO., LTD. 

WINNIPEG, MAN. 




The Woodstock Wagon & 
Mfg. Co., Limited 

WOODSTOCK, - ONTARIO 



F. E. MYERS & BRO. 

ASHLAND. OHIO 



PUMPS OF ALL KINDS 

HAY UNLOADING TOOLS 

BARN DOOR HANGERS 

guaranteed by our reputation for fair 

dealing 

The name means "QUALITY" 
LOOK FOR THE NAME MYERS 



J. H. ASHDOWN HARDWARE CO. 
Winnipeg, Calgary andJBranch Houses 









A new glass 
for office par- 
titions, having 
the appearance 
of watered silk. 

# 

Get 
Our Prices. 

* 


EjXxZJl, 1 - ' *L ^" ~1 


Can'be'used in 
any position 
where an ar- 
tistic effect is 
desired. 

* 

Ask 
For Samples. 




rSyfef ■ %, -% Vjg "t^f^^r 


I[g5lsg^ 


H 


Max-Silk Glass 

We also handle 

EASY SET BARS DOBBIN'S DAYLIGHT BARS 

NU-PLAN SIDEWALK PRISM 

The Consolidated Plate Glass Company 

of Canada (Limited) 
MONTREAL TORONTO WINNIPEG 



NOVA SCOTIA STEEL 

«ft COAL CO., Limited, 

NEW GLASGOW, N.S. 



Manufacturers of 



FERRONA 
PIG IRON 

and SIEMENS-MARTIN 

OPEN HEARTH STEEL 



Keep in mind the domin- 
ant fact that mankind from 
its first appearance on the 
earth has been schooled by 
nature to look for signs ; 
for invitations to taste; for 
suggestions as to what to 
wear. Tell your story 
briefly, forcibly, truthful- 
ly, and address it through 
the proper media and you 
can successfully apply ad- 
vertising as a means to 
increased distribution. 



Jardine Universal Ratchet 
Clamp Drill 

Died In factories of all kinds for 
hurried machine repairs. 

All machine shops and railway 
■hops ahould have it. 

Bridge builders, track layers, 
and structural metal workers 
hare constant use for it. 

Sand for Description. 



A. B. JARDINE & CO. 

HESPELER - - • ONTARIO 

87 



Steel Sheets for Deep Stamp- 
ing and Enamelling Purposes 

"Comet Brand" 

Also Dark Blue, P.C.R. and C.A. 

Sheets, also Galvanized Canada 

Plates. 

Makers 

W. Gilbertson & Co., Limited 

Sole Canadian Sales Agent 

ALEXANDER GIBB 

St. Nicholas Bldg. - Montreal 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



■^/w 




Steel 

Rim 

Locks 



are noted for ^heir 
strength, durabil- 
ity and efficiency. 




Safety Demands a Good 
Lock 

The "NATIONAL" Locks are built 
for strength and safety, the highest 
quality steel being used in their 
manufacture. They are made to 
meet the requirements of your high- 
est class trade. 

The "National" Lock is the only 
steel rim lock made in Canada, but 
sells at a medium price. 

Let us hear from you. 

NATIONAL HARDWARE 
COMPANY, LIMITED 

ORILLIA, ONTARIO, CANADA 




GOODS THAT LAST 

WHEN YOU ARE IN THE MARKET FOR 

Wire Cloth 

Perforated Sheet Metals 
General Wire and ironWork 

Consult us. We have goods that 
have a clean record, ensuring the 
buyer his money's worth and the 
dealer a good profit. 



Do not hesitate about 
sending us your order or 
specify our goods when 
ordering through your 
Jobber. 

Have you a copy of our 
new catalogue ? 




Canada Wire and Iron Goods Company 

HAMILTON, ONT. 

We Specialize in all kinds of Steel Cells, Steel Work, Etc., for Prisons. 
Jails and City Lockups. 



THE 4 CARDINAL 
VIRTUES OF THE 
FOX FLOOR SCRA- 
PING MACHINE 

1. Simple of Construction. 

2. Easy to Operate. 

3. Leaves a Perfect Finish. 

4. Inexpensive. 

Every Fox Scraper is guaranteed 
to do perfect work. 

Manufactured by 




FOX SUPPLY CO 

112 King Street 
BROOKLYN, WIS. 



THE FOX FLOOR SCRAPER IS SOLD BY :— 

The James Walker Hardware 
Co., Ltd. 



The E. Cavanagh Co., 

Ltd. 

Montreal 

Durand Hardware Co. 
Montreal 



Montreal 

Frothingham & Workman, Ltd. 
Montreal 



Prompt deliveries will be made. 
Write for Catalogue and Prices. 



PARKER'S 

Swivel 

VICTOR VISES 




Quick Working — Convenient 

Mechanics should use this vise because it saves 
time aud money. 

With it any piece of work can be instantly 
grasped by one motion of either the right or left 
hand. 

The Solid Steel Strengthening Bar is a great 
feature that prevails in all our vises, also the 
solid under portion of front jaw. Quality guar- 
anteed. 

Get full particulars. 

The Charles Parker Co. 

MERIDEN, CONN., U.S.A. 



88 



Personal Chat With You About Ourselves 



GETTING RESULTS. 

It will be remembered tbat the front cover of Hard- 
ware and Metal, issue of February 3, contained a striking 
advertisement of the new line of High Speed Bits, manu- 
factured by the Tobin Arms Mfg. Co., Woodstock, Ont. 

Mr. Tobin told us at the hardware convention in 
Guelph, two weeks later, that it was the most resultful 
trade paper advertising he had ever done. 

Even at that, the advertisement in question, undoubt- 
edly brought results which did not come to Mr. Tobin 's 
attention. 

In this connection, a letter just received from V. J. 
Brown, our Maritime Province representative, should in- 
terest every business man who has anything to sell the 
Canadian hardware trade. Mr. Brown says: 

"Mr. Norman Zwicker of Lunenburg, N.S., 
told me to-day that he placed an order for auger 
bits with Tobin Arms Mfg. Co., after seeing their 
advertisement in Hardware and Metal. 

"The advertisement was illustrated and he 
told me he placed the order as the result of 
having seen the ad., the firm's traveler being 
around about two days after the advertisement 
appeared." 

This incident illustrates one of the greatest services 
performed by a good trade paper, such as Hardware and 
Metal. It co-operates with the salesmen of its advertisers 
introducing them in advance, and making it easier for 
them to secure orders. 

Mr. Zwicker didn 't sit down and write the Tobin Arms 
Mfg. Co., asking them to send him a catalogue. The 
records of the Tobin Arms Mfg. Co., would not credit 
Hardware and Metal with an inquiry from Mr. Zwicker, 
and that is the way some firms count results from adver- 
tising. 

But the sales books of the Tobin Arms Mfg. Co. show 
that Mr. Zwicker actually bought their auger bits, and 
Mr. Zwicker says that the advertisement in Hardware and 
Metal influenced him to place the order. 

If the firm use him right, and supply him with first- 
class goods (as they no doubt will), he will probably be 
a permanent quantity buyer of Tobin High Speed Bits. 

© ■ 



BEST TRADE PAPER ON THE CONTINENT. 

An experienced advertising man, who has been in 
close touch with trade papers both in Canada and United 
States, recently made a very significant statement to one 
of our representatives. 

Said he: "My experience has forced me to the conclu- 
sion that Hardware and Metal covers its field more tho- 
roughly and has the confidence of its readers more com- 
pletely than any other trade paper on the continent, bar 
none." 

This statement is worth analysing. Every manufac- 
turer or jobber of goods sold through the hardware trade, 



should weigh it carefully and make the most searching in- 
vestigation into the position occupied by Hardware and 
Metal, among Canadian hardwaremen. 

If it is found, upon inquiry, that Hardware and Metal 
is regarded by wholesale and retail hardwaremen as the 
prime authority on all matters pertaining to the Canadian 
hardware trade; if readers of the paper state that they 
are guided in the conduct of their business by the sugges- 
tions and advice contained in Hardware and Metal; if 
they look for our weekly market reports to assist them 
in buying right— then Hardware and Metal obviously 
merits first consideration in the placing of advertising to 
the Canadian hardware trade. 

Published weekly under progressive management for 
nearly 24 years, Hardware and Metal has deserved and 
gained a prestige in the Canadian hardware trade which 
enables us to offer an absolutely unique advertising ser- 
vice to manufacturers or wholesalers desirous of securing 
distribution through Canadian hardware stores. 

"Hardware and Metal is the only business paper we 
cannot do without," remarked a dealer in an Alberta city 
to a hardware traveler, a few weeks ago. 



READING H. & M. IN THE STREET CAR. 

We know one manufacturer of a staple article sold by 
hardwaremen, who has been persuaded that street car 
advertising is the most profitable kind for him. 

If he had been with the Montreal Editor of Hardware 
and Metal on a Windsor car the other day, his faith in 
street ear advertising might have been shaken, if not 
actually shattered. 

Seated in the car was the manager of one of Canada's 
largest hardware stores, industriously reading the latest 
issue of Hardware and Metal. 

It is more than likely that the ceiling of the car, re- 
splendent as it was with advertisement of Massage Cream, 
Holeless Hosiery, and Masticated Breakfast Food, had 
not the slightest fascination for the hardware man. 

At any rate, it was not until he was saluted by the 
editor tbat his attention was diverted from the pages of 
Hardware and Metal. 

Getting into conversation with the editor, he proceeded 
to discuss several items which had aroused his interest 
in the paper, among others, an article on "turning over 
stock." He also spoke about the reliable predictions 
which had been made in the columns of Hardware and 
Metal regarding prices of white lead, and other commo- 
dities. 

That man is an exceedingly large buyer. His name, 
if mentioned, would be familiar to nearly every hardware 
manufacturers in Canada and United States. The fact 
that he thinks enough of Hardware and Metal to take 
it home for careful perusal, is a good indication of Hard- 
ware and Metal's standing in the Canadian hardware 
trade. 
89 



HARDWARE AND METAL 




fmi&cn/ 'tff^wazw xcm^ons 




90 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



THE BLUE BAND 



IDENTIFIES 
IT AS A 



HAMILTON BUCKET OR NIOBE PAIL 




The Best on Earth 

Get the right color and you will have the 
"WRIGHT" goods. 

These Buckets and Pails are extra heavy, 
and suitable for use by contractors, railroads, 
boats, city corporations, etc. 

Each Pail is made from two blanks, thus 
having only two side seams. The bottom 
cannot fall out, and the pails are guaranteed 
not to leak. 

Wrltm us for further 
particulars and price. 

E. T. Wright & Co. 

(H. G. WRIGHT) 

HAMILTON CANADA 




Store Management-Complete 



16 Full-Paie 
Illustrations 




272 Pages 
Bound in Cloth 



ABSOLUTELY NEW 



ANOTHER NEW BOOK 

BY 

FRANK 
FARRINGTON 

A Companion Book to 

Retail Advertising 
Complete 

$1.00 POSTPAID 

"Store Management — 
Complete" tells all 
about the management 
of a store so that not 
only the greatest sales 
but the largest profit 
may be realized. 

THIRTEEN CHAPTERS 
Here is a sample: 

CHAPTER V.-THE 
STORE POLICY— What it 

should be to hold trade. 
The money-back plan. 
Taking back goods. 
Meeting cut rates. 
Selling remnants. De- 
livering goods. Sub- 
stitution. Handling 
telephone calls. 
Courtesy. Rebating 
railroad fare. Courtesy 
to customers. 

JUST PUBLISHED 



Send us $1.00. Keep the book ten days and if it isn't worth the 
price return it and get your money back. 

TECHNICAL BOOK DEPARTMENT 
143-149 University Ave., - Toronto, Canada 



It Does Sift Ashes Without Dust 

and with practically no extra effort 



SAVES 

GOOD 

FUEL 




HOLLAND FURNACE COMPANY 

HOLLAND - MICHIGAN 

Sole Manufacturers and Patentees 



TWO CENTS PER WORD 

You can talk across the continent for two cents 
oer word with a Want Ad. in this paper. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



A Trial Will Convince You 

that there are good profits and com- 
plete satisfaction in selling our 

BUILDERS' 

HARDWARE 




Our line of Builders' Hardware includes 
Butt Hinges, Strap Hinges, Hasps, etc. 

We use only the very best materials 
and employ only expert workmen. 
Do not hesitate — send us a trial order 
at once . We guarantee satisfaction or 
refund the money. 

Write for Catalog. 

COWAN & BRITTON 

GANANOQUE, ONT. 



STAR 

Safety Razor 




The only safety with a 
barber's blade. It will give 
satisfaction for years without 
additional cost. 

We are receiving many inquiries from 
Canada for STAR goods. We give 
these to our dealers whenever possible. Our 
national advertising is making the demand 
greater daily. 

Many dealers are dressing their windows with 
STAR goods and display matter. It draws to 
their stores the purchasers of STARS created by 

^our advertising. Are you one of these dealers? 
k Write us for display matter of all kinds and for 1912 Catalog of 
^^ STAR Safely Razor* 

* -^^-^^— STAR Shaving Brushes 

STAR Diagonal Grooved Strops 
STAR Automatic Stropping 

Machines 
STAR Safety Corn Razors 




Your Jobber 'anil supply you 



Kampfc Bros. 

12-14 Reade Street 

NEW YORK CITY 



Do Not Lose a Sale 

because you cannot meet the Engineers' 
Requirements— keep a line of " MORRISON'S " 

GUARANTEED ENGINEERS' GOODS 

in stock and be prepared. 

Made from the very best mater- 
ial and the construction is strictly 
up-to-date in every respect. 

Backed by our guarantee and 
a long retained reputation for dura- 
bility, efficiency and economy. 

Our Engineers' Goods are real 
profit producers which never fail to 
give satisfaction. 





J.M.T. INJECTORS 



J.M.T. VALVES 



Write for illustrated catalogue on complete line, also prices 

The James Morrison Brass Mfg. Co., 

LIMITED 
93-97 Adelaide Street West .::- -::- TORONTO 



92 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



INDEX TO ADVERTISERS 

Occasionally advertisements are inserted in the paper after the index has been printed. The insertion of the Adver- 
tiser's name in this index is not part of the advertising order. The index is inserted 
solely for the convenience of the readers of the paper. 



Acme Shear Co 85 

American Grinder Co 72 

American Shearer Co 84 

Armstrong Bros. Tool Co 12 85 

Atkins & Co., E. C 86 

Atlas Mfg. Co 84 

Aylmer Pump & Scale Co 80 

Auto Controller Co., The 76 



Barber Asphalt Paving Co 26 

Barker, D. J., & Son 16 

Barnett, G. & H. Co 76 

Barton Netting Co 74 

Belleville Hdwe. & Lock Co 71 

Bemis & Call Hdwe & Tool 'Co... 80 

Berry Bros., Ltd 71 

Bissell Carpet Sweeper Co 27 

Bosse & Banks 84 

Bowser, S. ¥., & Co., Ltd 53 

Bradstreets 85 

Brandram-Hendeisun. Ltd 51 



Bridgeport Hdwe. Mfg. Co. 

British America Assurance Co 

Brown Boggs Co., Ltd 

Buck Stove Co.. Wm 

Buffalo Mfg. Co 

Burrow Stewart «S: Milne 

Burgess Norton Co. , The 

Burmeister & Wain's Export Co., 
Ltd 



Cameron & Campbell 84 

Canada Cement Co 22 

Canada Foundry Co 82 

Canada Glue Co 31 

Canada Metal Co 9 

Canada Steel Goods Co 8 

Canada Wire & Iron Goods Mfg. 

Co 88 

Canadian Copper Co 73 

Canadian National Exhibition 4 

Can. Fairbanks-Morse Co.. Ltd. ... 2 

Canadian Ferrosteel Co 18 

Canadian Hart Wheels 78 

Canadian Tube & Iron Co 17 

Can. Heating & Ventilating Co 15 

Caverhill, Learmont & Co 29 

Cavers Bros 77 

City of Leipzig 81 

Cheney & Sons. S 84 

Chicago Spring Butt Co 1 

Consolidated Plate Glass Co 87 

Crawford Co.. W. C 13 

Cummings, Jas. H., & Co.. Back cover 

Cummer-Dowswell, Ltd 21 



Davidson, Thos., Mfg. Co S 

Delta File Works 27 

Deming Co., The 78 

Directory of Manufacturers 84 

Dominion Cartridge Co 32 

Doikiu Bros 26 

Double Claw Hammer Co 1 

Dougall Varnish Co 67 

Dreis, Edward 25 



Ely Mfg. Co., Theo. J. 
Enterprise Enamel Co. 



Findlay Bros 

Ford Auger Bit Co. 
Fox Supply Co 



Gait Art Metal Co 4 

Garlock Packing Co 81 

Gibb, Alexander 84 87 

Gilbertson & Co., W 83 

Gillette Safety Razor Co 

Inside front cover 

Goodell-Pratt Co 77 

Grand Rapids Hdwe. Co 70 

Greening, B., Wire Co 20 

Gutta Percha & Rubber Mfg. Co., 

Inside back cover 

Hall Zryd Fdry. Co 14 

Hamilton Brass Mfg. Co 17 

Hamilton Cotton Co 85 

Hamilton & Son, C. J 23 

Hamilton Stamp & Stencil Wks.... 78 

Harrington & Richardson Arms Co.. 30 



Harris, J. W„ Co. 

Heinisch, R., Sons Co 

Henderson & Richardson 

Hills, Allan, Edge Tool Co., Ltd... 

Holland Furnace Co 

Howland. H. S., Sons & Co 

Hunt Helm Ferris (!o 

Hutton, Jas., & Co 



Independent Cordage Co., Ltd. 
Imperial Vamish & Color Co. 
International Vamish Co 



James & Reid 78 

Jamieson & Co., Ltd., R. C 57 

Jardine, A. B., & Co 87 

Jenkins & Hardy 84 

Laidlaw Bale Tie Co 74 

Lamplough, F. W 79 

Leslie, A. C, & Co 31 



Lewis Bros. , Ltd 3 

Lloyd, Ed 81 

London Bolt & Hinge Works 83 

London Foundry Co 74 

London Rolling Mill Co 73 

Lowe Bros. , Ltd 49 

Lufkin Ride Co Inside back cover 

Lundy Shovel & Tool Co 30 



McArthur, Alex., & Co 

McAvity & Sons, T 

McClary Mfg. Co 12 

McDougall, R., Co 

McGlashan-Clarke Co., Ltd 

McKinnon Chain Co 

Magnolia Metal Co 

Maple City Mfg. Co 

Marble Arms & Mfg. Co 

Martin-Senour Co 

Maxwell, D., & Sons 

May & Padmorc, Ltd. ..inside back cov 

Meakins & Son 

Metal Shingle & Siding Co 21 

Millers Falls Co 

Mitchell & Co., David 

Moore & Co., Benjamin 

Morris & Bailey Steel Co 

Morrison Brass Mfg. Co., Jas 

Myers & Bro., F. E 



National Acme Mfg. Co 

National Hardware Co 

New Imperial Cycles, Ltd. ... 

Newman, W.. & Sons 

Nicholson File Co 

Nickel Plate Stove Polish Co. 
Norsworthy, G, & Co., Ltd... 
Nova Scotia Steel & Coal Co. 
North Bros. Mfg. Co 



Oakey, John, & Son 

Ohio Foundry Co 

Ontario Lantern & Lamp Co., 
Otterville Mfg. Co 



Parker, Chas., Co 

Parmenter Bullock Co., The 

Paterson Mfg. Co 

Pease Fdry. Co 

Peterborough Lock Co 

Pittsburg Lamp, Brass & Glass Co., 

The 

Pinchin-Johnson & Co., Ltd 

Pink, Thos 

Pratt & Lambert 



Ramsay. A., & Son Co 60 

Raymond Bros 84 

Remington Arms - Union Metallic 

Renfrew Scale Co 78 

Cartridge Co 32 

Robertson Mfg. Co., Ltd., P. L.... 88 

Rogers, Alfred, Ltd 12 

Rogers, Henry, Sons & Co... Front cover 

Ross Rifle Co 88 

Samuel, M. & L., Benjamin & Co. 81 

Seuramberger Uhifedernfabrik 27 

Seymour, Henry T., Shear Co 85 

Sharratt & Newtn 85 

Shaw, A., & Son 85 

Sheet Metal Products Co 2 

Sherwin-Williams Co. of Can 65 

Shurly-Dietrich Co., Ltd 17 

Simonds Canada Saw Co 80 

Smart Mfg. Co., The James 13 

Smith Hardware Co 83 

Southington Mfg. Co 85 

Spear & Jackson, Ltd 

Spooner, Alonzo W., Ltd 

Standard Chain Co 70 

Standard Mfg. Co 16 

Standard Paint & Varnish Co 59 

Standard Rule & Level Co 23 

Steel Co. of Canada, Ltd 6 

Stephens, G. F., & Co 57 

Stevens, Hepner Co., Ltd 70 

Stevens Co., Ltd., The Jno 80 

Still, J. H Inside back cover 

Strachan Oswell & Co 82 

Stratford Mfg. Co 79 



77 



Tallman Brass & Metal Co 

Thompson, B. & S. H 

Toronto Plate Glass Importing Co. 
Townsend & Co., S. P 



B2 
86 
55 
23 

Utica Drop Forge Co 77 

Utilities, Limited 81 

Want Ads 58 

Walker Bin & Store Fixture Co. ... 5 

Ware Mfg. Co 74 

Western Distributors, Ltd 84 

Western Wire & Nail Co 85 

Wheeler & Bain 23 

White Mop Wringer Co 73 

Whitman & Barnes Mfg. Co 75 

Wilckes-Martin-Wilckes Co 82 

Winnipeg Ceiling & Roofing Co 72 

Winnipeg Paint & Glass Co., Ltd. 59 
Wright, E. T., & Co 83 

Yale & Towne 10 11 



A Good Year-round Seller ! ! 

is within your reach. Seize 
this opportunity to stock 

The "Tweed" 
Sanitary Chemical Closet 

It will bring you surprising results 

Bottom and top stamped out of 20 gauge Galvanized 
Steel and is very strong, durable, attractive and guar- 
anteed to be absolutely sanitary, and to satisfy every 
user or money refunded. The only closet with closed- 
in top. 

Up-to-date facilities and 
special machinery enable 
us to produce these su- 
perior grade closets at a 
very low price. 
We will help you to get 
started by sending you 
circulars, talking points, 
or an expert salesman 
and cut for local adver- 
tising. 

Large stock on hand, 
can ship promptly. Get 
after summer resort 
business. 




Write for Catalogue. 



THE 



Steel Trough and Machine Co., Ltd. 

TWEED - - ONTARIO 

STOCKED IV WEST BY:— The J. H. Ashdown Co., Ltd., 
Winnipeg, Saskatoon and Calgary; Gordon & Son, Eburne, B.C. 



The Corona Roaster 

YIELDS A GOOD PROFIT 




Housewives 
appreciate this 
roaster be 
cause it is as 
easily kept 
clean as a din- 
ner plate. The 
hard, glossy 
enamel cannot 
crack o:* chip 
off. 



Can be used for roasting any kind of meats, and is 
fully adapted to meet the requirements of a per- 
fect roaster. The double air jacket is all made of 
the one piece of steel. 

WE HELP YOU MAKE SALES 

by supplying advertising matter. 
Don't miss a chance to procure this ideal trade 
winner. Let us send you a trial order. Full direc- 
tions accompany each roaster. 

We manufacture a big line of well-known Enameled 
steel ware in ' ' Corona ' ' and ' ' White Star ' ' and 
other Brands. 

The Enterprise Enamel Co. 

BELLAIRE, OHIO 



93 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



CLASSIFIED LIST OF ADVERTISEMENTS 



Abrasive Wheels 

London Emery Works, London, Eng. 
Carborundum Co., Niagara Falls, N.Y. 
Canadian Hart Wheels, Hamilton. 

Aluminum Ware 

Hero Mfg. Co., Philadelphia. 
Northern Aluminum Co., Toronto. 
Btorer Mfg. Co., Frseport, 111. 
Ware Mfg. Co., Toronto. 
Wondershinc Limited, Toronto. 

Ammunition 

Dominion Cartridge Co., Montreal. 
Remington Arms Union Metallic Cart- 
ridge Co., New York. 

Animal Traps 

Oneida Community Ltd., Oneida, N.T. 
Anchors 

Henderson ft Richardson, Montreal. 

Star Expansion Bolt Co., New York. 

Auger Bits 
Ford Auger Bit Co., Holjoks, Mass. 
Spear ft Jackson, Sheffield, Eng. 
Tobin Arms Mfg. Co., Woodstock. 

Babbitt Metal 
Canada Metal Co., Toronto. 

Magnolia Metal Co., Montreal. 
Alonzo W. Spooner, Ltd., Port Hope, 

Tallmkn Brass ft Metal Co., Hamilton. 
Bar Iron 
Henderson A Richardson, Montreal. 
Steel Co. of Canada, Hamilton. 
London Rolling Mills Co., London. 

Bale-Ties 

Laidlaw Bale-Tie Co.. Hamilton, Ont. 
Bar Urns 

Buffalo Mfg. Co., Buffalo, N. Y. 
Bath Boom Fittings 

Buffalo Mfg. Co., Buffalo, N.Y. 

8. Stemau * Co., Brooklyn, N.Y. 

Belting 

Dominion Belting Co., Ltd., Hamilton 
Sadler ft Haworth, Montreal. 

Belting, Hose, etc. 

Gutta Percha and Rubber Mfg. Co., 
Toronto. 

Bird Cages 

E. T. Wright ft Co., Hamilton. 

Binder Twine 
Plymouth Cordage Co., N. Plymouth, 

Mass. 

Bolt! and Nuts 

London Bolt and Hings Works, Lon- 
don, Ontario. 

Ths Steel Co. of Canada, Ltd., Ham- 
ilton. 

National Acms Mfg. Co.. Montreal. 

Boilers and Radiators 
Pease Foundry Co., Toronto. 
Gumey Foundry Co., Toronto. 

Bolts — Expansion 

Star Expansion Bolt Co., New York. 
Brackets Shelf 

Atlas Mfg. Co., New Haven, Conn. 

P. & F. Corbin, New Britain, Conn. 

8tanley Works, New Britain, Conn. 
Brass Goods. 

Jas. Cartland ft Son, Ltd., Birming- 
ham, Eng. 

Evered & Co., Smethwick, Eng. 

Henderson & Richardson, Montreal. 

Tallman Brass & Metal Co., Hamilton 

Stover Mfg. Co., Freeport, 111. 
Brass, Sheets, Tubes and Rods. 

Henderson & Richard9on, Montreal. 

Tallman Brass ft Metal Co., Hamilton 

Brushes. 

Meakins & Sons, Hamilton. 
Stevens-Hepner Co., Port Elgin. 

Bridle Rings — Galvanized, Brass 
and Plain. 
Star Expansion Bolt Co., New York. 
Builder's' Tools and Supplies. 

Canada Wire & Iron Goods Mfg. Co., 

Hamilton. 
Caverhill, Learmont ft Co., Montreal. 
Howland, H. S. Sons & Co., Toronto. 
Lewis Bros. & Co., Montreal. 
Lufkin Rule Co., Saginaw, Mich. 
North Bros. Mfg. Co., Philadelphia, 

Pa. 
Stanley Rule ft Level Co.. N. Britain 

Builders' Hardware. 

Belleville Hardware ft Lock Mfg. Co., 
Belleville. 

Canadian Yale ft Towne, St. Cath- 
arines. 

P. & F. Corbin, New Britain, C. 

May ft Padmore, Birmingham, Eng. 

National Hardware Co., Orillia. 

Peterborough Lock Mfg. Co., Peter- 
borough. 
Butts. 

Canada Steel Goods Co., Hamilton. 

P. ft F. Corbin, New Britain, C. 
Cans 

Thee. Davidson Mff. Co., Montreal. 

MeClary Mfg. Co., Toronto. 



The Sheet Metal Products Co. of Can- 
ada, Ltd., Montreal, Toronto, 

Winnipeg. 

Carriers, Cash and Parcel 
Hamilton Brass Mfg. Co., Hamilton. 

Carpet Sweepers 

Bissell Carpet Sweeper Company, 
Grand Rapids, Mich. 

Carriage Heaters 

Chicago Flexible Shaft Co., Chicago. 
Carriage Springs and Axles 
Guelph Spring and Axis Co., Guelph. 

Cartridges 

Dominion Cartridge Co., Montreal. 

Cash Registers 
National Cash Register Co., Toronto. 

Cattle and Trace Chains 

Greening, B„ Wire Co., Hamilton. 
McKinnon Chain Co., St. Catharines 
Oneida Community Limited, Niagara 
Falls, Ont. 

Cement 

Canada Cement Co., Montreal, P.Q. 

Alt. Rogers, Ltd., Toronto. 

B. ft S. H. Thompson ft Co., Montreal 

Churns 
Connor, J. II., ft Sons, Ottawa, Ont. 
Cummer-Dowswell Ltd., Hamilton, Ont 
Maxwell, David, ft Sons, SLMary'i, Ont 

Chafing Dishes 
Buffalo Mfg. Co., Buffalo. 
S. Stemau ft Co., Brooklyn, N.Y. 

duplets 

S. Cheney ft Son, Manlius, N.Y. 

Chicken Coops. 

Triangle Mfg. Co., Freeport, 111. 

Clippers — All Kinds 

American Shearer Mfg. Co., Nashua, NH 
Chicago Flexible Shaft Co., Chicago. 
Coatea Clipper Mfg. Co., Worcester, 
Mass. 

Clocks 

The Western Clock Mfg. Co., La Sails, 
111. 

Clothes Reels and Lines 
Cummer-Dowswell Ltd., Hamilton, Ont 
Hamilton Cotton Co., Hamilton. 

Clothes Wringers 

Cummer-Dowswell Ltd., Hamilton, Ont 
American Wringer Co., New York City 
Lovell Mfg. Co., Erie, Pa. 
Cold Rolled Strip Steel 

The Morris ft Bailey Steel Co., Pitts- 
burg, Pa. 

Cordage 
Hamilton Cotton Co., Hamilton. 
Plymouth Cordage Co., N. Plymouth, 
Mass. 

Cow Ties 
Greening, B., Wire Co., Hamilton. 
McKinnon Dash and Metal Co., St. 

Catharines. 
Oneida Community, Ltd., Niagara Falls 
Cuspidors 
Buffalo Mfg. Co., Buffalo, N.Y. 
Thos, Davidson Mfg. Co., Montreal. 
McClary's, London, Ont. 
The Sheet Metal Products Co., of 
Canada, Ltd., Montreal, Toronto, 
Winnipeg. 

E. T. Wright ft Co., Hamilton. 

Cutlery — Razors, Scissors, etc. 

Caverhill, Learmont ft Co., Montreal 
Crookes, Jonathan & Son. 
Dorken Bros, ft Co., Montreal. 
Greeff, Bredt Co., Toronto. 
Henderson ft Richardson, Montreal. 
Heinisch's, R., Sons Co., Newark.N.J. 
Howland, H. 8., Sons ft Co., Toronto 
Hutton, Jas., ft Co., Montreal. 

F. W. Lamplough & Co., Montreal. 
McGlashan, Clarke Co., Ltd., Niagara 

Falls. 

Door Bolts. 

Montreal Hdwe. Mfg. Co., Montreal. 
Door Checks. 

Wm. Keating, Toronto. 

Canadian Yale ft Towne, St. Cath- 
arines. 

P. ft F. Corbin, New Britain, C. 
Door Hangers. 

F. E. Myers ft Bro., Ashland, O. 

Richard Wilcox Mfg. Co., Aurora, 111. 
Door Springs. 

Stover Mfg. Co., Freeport, 111. 
Drawer Pulls. 

P. & F. Corbin, New Britain, C. 

Stover Mfg. Co., Freeport, HI. 
Drills, Brick and Stone. 

Star Expansion Bolt Co., New York. 

Whitman ft Barnes Mfg. Co., St. 
Catharines. 

Drills— High Speed 

Alexander Glbb, Montreal. 



Drinking Cups 

Hero Mfg. Co., Philadelphia. 
Dry Batteries 

Canadian Carbon Co., Winnipeg. 
Eavetroughs 
Thos. Davidson Mfg. Co., Montreal. 
McClary's, London, Ont. 
The Sheet Metal Products Co. of Can- 
ada, Ltd., Montreal, Toronto, Win- 
nipeg. 
E. T. Wright ft Co., Hamilton. 
Metal Shingle ft Siding Co., Preston, 
Wheeler ft Bain, Toronto. 
Emery or Corundum Wheels 
The Carborundum Co., Niagara Falls, 

N.Y. 
Canadian Hart Wheels Limited, Ham- 
ilton, Ont. 
London Emery Works, London, Eng. 
Electric Fixtures 
The Barton-Netting Co., Ltd, Windsor 

Ont, 
Jas. Morrison Brass Mfg. Co.. Tor- 
onto. 
Emery Cloth 
London Emery Works, London, Eng. 
Jno. Oakey & Sons, Ltd., London, 
Eng. 

Emery Wheels. 

London Emery Works, London, Eng. 
Jno. Oakey & Sons, Ltd., London, 
Eng. 

Enameled Ware 

Thos. Davidson Mfg. Co., Montreal. 

The Sheet Metal Products Co.of Canada 
Ltd., Montreal, Toronto, Winnipeg 

McClary's, London, Ont. 
Escutcheon Pins 

The Parmenter ft Bulloch Co., Gana- 
oque, Ont. 

Steel Co. of Canada, Ltd., Hamilton. 
Fencing — Woven Wire 

The Steel Co. of Canada, Ltd., Ham- 
ilton. 

Banwell-Hoxie Wire Fence Co., Ham- 
ilton. 

McGregor, Banwell ft Co., Walker- 
ville. 
Files and Rasps 

Barnett Co., G. ft H., Philadelphia, Pa 
Delta File Works, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Disston, Henry, ft Sons, Philadelphia, 

Pa. 
Nicholson File Co., Port Hope. 
Simonds Canada Saw Co., Ltd., 

Montreal. 
Spear ft Jackson, Sheffield, Eng. 
Firearms and Ammunition 

Harrington ft Richardson Sons Co., 
Worcester, Mass. 

C. J. Hamilton ft Son, Plymouth, 
Mich. 

Tobin Arms Mfg. Co., Woodstock. 
Fire Escapes 

Canada Foundry Co., Ltd., Toronto. 

Dennis Wire ft Iron Co., London. 
Fire Grates. 

Ohio Foundry ft Mfg. Co., Steuben- 
ville, O. 

Fine Irons 

Stover Mfg. Co., Freeport, IU. 
Fire Place Furnishings 

The Barton-Netting Co., Ltd., Wind- 
sor, Ont. 

Flint Paper 

London Emery Works, London, Eng. 

Jno. Oakey & Sons, Ltd., London, 

Eng. 

Food Choppers 

Enterprise Mfg. Co., Philadelphia. 

D. Maxwell ft Sons, St. Mary's. 
Foot Warmers 

Chicago Flexible Shaft Co., Chicago. 

Forgings 

Steel Co. of Canada, Limited, Hamil- 
ton. 

Furnaces, see Stoves 

Galvanizing 

Canada Metal Co., Toronto. 
Thos. Davidson Mfg. Co., Montreal. 
The Steel Co. of Canada, Ltd, Ham- 
ilton. 

Galvanized Iron 
W. Gilbertson ft Co., Ltd., Alex. 

Gibb, Montreal, Agent, 
Henderson ft Richardson, Montreal. 
John Lysaght, Ltd., Bristol, Newport 
and Montreal. 
B. ft S. H. Thompson ft Co., Mont- 
real. 

Gas Fixtures 

The Barton-Netting Co., Ltd., Wind- 
sor, Ont. 

Jas. Morrison Brass Mfg. Co., Toronto 
Glass 
Hobbs Mfg. Co., London. 
Toronto Plate Glass Imp. Co., Toronto 
Winnipeg Paint ft Glass Co., Winnipeg 
Consolidated Plate Glass Co., Tor- 
onto. 

A. Ramsay ft Son, Montreal. 

B. ft S. H. Thompson ft Co., Mont- 
real. 



94 



Glass, Ornamental 

Consolidated Plate Glass Co., Toronto 

Hobbs Mfg. Co., London. 

Toronto Plate Glass Importing Co., 
Toronto. 

Winnipeg Paint ft Glass Co., Winni- 
peg. 

Glass Paper 

London Emery Works, London, Eng. 

Jno. Oakey & Sons, Ltd., London. 
Eng. 

Glass, Wired 
Hobbs Mfg. Co., London. 
Toronto Plats Glass Imp. Co., Tor- 
onto. 
Winnipeg Paint ft Glass Co., Winni- 
peg. 
Consolidated Plate Glass Co., Torento 
Glaziers' Diamonds 
Pelton, Godfrey S. 
Sharratt ft Newth, London, Eng. 
Winnipeg Paint ft Glass Co.. Winni- 
peg. 
Glue 

The Canada Glus Co., Ltd., Brant- 
ford. 

Henderson ft Richardson, Montreal. 
Grinding Machinery. 

London Emery Works, London, Eng. 
Grindstones 

Richards-Wilcox Mfg. Co., Aurora. 
IU. 

American Grinder Mfg. Co., Mil- 
waukee. 

Guns 

Harrington ft Richardson Arms Oe. 

Worchester, Mass. 
Tobin Arms Mfg. Co., Woodstock, Ont. 
C. J. Hamilton ft Sea, Plymouth, 

Mich. 

Hammers 

Stover Mfg. Co., Freeport. 111. 
Whitman ft Barnes Mfg. Co.. It. 
Catharines. 

Handles 

Still, J. H., Mfg. Ce u St. Thomas. 

W. C. Crawford Co., Tilbury. 
Hardware, Metal Window. 

Canadian Yale & Towne, St. Cath- 
arines. 

P. ft F. Corbin, New Britain, Cena. 
Hay Unloading Tools 

F. I. Myers ft Bro., Ashland, Okie. 
Hinges 

Canada Steel Goods Co., Hamlltsa. 

Cowan ft Britton, Gananoauc 

Montreal Hardware Co., Montreal, 

Ths Stanley Wsrks, New Britain. 
Conn. 

Hinges, Spring 

Chicago Spring Butt Co., Chleaga. 

Standard Mfg. Ce.. Shelby, Ohio. 
Hockey Sticks 

Still, J. H. Mfg. Co., St, Thomas. 

St, Marys Wood Specialty Oe.. at. 
Marys. 

Hooks 

P. ft F. Corbin, New Britain, Conn. 
Henderson ft Richardson, Montreal. 
Steel Co. of Canada, Limited, Ham- 
ilton. 
Stover Mfg. Co., Frseport, I1L 
Hoop Iron 

The Steel Co. sf Canada, Ltd., Ham 
ilton. 

Hoops — Steel and Wire 

Laidlaw Bale-Tie Co., Hamilton, Ont. 

Horseshoes and Nails 

Steel Co. of Canada, Ltd., f"*iHri 
Ice Cream Freezers 

North Bros. Mfg. Co., Philadelphia. 

The Sheet Metal Products Co.of Canada 
Ltd., Montreal, Toronto. Winnipeg 
Ice Cutting Tools 

North Bros. Mfg Co., Philadelphia, Ps 
Iron and Steel Bars 

Henderson ft Richardson, Montreal. 
Steel Co. of Canada, Limited, Hamilton 

London Rolling Mill Co., London, 

Iron Pipe 

Steel Co. of Canada, Ltd., Hamilton. 
Canada Tubs ft Iron Co., Montreal. 
Iron Pumps 
Aylmer Pump ft Scale Co., Ay liner. 
R. McDougafl Co., Gait. 
Red Jacket Mfg. Co., Davenport, Iowa 
F. E. Myers ft Bro., Ashland, Ohio. 

Knife Polish 

London Emery Werks. London. Bag. 
Jno. Oakey & Sons, Ltd., London, 

Eng. 

Ladders, Step. 

Otterville Mfg. Co., Otterville, Ont. 

Stratford Mfg. Oe., Stratford, Ont. 
Ladders — Shelf 

Hamilton Brass Mfg. Oe., Hamfltoa, 

F. E. Myers ft Bre., Ashland, Ohio. 

Richards-WUoox Mfg. Oe., Aarera. 
IU. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Lamps, Acetylene 

Maple City Mfg. Co.. Monmouth, DL 
Lampblack 
The L. Martin Co., New York. 
Wilekee Martin Wilckee Co.. New Tork 

Lanterns 
Thos. Davidson Mff. Co., MontreaL 
The Sheet Metal Product! Oo.of Canada 
Ltd., Montreal, Toronto, Winnipeg 
K. T. Wright * Co., Hamilton. 

Lawn Fencing; 
Canada Wire * Iron Goods Mfg. Co., 

Hamilton. . , . _ „ 

B. Greening Wire Co., Ltd.. Hamil- 

McGregor Banwell * Co.. Walkerrflle 

Banwell Hoxie Wire Fence Co.. Ham- 
ilton. 
Lawn Mowers 

D. Maxwell * Bone, St, Mary's, Ont. 

Supplee Hardware Co., Philadelphia 

Clipper Lawn Mower Co., Dixon, 111. 

8. P. Townsend & Co., Orange, N.J. 

Whitman ft Bamee Mfg. Co., St. 
Catharines. 
Lawn Swings 

F. E. Myers * Bro., Ashland, Ohio. 

Stratford Mfg. Co., Stratford, Ont. 

Lightning Rods 

Hamilton Brass Mfg. Co., Hamilton, 
Ont, 
Locks, Knobs, Escutcheons, etc. 

BelleTille Hdw. and Lock Mfg. Com- 
pany, Belleville. _ 

Canadian Tale * Towne, St. Cath- 
arines. _ , 

P. ft F. Corbin, New Britain, Conn. 

May ft Padmore, Birmingham, Eng. 

National Hardware Co.. Orillia. 

Peterborough Leek Mfg. Co., Peter- 
borough, Oat. 
Lumbering; Tools 

Pink, Thos., ft Co., Pembroke, Ont 
Manufacturers' Agents 

Oibb, Alexander, Montreal. 

Mcintosh, H. F., ft Co.. Toronto. 

Western Distributors Ltd., Saskatoon. 
Mantels and Grates 

The Barton-Netting Co., Ltd., Wind- 
sor, Ont, 
Match Boxes 

Stover Mfg. Co.. Freeport, 111. 
Metals 

Canada Metal Co., Toronto. 

CaTerhill, Learmont ft Co., Montreal. 

Gibb, Alexander, Montreal. 

Henderson ft Richardson, Montreal. 

Leslie, A. C ft Co., Montreal. 

Lyssght, John, Bristol, Eng. 

Magnolia Metal Co., Montreal. 

McKechnie Bros., Birmingham, Eng. 

Nora Scotia Steel and Coal Co., New 
Glasgow, N.S. 

Samuel, Benjamin ft Co., Toronto. 

Alonzo W. Spooner, Ltd., Port Hope, 
Ont. 

The Sheet Metal Products Co.of Canada 
Ltd., Montreal, Toronto, Winnipeg 

Tallman Brass ft Metal Co., Hamilton 

Thompson, B. ft 8. H. ft Co.. Montreal 

Metal Lockers 

Canada Wire ft Iron Goods Mfg. Co., 
Hamilton. __. 

Dennis Wire ft Iron Co., London, Ont. 
Metal Shingles, Sidings, Etc. 

Gait Art Metal Co.. Gait. 

Metallic Roofing Co., Toronto. 

Metal Shingle and Siding Co., Preston. 
Metal Polish, Emery Cloth, Etc. 

Oakey, John, ft Sons, London, Eng. 

John C. Wilson, Ottawa. 
Metal Store Fronts 

Canada Foundry Co., Ltd., Toronto. 
Mop Holder 

Theo. J. Ely Mfg. Co., Erie, Pa. 
Mop Wringers 

Theo J. Ely Mfg. Co., Girard, Pa. 

White Mop Wringer Co., FultonTille, 
N.T. 
Nail Pullers 

The Bridgeport Hdw. Corp., Bridge- 
port, Conn. 

Smith Hardware Co.. Montreal. 

Nails, Wire 

Laidlaw Bale-Tie Co., Hamilton, Ont. 

Parmenter ft Bulloch Co., Gananoqne. 

P. L. Robertson Mfg. C, Milton, Ont. 

Steel Co. of Canada, Limited, Ham- 
ilton. 
Oilers 

Thos. Daridson Mfg. Co., Montreal. 

Hero Mfg. Co., Philadelphia, 

Maple City Mfg. Co., Monmouth, 111. 

The Sheet Metal Products Co.of Canada 
Ltd., Montreal, Toronto, Winnipeg 

Wright, E. T. ft Co., Hamilton, Ont. 
Oil Stones 

Canadian Hart Wheels, Hamilton. Ont 

Carborundum Co., Niagara Falls, N.T. 
Oil Stoves 

MeClary Mfg. Co.. London. 

Queen City Oil Co., Toronto. 
Oil Tanks 

Bowser. B. F., ft Co., Toronto. 



Ornamental Iron and Wire 

Canada Wire ft Iron Goods Mfg. Co., 

Hamilton. 
Dennis Wire ft Iron Co., London, Ont 

Packing 

Garlock Packing Co., Hamilton, Ont 
Paints, Oils, Varnishes 

Berry Bros., Limited, Walkerrile, Ont. 

Brandram Henderson, Montreal. 

Canada Paint Co., Montreal. 

Canadian Oil Companies, Ltd., Tor- 
onto. 

Dougall Varnish Co., Montreal. 

Glidden Varnish Co., Toronto. 

Imperial Varnish and Color Co., Tor- 
onto 

International Varnish Co., Toronto. 

R. C. Jamieson ft Co., Ltd., Montreal 

Lowe Bros., Ltd., Toronto. 

Martin-Senour Co., Montreal. 

Moore, Benjamin ft Co., Toronto. 

Pinchin, Johnson Co., Toronto. 

Pratt ft Lambert Inc., Bridgeburg, 
Can. 

A. Ramsay ft Son Co., Montreal. 

Sherwin-Williams Co., Montreal. 

Standard Paint and Varnish Co., 
Windsor, Ont, 

G. F. Stephens ft Co., Winnipeg, 
Man. 

Winnipeg Paint ft Glass Co.. Winni- 
peg. 
Paint and Tarnish Remover 

Chadeloid Chemical Co., New York. 

Dougall Varnish Co., MontreaL 

Imperial Varnish ft Color Co., Tor- 
onto. 
Perforated Sheet Metals 

Canada Wire and Iron Goods Mfg. 
Co., Hamilton. 

Greening, B., Wire Co., Hamilton. 

Pig Iron 

Henderson ft Richardson, Montreal. 
Steel Co. of Canada, Limited, Ham- 
ilton. 
8amuel Benjamin ft Co., Toronto. 
A. C. Leslie ft Co., Montreal. 
Pipe, Wrought Lead and 
Galvanized 
Steel Co. of Canada, Limited, Ham- 
ilton. 
Canadian Tube ft Iron Co., Montreal. 
Pliers 
Henderson ft Richardson, Montreal. 
Smith Hardware Co., Montreal. 
Poultry Netting 
Greening, B., Wire Co., Hamilton, 

Ont. 
John Lysaght, Ltd., Bristol, Newport 
and Montreal. 
Pruning Knives 

International Tool Co., Detroit. 
Pumps 
Canada Foundry Co., Ltd., Toronto. 
R. McDougall Co., Gait, Ont. 
F. E. Myers ft Bro., Ashland, Ohio. 
Red Jacket Mfg. Co., Davenport, Iowa. 
Pumps, Power 
Canadian Fairbanks-Morse Co., Ltd., 
Montreal. 
Putty 
Brandram-Henderson Co., Montreal. 
Canada Paint Co., Montreal. 
Sherwin-Williams Co., Montreal. 
Pinchin-Johnson ft Co., Toronto. 
Steel Co. of Canada, Ltd., Hamilton. 
Rat Traps 
Canada Wire ft Iron Goods Mfg. Co., 

Hamilton. 
Lovell Mfg. Co., Erie, Pa. 
Oneida Community, Ltd.. Niagara 
Falls. 
Razors 
Gillette Safety Razor Co., Montreal. 
Greeff-Bredt ft Co., Toronto. 
Jonathan Crookes ft Son, Sheffield, 

Eng. 
Dorken Bros, ft Co., Montreal. 
Jas. Hutton ft Co.. Montreal. 
Kampfe Bros., New York. 
Razor Blades. 
Schramberger, Uhrfedemfabrik, 
Schramberg, Germany. 
Razor Hones 
Canadian Hart Wheels, Ltd., Ham- 
ilton. 
Carborundum Co., Niagara Falls, N.Y. 
Razor Stropa 

J. R. Torrey ft Co., Worcester, Mass. 
Registers 
Jas. Stewart Mfg. Co., Woodstock, 

Ont. „ . 

Canadian Ferrosteel Co., Bridgeburg. 
Rivets 
Steel Co. of Canada, Hamilton. 
Parmenter ft Bulloch Co., Gananoque. 
P. L. Robertson Mfg. Co., Ltd., Mil- 
ton West, Ont, 
Roofing Supplies 
Barber Asphalt Co., Philadelphia, 
Brantford Roofing Co., Brantford. 
Canadian 8upply Co., Toronto. 
Dominion Roofing Co. of Canada. 

Ltd., Toronto. 
Gait Art Metal Co., Gait, Ont. 
McArthur, Alex., ft Co., Montreal. 
Metal Shingle ft Siding Co., Preston, 

Out 
Metallic Roofing Co.. Toronto. 
Dnited Roofing ft Mfg. Co., Phila- 
delphia, Pa. _ _ , 
Winnipeg Paint ft Glass Co., Winni- 
peg. 



Rope 

Independent Cordage Co., Toronto. 
Rules and Gauges 
Jas. Chesterman ft Co.. Ltd., Shef- 
field, England. 
Li if kin Rule Co., Windsor. 
Saws 
Atkins, E. C, ft Co., Indianapolis, 

Ind. 
Disston, Henry, ft Sons, Philadelphia. 
Drabble ft Sanderson, Sheffield, Eng. 
Sburley Dietrich Co., Ltd., Gait, Ont. 
Simonds Canada Saw Co., MontreaL 
Spear ft Jackson, Sheffield, Eng. 
Scales 
Aylmer Pump ft Scale Co., Aylmer, 

Ont. 
Burrow, Stewart ft Milne Co., Ham- 
ilton. 
Renfrew Scale Co.. Renfrew, Ont. 
Screen Door Sets 
P. ft F. Corbin, New Britain, Conn. 
Stanley Works, New Britain, Conn. 
Screws, Nuts, Bolts 
National Acme Mfg. Co., MontreaL 
Steel Co. of Canada, Limited, Ham- 
ilton. 
Screws, Wood 
P. L. Robertson Mfg. Co., Milton, 

Ont. 
Steel Co. of Canada, Hamilton. 
Scythe Stones 
The Carborundum Co., Niagara Falls, 
New York. 
Shears, Scissors 
Acme Shear Co., Bridgeport, Conn. 
R. Heinlsch's Sons Co., Newark, N.J. 
Henry T. Seymour Shear Co., New 

York. 
J. Wiss ft Sons Co., Newark, N.J. 
Shelf Boxes 

Cameron ft Campbell, Toronto. 
Shellacs 

Berry Bros., Walkerville. 
Shovels and Spades 

Spear ft Jackson, Sheffield, Eng. 
Sieves and Screens 
Canada Wire ft Iron Goods Mfg. Co., 

Hamilton. 
B. Greening Wire Co., Ltd., Hamil- 
ton. 
Silverware 
McGlasban, Clarke Co., Niagara Falls. 
Oneida Community, Ltd., Niagara 
Falls. 
Sporting Specialties. 
Marble Arms & Mfg. Co., Gladstone, 
Mich. 
Sprayers 
Cavers Bros., Gait, Ont. 
T. Collins Mfg. Co., Toronto. 
Thos. Daridson Mfg. Co., Montreal. 
The Sheet Metal Products Co.of Canada 
Ltd., Montreal, Toronto, Winnipeg 
E. T. Wright ft Co., Hamilton. 
Spramotor Co., London. 
Springs 
B. Greening Wire Co., Ltd., Hamilton 
Henderson ft Richardson, MontreaL 
Spring Hinges, Etc. 
Chicago Spring Butt Co., Chicago, 111. 
Standard Mfg. Co., Shelby, Ohio. 
Stains, Shingle 

Berry Bros., Walkerville. 
Stains, Wood 

Berry Bros., Walkerville. 
Staples 
B. Greening Wire Co., Ltd., Hamilton 
Steel Co. of Canada, Ltd., Hamilton. 
Steel — High Speed 
Alexander Gibb, MontreaL 
Henderson ft Richardson, Montreal. 
Steel— Cold Rolled Strip 

Morris ft Bsiley Steel Co., Pittsburg. 
Steel Wire Hoop« 

Steel Co. of Canada, Ltd., Hamilton. 
Stencils 
Hamilton Stamp ft Stencil Co., Ham- 
ilton, Ont. 
McClary's, London, Ont, 
The Sheet Metal Products Co.of Canada 
Ltd., Montreal, Toronto, Winnipeg 

E. T. Wright ft Co., Hamilton, Ont. 
Herod Machine ft Stamping Co., 

Brantford. 
Store Ladders 
Hamilton Brass Mfg. Co., Hamilton, 
Ont. 

F. E. Myers ft Bro., Ashland, Ohio. 
Stoves, Furnaces 

Burrow, Stewart & Milne Co., Ham- 
ilton. 

Findlay Bro3., Carleton Place. 

Clare Bros. & Co.. Preston. 

Holland Furnace Co., Holland, Mich. 

Thos. Davidson Mfg. Co., Montreal. 

McClary's, London, Ont. 

Pease Foundry Co., Toronto. 

D. J. Barker ft Co., Pieton. 
Stoves. Gns. 

Burrow, Stewart ft Milne Co.. Ham 
ilton. 

MeClary Mfg. Co., London. Ont. 
Taeks 

The Steel Co. of Canada, Ltd.. Ham 
llton. 
Tapes 

Jas. Chesterman ft Co., Sheffield, Eng. 

Lufkin Rule Co.. Windsor, Ont. 
Tiling — Wall and Floor 

The Barton-Netting Co., Ltd.. Wind- 
sor. Ont. 



Tin Plate 
Henderson ft Richardson, MontreaL 

A. C. Leslie ft Co., Montreal. 

B. ft S. H. Thompson ft Co., Mont- 
reaL 

M. ft L. Samuel, Benjamin ft Co., 
Toronto. 
Tools 

The Chapin Stevens Co.. Pine Mead- 
ow, Conn. 

The GoodeU-Pratt Co., Greenfield, 
Mass. 

Spear ft Jackson, Sheffield, Eng. 

Allan Hills Edge Tool Co., Gait. 

Armstrong Bros. Tool Co,, Chicag*. 

Robt. Sorby ft Sons, Sheffield. 

Stanley Rule ft Level Co., New 
Britain. 

International Tool Co., Detroit. 
Tools — Metal Workers' 

Brown-Boggs Co., Hamilton. 
Tool Grinders 

American Grinder Mfg. Co., Milwaukee 

Wis. 
Luther Grinder Mfg. Co., Milwaukee. 
Richards-Wilcox Mfg. Co., Aurora 
I1L 
Trucks 

Aylmer Pump & Scale Co., Aylmer, 
Ont. 

Burrow, Stewart & Milne Co., Ham- 
ilton. 

Renfrew Scale Co., Renfrew, Co. 
Varnishes: See Paints 

Berry Bros., Limited, Walkerville, Oat 

Dougall Varnish Co., MontreaL 

Glidden Varnish Co., Toronto. 

International Varnish Co., Toronto. 

Pratt ft Lambert, Bridgeburg. 
Ventilators 

Harris. J. W„ Co., MontreaL 
Vises 

Henderson ft Richardson, MontreaL 

Hollands Mfg. Co., Erie, Pa. 

Chas. Parker Co., Meriden, Coaa. 

Prentiss Vise Co., New York. 
Washing Machines, Etc. 

J. H. Connor ft Son., Ottawa, Oat. 

Cummer-Dowswell Ltd., Hamilton. On* 

Henderson & Richardson, Montreal. 

D. Maxwell ft Son, St. Mary's, Oat. 

One Minute Washer Co., Toronto. 

London Foundry Co., London. 
Wall Plaster 

Manitoba Gypsum Co., Winnipeg. 
Waffle Irons 

Stover Mfg Co., Freeport, DL 
Wagons — Children's 

Wod stock Wagon Co., Woodstock. 
Washers 

P. L. Robertson Mfg. Co., Miltsa, 

Ont. 
Steel Co. of Canada, Limited, HamllUa 
White Lead 

Brandram-Henderson Co., MontreaL 
Steel Co. of Canada, Limited, Hamilton 

Wholesale Hardware 
CaTerhill, Learmont ft Co., Montreal 
Howland, H. S., Sons ft Co., Toronto 
Lewis Bros, ft Co., MontreaL 

Window Guards 
Canada Wire ft Iron Goods Mfg. Caw 

Hamilton. 
B. Greening Wire Co., Ltd., Hamilton 
Wire Guards 

B. Greening Wire Co., Ltd., Hamilton 
Wire Door Guards 

B. Greening Wire Co., Ltd., Hamilton 
Wire — Iron, Steel, Brass and 
Copper 
B. Greening Wire Co., Ltd., Hamilton 
Henderson ft Richardson, MontreaL 
Laidlaw Bale-Tie Co., Hamilton, Ont. 
P. L. Robertson Mfg. Co., Milton, Ont. 
Steel Co. of Canada, Limited, Hamilton 
Wire Mats 
Andrews Wire Works of Canada, Ltd., 

Watford, Ont. 
Canada Wire ft Iron Goods Mfg. Co., 

Hamilton. 
B. Greening Wire Co.. Ltd., Hamilton 
Wire Goods, Bright 

Steel Co. of Canada, Limited, Hamilton 
Wire Goods 
Canada Wire ft Iron Goods Mfg. Co., 
Hamilton. 
Wire Machinery 
Ed Brand, 47! Moss Lane., Manehestoi 
Eng. 
Wire Products 

Andrews Wire Works, Watford, Oat. 
Wire Rope. 
The B. Greening Wire Rope Co., Ltd. 
Hamilton. 
Wire Springs 
B. Greening Wire Co., Ltd., Hamilton 
Henderson ft Richardson, MontreaL 
Jaa. Steele Limited, Guelph. Ont. 
Wood Finishes 

Berry Bros., Walkerville. 
Wrenches 

Cochran Pipe Wrench Co. 
Whitman ft Bames Mfg. Co.. M. 

Catharines. 
Bemis ft Call Hdwe. ft Ted Oa,, 

Springfield, Mass. 



95 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



"%*$*" 




280 Galibre 



High Velocity 



Don't make the 
mistake of selling 
a cheap arm to 



a man who can afford to buy a more expensive one 

It pays you to sell the "ROSS 280" High Velocity. 

Not only is it the best sporting rifle made, but the retailing 
price is $70.00 and it is a sale worth making. 

Moreover, any man fortunate enough to own a Ross High 
Velocity is sure to be proud of it and it will prove itself a 
walking advertisement for your store. 



ROSS RIFLE CO. 



QUEBEC 




T 

o 




PAT. FEB. 2, 1909 



ROBERTSON 

SOCKET HEAD 

WOOD SCREWS 

have a new and very important feature in the square hole. It is a feature that wood 
workers are quick to notice, as it not only preserves the screw, but also saves much of 
their valuable time, as it does away with all possibility of the screw driver slipping. It is 
certain to create a large demand in your vicinity after once introduced. 

We also manufacture Hand Drivers, Yankee Bits, Brace Bits, Rivets, Burrs, 
Washers, Nails, Wire and other high grade products. 

The P. L. Robertson Manufacturing Co., Limited, - Milton, Ont. 

TORONTO WAREHOUSE, 19 Jarvis Street, - F. J. Schuch, Agent 

Montreal Agent: — Edwin Schofield, Room 509 Canadian Express Building. Montreal, Que. 






Write for catalogue and prices (I 



96 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



CLEAN, SATISFACTORY 

PROFITS 



can only be s.ecured by selling a reliable 
and serviceable article. In 

STILL'S 

AXE HANDLES 

you will have everything that is desired in 
a quick-selling and reliable handle. The 
shaping, balancing, finishing and selection 
of wood are done by experts, and an abso- 
lute guarantee accompanies every handle 
that leaves our factory. Write for price 
list. 

J. H. Still Mfg. Co., Ltd. 



ST. THOMAS 



ONTARIO 



MAYMORE 






MAYMQRE GLAK KNOBS 

ARE BRILLIANTLY CUT 
FROM THE FINEST 
AND CLEAREST METAL 



fio. 7963 
THESE ARE 

ONLY TWO FROM 

AH UNIQUE SELECTION 
Ho. 7965 " 

Write for Particulars of Complete Line to 

THOMAS. W. KIRBY 

YONCE ST ARCADE TORONTO 

MANUFACTURED BY 



MAY&PADMOREt Birmingham 



ENG 



THE "HANDY |ANDY" FORCE CUP 

FORIHOUSEHOLD USE 




Enables anyone to keep the waste pipes of sinks, basins, 
baths, tubs, etc., free and clear, and in a safe and 
sanitary condition. 

THERE'S A GOOD SALE FOR THEM 

MANUFACTURED SOLELY BY 

The Gutta Percha & Rubber Mfg. Co. of Toronto, Limited 

Toronto Montreal Halifax Winnipeg Calgary Vancouver 



MEASURING TAPES 

MUST BE ACCURATE 

To sell well they must also be of the most improved design ; particularly adapted 
to the work they have to do ; durable and reliable. 



Those that bear 
this Trade-Mark 



fi/FKIN 



are the leaders of the field because they have always given satisfaction. THEY 
ARE DOMINION MADE. 




sale by th e fi/FKiN Rule t?o. of(?anadaUtd. 

Windsor, ont. 



FOR 

AIL JOBBERS. 



CATALOGUE 
ON REQUEST 



If present crop promises are realized, 
Canadian Hardwaremen will do a tre- 
mendous business this Fall. 

By the first of September it will be 
possible to accurately estimate the crops. 
Dealers will then place their orders with 
confidence. 

Hardware and Metal's Annual Fall 
Number will be issued August 31st — just 
when the tension is relieved, and every- 
body is ready to do Fall business. 

Your advertisement in this number 
will reach the Canadian Hardware Trade 
at precisely the right time to influence 
their Fall purchases. 

Let us show you how you can use this 
fine issue to your advantage. 




1,228TH ISSUE 



HARDWARMTAL 

Published Weekly by 

THE MACLEAN PUBLISHING COMPANY, LIMITED 

Vol. XXIV. Publication Office: Toronto, Canada No 32 

Aug. 10, 1912 




DOMINION 




Highest Quality 

RIFLE CARTRIDGES I2™| 



REVOLVER CARTRIDGES 
SHOT SHELLS and PRIMERS 



Carry Canadian Cartridges 

FOR SUBSTANTIAL PROFITS 

SATISFIED CUSTOMERS 

AND QUICK TURNOVER 



Dominion Cartridge Co., Limited 

MONTREAL, CANADA 



1 






^///s/s^^ 



HARDWARE AND METAL 




Big Ben Store Helps 



In order to enable Canadian dealers to 
get the maximum benefit from the Big Ben 
campaign now running in Canadian mag- 
azines, we are packing Big Ben specially 
for Canadian trade, six in a carton with a 
full set of store selling helps (two posters, 
two show cards, two metal signs. ) 

On an order for 12 we add a solid ma- 
hogany display stand. On an order for 24 

In broken and dozen /ots, $2.15 less 



or more, we print your name on dials, give 
the posters, display stand, and a beautiful 
metal sign lithographed in five colors. 

Big Ben and his selling helps are being 
carried in stock by 54 wholesale Canadian 
distributors. We will be glad to let you 
have their names upon request. Any will 
tell you Big Ben is the best made and the 
best selling alarm that's ever been put out. 

In lots of 24, $2.05 less 2%. 



The Western Clock Co., La Salle, 111. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 

Si 




The Carpenter — The Mechanic — The Farmer — The Man of the House — 

All users of edged tools want the 

CARBORUNDUM SHARPENING STONES 

And they are going to get them from the Carborundum Dealer 

The demand is increasing every day — the story of Carborundum — why it is the hardest and sharpest known 
material — why Carborundum Sharpening Stones cut faster, give a better edge and last longer — is being told to 
thousands, the market is being brought to the doors of the hardware dealer. 

The one way to get your share — to make your sharpening stone account show up well on 
your books, is to be a Carborundum dealer. 

Write us now about complete stock — ask us about the Carborundum trade 
helps. Are you on the mailing list for "At the Sign of the Indian Head ?" 

THE CARBORUNDUM COMPANY - Niagara Falls, N.Y. 




THE LIGHTNING AND BLIZZARD 

FREEZERS 



stand ready to serve you 
in the same satisfac- 
tory manner ia which 
they have served both 
trade and consumer 
for over a quarter of 
a century. The con- 
struction is of the same 
high class. They run 
easy, freeze quickly 
and take the smallest 
amount of ice and salt 
of any freezer made. 
The extensive adver- 
tising from season to 
season has created a 
permanent demand. 
They bring trade and 
help you keep it. 



Better let your Jobber quote at once. 

NORTH BROS. MFG. CO. 

Philadelphia, Pa. 





HARDWARE AND METAL 



More Reliable Than the Windmill 

Every Farmer is a Prospective Buyer 

At one time the farmer endorsed the windmill as a convenience and necessity. Since 
then time have changed. New things are constantly taking the place of the old. Such 
is the case with 

The "ECLIPSE" Pumper 

With it the farmer does not have to depend on the wind or the weather — 
he has pumping power when he needs it. 

The "Eclipse" will pump as much water as a 10 or 12 ft. windmill run- 
ning in a 20 mile wind. It uses about one pint of gasoline per hour, and 
pumps over 1,000 gallons of water. 

This small operating cost will appeal to every farmer. 

Put an ' ' Eclipse ' ' in stock and get after the farmers. You will get surprising results. 

Write for full particulars. 

The Canadian Fairbanks-Morse Co., 

LIMITED 



. 





MONTREAL 
ST. JOHN 
OTTAWA 



TORONTO 

WINNIPEG 

CALGARY 



SASKATOON 

VANCOUVER 

VICTORIA 



- S.M.P. LITHOGRAPHED STOVE BOARDS 



Wood or 
Paper Lined 



>s>,Tivry;-.'>^ k»j>.->, .Wk i iiv^y^-vi.^:> 




Assorted 
Colors 



The SHEET 



MONTREAL 



Manufactured in all Standard Sizes. Prices on Application 

METAL PRODUCTS CO. of Canada, Limited 

Successors to KEMP MANUFACTURING COMPANY 

TORONTO WINNIPEG 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



The New Dover Sad Iron 



We are now offering the trade a new sad iron — made 
by the makers of Asbestos Sad Irons — which will sell at a 
price to compete with the Potts and old style irons. 



PRICES NOT RESTRICTED 

There is no restricted price, but 
dealers are enabled to and are ad- 
vised to sell at a figure which will 
afford a reasonable margin of profit. 



Get 

an early 

start 




THEY ARE SELLING FAST 

Our salesmen have taken an un- 
usually large number of orders for 
these irons in the two weeks they 
have offered them. 



Are 
YOU 

Supplied ? 



Solid Cast Iron, Double Pointed Cores, Stamped Steel One-piece Hood ; One-piece 
Heavy Wrought Steel Handle Support passing through Hardwood Handle and 
Bolted to inner side of cover. Asbestos Covered Square Steel Rest or Stand. 

Nickel Plated and Highly Polished Core Faces and Round Edges ; Aluminum Tops, 
Nickel Plated Hood; Black Enameled Handle. 

The superior features of the Dover Sad Irons are :- 
Straight, strong handle. 

Detachable hood which protects the hand from heat. 
Safe, sure lock. 
Carefully ground and perfectly polished ironing surface. 



Orders for Dover Sad Irons are solicited at the following prices 

In lots of Three Dozen or More - 

In lots of Half Dozen or More (less than 3 dozen) 

In lots of Less than Half Dozen Sets 



per dozen $13.50 
per dozen $14.00 
per dozen $15.00 



Packed Quarter Dozen in a Case; Each Set in a Corrugated Board Carton, Rust Proof and Sealed. 
The High Standard of Asbestos Sad Irons is your assurance of merit in the new Dover Sad Irons. 



LEWIS BROS. Limited, Montreal 



OTTAWA 



TORONTO 



VANCOUVER 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



PILABRASGO 



Are iou 



Are You Getting Used to That Word ? 

—PILABRASGO— 

Another Way of Saying 

QUICK SALES 

Has Your Store Found That Out Yet? 

It's caught on with the trade like wildfire. Merchants 
all over Canada have learned that Pilabrasgo — featured in 
their stores — mean a rattling big business and one that's 
always coming. 

Pilabrasgo Oil, Gas and Electric Goods are the 
prettiest, cleanest-cut, fastest selling goods on the road. 
Just the goods to stimulate a great big trade for you. 

Make Pilabrasgo count for your business. Drop a 
postal for our man. 

The Pittsburgh Lamp, Brass & Glass Co. 

General Offices and Factories ; PITTSBURGH, Pa.. U.S.A. 



Canadian 
Branch 




113Wortley Road, 
London, Ont. 



R. E. DAVIS. Special Representative. 



Push 

and 

Pull 




Richards- 
Wilcox 
No. 21 

Trolley Barn 
Door Hanger 



Push and pull 
doors equipped 
w i t h Richards- 
Wilcox Door 
Hangers — as often 
as you wish, for 
scores of years — 
they will always run smooth, easy and sure — al- 
ways move straight, without wobbling. Richards- 
Wilcox Door Hangers will last for years under 
hard use, because they are the result of thirty 
years Hanger building experience — they're made 
right — from right materials and by right men. 

You, your customers and clients can depend 
on Richards-Wilcox Door Hangers. Get catalogs 
and prices to-day. 

A Hanger for Any Door That Slides 



fcchards Wilcox* 

kxsH Manufacturing Co. \-sss4 / 
life] AURORAjLL .USA. HHi 



«rf***pM*M*MM«M^Mi*mM*tfimi 



T 



HE price of a lamp is a small per cent, of its total 
cost unless it's an Angle Lamp. Up-keep and oil 
brings the yearly cost high in lamps that are sold to 
promote oil consumption. 

The Angle Lamp gives better light with less cost than other lamps — it is free 
from odor, smoke and dirt — it cannot explode. 

Your customers are entitled to the best light, and you can well afford to give it 
to them, because the Angle Lamp shows you a good profit, due to our "Pro- 
tective Distributor Policy " for one dealer in each town, and to the fact that we 
give the dealer the jobbers' discount. Let us tell you more about it. 



Angle Manufacturing Co. 




244-246 West 23rd Street 
New York City 



All Sizes, 1 to 8 Burners 



muM^m— »i* fm nmym i m ti vu mm ***** * * t m nmt\ H \tm§*m * \ t mt****i\t* n ,*u*%mm0*+0i+i0*m 

4 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



It's all in the 
Wheels 




No. 400 



It's the 
Wheels 
in all 



No. 1. 



Ci(wdeU-Jjutttl 




GLASS CUTTERS 

They have caused the sales in this particular line to 
increase very rapidly. 

We take special pains to see that each and every glass 
cutter wheel is carefully tested by actually cutting- glass 
before it is sent out. 

You can depend upon these wheels as being the very 
best wheels made for cutting glass. 



Goodell-P 




Have The 

MOST ATTRACTIVE STORE 

In Your Locality! 

Your Trade Will Increase 
As A Result! 




PRINT No. 10 



Berlin Hardware 
Display Cabinets 

are so constructed that the goods are displayed 
behind glass doors or display front compart- 
ments. 

This case keeps door sets and builders' hard- 
ware free from dust, and greatly adds to their 
appearance. 

Our Display Cabinets are made of a high 
quality oak and finely finished. 

Cut illustrates Print No. 10, being the third 
section of a large case. 



Did you cut print from last issue ? 

If not it will pay you to do it now, if possible. 
Save all the prints with numbers for reference 
in designing a case to meet your particular re- 
quirements. Then write us for specifications 
and prices. 

Write for circulars on complete line of store 
fixtures or any special line in which interested. 



Is your store the most attractive in your 
locality? If not, let us help you make it so — 
we can do it at a reasonable price, too. 

The Walker Bin & Store Fixture Go. 



Manufacturers and Designers of 

Modern Store Fixtures 



LIMITED 

BERLIN, ONTARIO 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



THE 

STEEL COMPANY OF CANADA 

LIMITED 



Our Mills 

Can Ship Immediately 

From Stock 

BOLTS and NUTS, 

PRESSED SPIKES, STOVE 

BOLTS, STOVE RODS, 

TACKS, HAY BALING 

WIRE 



DISTRICT SALES OFFICES: 

HAMILTON, TORONTO, MONTREAL, WINNIPEG 

W. A. MacLennan, Vancouver, B.C. H. G. Rogers, St. John, N.B. 

J. B. H. Rickaby, Victoria, B.C. Geo. D. Hatfield, Halifax, N.S. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 




For Your Sporting Trade 



We have a large stock of guns, rifles and ammuni- 
tion ready for the dealers who aim to secure the best 
sporting trade. Strictly reliable in every way. Our 
stock is from the best makers, and can be depended 
upon to satisfy the keenest sportsman buyer. 



Send us your Orders 



H. S. Howland, Sons & Co., Limited 



WE SHIP PROMPTLY 



Wholesale Hardware 
TORONTO 

GRAHAMS NAILS ARE THE BEST 



OUR PRICES ARE RIGHT 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Crescent 




Brand 



Crescent Brand HARDWARE 




Butt Hinges 



Strap Hinges 



Tee Hinges 



Barn Door Hangers Parlor Door Hangers 
Trolley Hangers Hinged Hasps Shelf Brackets 



Wrought Staples 



Rollston Pulleys 



Gate Hooks Wagon Hardware 



Steel Sheets 



Bands 



Etc. Etc. Etc. 



Bars 



Rods 



Wire 



CANADA STEEL GOODS CO., Limited 

HAMILTON - - - CANADA 




Davidson's "Queen" Oil Tanks 

For Storing Coal Oil, Linseed Oil, etc. 



Made of Heavy Galvanized Iron. 
Handsomely Japanned and Ornamented. 
The bottom is protected from damage by 
an inset stand of wood, one inch thick. 
Fitted with interchangeable pump. Also 
Measure tray with hinged cover and 
padlock hasp. 



3 SIZES 

Yi Bbl. 1 Bbl. 



Approx. I 
Capacity \ 25 
Gallons J 



50 



2 Bbls. 
100 



Write for prices 



THE THOS. DAVIDSON MFG. CO. Limited 



MONTREAL 



WINNIPEG 



TORONTO 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



The "MARSHALLTOWN" No. 19 

The Trowel of Quality 



Philadelphia 
Pattern 




The Hang 
is Perfect 



THE QUALITY IS THE BEST 



WE ARE HEADQUARTERS 

Wood, Vallance & Leggat, Ltd., Vancouver; Wood, Vallance, Ltd., Winnipeg; 
Wood, Vallance & Co., Hamilton; Wood, Vallance & Adams, Calgary. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



WEAR-EVER 



ALUMINUM 



TRADE MARK 



"Wear-Ever" Aluminum Ware 





"No ! They are not all the same " 

"Wear-Ever" 

Aluminum Utensils 

are different. 



Of course, aluminum is aluminum; 
but utensils may differ in thickness, in 
handles, in finish. 

Thickness. They are made thick 
enough to prevent denting readily ; 
thick enough to guarantee a lifetime 
of satisfactory service. 
Handles. The handles of "Wear-Ever" 
utensils are made of the best tinned 
steel. Aluminum handles would be- 
come too hot — wooden handles would 
burn off or break. The handles of 
"Wear-Ever" utensils are gripped to 
the utensils by aluminum rivets with 
large heads. The heads are not sunk 
into the side of the utensil — the side 
remains of uniform thickness, strong 
enough to hold the handle on firmly 
for years . 

Finish. The outside is polished. The 
inside is hardened by an electrical 
process which makes the metal harder, 
smoother, less liable to be discolored 
by food or water containing alkali or 
iron, and more easily cleaned than 
would be possible if the utensils were 
not so finished. 

Replace utensils that wear out 
with utensils that"Wear-Ever" 









WRITE FOR CATALOGUE AND PRICES TO 

The Northern Aluminum Company, Ltd. 

TORONTO, ONTARIO 



10 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



"Farm Special" 

for grinding 
all Farm Tools. 

No. 63. 




LUTHER 

Dimo-Grit 

TOOL GRINDERS 

The Luther Line includes 32 types of grindecs 
to meet every tool sharpening need for 
mechanics, farmers, ranchers, machinists, carpen- 
ters and every class of tool-users. Every grinder 
is scientifically designed, strongly built and fully 
protected by patents. 

25 Times Faster Than Grindstones 

Dimo-Grit, the new artificial diamond abrasive, 
best for steel, cuts hardest steel as emery cuts 
copper. It peels steel away in tiny shavings 
instead of wearing it away like emery or the 
grindstone. 25 times faster than the grindstone, 
10 times more efficient than emery. No need of 
cooling with water — no danger of drawing 
temper. 

Shaft Drive Grinders for Farmers 
and Mechanics. 

The Luther shaft-drive grinder is built entire- 
ly of steel and iron, with shaft drive in dust- 
proof housing. It sells in 4 outfits, including 
one for farmers and one for mechanics. The 
farmers' outfit includes disc and sickle grinding 
attachments, and other tool rests for all grind- 
ing of farm tools. The mechanics' outfit includes 
plane-bit and twist drill sharpening attachments, 
and provides for every sharpening and polishing 
need. Extra attachments transfer this grinder 
into jig and circle saws, drill, forge, lathe, milk 
tester, etc. 

Good Profits for Dealers. 

The fast-cutting Dimo-Grit wheels, the super- 
ior design and construction of Luther grinders 
enable dealers to make quick sales. Profits are 
good, and we give price protection. Write for 
full information about complete Hue. 

LUTHER GRINDER MFG. CO. 

Dept. 139, Stroh Bldg., Milwaukee, Wis. 

Canadian Distributors : — Henderson & Richardson, 

Montreal ; Moncrief f & Endress, Ltd., Winnipeg ; 

J. M. Kains & Co., Vancouver, B.C. 




Shaft-drive for mechanics and farmers — foot and 
engine power. No. 273. 



No. 17. 




No. 16. /Jk HL 



I No. 15. No. 14. 

'Mechanics Special" — hand and foot power. 




No. 35 



"Compacto" — quickly taken 
apart or assembled for tool 
chest service. 



"Best Maide" uses every 
surface of wheel. 



11 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Quick Action Means Business in These 

McClary's 
GRAIN SCOOPS and GRAIN BASKETS 

will be in demand by 
your Farmer Friends 
— but they must get 
quick service — 

McClary Grain Scoops are 
made from heavy gauge 
and strongly handled. 

The Grain Baskets are made 
from heavy guage galvan- 
ized iron — strong and lasting 
in quality. 






MXIaryS 



London, 
Ontario 



Mc Clary's 
Ship Quick 



Toronto Montreal London Vancouver St. John, N.B. Hamilton Winnipeg Calgary Saskatoon 

Wholesale Agents Wanted in Toronto and Winnipeg 

FOR 

"F.M." PRESSED STEEL MILK CANS 

The Standard Cans of the World 

APPLY :— 

Burmeister & Wain's Export Company, Limited 

COPENHAGEN F. DENMARK. 
Cable Address: Burwain, Copenhagen 

The most hygienic and practical cans made. Pressed from a 
single sheet of steel, they are stronger than ordinary cans. After 
years of wear they may be re-tinned equal to new. Fitted with 
a new rust preventing device which prolongs the life of the can 
and prevents contamination of the milk. 

HIGHEST AWARDS RECEIVED AT ALL EXHIBITIONS WE HAVE TAKEN PART IN 





12 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



The "Fountain" 
LAWN SPRINKLER 



r 



"A SPRINKLER That Every 
Household Can Afford To Buy" 

Try it on your own lawn — Your 
customers will ask "where can 
I get one like it?" 
It Really Imitates Nature 
Made of brass, hand 
somely polished, 
thoroughly 
good and 
"looks 
it" 





With Every Order of 

SIX SPRAYERS You Get a 

Very Attractive DISPLAY BOX 



which makes selling easy — Your jobber has 
it, ask him and be sure to specify the "Marysville 
Fountain" — The original and only sprinkler with 
The "Mist-Like Spray" 



The Standard Stamping Co. 

No. 501 MAIN ST., MARYSVILLE, OHIO. 



Oct After the Farm Trade 

And Procure \ Profit Worth While 




STEEL JACKET FEED COOKER HEAVY CAST 
IRON CALDRONS 

MADE IN 7 SIZES 
Nos. 20,30,40,60. 75, 90 and 120 



Heavy Galvanized Steel Hog 
Feeding Troughs 

Clean, Sanitary 

Easily Handled 

Strong, Durable 
Ledge each side to prevent pushing 
or pulling of food to the floor. Cast 
Iron ends secured by our patented 
device. 

Stock Lengths — 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 
12 ft. Odd lengths made to order. 





These Cookers are indispensable to Farmers, Butch- 
ers or Stock Men. Grains that are useless for other 
purposes, by the use t>f these cookers are made as 
valuable as the best marketable products. 



Heavy Galvanized Steel Stock 
Watering Troughs 

Standard size holds about 10 
imperial gallons to foot. Other 
sizes made to order. 

Regular Stock Lengths, 
6, 7, 8, 10 and 12 ft. 

Made without rivets. Heavy Cabt 
Iron end fastened by our patented 
device. 



These are articles that appeal to every farmer, as they assure real value for money invested. Let 

us have your inquiry at once. Our proposition means money to you. 

We guarantee absolute satisfaction. Hot, dry weather does not injure them; no leak, no rusting. 

Erie Iron Works, Limited, makers St. Thomas, Ont. 



13 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



For Quick and Satisfactory Sales Try 

"EMPIRE" 

HOT AIR REGISTERS 

These are two popular and very neat designs that are sure 
to attract those who are interested. 

The "Empire Special" Register meets the demand for a 
register with a large opening. Has all the qualities that are 
required to assure the complete satisfaction of the user. 







MOORISH DESIGN CAST REGISTER 
Made in full sizes from 7 x 10 to 12 x 15 



EMPIRE SPECIAL 

New design, made in full sizes from 7 x 10 

to 12 x 15 

Made in Japanned, nickel-plated and oxidized 

Write us to-day for full particulars, catalogue 
and discounts. 

Others dealers are making good profits by handling 
this line — you can do the same. We guarantee to 
please you. Do not Delay. 

THE 

Canadian Heating & Ventilating 
Company, Limited 

OWEN SOUND ONTARIO 

Or The Canadian Heating and Ventilating Co. Branch : 
521 Henry Avenue, 'Winnipeg, Man. 




ALL YOUR CUSTOMERS WILL WANT THIS 

Here Is What Has Been Needed to Make Perfect 
the Equipment of Fireless Cookers 

"IDEAL" TRIPLICATE PAILS 
OF PURE ALUMINUM 

For cooking several things at one time 
in one compartment of a Fireless Cooker. 

Freight Prepaid on First Order for one Dozen or More Sets 

BIG DEMAND FOR THIS ARTICLE 

TRIPLICATE PAILS OF ALUMINUM is what has been lacking to make the equipment 

of Fireless Cookers perfect. As always we lead with the latest and best cooking devices — 

|things the peorle want. These pails are made from heavy seeets of PURE ALUMINUM, 

seamless and have self-locking covers. Each pail has capacity for two quarts. Three 

together 9J inches in dia- 
meter. Same diameter as 
8-qt. kettle. 

Not only the IDEAL 
equipment for a Fireless 
Cooker (any make) but 
also splendid for cooking 
several things at one time 
over one burner of a GAS 
or OIL STOVE. 

Prices: Retail $3.00 per set 

Dealers $24.00 per Dozen 
Sets. 

Made Exclusively by 

THE TOLEDO COOKER CO., 1319 W. Bancroft St., TOLEDO, OHIO 

LARGEST MANUFACTURERS OF COOKERS IN THE WORLD 




SPECIAL OFFER COUPON 
FOR TRIPLICATE PAILS 

TOLEDO COOKER CO., Toledo, Ohio: 

I understand as a Special Introductory Offer 
to dealers on your Triplicate i "Us o* Pure 
Aluminum, you will PREPAY t-si*',~ on first 
order for one dozen or more sets. 

Send me doz. Sets 

doz. "Lifters" 

Name 

Address 

TERMS : 30 days, net ; 2% cash, 10 days. 




" IDEAL " Fireless Cook Stove 

The Cooker with the "v>"«iter Seal" top. 
Pure aluminum lining . vulcanized solid 
oak outer casting. 

Finest built. Best Cooking, Handsomest 
Cooker on the Market. 
Send for our catalogues and prices on Steam 
and Fireless Cookers, Write to-day. 



14 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



YOUR FURNACE PROFITS 

will rapidly increase if you make a specialty of 

The Pilot 
Success Furnace 




It has an extra long fire travel which completely absorbs all heat — 
none goes to waste up the chimney, as is a common occurrence 
with most furnaces. 

Constructed of only the highest grade materials and is nicely finished. 

It is certain to attract prospective buyers. 

Let us send you full particulars at once. 

The Hall Zryd Foundry Co., Ltd, 

HESPELER, ONTARIO 

- _ _______ . _ __ 



HARDWARE AND METAL 




The Lowest Co-efficient Of Friction Of Any Known Metal 

Which Means Less Wear, Less Fuel and Oil, Less Heating, Less Squashing, etc. 

SOLD BY LEADING DEALERS EVERYWHERE OR BY 



MAGNOLIA METAL CO. 



Office and Factory : 
225 ST. AMBROISE ST., MONTREAL 



The CHAMPION RANGE Pays a Splendid Profit 

(Satisfaction Guaranteed) 

This range is designed and constructed by experts, 
and made from the best qualities of iron. The mount- 
ings are artistically designed and the whole range is 
finely finished. 

THE CHAMPION GRATE 

saves an enormous amount of FUEL. 

Its durable and service-giving qualities insure a 
good value to every buyer. 

Write for catalogue to-day — it gives full description. 

D.J. BARKER & COMPANY, Picton, Ontario 






Here is YOUR Chance 

to make your range department more 
profitable and more satisfactory. 

Happy Thought" Ranges 

are known from one side of the 
continent to the other and re- 
commended by every house- 
wife who ever used them. 

The "HAPPY THOUGHT" 

works equally well with coal 
or wood and gives a longer 
and more reliable service 
than any other. 

This is not a claim, but a 
fact, and we can prove it. 

Get a "HAPPY THOUGHT" 

Catalog at once. Each sale 
brings a good profit. 

The William Buck 
Stove Co., Limited 

Saskatoon Vancouver Brantford Montreal Winnipeg 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



ROBERT SORBY'S 

CELEBRATED KANGAROO BRAND 

TOOLS 

of all kinds 




LISTS AND PRICES FROM 

R obert Sorby & Sons, Ltd. 
sheffield - england 

Canadian Representative 
GEO. H. SAYWELL, 61-3 Albert Street, WINNIPEG 

Local Agents at : 
TORONTO CALGARY VANCOUVER SASKATOON 



There's a Good Profit in 
Selling Our 
WIRE GOODS 




Your N otion 
Counter is in- 
complete without 
our line of wire 
goods. In the manufacturing- process 
we use only the best material and em- 
ploy men who are experts in wire work. 

The price is so low that every person 
can afford to pay it. 




Write for our com- 
plete catalogue and 
price list. 



Andrews Wire Works of Canada, Ltd. 



Watford, Ont. 



Rockford, 



Why Buy the "Near Brand" when 
the Best is Procurable ? 

THE L. MARTIN CO.'S 

Old Standard, Eagle, Pyramid and Globe 

GERMANTOWN 

LAMPBLACK 

IS THE BEST 

AND HAS BEEN FOR OVER SIXTY YEARS 

Sold by all dealers who realize that a satisfied customer is 
worth more than a little extra profit on a less reliable article. 

~ . The L. MARTIN CO. 

x \y] Manufacturers of the 

'■j Highest Standard Lampblacks 

for all purposes 
^^ ASK YOUR DEALER 

Quality is remembered long after price is forgotten 

NEW YORK PHILADELPHIA CINCINNATI LONDON, ENG. 



JAMES GARTLAND & SON 

BIRMINGHAM, ENGLAND LIMITED 

Also LONDON. GLASGOW. CAPE TOWN and SYDNEY. N.S.W. 

Contractors to the Admiralty and War Office 




Manufacturers of every description of 

BUILDERS' CABINET, FANCY AND 
NAVAL BRASS FOUNDRY 

Our new Catalogue, 1911 edition, fully illustrated, mailed free on 
Application to wholesale Hardware Merchants. 



17 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



—THE DEFIANCE— 

THE MOST POWERFUL 
REGISTER IN THE WORLD 



i -a^-^w^^ 




Fits a stack head EIGHT INCHES deep, and accom- 
modates either a 12 in. or a 14. in. supply pipe. 
Write for prices. 

Canadian Ferrosteel Co., Limited 

BRIDGEBURG, ONTARIO 









1 







No. 1186 Coal Grate 



MANUFACTURED BY 



The Ohio Foundry & 
Manufacturing Co. 

STEUBENVILLE. OHIO, U.S.A. 

Manufacturers of all styles of coal 
or gas burning fire-place goods, 
as well as andirons and wrought 
fire-place trimmings. 



IMPERIAL — STANDARD 


- SCALES 


400 Varieties Accurate, Durable, Well 
Send for the large 128 page catalog and prices, 


Finished 
No. 66 

Letter and Postal Scales 


Butchers' Scales 


Platform SE ?i 


i^^^55S^f 


Bathroom Scales 


Scales 


JpP^^jKi 


Railway Depot Scales 


Confectioners' Scales 


All Capacities |pl 


I) 




Railway Track Scales 


Dairy Scales 


300 Lbs. to 111 




Rolling Mill Scales 


Druggists' Scales 


3000 Lbs. 1 !j 




Salt, Meat and Fish Scales 


Foundry Scales 


// 




Stock Scales 


Grain Warehouse Scales 


^ 1 1: 




Steelyards 


Grain Elevator Scales 
Grocers' Scales 


'■S^jgj^ i^zSSSS^HPy.-- ■ 


Weigh Beams 
Union Scales 


Tea Scales 


iJllP&i 


dpP^ 


Etc. 

o., Limited 




The Burro 


w, Stewart & Milne C 


HEAD OFFICE AND WORKS : HAMILTON 
Offices and Warehouses at Toronto, Montreal and Win 


nipeg 



18 



HARDWARE AND METAL 




- 







METALLIC CEILINGS FOR STORES 

There is money for you in selling them, in erecting them 
and in selling the paint to finish them. Write for our 
Catalogue and go in for this line at once. 

The Metallic Roofing Co. of Canada, Limited 



TORONTO, ONT. 



Manufacturers 



WINNIPEG, MAN. 



C91 




Pink's 

Lumbering 

Tnnls 



MADE IN CANADA 



The Standard Tools in every province of the Dominion, New Zealand, Australia, Etc. 
We manufacture all kinds of lumber tools. Light and Durable. 

Send for Catalogue and Price List. Long Distance Phone No. 87. 

Sold throughout the Dominion by all Wholesale and Retail Hardware Merchants. 



Manufacturers 
of 



The Thos. Pink Company, Ltd., 

PEMBROKE, ONT. 



Lumber Tools 



19 



HARDWARE AND METAL 




GREENING'S 



COW TIES 



ARE THE 



Lightest, Strongest and Best Chains on the market. 

Made in six sizes and six styles. 

Also Halter, Dog, Kennel, Tie Out and Trace Chains. 




MANUFACTURED BY 



The B. Greening Wire Co, 



LIMITED 




HAMILTON, Ont. 



MgcegEeoaeBEBoa *"» 



MONTREAL, Que. 



: ■ OBBBD BPBBQ 




Trace Chains. 



Halter, Dog and Kennel Chains. 



WHAT WE DO KNOW 




'TpHAT any kind of a milled part which you 

A need to manufacture your products can 

be handled at our plant accurately, more rapidly 

and at a lower price than you have been paying. 

T_JIGHLY specialized machinery to cut all 
■*• "* kinds of parts from metal bars are oper- 
ated at our Montreal plant. Let us show you 

what we can do for you in price and delivery. 

Send in your samples for a quotation. 

"D EGULAR Cap and Set Screws with U.S.S. 
A ^ or "V" threads and Nuts (plain or castell- 
ated) in iron, steel or brass, carried in stock for 
immediate sihpment. Sold either in bulk or 
package. 




NAMCO 



The National-Acme Manufacturing Co. 

Montreal, St. Henri and G.T.R. 



20 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Preston Metal Garages 



have met with such favor among automobile owners that 
they are becoming known all over the country. In order to 
handle inquiries coming in we want agents all over the 
country. 

Every auto owner is a prospect. Write to-day for full infor- 
mation in regard to the agency for your territory. 



MENTION HARDWARE AND METAL 



Metal Shingle&SidingC 

PRESTON ONT. MONTREAL QUE. 



WW 



m 



m 



i 



iv; 



You Can Sell These Machines NOW! 

They're hot weather washers because they wash clothes thoroughly without any labor 



They Run Themselves 




In every 
house 
where 
running 
water is 
avail- 
able 
there is 

a 
possible 

pur- 
chaser. 

MADE BY 




Agents : 

W. L. Haldimand & Son, 

MONTREAL 

H. F. Moulden & Son, 

WINNIPEG 



Cummer-Dowswell, Limited 

HAMILTON, ONTARIO 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



NEW LINE 

UNIVERSAL CLOTHES WRINGERS 

Plain Bearings and Steel Ball Bearings 
Spiral Pressure Springs Enclosed Cog Wheels 



PLAIN BEARINGS 

No. 310E— - Rolls, lOxlf inches 

No: 311E— .... Rolls, llxlf inches 

STEEL BALL BEARINGS 
No. 317E— - Rolls, lOxlf inches 

No. 318E— - Rolls, llxlf inches 

SAME STYLE MADE IN FOLDING BENCH 
SEND FOR CATALOGUE "F" 




Packed 3 in a case 



THE AMERICAN WRINGER COMPANY 

99 CHAMBERS STREET, NEW YORK 



I 



Chicago Steel Bending Brakes 

Are Now Made In Canada 

EVERY DEALER WHO HANDLES 
SHEET METAL SHOULD HAVE ONE 



They are adapted to a large variety of work. 
They are very suitable for rapid and accurate 
bending. Narrow edges can be bent. 

One man can easily operate this machine. 

A wrench fitting all the adjustable parts is 
furnished. 

Five moulding forms suitable for making cor- 
nice ridge roll and other moulding work are 
supplied with the Cornice Brakes. 

Before buying, we want you to be convinced 
as to the satisfaction these brakes are giving. 

Write us for list of users — then write them 
and get their verdict. 

Do It Now. 



EDWARD DREIS, Chatham, Ont. 




22 



HARDWARE AND METAL 




With every assortment of "JERSEY" VISES, a Stand similar to the one 
shown in the illustration is furnished. They make a very attractive 
appearance and display the Vises in such a manner as to result in increased 
sales. 

Send for our special Vise circular which contains complete description of all styles made. 

#ul* Si Level Cio. 

"New Britain.Conn.U.SA 




TOWNSEND MOWERS 

HAND MOWERS and HORSE MOWERS 

All Our Hand Mowers 
Are Ball Bearing 

SENT ON THEIR MERITS 



Write for Catalog 

S. P. Townsend (SL Co. 

ORANGE. N. J. 




Reap Good Profits 



and retain youi good reputa- 
tion by selling rifles that create enthusiasm 
among old and young users through their accuracy, balance 
and dependability. When it comes to delivering the goods, the 

HAMILTON 



This rifle is excellently finished — the 

working parts are made of the strongest 

and most durable metal, 

and can be easily 

kept in order. 




22 " 
CALIBER 



RIFLES 



have no equal, and they sell at a price that appeals to every buyer, For Sale by 
assuring quick sales for the dealer. Write us for circulars and prices. *" Jobbers 

C. </. Hamilton & Son, Plymouth, Mich, 




„■■■. I ,.55 

»»l)iii nil,- i iihuw i 



Our Conductor Pipe and Eavetrough is the Fit Easy kind. 

Corrugated iron, skylights, elbows, ridge roll, valleys and ventilators. 




WHEELER & BAIN 

The Quick Shippers 
TORONTO 



23 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



CAN WE HELP YOU 



There are some hardware dealers living in this 20th 
Century who are still using 19th Century methods. 
They do not realize that Halifax is closer to Vancouver 
to-day than Montreal was to Toronto fifty years ago. 

Twenty-five years ago it was a calamity for a mer- 
chant to lose a good clerk, for he knew it was practically 
impossible for him to get in touch with an experienced 
man. Such an idea as making a deal with a fellow hard- 
ware man a couple of hundred miles away either to buy 
a set of tinners' tools or to sell a second-hand counter or 
show case, did not seem practicable to even the most 
progressive hardware men. If a man wanted to sell his 
business he had to accept the highest price he could get 
from some one of his fellow townsmen, for no one else 
knew of the opportunity or had any means of finding out 
about it. 

• To-day the up-to-date dealer 

CREATES HIS OPPORTUNITIES 

He states his wants briefly in a " Hardware and 
Metal want ad." and in four days' time practically every 
hardware merchant, clerk, hardware manafacturer and 
traveler has read the proposition, and it seems reason- 
able that somewhere among the " blue noses " of the 
Maritimes or the pioneers of the boundless West some- 
one will want just what he has to offer. 

EVERY HARDWARE MERCHANT IN CANADA 

can take advantage of our "want ad." page. Ask yourself : 

Is there not some article I would be better without if I could 
get a fair price for it ? If you cannot get a fair price for it by ap- 
pealing to the trade throughout Canada you had better sell it for scrap 

We can help you, but you must take the first step. 

Surely it is worth 25c or 50c to find the one man in Canada 
whose wants dovetail into just what you have to offer. 

RATES : (payable in advance) 2c per word first insertion, lc per word 
subsequent insertions. Box Number, 5c additional each insertion. 



HARDWARE & METAL 



Montreal 



Toronto 



Winnipeg 



24 



HARDWARE. AND METAL 



THE BLUE BAND 



IDENTIFIES 
IT AS A 



HAMILTON BUCKET OR NIOBE PAIL 




The Best on Earth 

Get the right color and you will have the 
"WRIGHT" goods. 

These Buckets and Pails are extra heavy, 
and suitable for use by contractors, railroads, 
boats, city corporations, etc. 

Each Pail is made from two blanks, thus 
having only ttuo side seams. The bottom 
cannot fall out, and the pails are guaranteed 
not to leak. 

Writ* us for further 
particulars and price. 

E. T. Wright & Co. 

(H. G. WRIGHT) 

HAMILTON CANADA 




CANADIAN TUBE & IRON CO., 



LIMITED 
Montreal, Canada 



OUR NEW BOLT AND NUT DEPARTMENT is now in operation, 
and we are fully equipped for the manufacture of: 



CARRIAGE BOLTS, COACH AND LAG SCREWS, 

TIRE BOLTS, MACHINE BOLTS, 

SLEIGH SHOE BOLTS, PLOW BOLTS, 

TRACK BOLTS, SQUARE NUTS, HEXAGON NUTS, 

BOILER RIVETS, TINNERS' RIVETS, 

ETC. 



ASK YOUR 
JOBBER FOR 




<J 



TRADE MARK 

BRAND 



OUR WROUGHT PIPE 

Black and Galvanized, Sizes 1/8 in. to 4 
in., is thoroughly inspected and tested to 
600 lbs. pressure, and every length is 
branded with our trade mark. 



Also NIPPLES 

Black and Galvanized 
All Sizes. 




CANADIAN TUBE & IRON CO., LIMITED, MONTREAL, 



Works : 
Lachine Canal 



MAPLE LEAF 




"Improved Racer" Cross Cut Saw 

This saw has proved itself to be the fastest cutting saw in use to-day. 
The cut illustrates the wide blade, but we also make this saw in 
a narrow pattern, thin back, which is especially well suited for small 
timber or pulpwood. All "MAPLE LEAF" saws are fully guaranteed. 

WHEN ORDERING SPECIFY "MAPLE LEAF." 

Shurly-Dietrich Co., Limited 



GALT, ONTARIO 



25 



and 



VANCOUVER, BC. 



H A R D W ARE A ND METAL 



Wrought Steel 



Reversible 
Loose Pin 



Butts 




HDW.MFG.CO. 



© 



o 



ANOTHER OF OUR 
"QUALITY" LINES 



A LITTLE BETTER 
THAN THE ORDIN- 
ARY BUT NO 
HIGHER IN PRICE. 

Now is the time to stock up — 
Send for our catalog of Butts, 
Hinges, Light T and Strap 
Hinges, Heavy T and Strap 
Hinges, Latches, Door Bolts, 
Hitching Rings, Etc. 



THE MONTREAL HARDWARE MFG. CO., Limited 

: : : : QUEBEC 



MONTREAL 



GIVE YOUR CUSTOMERS A SQUARE DEAL 

BY SELLING THEM 

. BOKER & CO.'S 



EG 



TREE BRAND CUTLERY 



Far Superior To Any Other Brand 




"Radium" Scissors and Shears 

Have Proved Wonderful Sellers. 



FOR SALE BY ALL LEADING WHOLESALE HARDWARE FIRMS 



26 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



The name "Yale" heJps make the sale 




YALE 

door checking 
devices 



In the new Yale Door Check we have 
produced the most efficient door checking 
device in the world — a check that stands 
as the result of years of experimentation 
and experience. 

We are telling the public about it through 
our magazine advertising and, to help you 
turn your fair share of this trade into your 
own store, we stand ready to back you 
up by giving you, free, any or all of these 
business aids: 

Newspaper advertisements, in plate form, for you to use in 
your local papers. 

A window display that will command attention and interest. 
Street car cards, if you wish to advertise in this way. 
Store cards and hangers that will help you make sales. 
The Quiet Life, a cleverly written booklet, bearing your own 
imprint, for you to offer your customers. It should help you 
to clinch many a sale. 

Yale : A New Door Check, a booklet of more technical char- 
acter, fully illustrated, explaining how the Yale Check is 
better than the old Blount, on which it is modeled. 

We will be glad to send you samples of this 
material, and when you're writing us ask 
for a copy of the booklet/'Yale in Canada." 

Canadian Yale & Towne Limited 

Makers of YALE Products in Canada : Locks, Padlocks, 
Builders' Hardware, Door Checks and Chain Hoists 

General Offices and Works, St. Catharines, Ont. 



084-1 



Gloekler 's[! Patent 

FASTENERS 

For Refrigerator Doors and 
Cold Storage Work 




SHOWING DOOR OPEN 

Simple and Easy to Operate 
EASY TO SELL 

These fasteners are heavy and substantially 
constructed and are specially adapted for 
heavy work. They will last a lifetime. You 
are certain to have calls for these, stock a 
few and be prepared — don't mis» a sale. 

We also make a line of Spring Fasteners, 
Hinges, etc., in tinned, brass and nickel plated. 

■H ' !| 11111 




SHOWING DOOR FORCED SHUT 



Write /or descriptive circulars and price list 

Bernard Gloekler Co. 

Pittsburgh, Pa. U.S.A. 



H A R D W A R E A ND METAL 



WASH BOILERS That Will Prove Rapid Sellers 

These boilers are positively hand made from start to finish. 

Each one has a heavy steel wire rod which assures strength 

and durability. 

All seams are carefully soldered. We make all grades of Copper, 

Tin and Galvanized ware, each guaranteed to give the buyer 

his money's worth. 

Write for catalog on all our lines — our prices will interest you. 

SOREN BROS., Cor. King & Niagara Sts., Toronto 





<* 



GOOD CHEER" Sidewall Registers 



A line in four ftlzrs, of uniform design throagrhout. Neat and tasteful pattern, aad 
supplied In black Japan, ordinary oxidised or fall oxidised finish, with enamelled green 
fan. Oar ordinary oxidised will abont equal the more expensive fall oxidised finish 
of other makes. 

Positive acting- fan — stays exactly where set, and when closed locks tight. No 
springs, etc., to weaken or loosen. 

The price? It will pay yon to Inquire. 

A fall line of the above carried by The J»« Stewart Mfg. Co., Limited, Winnipeg, Man. 

The Jas. Stewart Manufacturing Co., Ltd. 

Woodstock, Ontario 



p \SST 0vV 




U£&^ 



The mechanic using 



DISSTON 

SAWS, TOOLS and FILES 

obtains those full and satisfying results which make him an 
earnest advocate of the DISSTON BRAND. 



HENRY DISSTON & SONS 

INCORPORATED 

Keystone Saw, Tool, Steel & File Works 
Established 1840 PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



28 



HARDWARE AND METAL 




No. 993 
Corner Braces 

with metal clad ball bear- 
ing head, carefully cut 
machine steel gears, en- 
closed mechanism, univer- 
sal pattern jaws for round 
shank or square taper 
shank drills. All parts 
nickel plated, 8 or 10-inch 
sweep. 




No. 733 

Iron Frame Breast 
Drills 

Two speed design, heavy 
nickel plated universal 
pattern chuck, taking 
round or taper square 
shank drills. Level is firm- 
ly set in frame. New latch 
holds spindle from turn- 
ing while changing drills. 
Crank can be set for three 
different sweeps. 




New Ratchet Braces 
with Universal Chuck 

Highest quality material and 
workmanship. Most improved 
form of construction. Cocobolo 
heads and handles. Ball bear- 
ing heads. Metal parts heavily 
nickel plated. 

No. 903, 10 in. Sweep. 




Stanley Butt Gauges 

No. 93. Steel head, brass slide, nickel plat- 
ed. Fitted with 3 cutters, comprising 
Rabbet, Marking and Mortise gauges of a 
scope sufficient for all door trim. 




N°26 



Screw Driver Bits 

No. 26. Forged from cruc- 
ible cast steel, oil temper- 
ed and polished. Assorted 
sizes. 



Veneer Scraper 
Plane No. 212 




N°2I2 



only 5% i ncn long, a very convenient tool 
for light work. Adjustable blades. Handy 
grip feature on sides. 



Sold by 



All 
Made by 

Stw\w> Ca verhill, Lear mont & Co. 

"New Brjtain.Conn.U.SA 

29 



Montreal 



HARDWARE AND METAL 




CLIPPERS r. L s l 

But only one quality 




BURMAN'S 



They still hold that 
reputation and there 
are no clippers manu- 
factured to-day that 
can compare in quality, 
and BURMAN'S cost no 
more than inferior 
lines. 



Clippers have been known 
for over 40 years as the best 



STOCKED BY 
ALL JOBBERS 



B. & S. H. THOMPSON & CO., 



LIMITED 



Sole Agents for Canada 



MONTREAL 




A Proposition That Is vvorth vvhile 



One that will fill your spare time with congenial work — bringing good 
money. Are you interested ? You are. Well, here are the details. 

Throughout Canada is scattered an army of men who 
are everywhere booking subscriptions for MacLean's 
Magazine. If you join them you can add very con- 
siderably to your regular income. If you are a hustler 
you will find it will pay you to give all your time to 
the work. 

Some of our most successful salesmen were "spare time men" first. 

^Write us for terms and full particulars 

MacLEAN PUBLISHING COMPANY 



143-149 University Avenue, 



TORONTO, CANADA 



30 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



LYSACHT'S 
WIRE NETTINC 

Unexcelled for quality, 
strength and durability 



THOROUGHLY 

GALVANIZED 



John Lysaght, Limited A. C. Leslie & Co., Limited 
Makers MONTREAL 

Bristol, Newport and Montreal Managers Canadian Branch 



INGOT COPPER 

PRIME LAKE 

ELECTROLYTIC 

CASTING 

Enquire at Metal Head- 
quarters and save money 

A. C. LESLIE & CO., Limited 

MONTREAL 




THIS WASHER 
Appeals to Women 

because of the recent improved features 
that make it the most efficient and conven- 
ient washer sold at the price. 

CONNOR 

Ball Bearing Washer 

will make your washing machine dept. a 
success and a big dividend earner. Many 
progressive dealers have doubled their 
washing machine sales since taking hold 
of the Connor Ball Bearing Washer. You 
can do equally as well. Drop a card for 
our new catalog. 



J. H. Connor & Son, Ltd., Ottawa, Ont. 



31 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



M 




Made In Your Own Country 

By Your Own Workmen 



Guaranteed to be perfect in every particular 



DOMINION CARTRIDGE CO., Limited 

MONTREAL - QUEBEC 



Tell Your Customers That 



ANTI-DUST 



SWEEPING 
POWDER 



MEANS 

FLOORS CLEAN CARPETS BRIGHT 

ALL DISEASE GERMS KILLED HOME FRESH AND SWEET 

NO DUST WHILE SWEEPING 

EVERY HARDWARE DEALER CAN SELL ANTI-DUST — IT BRINGS A GOOD PROFIT 



MacLaren Imperial Cheese Co., Limited 

DISTRIBUTORS FOR ONTARIO 

Sapho Mfg. Co., Limited - - Montreal 

32 " 



The Fall Fair Booth is Business Getter 

Exhibits at Fairs Bring Direct Sales And Also Tend to Advertise The Store — 
Secure the Manufacturers Co-operation, and Make the Booths Really Attrac- 
tive — Advice From Dealer Who Has Done This. 



Written for Hardware and Metal by J. Stewart Neill, 

Sons, Fredericton, N.B. 



James S. Neill and 



With the arrival of August come 
thoughts of fall, and with us fall means 
some hard work preparing for the dis- 
play of various lines at the fall exhi- 
bition. Yes we are believers in the val- 
ue of using booths at the Fair. Enough 
results have been apparent to make us 
certain that this way of advertising 
pays, and we have reason to believe that 
there are other results which do not 
show on the surface. 

But, as has been said, we have had 
success with our displays. We have 
been arranging booths for some years 
now. You see we tried the experiment, 
and found it a success. The first year 
we showed stoves we sold 25 during 
the Fair, and had 30 sales between the 
close of the exhibition and the end 
of the year, which seemed to be directly 
attributable to that fall display. We 
keep two men at the stove booth, ex- 
plaining the good points of the line 
which we carry. That, of course, adds 
to the expense, but it assuredly pays. 
Many Considering Question Now. 

At this season there may be a goodly 
number of hardwaremen who will be 
considering the question of using floor 
space at the Fall Fairs. Will this, they 
may wonder, bring returns, or will it 
mean nothing but an expense. Wi f h 



men facing this problem it may be ap- 
propriate for us to outline the action 
we have taken, and to show some of the 
results. Of course what we have found 
wise here might not be wise for some 
other dealers situated differently, yet 
our experience may be of some value to 
many. 

Perhaps the best way in which it can 
be shown that we have been satisfied 
with the results we have secured in .'.lie 
past from Fall Fair displays, is to state 
that last fall we had five separate booths, 
covering a floor space of 1,200 sq. feet. 
In all the booths we made elaborate ,le- 
signs. Indeed we acted upon the prin- 
ciple that if the exhibit was worth 
while at all it was worthy of the best 
we could give. That is something, I 
believe, which all might well remember. 
There is little use in merely gathering 
a few articles together and putting them 
into a booth. Such an arrangement — 
or lack of arrangement — may do the 
articles more harm than good. The peo- 
ple at a Fair want things presented lo 
them in an attractive way. If sonn 
novel arrangement is made they will 
pause and inspect, where otherwise 
they would hurry by to the stand of 
some more progressive man, or to the 
performance going on outside. 



Also we have found it an exceedingly 
good thing to secure the co-operation 
of the manufacturers of those lines 
which we purpose showing. The task 




Young lady who assisted in the paint 
booth — Her novel attire at- 
tracted attention. 




Electrical fixture booth — This was well lighted up and proved one of the 

features of the fair. 

33 



is too great to shoulder alone. Appeal 
to the manufacturers. They are ready 
to make suggestions, and in some cases 
to send men to help prepare the booth, 
and to demonstrate the goods shown 
there. Indeed of the five booths we 
had last fall, four were prepared with 
the assistance of the manufacturers, 
and four of the lines were demonstrated 
by the companies representatives in this 
district. 

The manufacturers might not be able 
to give such fine aid to all, but exhibi- 
tors wishing hints on display would do 
well to get in touch with the makers. 
They will take an interest. 

Some of the Booths. 

It is not necessary to say a great deal 
about the lines we showed last year. 
Perhaps our most attractive display v\as 
one of electrical fixtures. It was made 
in octagonal shape, strings of miniature 
lamps being strung from the centre to 
the eight points. These lamps were in 
the form of men, birds, flowers, and 
fruit, and at once attracted attention. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



We did not spare electric current in 
that booth. In all we had one 500 Watt 
lamp, eight of 250 watts, twenty-four 
of 25 watts, and 64 miniature lamps. 

Roofing Booth. 

One booth demonstrating roofing- 
was also an exceedingly popular one. 
This was made in the form of a house, 
thatched, of course, with the particular 



Fairs do Help. 

Our paint booth was another one 
which drew a great deal of attention, 
undoubtedly owing to a fine display ar- 
ranged by W. P. Downing, the com- 
pany's representative who had this in 
charge. 

But really there was not a booth 
which did not more than come up to 
our expectations. It cost a good deal 



:%#& 




The store of Jus. S. Neill and Sons, Fredericton. 



material we wished to bring forward. 
The interior was arranged as a 
rest room, with chairs, and tables for 
writing picture post cards upon. You 
know how tired people get at a fair. 
Well this booth gave them a place iu 
come and take things quietly. While they 
were here they looked at the roofing, 
and there is not the least doubt but 
that we made a number of sales as a 
result of that display. 



to arrange the booths, and to look after 
them properly, but the results more 
than repaid us for this. We not only 
made a good number of sales during 
the week, but since our business has 
grown finely. We can come to only one 
conclusion, all things being considered 
— that exhibiting at the Fair helps us. 
We intend to continue the practice, 
which after all. is the best proof of our 
faith. 



A Big Advance in Brass Goods 

From 20 to 30 Per Cent. Increase in Prices is Declared, to 
go Into Effect at Once — Advance in Wages is One of the 
Main Contributing Causes. 



The latest line handled by the hard- 
ware merchant to show an upward 
movement in price is brass and brass 
goods. Nor has the advance been a 
small one for everything considered it 
will range from 20 to 30 per cent. Per- 
haps one of the most important reasons 
underlying the advance is the increased 
wages which have had to be paid by 
manufacturers in recent years. 



At least, particular stress has been 
laid on this point by one English firm, 
which with others had reduced discount 
on brass goods from 50 to 40 per cent. 
They point out that not only have 
higher wages to be paid for producing 
of raw material but also to workmen 
who turn it into the finished product, so 
that brass goods are really doubly af- 
fected by increased wages. 
34 



A large percentage of the brass goods 
sold in Canada come from England. 
Manufacturers there now have to care 
for the national insurance recently in- 
augurated for the benefit of workmen 
and while amount is not very large, 
all these items go into the price of the 
goods. 

The duty on brass goods from Eng- 
land is 20 per cent., so that besides in- 
crease of 20 per cent, in goods at fac- 
tory, a larger duty has to be paid, as 
invoiced price on which duty is reckon- 
ed is 20 per cent, larger. "Having a 
larger volume of money invested," said 
one dealer, "the jobber will also have 
to get more profit, so that when every- 
thing is considered goods which previ- 
ously cost the retail merchant $1 will 
now cost $1.30." 

Greatest volume of trade in brass 
goods is done around Christmas, such 
lines as candlesticks, kettles, jardiniers, 
fenders and other fancy brass goods 
selling. Past years have shown a gradu- 
ally increasing demand for these goods. 

The advance goes into effect imme- 
diately, although those dealers who 
were fortunate enough to have goods 
booked ahead will get them at the old 
price. 

— ®— 

FOWLER CO. PLANT ENLARGED. 

St. John, N.B. — The manufacturing 
plant of Josiah Fowler & Co., in St. 
John, N.B., has been changed somewhat 
and considerably enlarged recently. In 
addition to making axes, hammers, etc.. 
as they have been doing now for 
nearly half a century, they are now 
equipped for the manufacturing on a 
large scale of automobile springs. Mr. 
Fowler's treatment is a secret process. 
Mr. Fowler, Sr., a few years ago or- 
ganized an auto spring factory at New- 
castle, Indiana, which he sold last year 
owing to the sad death of his son who 
had been in charge. 

This occasioned his action in enlarg- 
ing the St. John plant, and the concen- 
tration of all their energies on Can- 
adian production. Mr. Fowler, jr., is 
president of the new company. He is 
a practical man, and is ably assisted in 
the company by Mr. Barbour, treasurer. 
So thoroughly are they known for su- 
perior work, that they have orders for 
repairs, in auto work, from all over 
Canada. 



Got a Prize. 

Govan, Sask. — I. Dutton, hardware 
dealer, had a sporting goods booth at a 
local exhibition and won second prize, 
being awarded $10. 



Forecast of Conditions in the West 

Representative of Hardware and Metal Who Has Visited All Parts of the 
West, Sums up His Impressions— Yield Will be Average, But the Acreage Has 
Been Largely Increased — The Problem of Moving the Crop — Interior Ele- 
vators and Home Granaries Are Advocated. 



How are things in the West? 

All speculation as to trade possi- 
bilities in Canada inevitably begins 
with that query. A great deal de- 
pends on the West. If crops are 
good there, the manufacturer puts on 
night shifts and goes to the bank for 
the capital necessary to extend his 
plant. If the crop reports are pes- 
simistic, the manufacturer begins to 
plan retrenchments, and the banks 
are chary about loans. 

The question of Western condi- 
tions is one, therefore, of wide im- 
port, and men in all lines of business 
are deeply interested. A representa- 
tive of Hardware and Metal has been 
engaged on a tour through Western 
points during the summer months, 
and has thereby gained a clear in- 
sight into conditions as they actually 
exist. Hardwaremen will be interest- 
ed in the following summary of his 
impressions : 

Prince Albert, Sask., Aug. 1. — On 
all hands is heard the significant story 
of "good crops.'' After an extended 
trip through the West, during which 1 
have visited practically all districts and 
talked with all classes of men, I have 
» eome to the conclusion that the crop 
should be a bumper one. The weather 
has been favorable recently. The fine 
warm weather which we have met with 
during the past few days has been great 
for the crops. With a few more days 
of it, all danger will be over. All that 
will be needed to put the finishing 
touches on a record year will be good 
harvest weather. 

The Western farmer stakes so much 
on favorable weather that he has be- 
come, perforce, a good judge of all per- 
taining to it. When a Westerner tells 
me that the signs point to an early 
winter or a late fall, I am more than 
half inclined to believe him. He is not 
a mere idle prophet. At the present 
time, all talk is of a long and warm 
fall. If such proves to be the case, the 
farmers will have an exceptional op- 
portunity to get in the grain. 
An Average Yield. 

I am not predicting a record break- 
ing yield. In a few localities, in Sou- 
thern Manitoba, there have been heavy 
hail storms which have wrought havoc. 
This will not seriously affect the general 
result. Every thing at present indi- 
cates a good average yield. 

There has been, of course, a great in- 
crease in the acreage. Thus, if the 
yield is up to the average, the total out- 



put will be very materially increased. 
This is what everyone is banking on. I 
have talked to a good many hundred 
men in all stations of life during the 
past few weeks, and there have only 
been two or three pessimists in the lot. 
And yet there is room for pessimism 
of a kind. Consider the question of 
harvest help. The West will need 50,- 

000 men this year to garner the crops. 
Will that number be forthcoming? 
There does not seem any possibility of 
it. There will be the usual rush of men 
from the East anxious to make the big- 
wages that the Westerner offers. West- 
ern cities and towns will be deserted by 
the floating population, and all men 
without permanent occupation during 
harvest time. But the number of vol- 
unteers will, we fear, fall far short of 
the required number. 

Will There be Blockade. 

There is likewise the danger of an- 
other grain blockade. The railways, of 
course, are ' being blamed. Personally, 

1 cannot see what the railroads could 
have done to meet the present situation. 
The growth of the West reminds one 
of the story of Jack and the Beanstalk. 
The west "counts that day lost whose 
low descending sun" sees not at least 
one new town added to its swelling list 
and many hundreds of new inhabitants 
added to its roll. That the railroads 
have not kept pace is, after all, not so 
strange. 

Interior Elevators. 

The imminence of a blockade has 
again revived interest in that pet 
scheme of the theorist — the establish- 
ment of interior storage elevators. It 
has now become more than a theory. It 
i=i a possibility. 

The scheme is, briefly, to build large 
elevators where the grain can be held 
during the winter. The farmers would 
thus be saved from loss and would be 
enabled to finance upon their stores to 
meet current obligations. 

Another remedy that is now being 
urged strongly upon the farmers is the 
building of granaries upon the farms. 
Thus equipped, the farmer could store 
his grain right at home until such time 
as it was possible to get shipments. 

Large numbers are accepting this ex- 
pedient. There are many, however, who 
are not in a position to do so. The first 
objection that arises is that many far- 
mers — a majority of them perhaps — 
could not afford to build a granary. 
The expense involved is pretty steep. 
Although the Westerner is generally de- 

35 



picted as a man with cash to burn and 
a willingness to burn it, a great many 
of the "farmers are men who have start- 
ed with a small capital (made up more 
of indomitable will than coin of the 
realm), and they are not yet in a posi- 
tion to afford a granary. Then there 
is the very serious objection that grain 
stored in private granaries cannot be 
financed upon and the farmer generally 
needs "something to go upon." 

To meet these difficulties, it has been 
suggested that the Government step in 
and render assistance either by enabl- 
ing the farmer to finance upon grain 
stored in private granaries or by ex- 
tending aid in the building of such gran- 
aries. It is pointed out that last spring 
the Government assisted many farmers 
to get seed grain for sowing. If this 
step were justified, it is argued that the 
same justification would hold in the 
present instance. If the Government 
stepped in to help put in the crop, there 
is no reason why it should not h<»lp to 
save it. 

In a dry fall, there seems little doubt 
that the home granary is the proper 
method of taking care of the grain 
that cannot be forwarded to the lake 
front before the close of navigation. In 
wet seasons, however, it is useless. The 
grain would soon spoil. To save large 
quantities of damp grain, the interior 
hospital store house is a necessity. It 
is indeed surprising that there is no 
wide movement toward the establish- 
ment of these. Two weeks more and 
the hum of the binder will be heard 
in the land and little toward that end 
has been done. 

Conditions in the hardware trade are 
good. I have called upon many in both 
the wholesale and the retail, and have 
heard the same story everywhere. 
"Good business now — better ahead," 
epitomizes the opinion of all connected 
with the trade. 

© 

ATTRACTIVE PILE SIGN. 

The Delta Eile Works, Philadelphia, 
have prepared a handsome and attrac- 
tive sign for use by merchants handling 
their goods. It is an artistic production, 
done in harmonious colors, and will 
make a most desirable addition to the 
display signs of the hardware merchant. 
The sign is 21 1 / 2 x9% inches. It displays 
a 16-inch Flat Bastard Pile in its actual 
size and color, making it true to life. 
The Delta File Works' trade marks, 
the Delta and Wreath of Quality, are 
displayed on the sign. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



THE 



(ESTABLISHED 1888.) 

MACLEAN PUBLISHING CO., LIMITED 



JOHN BAYNE MACLEAN 



President. 



Publishers of Trade Newspapers which circulate in the Provinces 
of British Columbia, Alberta, Saskatchewan, Manitoba, Ontario, 
Quebec, Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, P. E. Island and New- 
foundland. 

CABLE ADDRESSES 
CANADA: Macpubco, Toronto. ENGLAND: Atabek, London, Eng. 

OFFICES 

Montreal - 701-702 Eastern Tp. Bk. Building. 
Toronto - - 143-149 University Avenue. 
Winnipeg 34 Royal Bank Building. 

Vancouver, B.C. - " - - H. Hodgson, 18 
London, Eng. - E. J. Dodd. 88 Fleet St. E.C. 
New York R. B. Huestis, 115 Broadway, N.Y. 
Chicago A. H. Byrne, 140 South Dearborn St. 
France John P. Jones & Co., 31bis Faubourg 



Phone Main 1255. 

Phone Main 7324. 

Phone Garry 2313. 

Hartney Chambers. 

Phone Central 12960 

Phone 2009 Rector 

Phone Rand 3234. 
Montmartre, Paris. 

SUBSCRIPTION 

Canada, $2; United States, $2.50; Great Britain and Colonies, 8s 
6d; elsewhere, 12s. 

PUBLISHED EVERY SATURDAY. 



PROSPERITY ASSURED. 

The prosperity of the country depends in no small de- 
gree on the Western crops. The sequel of good crops is 
the free circulation of money in the West and that condi- 
tion is soon commuicated to the east. 

It seems reasonably assured that the crop this year 
will be larger than ever before. There have been adverse 
conditions and damage has been done in some sections by 
hail storms. The yield will be quite up to the average, 
however. Even the most conservative admit that, while 
men of a more enthusiastic frame of mind are predicting 
better things. Taken in conjunction with the immense 
increase in acreage, even an average yield would mean a 
much larger output than ever before. The weather at 
present is favorable, and there is little danger of any- 
thing cropping up to upset present calculations. 

The crop is safe, and prosperity for the whole coun- 
try is assured. 

@ ■ 

ACTING UPON THE SIGNS. 

Dealers are so busily engaged figuring out the many 
problems of selling, that often they seem to disregard 
the buying side of their business. Surely this deserves a 
fair share of attention. According as a good or bad buy 
is made is a good or bad sale made possible. It takes an 
exceedingly efficient salesman to make a good profit when 
the buying has been poor. 

An instance comes to hand this week. Iron pipe has 
advanced in price. Dealers must now pay more for it, 
and therefore they must sell it for more. So far, so good. 
But it has been pretty generally known for some time that 
this advance would come. The dealers have been advised 
of this; therefore, they had every opportunity of getting 
in their order when they could secure the pipe at the 
old price. Some did this, and so, are able to get in ad- 
dition to the regular profit, a profit equal to this last ad- 
vance. But others there are who paid no heed to the 
predictions. Consequently, they are paying about five 
per cent, more for their pipe now. 

In the Montreal market report published in Hardware 
and Metal on July 27, appears this sentence : 

"Galvanized pipe, too, is scarce already, and 
seems likely to become scarcer. Especially is this 
true of the smaller sizes. It is not certain yet 
that prices will be advanced, but this seems like- 
ly. Certainly dealers would do well to cover. ' ' 
The moving finger was writing. A week later, in the 
issue of last Saturday, appeared this comment : 



"Iron pipe, too, might well be purchased. 
There is a great probability that the price of this 
will advance within a very short time." 
Indeed it seems that the dealer who did not get his 
supply before this week's advance, has only himself to 
blame. He was told of the upward trend. He was ad- 
vised that the upward movement would likely come 
"within a very short time." If he did not send an order 
at once the fault is his. If he did send an order at once 
the profit is his, and fortunately there are a good many 
dealers who did that very thing. 

® 



IMPRESSIONS OF CANADA. 

The Hardware Trade Journal, London, England, con- 
tinues to enlighten its readers on the score of trade con- 
ditions in Canada; at any rate to ply them with articles 
respecting this country. The latest is a letter from a 
special commissioner who traveled from coast to coast 
and who picked up en route a jumble of impressions. He 
is inclined to be critical and picayune in his treatment 
of the country as he saw it. He tells of the narrowness 
of the streets of some of the cities, the lack of platforms 
at stations, and the incongruity of buildings, but makes 
never a reference to the miraculous growth that has 
turned wild prairie lands into populous sections, stud- 
ded with towns and traversed by railroads, in the course 
of a few years. He has been so engaged in finding flaws 
in regard to small matters that he has missed entirely 
the evidences of unprecedented activity and development; 
at any rate, he has most studiously avoided the worth- 
while topics and has devoted himself to the criticism of 
detail. 

However, he has voiced some home truths as well. 
He says, "Many British houses fail to get the business 
because they have not followed the Imperial advice to 
'Wake up.' " He points out that many manufacturers 
in Great Britain refuse to conform to conditions here 
and so lose trade. 



KEEPING BUYING DATA. 

A college education, it has been said, does not give a 
man a knowledge of everything, but it does train him 
so that he knows how to proceed to find out whatever he 
wants. 

Some such power is needed by many hardwaremen. It 
is impossible for each dealer to carry every line handled. 
But he should have an idea where the great majority of 
these can be secured. A customer asking for a little used 
line is not greatly surprised to find that tbis is not kept 
in stock. But he will be surprised if he finds that the 
dealer knows little or nothing about it, and is not able 
to say how the article may be secured. 

There are dealers — fortunately, a large number — who 
keep the manufacturers' catalogues in a systematic way. 
They have these indexed, and when an article is asked 
for they know where this is to be secured, if it is not on 
their shelves. They refer to their catalogues, and can 
tell the customer what the article will likely cost, and how 
long it would likely take to get it. Such information, 
coming from the dealer, strengthens him in the eye of 
the customer. 

Yet there are lines which are not described in the 
catalogues. Perhaps the manufacturers have not become 
alive to the fact that the territory, in which these may 
well be sold, has broadened as it has. How is the dealer 
to tell where these goods may be secured, when the un- 
expected demand for them comes f Books, containing the 
information, are not available. Yet, he is still on a par 



36 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



with the college trained man. He does not know the 
line, but he knows where to find out about it. He can 
write Hardware and Metal and be reasonably sure of 
getting the desired information. Some of the widest- 
awake and most up-to-date dealers in Canada avail them- 
selves of this information service monthly. They are 
big enough to be willing to give aid, and big enough to 
ask aid when they need it. 



Another Tentacle 



POINTED EDITORIALS. 

Are you making your advertising pay? 

* * * 

Again we might ask, who said eight cent white lead? 
* * * 

An average yield on an increased acreage means a 
record crop in the West. 

* * * 

Outside salesmanship not only means sales outside 
the store, but it means more sales inside. 

* * * 

The living element in a window undoubtedly attracts 
attention, and that — with the goods — means sales. 

* * * 

White lead is selling in Toronto at $7.95. Our pre- 
diction of 8-cent white lead has practically been fulfilled. 

Prices just at present are much like elevators to the man 
who wants to get down in a hurry. Everything is "going 
up." . 

* * * 

Think of turning a woman into a silent salesman. Yet 
using them as demonstrators in a window practically ef- 
fects this change. 

The West is demanding more rope, not to carry out 
the suggestion of the old adage, but to make sure of get- 
ting the crop harvested. 

* * * 

When three-quarter million orders are going in the 
West, one wakens up to the fact that the West is getting 
to be "some punkins." 

* * * 

Just three weeks now before the fall special number 
of Hardware and Metal will be issued. It is going to be 
the best on record. Watch for it. 

* * * 

Leather has been advanced in price 10 per cent. If 
a higher figure be struck for belting and such lines, the 
hardwareman will know the reason. 

* * * 

A business letter, it has been said, should deal with 
but one subject. It goes without saying that it should be 
legible — yet some business letters aren't. 

* * * 

Every time we get a written letter, we raise a prayer 
of Thanksgiving for the man who invented the typewriter, 
and who made unreadable scrawls unpopular. 

* * * 

The West is now complaining of a shortage of binder 
twine. The West is like a growing boy whose clothes are 
generally too small for him. The demands of the West 
are increasing all the time so that the sleeve of supply 
does not cover the arm of demand, leaving a stretch of 
wrist showing. 



'"p HE story of the fight between Giliat and the devil- 
■*■ fish is a familiar one; how the tentacles of the 
monster of the deep fastened themselves upon the un- 
wary trespasser into its domain, and how Giliat finally 
killed it by hacking the head of the octopus — the centre 
of power. 

The term "octopus" has been aptly applied to the 
modern trust. It describes it accurately; for the trust 
is a many-tentacled monster, which can only be destroyed 
by a blow at the very centre of its being. It is useless 
to endeavor to maim or sever the tentacles, for each one 
destroyed is replaced by new ones which grapple in fresh 
places. 

This is exemplified in the case of the fight that is now 
being waged against the mail order octopus in the United 
States. Feeling the necessity for a stronger grip on its 
struggling victim, the public, the mail order house has 
thrown out a new tentacle. It is called a building and 
loan department. This is the way it works. 

A farmer (call him Brown) is thinking of erecting new 
buildings on his land. While he is debating the matter 
of a loan, he receives a letter from this new building and 
loan concern. A low rate of interest and liberal terms 
are mentioned. He becomes interested and asks for more 
particulars. Another letter comes back post haste, con- 
firming and strengthening former assertions, and adding 
that, in addition to saving him money on his loan, they 
are in a position to save him 50 per cent, or more on all 
building material. It is pointed out that their material 
will be superior to anything that the local dealers can 
supply. Nothing is overlooked to make the offer attract- 
ive. Brown falls. He signs the contract, and the result 
is that he orders everything direct — plans, material and 
tools. The mail order house sells him everything. 

But it does not stop there. Supposing that Brown 
finds himself some time thereafter a little hard up for 
ready cash. He applies for an extension of credit. It is 
granted him — but on certain conditions. It is pointed 
out to him that it is not fair for him to buy his hardware, 
groceries, shoes, clothing, etc., from local dealers, paying 
them cash, when he asks an extension of time from them, 
and this makes them wait for their money. Besides, they 
can save him money on all these things.. Brown has a 
chance to get an extension if he starts to order all his 
supplies from the mail order house (and he pays cash, of 
course.) In other words, the tentacle has wrapped itself 
around friend Brown, and he has no escape. 

Suppose that other bad years follow. Brown is dealing 
with a corporation that is in business for profit only. The 
plans of the mail order house are not governed in any 
sense by sentiment. Had Brown secured his loan from 
the local bank, it might have tided him over. The mail 
order house will extend his credit as long as they are 
able to make a profit out of him — and no longer. Thus, if 
he has a continued run of hard luck, Brown is likely to 
be badly squeezed. 

The mail order octopus is as resourceful as it is 
menacing. The latest plan is indicative not only of the 
masterful way in which these corporations are directed, 
but also of their deep-laid design to acquire a still stronger 
hold on the buying public. The retail trade of the United 
States is finding the danger more serious all the time. 
If the power of the octopus is strengthened by a Parcels 
Post measure, the retail Giliat may not escape as lightly 
as the hero of Victor Hugo's romance. 



37 



How I Made My Advertising Pay 



Progressive Dealer Recites His Experience and Gives Some 
Practical Advice — Newspapers/ are the Most Effective Me- 
dium — Uses Large Space in Order to Make Copy Distinctive 
and to Use Cuts — Business Has Increased Largely as a Re- 
sult. 
Written for Hardware and Metal by Geo. A. Elliott, Jr., Brantford. 



The hardwareman should give a large 
share of his attention to the question 
of advertising. It has become a very 
essential part of the retail business. 
You have to let the people know 
what you are offering in order to get 
their trade nowadays. Everything may 
come to him who waits, but that axiom 
does not hold good in the management 
of a store. Trade comes to the mer- 
chant who advertises, not to the man 
who sits back and waits. 

In the matter of advertising, condi 7 
tions vary to such an extent that I 
think each dealer should use the 
methods which he finds best suited to 
his needs and his particular locality. 
From the viewpoint of a city hardware- 
man, I do not think there is any me- 
dium so effectual as the newspaper. By 
taking space in the newspapers, the 
merchant reaches all classes. If there 
are a number of daily (or weekly) 
papers in the locality, choose the best. 
The rates will be higher but the re- 
turns will be larger in proportion. 

Changed to Larger Space. 

When I first started newspaper ad- 
vertising, I used small space daily and 
must confess that the returns were not 
appreciable. My ad. was just the same 
as a number of others. There was no- 
thing of iany particular character to 
distinguish it from the rest. When 
there is only limited space at the dis- 
posal of an advertising writer, he has 
not the opportunity to render his copy 
and his lay-out distinctive. He is 
forced to the level of mediocrity, as it 
were. 

I realized that, to be effective, my 
copy must be noticeable at a glance. 1 
wanted to make every reader either 
read the ad. through or, at any rate, 
connect the name "Elliott's" with the 
hardware and stove business. I was 
using three-inch space three times a 
week at this time. I changed this to one 
insertion weekly (on Fridays) , using full 
double column space or 41 inches in all. 
1 also introduced the use of cuts free- 

ly. 

Found Change Resultful. 

The results were apparent at once. 
My copy was attractive; at any rate, it 
attracted attention and it sold the 
goods. 

Under this new plan, my business has 
shown a very noticeable increase each 
vear. 



The Essential Points. 
I have found that the essential 
points in advertising are: 

1. Have your copy attractive. It 
must be readable at a glance. I have 
concluded that the average reader will 
not take the time to read all the ads. in 
the daily paper. I want to make sure, 
therefore, that mine will be one of 
those the people do read. To get value 
from the expenditure, the ad. must be 
different from others. 

2. I believe firmly in using prices in 
my advertising. For instance, note the 
item of lawn hose in the accompanying 
ad. Briefly, I state that it is guaran- 
teed, emphasize the quality rnd then 
state the price. To my mind, this is 
the key to successful advertising. 

3. It has never been 'my object to 
cater to the idea of bargain hunting. It 
is far better to endeavor to build up a 
steady and desirable trade by supply- 
blg reliable quality goods at a fair mar- 
gin of profit. I only advertise a bargain 
occasionally, and then as a leader, 
purely and simply. 

4. Under all circumstances, supply 
the goods exactly as advertised. People 
appreciate this. Nothing so arouses 
their distrust and disapproval as to 
supply them with something not up to 
the advertised specifications. 

5 Have a certain amount of unifor- 
mity about your copy. It pays to edu- 
cate readers to recognize vour ad. at 
first srlance. This you can do by having 
a distinctive heading and slogan. I al- 
ways use the heading:. "Elliott's Hard 
ware," and the slogan, "The place to 
buy reliable stoves and hardware." in 
my advertising as shown in the accom- 
panying specification, and it has become 
familiar to readers. 

6. My advertising is always on sea- 
sonable goods. Early in September, for 
instance, I will begin advertising Fall 
sroods and stoves. It pavs to attend to 
the lines which are most in demand. 

7. Use as many illustrations as the-' 
space will allow. I like to have an il- 
lustration, as far as possible, for every 
article advertised. An illustration, a 
short, snappy summing up of the quali- 
ties of the article, and the price clear- 
ly marked : — That is the standard that 
I always endeavor to live up to in pre- 
paring copy. 

Note the effect of the use of numer- 
ous cuts. The ad. looks "meaty," if 
such an expression be permissible: it 

38 



ELLIOTT'S 
HARDWARE 



THE PUCE 10 BUY ffiUUU SWW5 AND MMMAK I 

A Barrow Full of 

Bargains Awaits 

You Here on 

Saturday 




HonaeboM needs "f all kiDCe-T^is 

for i'] ij-B.iw- Gardex and Uwn TitOll- 

tradiry here regoiarly. Other* ■ 
it light along 



a»y by 



Guaranteed Lawn Hose 



lt'» Beat to Buy Good Ho*«-Our 
Li* ri Hi*e ib all guvatilecd quality, acid 
out price la as l»<v as good hose cao be 
►old Prfcfl tVr loot O 

IBt. 10c una rO 



Garden Cultivators 



iraablo tool, <aora« be- 
>i I be r*o re pronj! o»o 

.75 



K.I 



Burner Gaa Pi * re*. . 



1.98 



Big Bargains | or you in 
Watering Cans 




Its Fly Time 




■fid ■ 






Saturday** Price* on Screen Doora 

a 2s, *a oe. v so. s i i6 and * 

Good Plata Door foe SSc 

Uiogo and KinioR) ■■• it li earn door 

Street. Wise Cloth all width* from 



.39 




Screen Door 
Hinges 

IOc Pair 



Is Your SAW a Help or a 
Nuisance 7 

We offer ffOOd RM» for > I .00. J1-2S' 
»l. 50. »l.75,*S.OO. Ou. Iiaetaeom' 



Ice Cream Freezers 



Th'i: Freezer* are lumbit lot (trallf 
mo. aoJ t1>e price it ""hit) the reach of 
■Jl. Don! fa'l to jet one on 
Sainrdar. Qm'i nworice . 



.75 



Saturday the Day to Buy a Hammock 




1.58 



Here's a 
Snap for 
Saturday 





ThU i* a lia* 
in vbicb ve etcal 
offer you a large to 



35e 



HIIOTTS HARDWARF 



^PENINSULAR RANGES 
Ihecla WARM AIR FURNACES 



An advertisement prepared by Mr. 
Elliott — It occupied two full col- 
umns — Note the heading, the slo- 
gan and the splendid, use made of 
cuts and prices. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



fairly bristles with interest and selling 
points to my mind when cuts are used. 
One of the advantages of using lib- 
eral space is that it is possible then to 
use cuts and distinctive features. Copy 



cannot be brightened by cuts when the 
space used is small. 

This class of advertising takes time 
in the preparation but I am firmly con- 
vinced that it pays. 



8. Advertising is snot limited to 
newspaper space. We give our show 
windows careful attention and also do 
a certain amount of personal canvass- 
ing. 



Selling and Installing at Same Time 

Method of Going After Builders Hardware Sales, Adopted by Montreal Dealer 
. — Strong Points of This Plan — Also Some Weaknesses. 



This is an age of outside salesman- 
ship. Dealers there are who still do not 
find it necessary to send salesmen out 
through the neighborhood, but prac- 
tically every man in business is doing 
something along the line of outside work. 
An advertisement is an outside sales- 
man. So is a circular letter— or a cal- 
endar at Christmas time. 

This fashion of going after business 
did not spring up in any haphazard way. 
It is the result of careful study of busi- 
ness conditions. Dealers figured what 
trade there was to get, and how this 
might best be secured. 

There is a certain kind of business 
which will come to a dealer, whether or 
not he does anything more to secure it 
than keep the stock necessary to sup- 
ply the demand. There is other business 
which will go to some store — but unless 
it is sought it may be another dealer 
who will benefit. But there is business 
which may be lost entirely unless some 
progressive man goes out after it. 
There may be something which a person 
wants, but which he can get along with- 
out; something needed, but which 
means more trouble to get than to do 
without. 

These things are especially true of all 
builders hardware lines. There are in 
Canadian towns and cities, now, a large 
number of new houses. These are sup- 
posed to be completely finished, and yet 
in almost every case some weakness ap- 
pears. A door fastener may be lack- 
ing. A window catch may be defective. 
Perhaps some have been broken and 
need to be replaced. 

These imperfections are annoying. 
Any householder almost will be willing 
to part with a little money to supply 
the lack, yet many will put off going 
to the hardware store to buy these 
things. 

But supposing this trade is to be se- 
cured, is it worth going after? There 
is indeed a question here. It will be 
differently answered by different deal- 
ers, but here perhaps it would be better 
not to give an answer at all. Instead 
may be cited the method of one Mon- 
treal hardwareman. 

Montreal, as all know, has been pros- 
pering greatly, of late. New houses have 



been going up in all parts of the city — 
especially in the east, west and north. 
Now this particular hardwareman car- 
ries on his business near the west-end, 
and therefore he has devoted his atten- 
tion to that section. He concluded that 
there must be a good deal of builders 
hardware trade to be secured. He was 
not rushed greatly in the store, so he 
decided to take steps to secure this 
loose business. 

With this in view the hardwareman 
selected one of his clerks who showed 
some aptitude for going about, and 
talking to people. He also secured the 
services of a carpenter, and sent the 
two men off to the district in which new 
houses were plentiful. 

Now these men did not conduct any 
hit — or — miss campaign of salesman- 
ship. They had a fixed object in view 
— that object being an inhabited house 
which had not a letter-box in the front 
door. 

Could there be any better opening 
for a sale than the lack of an opening 
for a letter-box? This is an age of let- 
ters. The postman calls twice or three 
times a day, and unless he has a letter- 
box into which he can drop what he has 
brought he is obliged to ring the bell. 
That means a constant cause of disturb- 
ance and annoyance. Also the lack 
of a letter-box means that the missives 
have to be stuck under the door when 
no one is inside to receive them. This 
would not be so bad, if it were always 
possible. But often only an edge can 
be pushed through and the letter may be 
lost. 

Quoted a Flat Price. 

People realize this, and therefore this 
young hardware clerk regularly found 
a ready ear when he asked if there was 
need of a letter-box in the door. 

"How much would it cost?" was 
asked. 

"We will put one in for $1.50," would 
come the reply, and at the same time 
the letter-slip would be shown. It was 
a simple brass one, but one which would 
appeal to many. Some there were who 
asked for something different. They 
would be told that they could pick out 
what they wanted by going to the 
store. It would be explained that some 

39 



styles might cost a little more than the 
one being shown, but that whatever were 
selected the work of installing would 
be quickly attended to. 

That is a great selling point — the 
promise to install the letter-box. Many 
a man, in a new house, would buy one 
of these, but he is uncertain that he 
could put this in properly himself, and 
he knows that he will have difficulty 
securing a carpenter to do the work, and 
that he will have t pay a good sized 
figure for the services of such a man. 

But the majority approached by the 
clerk of this energetic hardwareman, 
were quite willing to have installed, the 
model brought around. The carpenter 
therefore set right to work. The whole 
transaction was completed in a few) 
minutes. 

Other Sales Made. 

But while the work of installing was 
going on the clerk was not idle. He 
showed some other things which he had 
brought in his bag — window catches, 
door stops, and similar lines. He did 
not urge the purchase of these, but 
merely inquired if they were needed. In 
many cases they were and sales were 
made. 

But it seems that the dealer who in- 
augurated this scheme made one bad 
mistake. He sold the letter boxes, and 
a good many other lines. But he did 
not make use of these sales as he might 
to advertise his store. He did not leave 
any cards, telling where hardware goods 
might be secured; and explaining that 
a telephone message would bring prompt 
delivery of any kitchen utensils which 
might be needed. Many did not know 
from whom they had purchased the 
letter-slip. They only knew that they 
had agreed to give so much for this 
work — that the work had been done sat- 
isfactorily, and that they paid out the 
money. 

But by failing to make his outside 
salesmanship act as an advertisement for 
the store the dealer lost part of his 
advantage. Yet he gained a good many 
sales, without losing any in the store. 
His methods, while not possible for all, 
may well suggest some similar line of 
activity. 



Is the Binder Twine Shortage Real? 

The Question of Tariff Enters Largely Into the Present Situation— Reports of 
Shortages Are Heard From the West— Number of Canadian Firms Manufactur- 
ing Binder Twine Has Been Reduced Since the Duty Was Removed. 



From the West comes a cry of dis- 
tress. Binder twine is to be scarce. 
Binder twine — why the prosperity of 
this prosperous young country hangs 
upon it. If the shortage is real, the 
results will be indeed serious. 

And there does seem to be some 
cause for the present uneasiness. Bin- 
der twine is far from plentiful now. 
Even in the East — and in what seems 
east to the far westerner — dealers are 
experiencing difficulty getting the sup- 
plies they need . In Ottawa, and neigh- 
boring places, there is at present a 
shortage which gives cause for im- 
mediate anxiety, but shortage enough 
to arouse the dealers to the fact that 
the supply of binder twine — compared 
to the demand — is small. 

The Tremendous Demand. 

But the West — It is there that a 
shortage would hit hardest if a shortage 
should come. There 600 million bushels 
of grain are tied up annually. The 
amount is growing each season. Think 
of it ! More than half a billion bushels 
are sent through the reapers each har- 
vest. That means that car load upon 
car load of binder twine is required, 
and should the supply of this be too 
small, much trouble and much loss 
would result. 

Men who have been, or are now in the 
binder twine business, do not care to 
pass a definite opinion upon the present 
situation. Piecing together the informa- 
tion which is available, however, it 
would seem that a large part of the 
binder twine which is needed will come 
through somehow. But there appears 
no doubt that there will be difficulty 
supplying this, and he will be a wise 
dealer who estimates what he will need, 
and who buys that at once. It is late 
already to place orders. Some men, who 
early put in their requisitions for a part 
of their supply, are finding difficulty 
in getting their sorting orders filled. 
Certainly those who have not yet or- 
dered their total supply should waste 
no time letting their needs be known. 

Cause of the Shortage. 

But what is behind the shortage — for 
a shortage there undoubtedly is, though 
it is hardly likely that it will cause as 
great trouble as some are predicting. 
Is not the production of binder twine 
keeping up with the demand? Are the 
acres of wheat multiplying more rapid- 
ly than the twine factories? 

This last would seem to be the gist 
of the matter. Farms are increasing in 



number. Land is producing more grain 
to the acre. The amount of binder 
twine needed, is therefore very much 
greater than was required a few years 
ago. And, what of the sources of sup- 
ply? The sources of supply, be it 
known, are less than they were a decade 
ago. Where there were eight binder 
twine factories in Canada then, there 
are now five. The situation is indeed 
one which calls for serious thought. No 
wonder Hon. Mr. White, the Minister 
of Finance, has stated that he is going 
to look into the matter very thoroughly, 
and appoint a committee of investiga- 
tion to bring in a finding. 

United States Twine. 

There are those who declare the pre- 
sent shortage of binder twine is due to 
the taking down of the tariff restric- 
tions, as they used to apply to this 
product. The great part of the twine 
now used here comes from two gigantic 
concerns in the States. But these con- 
cerns have also to supply a huge de- 
mand at home. There is some reason, 
therefore, for the ground some take, 
namely that these concerns — large and 
all though they are — do not have a suffi- 
cient production to meet the huge and 
growing demand. 

In view of the present situation, and 
in view of the fact that manufacturers 
have waited upon the Minister of Fin- 
ance, and have been promised a serious 
study of the situation to see if a tariff 
on binder twine is necessary, it will not 
be amiss to review tariff conditions. 

History of the Tariff. 

In April, 1897, there was a duty on 
binder twine coming into Canada of 
12 x /2 per cent. In 1898 this was reduced 
to 10 per cent., and then was removed 
entirely. 

What did this mean, some may ask? 
Well it would be hard to say what it 
did mean. But what followed is 
known, and the reader will have to judge 
for himself whether this came as a di- 
rect result of the tariff change, and if 
these happenings — however caused — 
have really tended to keep down the 
supply of binder twine, or if they have 
merely meant that this supply comes 
from a different source. 

In 1896 there was brought into Can- 
ada from the United States 3,018,065 
pounds of binder twine. That, it will 
be noted, was in face of a duty of 12 x /2 
per cent. 



In 1899, after free trade on binder 
twine had been declared, the import- 
ations amounted to 10,629,211 pounds; 
and in 1911, the importations had grown 
to 26,969,258 pounds. 

Canadian Concerns Discontinue. 
That should not make a shortage in 
binder twine, it may be said. Certainly 
it would appear that, with this greatly 
increased importation, the twine to meet 
the growing need would be to hand. But 
it must be remembered that this influx 
has had an effect upon the Canadian 
manufacturers. One factory which was 
used to produce 6,000 tons cut to 800 
tons, going in more for rope in which 
there is a better profit. 

Has Increase Offset Decrease. 

Now has the reduction in the supply 
of binder twine coming from Canada 
been large enough to offset the largely 
increased shipments coming from the 
United States. The question presents 
many difficulties. Had the Canadian 
manufacturers been able to make money 
in binder twine they would certainly 
have increased their plants to meet the 
increased demand — much as other manu- 
facturers have increased their plants. 
Thus the domestic production would 
have grown largely. As it is, however, 
there has been a shrinkage in the home 
production — a shrinkage which makes 
the total supply of binder twine barely 
sufficient, if it is sufficient at all. 

What the outcome will be is a ques- 
tion for the future. Certainly the ad- 
visability of fixing a tariff on United 
States twine is to be considered. Those 
who advocate this state as one justifi- 
cation, that Canadian twine can not now 
go into the United States free of duty. 
The States does allow the free entrance 
of twine made from New Zealand hemp, 
Istle or Tampico Fibre, Sisal grass of 
sun, but twine made from Manilla hemp 
is subject to a duty of 45 per cent. 

An Apparent Injustice. 

Now practically all Canadian twine 
is, and always was, made from Manilla 
hemp. So Canadian operators face that 
high tariff for their finished product, 
and also face a tariff for the raw pro- 
duct, since Manilla twine goes into the 
States free since the war with Spain. 

It is a serious question this. A return 
to the duty would almost certainly 
cause an advance in the price of binder 
twine. But it is possible this would not 
be a bad thing. It is better to have 
twine at a moderate price, than to have 
a low price without sufficient twine. 



Tools Gain in Efficiency, not in Price 

The Eighth Article in the Price Series, Telling of the Changes There Have Been 
in Tools During the Past Two Decades — On the Whole, Prices To-day are About 
Where They Were, but the Quality Has not Stood Still — Many Changes En- 
hancing the Value of the Tools Have Been Made. 



Lumber has more than doubled in price 
in twenty years. Carpenters, it is said, 
are worth less and get more. Only the 
tools with which carpenters and ama- 
teur carpenters work have remained low 
in price. This is an interesting thing to 
remember in an age when complaints of 
the high cost of living are constantly be- 
ing made. 

Taking it in a broad sense there have 
been practically no changes in the price 
of tools. Perhaps some lines show a 
slight advance, but this is so because an 
old model is compared with a model 
which did not exist twenty years ago. 
Would it be fair to compare the old 
high wheel velocipede with the motor 
cycle of to-day, and say that cycles are 
costing more now? Some comparison of 
tool costs are just as unjust. 

Labor Conditions Responsible. 

What actual changes in price there 
have been have been due largely to labor 
conditions. Men demanded and secured 
higher pay and shorter hours. That, of 
course, meant that the cost of production 
advanced, and consequently that the 
price advanced also, which put 
the burden upon the consumer. Con- 
sumers, after all, are many, while the 
manufacturers are few. This is the old 
theory, therefore, of dividing the load 
among many so that none will be utterly 
weighed down. 

But forgetting labor conditions, for the 
time ; forgetting the higher cost of coal, 
which makes production more costly; let 
a few concrete cases be taken and some 
inquiry made as to the changes the pass- 
ing years have brought in these lines. 
The Case of Chisels. 

Chisels are used by every carpenter, 
and sold by practically every hardware- 
man. How do the chisels of to-day com- 
pare with those used twenty years ago? 
The truth is that the chisel of to-day 
was not known twenty years ago — and 
twenty years is not such a tremendous 
stretch of time. Then the blade was 
flat and squared at the edges. Now the 
beveled edge is generally used. It cuts 
cleaner, and easier. Does it cost more? 
Well, that is a question. Chisels of this 
type can be bought for about 45 cents, 
retail. Twenty years ago chisels were to 
be secured for 25 or 30 cents. But they 
can yet be secured at that figure. The 
more modern stvles cost more, that is 
all. 

In the early nineties, and before that 
time, the great majority of the saws 
used in Canada came from England. This 



was also true of chisels, but hardly to as 
great an extent as with saws. Of late, 
there has come a change. United States 
and Canadian manufacturers have enter- 
ed the field, and many of the models used 
now come from them. But this is mere- 
ly a change in the source of supply. How 
about the goods supplied? 

A Dollar Will Go Further. 

As far as price goes there is little or 
no alteration. Dealers seem to agree that 
saws are for sale now at as low a figure 
as they were fifteen or more years ago. 
Some models may be more expensive, but 
for every cheap line sold in the old days, 
there is a somewhat corresponding line 
now. In saws a dollar will go as far now 
as it would in 1892. 

A dollar will go further indeed, for 
there has been a great change in qual- 
ity. Not that the steel has been improv- 
ed. Some claim it has, and some hold 
that the temper of the old saw was bet- 
ter than the temper of those now sold. 
Perhaps there has really been little dif- 
ference made here, but in shaping the 
saws a real advance is noted. 

Two decades ago saws were made with 
straight backs. Now they are generally 
modeled with hollow backs; and it has 
been shown that this small change makes 
a tremendous difference in the ease with 
which the saw does it work. Moreover, 
the tapering of saws has been improved 
tremendously. A saw used to be the 
same width from the teeth to the back. 
Not to-day! The blade tapers. At the 
teeth it is thicker than at the top of 
the blade. It is shaped somewhat like 
the blade of a knife, with the cutting 
edge reversed. 

Teeth Not So Widely Set. 

This greater width at the cutting edge 
enables the saw to travel more easily 
through the wood. It does not catch. 
It cuts more cleanly, for it is not neces- 
sary to have the teeth set so wide. 

Hammers, too, show a great change. 
To some a hammer is a hammer, provid- 
ing it will drive a nail. But suppose it 
is called upon not to drive one nail but 
several thousand. Then a hammer that 
is so nicely balanced that it exerts great- 
er driving power for less expenditure of 
energy is going to mean much. It will 
prevent the carpenter feeling that "three 
o 'clock fatigue. " It will increase his 
efficiency. 

This niceness of balance is just what 
the modern carpenter's hammer has. 
Moreover, it really does not cost as much 
41 



as did the hammers used by mechanics in 
the old daj's. These they were accus- 
tomed to get made especially for them 
• — at no small expense. To-day the per- 
fected work of close students of ham- 
mers is at their service for a dollar or 
less. 

Better Claws on Hammers. 

Moreover a hammer is sometimes used 
to draw-out as well as to drive-in. How 
does the modern clawhammer compare 
with the old one? In price there is no 
difference. Cheap models can be secured 
now as they could be secured then. But 
a good tool to-day is a better tool than 
it was those years ago. The claw is more 
bent, giving less awkwardness and great- 
er leverage. The claws are made more 
finely — so that to-day a good clawham- 
mer will pull from a board a half inch 
number 20 gauge brad, to draw which 
even fifteen years ago would have re- 
quired the use of a fine and powerful 
pair of pincers. 

Another line which has shown a great 
change is bits. Some of these models do 
cost more now than bits cost in the nine- 
ties. But the purchaser is paying for 
a new article, and is not being asked to 
give more for an article which he could 
secure in those earlier days. 

The centre bits used to be the only 
thing a short time ago. There was no 
twist to carry out the chips. The bit 
had to be removed to clear the way for 
its further work. 

As time has advanced, the twists and 
cutters have been changed, until to-day 
bits are to be secured which are pecu- 
liarly rapid — which may cost a little 
more than men were accustomed to pay, 
but which save more than their extra cost 
every day in the time they save the user. 
Efficiency Has Advanced. 

Then planes might be mentioned. It 
might be shown that the models have 
been rendered less clumsy and more ef- 
fective. A ten per cent, advance in the 
last four or five years has to be noted, 
but even with this the planes of to-day 
are little, if any, more costly than they 
were years ago, and they are infinitely 
more useful. 

In short, when the question is con- 
sidered, it becomes apparent that tools 
are not more expensive than they were. 
There are some new tools — tools needed 
for more exacting work — which do cost 
more, that is all. The real change in this 
hardware line is one of service. With 
the price remaining practically constant 
the efficency has advanced tremendously. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 




The following items are taken from 
the issue of August 13, 1892: — 

"The hardware firm of Chown, 
Farewell & Co., Belleville, has been 
changed to W. W. Chown & Co., Mr. 
Chown is now on the road combin- 
ing business with pleasure as many 
good business men do nowadays in 
taking their vacation. ' ' 
Editor's Note.— The firm of W. W. 
Chown & Co., still do business in Belle- 
ville, but W. W. Chown himself is in 
Edmonton, Alta., where he conducts the 
Chown Hardware Co. His son, R. C. 
Chown, now in Belleville, is a past 
president of the Ontario Retail Hard- 
ware and Store Dealers' Association. 



"It appears that counterfeit ten- 
cent pieces, dated 1891, are now in 
circulation. The only test is the 
sound." 

Editor's Note. — With the rapid mod- 
ern depreciation of the purchasing 
power of the dollar, the dime has be- 
come of such minor importance that the 
counterfeiter to-day would not waste 
time counterfeiting them. He deals in 
nothing less than bills and would be in- 
clined to look upon his predecessor of 
twenty years ago as a "piker." 

* » * 

"Owing to the growth of their 
business, the B. Greening Wire 
Co., Hamilton, have once more 
found it necessary to enlarge their 
premises. ' ' 

Editor's Note. — The necessity has 
been felt many times by the company 
To-day they rank among the best-known 
hardware manufacturing concerns in 

Canada. 

* * * 

"Application has been made to 
incorporate the James Robertson 
Co., Ltd., manufacturers of saws, 
lead pipes, etc., Toronto. Capital 
$250,000." 

Editor's Note.— The new building of 
the company on Spadina is to-day 
rapidly nearing completion. They are 
now largely interested in plumbing sup- 
plies of all kinds. 

* * * 

"The police have been notified 
to keep a look out for burglars 
who stole forty razors and nine 
dozen pocket knives from James 



Sheldrick's hardware store in 

Hagersville." 

Editor's Note. — Mr. Sheldwick, who 
is still in the hardware business in 
Hagersville can now afford to look back 
at his loss on that occasion with equani- 
mity. The thieves, however, believed 
in conducting their operations on a 
wholesale scale. 

» • » 

"It is reported that Ramsey, 
Sons & Co., the paint manufactur- 
ers are about to remove their 
works from Haymarket Square to 
Hochelaga. ' ' 

Editor's Note. — A. Ramsay & Son 
Co. are still on the old site, but a new 
plant has been erected. 

» • # 

' ' Tin : — The operations of buyers 
in New York have had a rather 
beautiful effect. Pig tin quotes at 
24y 2 cents." 

Editor's Note.— Tin is to-day quot»d 
around 50 cents, and there does not 
seem to be much chance of lower prices 
at any time in the future. The increase 
has been due to the wonderful increase 
in the consumption of tin. 



Hardware Letter 
Box 



Closet Seats. 

The Earl Construction Co., Athens, 
Ont. — "Kindly advise us what firms 
manufacture closet seats." 

Jas. Smart Mfg. Co., Brockville, Ont. — 
Editor. 

Stable Fittings. 

Stanley Mills & Co., Hamilton, Ont.— 
"Please give us names of makers of 
Iron Stable fittings in Ontario." 

Dennis Wire & Iron Co., London, Ont. ; 
Canadian Potato Machinery Co., Gait, 
Ont. ; Louden Machinery Co., Guelph, 
Ont.— Editor. 

Barn Door Hangers. 

B. F. Ahrene, Hanover, Ont. — "Can 
you give me names of manufacturers of 
barn door hangers with round tracks?" 

Richards Wilcox Mfg. Co., Aurora, 111., 
U. S. A. ; Hunt, Helm & Ferris Co., Har- 
vard, 111.; Stover Mfg. Co., Freeport, 
111.— Editor. 

Knoll Washer. 

S. Schwanz, Rocanville, Sask. — "Kind- 
ly inform me through your paper .who 
makes the 'Knoll' washer." 

Schultze Bros., Brantford, Ont. — 
Editor. 

Carbide 

E. Boucher, St. Hyacinthe, Que. — 
"Will you kindly give me name of manu- 
facturers of carbide?" 

42 



Willson Carbide Co., St. Catharines, 
Ont.— Editor. 

Redio Cloth. 

H. Sloan, Tilbury, Ont.— "Can you 
advise us where Redio Silver & Brass 
Polisher is made?" 

Redio Polish Co., 67 Fore St., London, 
E.C., England; MacLaren Imperial 
Cheese Co., Toronto, sole agents for 
Canada. — Editor. 

American Sheet Steel Manufacturers. 

Morrisburg Tack Mfg. Co., Ltd., Mor- 
risburg, Ont. — "Can you give us names 
of some American Manufacturers of 
sheet steel?" 

American Sheet & Tin Plate Co., Frick 
Bldg., Pittsburg, Pa.; Labelle Iron 
Works, Steubenville, Ohio ; Lefoe Sheet 
& Tin Plate Co., Niles, Ohio; Inland 
Steel Co., First National Bank Bldg., 
Chicago, 111.; American Rolling Mill Co., 
Middletown, Ohio; Stark Rolling Mill 
Co., Canton, Ohio. — Editor. 

Wood Wheels. 
Illsey & Harvey Co., Ltd., Port Wil- 
liams, N.S. — "Will you kindly give us 
names of manufacturers of wood wheels 
for waggons, also name of wood workers ' 
paper?" 

1. Canada Wheel Works, Merriton, 
Ont. ; J. B. Armstrong Mfg. Co., Guelph, 
Ont.; Dominion Wheel Co., Lindsay, 
Ont. ; Victoria Wheel Works, Gait, Ont. ; 
Ontario Wheel Co., Gananoque, Ont.; 
Chaplin Co., Ltd., of Chatham, Chatham, 
Ont. 

2. "Canadian Woodworker" Mail 
Bldg., Toronto.— Editor. 

Perforated Strap Iron for Pipe Hangers. 
Sumner Company, Moncton, N.B. — 
"Kindly advise us name of manufactur- 
ers of perforated strap iron for pipe 
hangers. Can you advise us as to name 
of publication in Chicago dealing with 
the natural gas question?" 

1. The Devlin Mfg. Co., Philadelphia, 
Pa.; Beaton & Caldwell Mfg. Co., New 
Britain, Conn. 

2. Can any reader give an informa- 
tion about the publication asked for? — 
Editor. 

Cast or Cut Cog Gears 
Illsey & Harvey Co., Ltd. — "Can you 
furnish us with names of manufacturers 
of small cog gears, cast or cut? Kindly 
give us name of a Canadian Implement 
paper. ' ' 

1. Hamilton Gear & Machine Co., To- 
ronto, Ont.; Rile Tool Co., Durer St., 
Montreal, Que.; Canadian Buffalo Forge 
Co., Montreal.; Robt. Gardner & Sons, 
Montreal. 

2. The Canadian Implement & Vehicle 
Trade, 8-10 Wellington St. E., Toronto. 
—Editor. 



Men the Greatest Asset to Hardware Business 

Ability to Pick and Train These Has Brought Men to the Front — How One 
Manager Rejected One Applicant and Accepted Another — How One Dealer Har- 
nessed Enthusiasm. 



It is generally agreed that the most 
valuable asset to any business is men. 
Get the right class of men in a business 
and that business will be of the right 
sort. One of the great problems before 
employers, therefore, is to secure the 
right kind of men. One of the big prob- 
lems for the clerks and heads of de- 
partments is to make themselves "the 
right kind," so that they will be in 
demand. 

Hugh Chalmers, who gave up a salary 
of $72,000 a year as manager of the 
Cash Kegister System, to take the head 
of the Chalmers Automobile Company, 
is said to be worth so much, among other 
things, because he knows how to pick 
men. A wholesale hardware dealer in 
Canada, who has risen from a poor man 
to an exceedingly rich one, is generally 
credited with being so successful becauss 
he knew how to pick subordinates. The 
man was not only an intelligent worker 
himself, but he knew how to gather 
about him men who would work loyally 
and intelligently. 

Possibilities the Thing. 

Hugh Chalmers has claimed that in 
selecting a subordinate he has always 
been guided not only by what that man 
can do at the time, but by the possibili- 
ties which he seems to possess. It is 
the man's capability of development, 
which, after all, makes him of great 
value. 

There are hardwaremen who taka 
much the same ground. What they have 
said about securing and developing their 
subordinates will be of value to many — 
not only to other dealers who are 
anxious to get new pointers on how to 
improve the efficiency of their staff, but 
also to clerks who are eager to learn 
the road to success — the most eagerly 
sought road, and the most easily missed 
in this twentieth century. 

A Montreal manager of a large con- 
cern tells of an experience he had with 
a man who came seeking a position as 
head of the Builders' Hardware depart- 
ment. 

"Have you had much experience with 
builders' hardware?" queried the man- 
ager. 

Couldn't Be Taught. 

"Yes," said the applicant, "I have 
been selling and buying it for five years. 
There is no one who can teach me any- 
thing about builders' hardware." 

"That so," laconically remarked the 
employer. "Then I don't want you. I 



have been buying and selling builders' 
hardware for over twenty years, and I 
learn something new about it almost 
every day." 

As this manager explains his action, 
it was not only the utter conceit of the 
applicant which made him regard him 
with disfavor, but he felt that this at- 
titude of knowing it all, which the man 
assumed, would lead him to reject any 
thing which he did not know. Now the 
manager wanted to keep his builders' 
hardware department thoroughly up to 
date. He didn't see how this would be 
possible with a man in charge who felt 
sure he knew all there was to be known 
about builders' hardware, so he turned 
him down. 

How the manager did fill the vacancy 
is worthy of note, as it will give a hint 
both to dealers and clerks. 

Learned in Spare Time. 

One of the clerks, a quiet but hard 
working man, came to the manager. "I 
hear," he said, "that there is a vacancy 
in the builders' hardware department. 
If you think I could fill the position I 
would like to get it." 

"Well," said the manager, "you are 
the first man who has asked me for the 
post. I like your interest, but what do 
you know about builders' hardware?" 

"Well," said the clerk, "as you know 
I have never had a great deal of ex- 
perience with it, but I have been work- 
ing in that department whenever things 
were slow in the tools. I have learned 
a good bit about it. I like the depart- 
ment, and think I could get along." 

Of course the clerk got the position, 
and equally of course he has been mak- 
ing good. He did not know everything 
about builders' hardware at first. He 
doesn't know everything about it now, 
but he knows a lot, and is always ready 
to learn. 

It is this enthusiasm, this interest, 
which is of the greatest value to an em- 
ployer. He has to search it out, and dis- 
covering it, do what he can to make 
that enthusiasm work to the benefit of 
the store. 

Lack of Enthusiasm. 

An Eastern merchant declares that 
there are many clerks who are more 
interested in waiting for night than 
they are in waiting upon a customer. 
Pay day is to them the one bright day 
in the hardware business. These men, 
this dealer declares, are more thought- 
ful of what they will do to-night than 
of what they will do five years hence. 
43 



The natural result is that five years 
hence they will do exactly what they are 
doing to-day, if they have been fortun- 
ate enough not to get shoved down hill. 

But the men with enthusiasm have a 
wide field before them. And the dealers 
who have clerks with enthusiasm and 
and fortunately there are many such 
clerks, have a great opportunity to reap 
immediate benefit. But they must en- 
courage this enthusiasm. They must 
show that they appreciate it, and they 
must develop it. 

There is a dealer in Ottawa, and an- 
other in Carleton Place who have adopt- 
ed one method in common with the pui~- 
pose of inspiring their clerks to give of 
their best. They have introduced the 
spirit of competition into the store work. 
When the windows are trimmed, and 
they are trimmed regularly, one man 
given one window and another the other. 
Both are told what the trim is to be of, 
though even in the decision of this they 
have a voice. Then they are allowed to 
go ahead as they like. What is the re- 
sult? Why as long as human nature is 
what it is there could be only one result. 
Each man tries to beat the other. Each 
puts careful thought on that trim. Each 
does the best work he possibly can, and 
then, when the trims are finished, every 
one in the store is allowed to pass an 
opinion on the result. 

Note Trade Bringing Qualities. 

But it is not only the immediate ap- 
pearance which is judged. The returns 
which the windows bring are noted. The 
clerks take as much delight in seeing 
the window which they trimmed bring 
results, as they would if the profits were 
going directly, into their pockets. 

Another eastern Ontario dealer found 
that one of his clerks had a mania for 
engines. What did he do? Simply har- 
nessed that man's ability. He started to 
handle engines — engines for use on farm 
and river. He took up automobile ac- 
cessories, and turned the whole depart- 
ment over to that clerk. 

The result would be the result in 
ninety-nine cases out of a hundred 
where an enthusiast was in charge. That 
clerk could fix engines, and he did fix 
them. People more and more came to 
him when they had trouble with their 
launches. He recommended new spark- 
ers, when these were needed. He sug- 
gested new batteries. He sold new en- 
gines, and all the time he was, and is, 
happy as a king. He was in love with 
his job, and so every one was benefiting. 



Progressive Hardware Retailing 



Hardware Firm are Rearranging Store Interior in Order to Feature Season- 
able Lines — Maritime Firm Clean Out Summer lines by Holding Sale — Ques- 
tion of the Storage of Oils. 



INTERIOR OF STORE REAR- 
RANGED. 

New Liskeard, Ont.— The Geo. Tay- 
lor Hardware Co., are making the fol- 
lowing announcement : — 

"The interior of our store at the 
front has been rearranged and it 
now presents quite an altered ap- 
pearance. The bargain tables have 
been moved to the front and as you 
enter, scores of wonderfully cheap 
things stare you in the face. Every- 
thing is marked plainly so that you 
can see in a glance just what you 
are expected to pay. These goods 
will sell themselves. The prices will 
pave the way. In a great many in- 
stances they are lower than prevail- 
ing prices in big city departmental 
stores. ' ' 

Editor's Note. — The stock in the store 
should always be moved around so that 
the seasonable lines are kept to the 
front. Kearrangements have the ad- 
vantage also of giving the store a per- 
petually new appearance. 



Editor's Note. — Demonstrations al- 
ways pay, but when unique features are 
added, as in the present case, interest 
on the part of the public is doubly as- 
sured. 



of their visit purchased from hardware 
dealers. 



GIRLS DEMONSTRATE RAZORS. 

Montreal, Aug.7. — The value of a de- 
monstration is being put to the test 
here, this method of attracting atten- 
tion and sales now being used in the 
James Walker Hardware Company, St. 
James street, and in the R. & W. Kerr 
Co., St. Catharine St. 

In both stores safety razors are being 
shown, and in each place a young lady 
is stationed in the window showing, by 
a number of printed cards and by per- 
sonal demonstration, just how the 
blades are put in place; how the guard 
is attached, and how the razor is drawn 
over the face. 

The demonstration has some unique 
features. To begin with the young 
ladies who sit in the windows, showing 
the goods, are masked. Probably this 
is but another way of attracting atten- 
tion. Any way men in good numbers 
have been gathering about these win- 
dows — first to see what was going on — 
then to have a look at the girl in the 
velvet mask — and finally to inspect the 
razor which was being shown. It is 
understood the demonstrations have 
brought good results. 



SUMMER LINES CLEARED OUT. 

St. John, N.B.— What is rightly term- 
ed a seasonable sale was conducted this 
week by the hardware firm of Emerson 
& Fisher, Germain street, who were des- 
irious of cleaning out a numerous 
stock of summer goods, and who suc- 
ceeded very well in their endeavors. By 
offering a discount of 15 per cent, they 
induced many buyers and much inter- 
est was evinced in the displays given to 
the lines being featured in the "clean- 
up," as it was called. These were chief- 
ly refrigerators, ice-boxes, hammocks, 
lawn swings, oil stoves, carts, and a few 
other articles which the firm did not 
like to burden themselves with in stock 
for the winter when the sale for them 
would certainly be dead. They manag- 
ed to dispose of a large number. 

Editor's Note. — It is a sensible move 
to dispose of surplus stocks at the pres- 
ent time. Demand will soon become a 
minus quantity. 



TOOK ADVANTAGE OF CELEBRA- 
TION. 

Fredericton, N.B. — This has been a 
particularly encouraging week for deal- 
ers in hardware in Frederiction. Con- 
ditions have been most promising. The 
merchants assisted in conducting an 
"Old Home Week," and aided widely 
in the advertising. There were hun- 
dreds of visitors to the city, drawn by 
the cry of "Back to New Brunswick 
for a Week," and attracted by the ad- 
vertising literature sent out, showing a 
splendid programme. The dealers deck- 
ed their premises in patriotic and holi- 
day style, and the hardware merchants 
took advantage of the occasion to prom- 
inently connect the sale of some of their 
lines with the celebrations. Window 
displays took the form of a hearty wel- 
come to visitors, to the sons and daught- 
ers of New Brunswick's capital return- 
ing to visit their old home, and few 
there were who will leave again without 
taking with them some tangible souvenir 
44 



STORAGE OF OILS. 

Sudbury, Ont. — The new civic fire 
by-law proposes to provide that a 
greater quantity than 25 barrels of 
oils cannot be kept in stock within the 
town fire limits. The hardwaremen, 
claim, and very justly, that this will 
constitute a detriment to trade. They 
have addressed the following letter to 
the council : — 
To Mayor and Council, 
Sudbury, Ont. 
Gentlemen, — Re storing of oils within 
the town limits, we, the undersigned, 
beg to submit the following alternative: 
"That we be allowed to handle oils, 
as in the past, in our present ware- 
houses, within a limitation of not less 
than 90 barrels of coal oils, gasolines 
and other barrels of coal oils, gaso- 
lines and other oils, as follows ; say 25 
of gasolines and balance of coal oils, 
or that new grounds be secured for 
us by the town within a very short 
distance of the present ones, a com- 
mon building thereon erected, a rail- 
way siding to it constructed, and a 
good wagon road leading to same 
built, said building to have a storing 
capacity of about 300 barrels. That 
gasoline or such other similar liquids 
be not limited to a smaller quantity 
than 30 barrels, and other oils to not 
less than 90 barrels, all of which for 
each of the individual firms. 

"As to the quantities needed for 
retailing purposes, the following 
would be necessary: — Coal oils, not 
less than 75 gallons of each kind; 
gasoline and other oils not less than 
12 gallons of each kind; turpentine 
at less than 75 gallons; paint oils not 
less than 75 gallons of each kind; 
lubricating oils, not less than 75 gal- 
lons of each kind. 

"The above when kept in open tanks 
or barrels, but in much larger quanti- 
ties when in tanks placed in fire proof 
vaults or underground and well ven- 
tilated. 

Cochrane Hardware Co., Ltd. 
Purvis Bros., Ltd. 
Ricard Bros. 



Current News of Hardware Trade 



Capital Stock Increased. 

Montreal. — Capital stock of the Cana- 
dian Fairbanks-Morse Co. has been in- 
creased from $2,600,000 to $3,100,000. 
Hardwaremen Lost. 

Russell, Man. — The general stores de- 
feated the hardware stores at a game 
of baseball. 

To Give Half-Holiday. 

North Bay, Ont. — The merchants here 
have decided to give a half-holiday on 
Wednesday afternoons. 

To Make Steel Tanks. 
Halbrite, Sask. — A factory has been 
started here . which will be thoroughly 
equipped to manufacture galvanized 
steel tanks of all descriptions. The com- 
pany is known as the Halbrite Steel 
Tank Co. 

In New Store. 

Eganville, Ont. — W. W. Watson, 
hardware dealer, has moved into his 
splendid new store in the Rink & Bol- 
and block. 

Bowmanville, Ont. — W. F. Dale has 
erected a two-storey brick store and is 
moving in his hardware and harness 
stock. 

J. H. Driscoll Killed. 

Winnipeg, Aug. 6. — J. H. Driscoll, 
formerly manager of the Winnipeg 
branch of the McClary Manufacturing 
Co., and one of the best known business 
men of the city, was struck by a street 
car on North Main street late this af- 
ternoon and died without regaining con- 
sciousness. 

Guelph Hardware Co. Fire. 
Guelph, Ont. — Fire broke out in the 
second storey of the Guelph Hardware 
Co. store during the early hours of the 
morning and did damage to the extent 
of several thousand dollars. It was con- 
fined to the upper storeys fortunately. 
The cause of the fire was defective el- 
ectric wiring. 

Opposes Government Control. 
Toronto, Ont. — An entirely new atti- 
tude towards the compensation of work- 
men was voiced by Secretary Trowern 
of the Ontario Retail Dealers' Associa- 
tion before Commissioner Meredith at 
the resumed session of the inquiry this 
morning. In unmistakeable terms he 
pledged the united force of the retailers 
of the province in opposition to the 
element of public ownership or state 
control entering the management of the 
Compensation Act. Public ownership 
he held a complete failure and savored 



of socialism. The retailers would pre- 
fer being left out of the arrangement. 
Effects of Strike Felt. 

St. John, N.B. — Dealers in St. John, 
Fredericton, Moncton, and elsewhere 
throughout the province are keenly 
feeling the effects of the big dock sarike 
in the old country and the delay in 
shipments of many lines of goods is not 
at all pleasing to them. English hard- 
ware, cutlery, etc., has been held up for 
some time, and while there have been a 
few deliveries, the fall stocks have been 
deferred in shipment. Many dealers 
have an abundant stock on hand in most 
lines, but as is always the case, the 
trade craves for something new and in 
addition there are several lines on which 
the inventories show the stock to be be- 
low the usual figures. Through the 
settlement better conditions are hoped 
for and the tension is expected to be re- 
lieved. There are several orders now in 
the course of delivery but when they 
will arrive is uncertain. 

New Retail Firms. 

Steven, Sask. — R. E. Beaton is start- 
ing in the hardware business here. 

Warner, Alta. — F. Nash, tinsmith, has 
started business here. 

Cereal, Alta. — -A. H. Melville is start- 
ing a hardware store. 

Business Changes. 

Leask, Sask. — Mattock & Chambers 
have sold out their hardware depart- 
ment. 

Camduff, Sask. — Geo. Shortreed has 
succeeded Sparling & Shore in the hard- 
ware business here. 

Montreal, Que. — Sarault & Poitras, 
hardware dealers, have dissolved part- 
nership. 

S. Coomber, Canadian representative 
of Henry Rogers, Son & Co., Wolver- 



hampton, has just returned from a trip 
through the West. 



MARITIME BOARD OF TRADE. 

The eighteenth annual meeting of the 
Maritime Board of Trade will be held at 
Truro, N. S., on August 21 and 22. 
Some of the subjects to be discussed are : 

That in the opinion of this board the 
railways of the Maritime Provinces 
should furnish heater cars when requir- 
ed for the protection from frost of po- 
tatoes and other perishable freight. 

That a bonus should be given by the 
several local Governments on all cattle 
raised on the farms in their respective 
provinces which when dressed for sale 
shall weigh more than 550 lbs., and shall 
be not more than 5 years of age. 

That the double-tracking of the Inter- 
colonial Railway between Painsec Junc- 
tion and Halifax should be deferred un- 
til such time as a thorough survey is 
made via Point de Bute, Pugwash Junc- 
tion, Westville, Musquodoboit and Dart- 
mouth with a view to locating an econo- 
mical line for freight traffic and avoid- 
ing the heavy grades on the present 
route. 

That the several local Governments 
give a bonus to owners of dairy cows 
which produce sufficient cream to pro- 
duce each 150 lbs. of butter per annum. 

The Workmen's Compensation Act — 
That in the opinion of this Board a more 
equitable agreement between employer 
and employe could be arrived at than the 
provisions of the present Nova Scotia 
Act provides. (Chapter 3, 1910.) 

What means may be taken to secure a 
desirable increased immigration to the 
Maritime Provinces? 



Three-Quarter Million Order Placed 



Winnipeg, Aug. 5. — Thos. L. Waldon, 
sales manager and secretary, Marshall 
Wells Company, Winnipeg, secured 
from the Edmonton, Dunvegan and Brit- 
ish Columbia Railway their order for 
track material, etc., for the construction 
of their line to Edmonton, north to 
Dunvegan, a distance of three hunch- 
and twenty miles. The order was for 
$750,000 worth of material. This no 
doubt is the largest order ever placed 
with the wholesale hardware trade in 
Canada or the United States. It will 

45 



require fifteen hundred car loads to 
move the tonnage from the head of the 
lakes to Edmonton. Mr. Waldon on his 
recent buying trip in the east placed 
with the Canadian manufacturers that 
portion of the order on which they were 
able to make satisfactory shipments. 
The magnitude of this order proves that 
at least the wholesale hardware business 
is not on the decline when Western Can- 
ada has such large orders to place and 
the opportunity to secure the business 
is taken advantage of by them. 



Weekly Market Report — Metals 





METAL 


NOTES. 






Business generally is ver^ 


• good. 


The 


outstanding feature 


is 


the 


great 


scarcity of lead due 


to 


the 


dockers' strike 


in England 






Tin 


has been 


quiet but i 


irm in 


tone. 











MONTREAL. 

Montreal, August 8. — Still the scar- 
city of lead is the great feature in the 
local metal situation. The trouble, of 
course, is largely the result of the dock- 
ers' strike in London. Stocks have not 
been coming out from there. Shipments 
which were expected to reach Montreal 
early in June have not been heard of, 
and it is not likely that the large sup- 
plies will come in for some time yet. 
One shipment is now on its way from 
Tyne, but it will not arrive for at least 
a fortnight, and even then the supply 
will be insufficient to meet the demand. 

Trail lead is commencing tto come 
through, but there are so many old ord- 
ers that it is impossible to guarantee any 
new delivery until September. Then 
the rush of grain from the west will be 
creating a scarcity of cars, so that it 
is doubtful if these shipments will reach 
the east before October. 

Facing Still Higher Prices. 

Lead is the only metal which is ex- 
ceedingly scarce at present, but all are 
high in price, and from what is learned 
it appears that Canada is facing high 
prices in metals. Copper maintains its 
high figures. Tin, while vacillating a lit- 
tle, seems to be moving upward rather 
than downward. Iron is high, and sheets 
are evidently on the point of advancing. 

The likelihood of these high figures, of 
course, suggests higher prices for some 
finished products. Indeed one or two of 
these higher prices have already been 
struck, such as iron pipe and brass 
valves ; and it is expected that soil pipe 
will be put upon a new level almost 
immediately. 

Tin: — There has been some shifting of 
prices, but generally the market has been 
rather quiet. Locally the supply is fair, 
and the demand good. It would seem, 
though, that higher prices may be look- 
ed for. 

Iron Going Up. 

Iron : — The market is rising, taking 
a 6d. advance on Wednesday which put 
the price on the Primary Market two 
shillings higher than last week. The 
quotations generally are 60s 6d. Lo- 



cally there is a very fair supply, but 
the demand is heavy. 

Owing to the advance in the raw ma- 
terial soil pipe is to be advanced. The 
supply of this was quite large a month 
or so ago, but since that time the order- 
ing has been so heavy that stocks arc 
greatly reduced. It looks more and 
more like a shortage. 

Galvanized sheets too are high, in 
England and in the States. It seems 
likely that the handlers here will have 
to make an advance in these. Black 
sheets have already been raised about 
10 cents per cwt. 

Spelter: — The metal is high in price, 
although East St. Louis has shown a de- 
cline the last few days. This is simply 
because the product was advanced too 
rapidly. The supplies are fairly plenti- 
ful, and no anxiety over this metal is 
felt. 

Lead: — The metal is exceedingly 
scarce, as has already been said : more- 
over there seems to be some doubt if it 
will become more plentiful within a 
month or two. Indications rather point 
toward a greater shortage. 

TORONTO. 

Toronto, Aug. 8. — The market is fea- 
tured chiefly by the continuance of the 
scarcity in lead. It is very hard to ob- 
tain ; so hard that the local market is 
practically denuded of the metal. 

The dockers' strike in the Old Coun- 
try is the cause of the shortage and 
there does not seem to be much hope of 
a betterment of conditions until the 
strike is settled. 

Generally speaking, business in metals 
is brisk. There is a steady call for all 
lines. The summer has seen little or no 
diminution of activity and an exception- 
ally busy fall is now anticipated. 

There have been no changes in price 
this week, though firmness is the pre- 
vailing note. 

Tin is Quiet. 

Tin : — The situation has not shown 
any developments. Generally speaking, 
tin has been quiet here. There has 
been a good demand, it is true. It is 
interesting to note that predictions as to 
tin are all favorable to the bull element. 
The "Metal Market" says: "London 
bulls have evidently returned from their 
holiday feeling pretty good over the 
prospect that the statistics a month from 
now will be the most favorable the mar- 
ket has had in years. In other words, 
no Banca tin comes on the market this 
month and if the visible supply increas- 
ed less than 400 tons last month with 
46 



the 2,400 tons Banca. what decrease 
will be shown at the end of this month 
when none of this Banca supply comes 
on the market? Another reason is un- 
doubtedly the feeling that 1912 has so 
far been a bad year for bears, in all 
metals and there is no reason to believe 
that this may not be continued. 

Copper:— The local market is quiet, 
although the demand continues quite ac- 
tive. The price has not changed. 

Very Scarce. 

Lead : — Pig lead is indeed very scarce. 
There is little in sight here, certainly 
not enough to meet the demand which 
is seasonably brisk. 

The price has remained stationary but 
it is in a sense nominal. 

Spelter: — The high price has been 
maintained and, as the demand is heavy, 
it seems resonable to assume that pres- 
ent prices will be maintained for some 
time. 

The primary markets, however, are 
turning weak. A despatch from New 
York reads: The spelter market has 
turned weak, and very much unsettled, 
and in the absence of buyers it is difficult 
to say exactly where the market is. On 
the New York Metal Exchange to-day 
spot and also August New York delivery- 
was offered for sale at 7c and October 
delivery at 6.90, without finding buyers, 
and for East St. Louis delivery spot and 
August offered at 6 7-8 September, 6.80, 
October 6%, November 6 5-8, but no buy- 
ers. The ore position has been evidently 
overplayed and is suffering in conse- 
quence. Doubt in the inability of pro- 
ducers to supply the country's require- 
ments has been shattered by the govern- 
ment statistics. 

Pig Iron: — There is a heavy demand. 
Prices remain firm. 

WINNIPEG. 

Winnipeg, Aug. 5. — Lead prices are 
very firm but no further advances are 
reported. 

The situation in plate remains un- 
changed there is still the same difficulty 
in obtaining supplies that has existed 
all summer with no prospect of any 
great improvement in the immediate fu- 
ture. 

Stocks of cement and structural steel 
and iron throughout the West now 
seem ample to carry on without delay 
the season's programmes of construc- 
tion. 

All iron works are running over- 
time, and sheet metal workers would 
be equally busy if they could obtain 
supplies needed. 



Weekly Market Report — Hardware 



A BRISK TRADE. 

Business in hardware lines is 
good, exceptionally so for this 
time of year. There is a large 
volume of busisess well distri- 
buted. 

An advance has been declared 
in iron pipe. This has been an- 
ticipated for some time. 

Brass goods have advanced, as 
noted elsewhere. 



MONTREAL. 

Montreal, August 8. — The predicted 
advances in the price of iron pipe came 
this week, and as often happens, a good 
many dealers were found unprepared. 
They will, therefore, have to pay from 
3 to 5 per cent, more for their black and 
galvanized pipe. 

Also there has been an advance in 
black sheet iron — the new figures being 
about 7V2 per cent, in excess of the old. 
Brass valves, too, have jumped in price, 
the new figures being some 10 per cent, 
higher. ' 

Generally business is remarkably good. 
Summer goods have well nigh ceased to 
move and even for those goods which 
are wanted only in winter, the call is 
becoming heavy. The chilly weather, 
which has marked all but two weeks of 
the summer, has had its effect. Garden 
tools, hose and lawn mowers are not mov- 
ing so well now ; but traps, lanterns, and 
preserving lines are in demand. 
Winter Goods Moving. 

Seasonable Goods. — The darker even- 
'nas are causing the demand for lanterns. 
The chilly evenings are evidently sug- 
gesting the coming of bitter weather 
later on, and are causing a movement in 
weather strip. But only the memory of 
past shortages can be credited with stir- 
ring up the early demand for sleigh bells 
and skates. For the sleigh bells especi- 
ally there has been noted a good demand. 

Meat choppers, kettles and such lines 
are being ordered largely. With the fall, 
and the approach of thanksgiving, these 
will be needed, and the wideawake deal- 
ers are preparing their supply now. 

Heavy Hardware. — Here it is that the 
main price changes have been noted. But 
there are more changes to be expected 
still. Soil pipe has not as yet been put 
upon a higher valuation. That this will 
be done before very long is practically 
certain. 

The New Net Figures. 

Of the changes which have been made 
perhaps that relating to iron pipes is 
the most important. The new net figures, 
as quoted by Montreal dealers are : 
Black Galvanized 

$1.88 1,4 and % inches $2.65 

$2.45 1/2 inch $3.35 



$2.90 % inch 

$4.10 1 inch 

$5.60 114 inch 

$6.75 iy 2 inch 

$8.40 2 inch 

$13.50 21/2 inch 

$17.70 3 inch 

$23.60 31/2 inch 

$26.90 4 inch 



$4.00 

$5.70 

$7.85 

$9.40 

$12.00 

$19.20 

$25.00 

$33.15 

$37.65 



In black sheet iron, too, the changes 
are worthy of tabulating. The new 
prices are : 

10 to 12 gauge $2.40 

14 to 16 $2.15 

18 to 20 $2.20 

22 to 24 $2.25 

26 $2.35 

28 $2.45 

Then in brass valves, the new figures 

show an increase of something like 10 

per cent. Standard compression have 

been advanced from 70 per cent, discount 

to 65 per cent, discount; while Jenkins 

valves, which have been quoted at 52 1 / 2 

per cent, off, are now listed at 45 per 

cent. off. 

Sporting Goods. — The mid-season lull 
is affecting business in this line some- 
what ; nevertheless, those handling these 
goods are not idle by any means. 

TORONTO. 

Toronto, Aug. 8. — For season of the 
year, business in general hardware is 
being well maintained. True, certain 
lines are rather inclined to quietness 
but that is only natural at this time. 
On the whole jobbers are well satisfied 
with volume of business being tran- 
sacted. 

Perhaps the recent cool weather has 
turned dealer's thoughts to 'fall and 
winter. This would appear so from 
greater interest being displayed in 
goods for fall demand. Weather strip 
and associated lines are beginning their 
annual movement. Lanterns, horse 
blankets, etc., are moving to the fore. 

Ose of the features of the week is an 
advance in iron pipe. Brass goods are 
also higher. Indeed, advance in this 
latter line has been large. 

Seasonable Goods. — The seasonable 
lines that are now in demand from the 
hardware man are quite extensive and 
there should be a good volume of busi- 
ness in evidence. In farming communi- 
ties there is a good call for all lines 
used in harvesting. Preserving is now 
in full swing and is responsible for no 
little amount of business at present 
time, while fly destroyers, paris green 
and similar lines all help along in sales 
these days. 

Farm Tools. — While retailers are still 
funding a good demand for many har- 
vesting lines, this business is pretty 
well to an end with jobbers. In its 
place, they are finding a call for thresh- 
47 



ing supplies which will soon be needed. 
Threshing will shortly be under way 
and besides supplies for this line, it will 
bring a demand for grain bags, material 
for erecting and repairing grain bins, 
etc. 

Household Goods. — Stellar lines of 
household goods at present are preserv- 
ing necessities. Kettles and jars are 
moving out. Associated lines such as 
sealer rings, sealing wax, corks, etc., are 
being asked for. 

Builders' Hardware. — Builders' hard- 
ware shows no price changes but there 
is a heavy demand. This is only to be 
looked for under extensive building 
operations now in evidence and which 
should cause demand for these lines to 
be maintained well into the fall. 

Heavy Hardware. — An advance in 
iron pipe, intimated as probable in past 
issues has furnished one of the features 
of the week. Particulars of its upward 
movement will be found elsewhere. 

Screws are regarded as firm. In fact 
they have been for some time but 
strength is no less pronounced, al- 
though there has been no advance. Gen- 
eral lines are in good demand. 

Sporting Goods. — Retailers are be- 
ginning to show interest in guns and 
ammunition for fall hunting. Indeed 
duck hunting season is not now far dis- 
tant and it is about time dealers were 
wheeling supplies into prominence. 

With exception of balls, demand for 
lacrosse and baseball goods is slack. 
Rugby goods will be wanted before 
long and dealers who are going to un- 
dertake an early campaign should soon 
be looking to their orders. 



WINNIPEG. 

Winnipeg, Aug. 5. — With the present 
eminently satisfactory crop outlook, 
there never was a better feeling in busi- 
ness circles generally throughout the 
West than now. Preparations are being 
made for a record in fall and winter 
trade but for the present there is a lull 
in activity as compared with the last 
few weeks. This was to be expected. 
Preparations for harvest being about 
completed. 

There is, however, no falling off in 
the demand for builders' hardware, 
building permits in the city are now 
well on the road to $15,000,000 and it is 
confidently predicted that they will run 
close to $20,000,000 for the year. 

Orders are now coming in freely for 
fall sporting goods, guns, rifles and 
ammunition. Ammunition prices are 
generally a little stiffer following 
strength in lead and metals, but with an 
ever increasing interest in field sports, 
this will hardly effect the volume of 
business. 



Stoves, Furnaces and Accessories 



t( 



Service " Will Be Keynote in Stove Sales 

Future Negotiations Will be Conducted on That Basis Says 
Contemporary — Merchants Will Not Sell Stoves But Service 
— They Will Contract to Heat a House. 



The following extracts from an article 
in the Hardware Reporter will be of in- 
terest : 

Selling stoves on the instalment plan 
seemed the greatest stumbling block for 
the hardware merchant. Encouraged by 
the seeming success of the instalment 
plan as conducted by furniture and 
housefurnishing stores, many hardware 
merchants adopted the plan. 

As a rule, two serious mistakes were 
made. The first and most serious mis- 
take was in selling at too little profit. 
The second mistake was in not being 
equipped to follow up collections. The 
plans of the instalment house were 
adopted with little thought or study of 
their methods. An investigation would 
have made their reasons for success plain 
to anyone. In the first place, where the 
retail hardware merchant was adding 25 
to 33 1-3 per cent, over factory cost to 
cover his profit and the cost of doing 
business, the instalment house added 75 
to 100 per cent. Again, the instalment 
hor~e maintained a well-equipped collec- 
tion department, closely following each 
payment as it came due, while the hard- 
ware merchant trusted to luck. Selling 
goods on long credit at a short profit and 
trusting to luck for payment, has never 
been a winning combination. 

The successful stove merchant of the 
future will not sell stoves. He will sell 
contracts. For a consideration he will 
contract to place in the home a cooking 
apparatus that (used as stipulated in the 
written contract) will aid in cooking in 
the best manner all cooked foods of 
whatever nature. If a heating stove, he 
will contract to heat the required space 
properly, and at the same time provide 
the ventilation so necessary to good 
health. There is no single article or 
combination of articles entering into 
home life that are of such vital import- 
ance to health and happiness as the ap- 
paratus on which nearly all food must 
be prepared or the home warmed and 
ventilated. 

The sale of stoves to-day is almost 
wholly a question of barter. To-morrow 
it will become a question of service. In- 
stead of the stove business being over- 
done, as is claimed by some unthinking 
persons, the surface has only been 
scratched. To the merchant wise enough 
to sell cooking and heating contracts the 
field is unlimited. He will study and 



know just how to operate each stove to 
get the best results. He will not permit 
a customer to select his own stove, 
often choosing a type entirely unfitted 
to his needs ,and then exacting a guar- 
antee from the merchant that it will 
meet certain requirements. 

With a contract to perform a certain 
work, the merchant will insist on him- 
self selecting the stove that is to be 
backed up by his guarantee. The mer- 
chant or his representative will visit and 
carefully inspect the premises in which 
the stove is to be used. He will exam- 
ine the flue to which the stove is to be 
connected. If a range or cook stove is 
being considered, he will learn the num- 
ber of people to be provided for. When 
the stove is finally placed it will be of 
the proper size and kind. Minute in- 
structions as to methods of operation, 
size and kind of fuel to use, how to regu- 
late the drafts, etc., will accompany each 
stove. In short, stoves will be sold, as 
they should be, on the basis of service. 

This change in stove marketing me- 
thods is surely coming. The retail hard- 
ware merchant will come into his own by 
this change. The mail order stove will 
pass out because the manufacturer or 
dealer at long range is not in a position 
to render this service. Instalment houses 
and department stores are preaching 
"service" in season and out, but are 
strangers to its practice. Whenever ac- 
tual service becomes involved, the big 
stores suddenly discover a line to be 
unprofitable. Their plan is to carry only 
such merchandise as will pay the great- 
est profit with the least "come back." 
One illustration will suffice: 

In the hardware line they carry only 
profit-bearing goods, leaving the unpro- 
fitable staples to the hardware merchant. 
The retail hardware merchant from the 
very nature of his business, is used to 
rendering service. In perhaps no other 
mercantile line is the merchant required 
to render the service that is expected 
of the hardware merchant. He is, 
therefore, naturally fitted to control the 
sale of stoves on the basis of service. 
While we are convinced that this change 
in stove selling methods is slowly but 
surely coming, we realize that its ac- 
complishment may be a matter of years. 

In the meantime, what? Under ex- 
isting methods there is good money to 
be made in the stove business. The rules 

48 



are few and simple. Study the needs of 
the community, the kind of fuel most 
used ,and then buy stoves to fit the re- 
quirements. Place each stove on a plat- 
form or truck where it can be seen and 
shown to the best advantage. See that 
each stove is carefully polished, and 
that all nickle or other or other trim- 
ming is well cleaned. Above all, keep 
your stoves clean and do not permit 
them to be used for storing surplus 
stock. A stove display should receive 
as much attention as a display of cut 
glass or fine mechanics' tools. A stove 
sale is often made or lost on a custom- 
er's first impression. For that reason 
the first impression should be made as 
favorable as possible. 

Without question the greatest draw- 
back to a successful stove business is the 
average merchant's almost utter lack of 
knowledge of stoves. To this lack of 
knowledge can be traced the loss of 
most sales. To offset this weakness price 
cutting is invariably resorted to. Know- 
ledge begets confidence. A salesman 
without confidence is like a ship without 
a rudder, neither being sure where they 
will land. In a large measure manufac- 
turers' salesmen are responsible for this 
ignorance on the part of the merchant. 
The salesman is instructed to and does 
devote his effort to extolling the merits 
of his particular line as compared with 
other lines. He no doubt assumes that 
as a matter of course the merchant is 
entirely familiar with all the details of 
setting up and operating any stove. As 
a matter of fact, many merchants, 
through a mistaken notion, assume know- 
ledge they do not possess. 

A stove merchant to be successful 
should be entirely independent. A mer- 
chant who does not know more about 
setting up and operating stoves of all 
kinds than the maker himself, is hardly 
worthy of the name of merchant. The 
merchant who js constantly referring 
every little complaint to the manufac- 
turer is the one always complaining of 
the stove business. The self-confident, 
alert, well-posted, hardware merchant is 
the one whose stove department is mak- 
ing him money. 

— ©— 
CAUTION ADVISED. 
Cleveland, 0., Aug. 8.— The Iron Trade 
Review to-day will say: — 

Caution and restraint in advancing 
iron and steel products to higher values 
is being counselled by leading steel 
manufacturers, who foresee a restricted 
buying movement if prices are increased 
too rapidly. 

On the average, deliveries of all steel 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



products are deferred eight weeks, and 
as specifications and new tonnage con- 
tinue greatly in excess of production, 
shipments gradually will be further post- 
poned. Under these conditions, no dif- 
ficulty is being experienced in maintain- 
ing prices and the tendency is toward 
higher values, notably on tin plate and 
wire products. 



The sharp advance at Pittsburgh in all 
grades of pig iron, approximately 50 
cents a ton for the week, was by no 
means an unexpected development, in 
view T of the recent heavy purchases, 
which easily aggregate 300,000 tons. 
The absorption of basic has been tre- 
mendous and onlv a small tonnage is 



available for delivery the remainder of 
the year. That the present quotations 
are attractive to the owners of idle 
furnaces is indicated by the number of 
stacks that are being prepared for early 
resumption. Two steel works and one 
merchant furnace have gone in this week 
and coke is being purchased for the re- 
quirements of five idle stacks. 



Weekly Market Reports— Stoves 



STOVE NOTES. 

Activity is now noted, although 
the fall rush is still some little 
distance away. Stove manufac- 
turers are now convinced that 
the crops are an assured suececs 
and are making arrangements 
accordingly for a heavy stove 
season. 



MONTREAL. 

Montreal, August 8. — This is the lull 
before the storm of orders. No great 
rush for stoves or for the accessories is 
being noted at present, but that there 
will be a rush none seem to doubt. Some 
of the dealers are getting their orders 
on file, so that they will be sure of their 
deliveries in a few weeks' time. As for 
the manufacturer, he is bending his ef- 
forts to getting the supply which will en- 
able him to meet the rush demand which 
is confidently expected. 

Of course, there is another contingency 
to expect — the difficulty of getting cars, 
and of securing cartage. There seems 
no way of guarding against that, how- 
ever, the dealer just has to take his 
chance, and the manufacturer can only 
hope that there will be no serious car 
famine. 

What Dealer Owes Himself. 

The dealer, of course, has something to 
do with his own chance. The earlier he 
places his order the better chance he has 
of securing the goods he wants in good 
time. 

Furnaces. — This line is commencing to 
move nicely. The contractors are getting 
their supplies, and many of the dealers 
who handle this class of goods are get- 
ting their stock ready. When Septem- 
ber comes there will be a great demand 
for furnaces — - a demand which may 
prove hard to fill. 

Refrigerators. — Despite the cool 
weather, and the lateness of the season, 
the business in this line is not yet over. 
It is quiet for a time, but in September, 
when the holidayers come back to town, 



there will be a good demand. It has been 
so in the past, and there seems no reason 
to doubt that it will be so this year. 
Some dealers are holding special sales of 
refrigerators now, aiming to clear out 
their stock. Others are waiting for a 
time; hoping to find a better demand in 
September. 

Big Trade Coming. 

Kitchenware. — This is the line which 
shows the greatest activity at present. 
Skellets and boilers, for preserving, are 
wanted by the dealers. They will soon 
be in great demand by the housewives, 
and the dealers must prepare. Already 
there has been a good deal of retail buy- 
ing in this line, but the greater part of 
the preserving is still to be done. The 
greater part of the trade in the goods 
needed, therefore, is yet to come. 

Oil stoves. — The new models put upon 
the market this year have met with a 
great deal of favor. Sales have been 
large, despite all unfavorable weather 
conditions. But the season for the coal- 
oil cooker is passing. Soon the coal oil 
heater will be in demand. Those stoves 
were largely bought last year. They will 
be wanted fully as much this fall — per- 
haps more. The prospects are that there 
is to be a heavy rush. 

Ranges and Heaters. — A good number 
of orders are being received, but many of 
these call for future delivery. Still, 
many stoves are being shipped at once, 
for even those dealers who do not ex- 
pect their business in this line to com- 
mence at once, wish to get some models 
on their floor, that they may have some- 
thing to show prospective customers. 
Some heaters are being shipped, too, but 
the great activity in this line is booking 
orders for future deliveries. 



TORONTO. 

Toronto, Aug. 8. — Canadian crops are 
being closely followed for they are to 
some extent at least, a gauge of the 
year's trade in stoves. Reports indi- 
cate generally rosy conditions at pres- 
ent time. At any rate, stove manufac- 
turers are looking forward to a record 
demand for stoves this year, tndica- 
49 



tions at present time are for plenty of 
money in circulation this fall and this 
combined with large influx of popula- 
tion this year, is accountable for pres- 
ent optimistic predictions of manufac- 
turers. 

It may seem strange that dealers 
should be interested in heating apparat- 
us and refrigerators at same time. This 
nevertheless is true. Interest in re- 
frigerators dwindled for a time but 
warm weather has still a considerable 
course to run and there is yet to be no 
little amount of trade secured in these 
lines. It is the dealer who keeps them 
in prominence who is going to get the 
trade. 

Furnaces. — There is a good trade 
present in furnaces and furnace acces- 
sories. Building has been on an ex- 
ceedingly liberal scale this year, par- 
ticularly in the cities and for some 
time now, retailers have had plenty of 
contracts for installing furnaces. With 
approach of fall, necessity of having 
this work done is becoming more evi- 
dent to builders and outlook for trade 
looks very bright. Manufacturers are 
busy now and it looks as if they would 
be taxed to full limit this fall. 

Retailers will have considerable furn- 
ace repair work to look after later in 
the year. 

Ranges. — - Outlook for stove trade 
this fall is particularly bright. This is 
indicated by volume of orders which is 
already coming to hand. A good many 
of these call for future shipment but 
some of them are ordered to go forward 
at once. This is more marked in the 
case of the West and certain distant 
parts of Ontario. 

Gas Stoves.^" This is the biggest 
year we ever had ^n gas stoves. ' ' This 
statement of one firm seems to reflect 
pretty accurately the opinion of majori- 
ty of manufacturers. This has been an 
excellent year for gas stoves, especially 
in the cities, where increasing number 
of apartment houses is the cause. Job- 
bers still report sorting orders as ap- 
preciable in volume. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Orillia Merchant Favors Saving Daylight 

Rescinding of the By-Law Giving an Extra Hour After Work 
a Mistake in His Opinion — Working Men Opposed It — 
Thought it Would Eventually Mean Longer Hours. 



The Daylight Saving Bill passed in 
Orillia, Ont., in June had a short life. 
It will be remembered that the Orillia 
council, believing that an extra hour of 
daylight would be acceptable to the 
people of that town, passed the by-law, 
declaring that with June 23 clocks were 
to be put forward one hour until Aug- 
ust 31 

This meant that -Orillia merchants 
would open their stores an hour earlier 
in the morning and close an hour soon- 
er in the evening than they had been 
accustomed to do. It also meant labor- 
ers in factories, clerks in stores, offices, 
etc., began work earlier in the day and 
quit earlier in the evening. In fact the 
entire commercial works of Orillia were 
put in motion an hour before those in 
the remainder of Ontario and of course 
shut down the 60 minutes sooner in the 
afternoon. This was to provide an hour 
more daylight after hours. 

The bj'-law went into effect all right, 
but did not hold its force very long. 
There were some objections and these 
took on a more determined appearance 
as the days of more daylight passed by. 

Favored By One Merchant. 

What one Orillia merchant, doing a 
large general business, thinks of the in- 
novation is interesting. 

"So far as our experience was con- 
cerned," a member of the firm stated 
to The Canadian Grocer, "we found the 
measure very satisfactory. 

"The trouble arose through a con- 
siderable number of working men refus- 
ing to fall in line with the by-law. This 
caused considerable confusion in the 
town, and those in favor thought it 
was better to rescind the by-law rath- 
er than prolong something that was ir- 
ritating so many. 

Advocates a Dominion Measure. 
"We believe that if the measure were 
adopted by popular vote, and the work- 
ing men consulted, it would be very 
beneficial to any town. If it were to 
become a provincial or Dominion 
measure it would be even more bene- 
ficial. 

"We think too, that it should be ex- 
tended so that the season would begin 
about the first of May. The advantage 
of changing the clock is that it does 
not in any way interfere with a per- 
son's regular working hours. 

Why Laborers Objected. 

"The objection of many working 
men came through their idea, encourag- 



ed by a few individuals, that it was a 
scheme of the manufacturers to en- 
force a longer day in the near future. 
The present factory day here, is from 
7 o'clock to 6. 

' ' We feel confident, ' ' he added 
"that if it were universally adopted 
this measure would bring a great deal 
of satisfaction to those who enjoy the 
brief Canadian summer." 



Catalogues 

and 

Booklets 



Stoves and Furnaces. 

Clare Bros. & Co., Preston, Ont., have 
issued two catalogues dealing with their 
heating lines. One is devoted to Hecla 
Furnaces and gives a most complete de- 
scription, dwelling on the points of fuel 
economy and non-leaking qualities. The 
slogan of this catalogue is "It saves one 
ton in seven." The Hecla is well illus- 
trated and each part is shown and de- 
scribed. Mention is also made of other 
lines of furnaces manufactured by the 
company. The catalogue has a "black 
cover with embossed silver print. 

The second is called "Comfort and 
Health" and is devoted to a discussion 
of "sane heating of houses." It con- 
tains many strong arguments in favor 
of warm-air heating, pointing ut the 
value of air circulation and humidity. 
The catalogue is well and pointedly writ- 
ten and is arranged in attractive style. 

Farm Improvements. 

The Canada Cement Co.. have issued 
an interesting instalment of "Farm Im- 
provements." It contains descriptions 
of concrete septic tanks and barns. 



WORLD'S TIN OUTPUT. 

"The stimulus represented by the 
high and increasing prices of tin during 
recent years has materially led to at- 
tempts to find and open up new tin dis- 
tricts, particularly in the United States 
and British Africa," says the London 
Times. "But the totals contributed by 
these new sources are hardly yet ap- 
preciable. The American production so 
50 



far has been negligible. For all prac- 
tical purposes the world's supply of tin 
is still provided by a very few older lo- 
calities. It is remarkable, indeed, how 
few and circumscribed these areas are; 
a southern province of China, the 
Straits Settlements, two small Dutch 
islands in the Malay Archipelago, the 
eastern coast of Australia, Tasmania, 
Bolivia and Cornwall — these were all, 
though now there should be added 
South Africa, which last year provided 
about 2,000 tons. In the ten years 
1902-11 these old tin districts produced 
tin as follows (for comparison the aver- 
age yearly production and the output 
for last year are also set out in tons) : 

1902-11. Aver. 1911. 

Straits Settlements . 575,829 57,582 53,670 

Australia 50.621 5,062 3.825 

England 46.763 4,676 4,500 

British Empire ... 673,213 67,320 61,995 
Malay Archipelago 

(Banca, etc.) 147.053 14,705 15,131 

Bolivia 166,193 16,619 22.064 

China (Yunnan) .... 38,204 3,820 3,600 

Grand total 1,024,663 102,464 102,790 

In four districts — the Straits, China, 
England and Australia — the production 
last year was below the average of the 
ten years. The most striking feature 
revealed by these figures is the expan- 
sion in the Bolivian production. That 
marvel among the mineral countries of 
the world now takes the second place 
as a producer of tin, having displaced 
the Dutch possessions from that posi- 
tion. The Bolivian output in 1910 was 
9,600 tons, and it has doubled in ten 
years." 



DEVELOPMENTS IN NAIL 
INDUSTRY. 

St. John, N.B.— The Maritime Nail 
Co., of St. John, N.B., is still a nail 
company, but no longer a maker >f 
horse nails. The horse nail section 
which was the original exclusive manu- 
factured product, has been taken over 
by the Capewell Horse Nail Co., and 
this is explained by the fact that Stan- 
ley Elkins, managing director of the 
former Maritime Nail Co., bought out 
the Capewell interests, and merged that 
with his own company, which he again 
sold. Then the new Maritime Nail Co. 
of to-day was organized for the purpose 
of manufacturing wire nails only. A 
complete new equipment has been put in, 
in fact a new mill has been established, 
with new capital, some new workers, 
new executive men, too, with Mr. El- 
kins president and managing director. 
They are making, in addition to wire 
nails — known as monarchs cut and 
coiled wire, also annealed fence wire. 
They have capacity for 1,000 kegs of 
nails a day, and in a couple of months 
expect to be running "full," at present 
producing 700 kegs a day. A staff of 
150 hands is required, and the trade ex- 
tends all over the Dominion. 



Methods of Retailing Paints and Varnishes 



Keeping the Paint Stock Intact 

The Stock Should be Housed in One Part of the Store — The 
Many Advantages of This Method — Scattering Stock in Vari- 
ous Parts of the Establishment is Bad From Every Stand- 
point. 



"I am a firm believer in keeping 
each department of the store distinct 
and separate," was the statement made 
recently by a hardwareman whose suc- 
cess has been so unmistakeable that his 
opinion carries weight as a result. 

"This mixing up of goods of all de- 
scriptions in all parts of the store is 
not good business," he continued. "In 
the first place, the goods do not have 
the 'selling force.' When the com- 
plete assortment is seen together, your 
chances of making sales are doubled. If 
there is one thing a discriminating 
buyer desires, it is a good assortment 
to pick from. If the assortment is right 
before him, he is better pleased than if 
the goods are scattered here and there 
on different counters, tables and shelves. 
One complete display has accumulated 
force. ' 

"In the second place it is more eco- 
nomical in every way. When goods of 
one kind or of a certain line are all to- 
gether, the salesman can wait on a 
customer without hunting up other vari- 
eties in different parts of the store. He 
thus saves time — his own -and the cus- 
tomers. 

"In the third place, the stock can 
be kept neater and more attractive. 

"In the fourth place, and last, it is 
possible to keep closer track of the 
stock. When the goods are scattered 
more or less promiscuously, the dealer 



never knows just what he has in stock. 
He may run out of a certain article and 
never discover the fact until it is called 
for. When the goods are centralized, 
however, it is less difficult to keep close 
track of the stock in each department." 
In the Paint Department. 
All these reasons hold good with re- 
spect to paint. The paint department, 
as well as all other departments, should 
have a part of the store to itself. AH 
paint stock and accessories should be 
assembled there — and there should be 
nothing else but paint. Let us review 
the reasons again. 

1. The paint has extra selling force 
when the entire stock is centralized. It 
attracts more attention. If a customer 
sees only scattered detachments of stock 
here and there, he is not likely to be 
impressed. But when there is a distinct 
place for the paint stock, the size of the 
display does away with any danger of 
its being missed. Furthermore, a large 
display is more likely to arouse interest 
than one of smaller dimensions. The 
customer concludes that this store is a 
good place to buy paint, that he is likely 
to get good satisfaction where so large 
an assortment is carried. 

2. It saves time. The customer can 
pick out the kind of paint and the 
amount needed without stirring. 

3. The stock can be made infinitely 
more attractive for a number of rea- 



sons. It can be kept sorted up, dusted 
and arranged in symmetrical rows. 
Hangers and lithographs can be used 
to brighten the appearance of the de- 
partment. When the stock is scat- 
tered, the effect is lost entirely. 

4. It is practically impossible to keep 
track of the stock in any other way. 
This is an important point, for the deal- 
er who would keep his paint stock well 
sorted up must watch it closely. Where 
so many different kinds of paint are 
carried and such a variety of sizes is 
called for, it is a common occurrence for 
certain kinds or sizes to run out. If 
the stock is scattered all over the store, 
there is no way of checking shortages. 
When it is all together the dealer can 
keep a close watch on it and promptly 
fill any deficiencies. 

Helps Sale of Accessories. 

There is another reason, and a very 
important one. Having a department, 
or section of the store set aside ex- 
clusively for paint, brings along the 
sale of specialties and accessories. 

In this way: When a customer calls, 
say for carriage paint, he sees an as- 
sortment of brushes, stains, etc., on all 
sides. The salesman having such lines 
ready to hand, has it in his power to 
suggest them to the customer. "Do 
you need a brush?" he asks; and thrusts 
a specimen in front of him. Now, if the 
paint is in one part of the store and 
the brushes are in a drawer in another 
part, five times out of ten the salesman 
won't bother asking and the other five 
times the customer will say "No" before 
the salesman can get the goods out. 




WELL-ARRANGED PAINT 
STOCK. 

Herewith is shown the paint de- 
partment in the store of Nap. Pel- 
letier & Son, Drummondville, Que. 
It will be noted that the stock is kept 
convenient, neat and clean. The 
hardware stock is displayed in the 
same attractive manner. On entering 
the store, one is struck by the neat 
arrangement of the interior. First 
impressions go a long way toward 
making sales. 



51 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



A Traveler's View of Painters' Trade 

It is Worth While When Care is Taken to Deal Only With 
Reliable and Good Pay Customers — The Method Adopted by 
an Eastern Ontario Dealer. 



The following interesting letter has 
been received, dealing with an article 
which appeared recently in the paint 
department of Hardware and Metal. 

Editor, Hardware and Metal : — 

"In reference to an article which ap- 
peared in a recent issue, dealing with 
the question of "Getting the Master 
Painter's Trade," I would like to con- 
tribute my views, from a traveler's 
standpoint and from past experience in 
the manufacturing end. 

"The average hardwareman, I be- 
lieve, does not want to bother with the 
trade of the painters. The reason is 
that the master painter wants too much 
credit and is likely to get behind with 
his accounts with the dealer. The 
painter starts in on a job and runs up 
a bill of $100 or more before the work 
is finished. As he seldom has any chat- 
tels of any account worth putting a 
mortgage on, the dealer has to go with- 
out any security, and it is now no won- 
der that he feels anxious. 

"I have known cases where the mas- 
ter painter has bought his supplies from 
the local hardwareman, and has used up 
all the money he could secure on cer- 
tificates of progress from the architect 
so that when the job was finally com- 
pleted, the painter had been paid all 
that was coming to him and had spent it 
all. There was not a cent for the hard- 
wareman. Such cases are not by any 
means uncommon. No wonder you ask 
'Is the game worth the candle?' 

"A few weeks ago, I was speaking 
on this subject to a hardware dealer in 
a town of about 5,000 people not far 
from Ottawa. The merchant informed 
the writer that three of the best mas- 
ter painters had come to him for sup- 
plies and wanted to know what credit 
arrangements they could make. 'Well,' 
said the dealer, 'it will be this way. You 



can have all the goods and material you 
want, but the terms will be thirty days 
only. Nothing will be carried forward 
and, as soon as the cash stops, your 
supply will also stop. ' He explained to 
the writer that he had been 'bitten' so 
often and prices generally had gone up 
so that he could not afford to have any 
losses. He has had the thirty-day pro- 
viso in force now since early in the 
spring, and has found that it works 
well. Both parties know where they 
'are at.' This dealer does his best to 
accommodate his master painter cus- 
tomers. If there is anything they want 
that he has not in stock, he wires for it 
at once and has it shipped on at once. 
This solidifies the confidence of the cus- 
tomers and shows them that he is try- 
ing his best to give good service. They 
reciprocate by paying cash on time. 

"These painters had previously been 
buying direct, and they had found the 
delays in waiting for material were un- 
avoidable. Thus, by the arrangement 
reached with the dealer, better satisfac- 
tion was given all around — to dealer, 
jobber and painter. 

"It is up to the hardwareman to 'dig 
in' and get after this trade. Properly 
regulated it can be made very profitable. 
Of course, the dealer must use discrim- 
ination and refuse the trade of all but 
reliable master painters. The risk is 
too great with the other kind." 
Yours truly, 

Traveler. 



BERRY BROS. CONVENTION. 

The Third Annual Convention of the 
sales force of Berry Bros, was held at 
the home office in Detroit, July 8, 9 and 
10. Salesmen were in attendance from 
every part of the United States and 
Canada, covering a territory from Maine 



to California, and from Saskatchewan 
to the Gulf. 

It is fifty-four years since Joseph H. 
Berry made his first lot of varnish in a 
copper kettle on top of a cook stove. It 
was commented on that in the half cen- 
tury which has elapsed, the operations 
of the company have been extended to 
all lands. 

Convention sessions were held every 
morning from 9 to 12, and every after- 
noon from 2 to 4. 

The evenings were given over to en- 
tertainment features. On Monday 
evening a boat ride was taken up the 
Detroit River and out into Lake St. 
Clair to the Motor Boat Club where 
dinner was served to the sales force and 
department heads. James C. Kelly, of 
the New York office was toastmaster, 
and addresses were delivered by Jas S. 
Stevenson, general manager, Mr. Kerr, 
general sales manager and others. On 
Tuesday evening there was a moonlight 
ride on the steamer "Sappho." On 
Wednesday evening, F. S. Colby, son- 
in-law of Thomas Berry, gave a recep- 
tion at his residence. 

The spirit of enthusiasm and co-opera- 
tion was strongly manifested throughout 
the convention. 

@ 

NEXT WEEK'S FEATURES. 

Next week's issue of Hardware and 
Metal will contain an interesting article 
on window dressing contributed by a 
western hardwareman and another ar- 
ticle dealing with the advisability of ex- 
hibiting at fall fairs. These are but 
two of the many practical articles which 
will appear in this issue. It will be re- 
plete with interest from start to finish. 

A. Ramsay Injured. 
Montreal, Que. — A. Bamsay, presi- 
dent of A. Ramsay & Son, Co., Mon- 
treal, fell while making an inspection of 
the factory a week ago, sustaining a 
fractured arm. The injury, though 
painful, proved quite insufficient to keep 
Mr. Ramsay away from the desk for 
long'. 




Group photo of Berry Bros. Salesmen asse'mbled in Annual Conference. 

52 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Our Campaign for 
FALL PAINTING 
Helps Dealers ! 

We are advertising Fall Painting to 
help M. L. Dealers dispose of their 
stocks of our product. It is our 
policy to use in. the M. L. Lines only 
the best and purest material. The 
successful results of the M. L. Paint 
a dealer sells, help to get that deal- 
er more business. 

OUR DECORATIVE AID DEPT. 

is also established to help out this broad policy 
of assisting the dealer. By it, we turn over to 
local trade hundreds of local opportunities for busi- 
ness in M. L. Paint. This department gives free color 
schemes, and answers questions on painting problems, 
be an M. L. Dealer, and to have these helps that guard your profits. 

SEND FOR SAMPLES. COLOR CARDS AND QUOTATIONS. WE ARE GLAD 
TO HELP THE TRADE WITH INFORMATION ON ANY PAINT QUESTION. 

Imperial Varnish & Color Co., Limited, Toronto 



These Are 
THE RIGHT LINES 

We make these lines with the utmost care 
and from the best material. For sale by dealers 
to the local decorative trade. They give fine 
results. They mean sure paint profits. 



M. L. PAINT 

is prepared from pure 
pigments and oil, care- 
fully mixed. Great cover- 
ing and protective power- 
Put up in handy size tins 
for every kind of job. 



FLOGLAZE 

is a line of self-varnishing 
hard-finish colors for all 
outdoor and indoor uses; 
excellent for finishing bug- 
gies, farm implements, gar- 
den furniture, etc., as well 
as fine indoor finishing. 



6-24 Morse Street 
TORONTO 



108 Princess Street 
WINNIPEG 




FLAT WALL COLORS 

are a new line, made for plaster and interior 

decoration. May be washed. Show no 

brush marks. Many shades available. 

The Decorative Aid Department 

furnishes stencil designs to 

use with Flat Wall Colors. 



365 Water Street 
VANCOUVER 



Y Y 

^ HOT WEATHER SERMONS h 



Short sermons are the most popular kind in August weather. 

Our sermonette for to-day is 

Lowe Brothers' " High Standard " Liquid 
Paint spreads easier — uniformly covers 
more surface — wears better and retains 
that look of newness longer than any 
other paint on the market. 

We have been making this assertion for nearly fifty years. Only 
the truth will bear this repetition. 



Y 

Y 
Y 



Y 



y 

Y 
Y 

Y 
Y 



Y 

Y 



Lyon-Monkhouse 
Limited 

Salter and Flora 
Sts., Winnipeg. 







TORONTO 

Dayton New York 

Kansas City 
Boston Chicago 



Weekly Market Report — Paints 



PAINT NOTES. 

White lead has been advanced 
15 cents and is now close to the 
$8.00 mark. 

Turpentine has dropped to 66 
cents at Toronto. 

Business all around is very 
good for this season of the vear. 



MONTREAL. 

Montreal, August 8. — White lead is 
becoming the Roosevelt of the paint 
market, absolutely refusing to get out 
of the "spotlight." It is only a few 
weeks since the last advance of 25 cents 
was made in the product, and now there 
comes the announcement of another rise. 
The manufacturers had nothing else to 
do. Raw material has risen so much 
that to cover themselves they had to 
put prices on a new plane. 

The rise this time is one of 15 cents. 
The desire was to keep the figures as 
low as possible, but this advance seem- 
ed absolutely necessary. 

Generally business in paint and paint 
products is remarkable. This, the gen- 
erally accepted slack season, sees the 
factories running full time. Indeed 
there are still so many orders coming 
in, and so many unfilled, that it has 
been found necessary, in some cases, to 
refuse shipment. 

Trying to Get Reserve. 

Those manufacturers who are fortu- 
nate enough to be catching up with their 
orders, are yet keeping their plants run- 
ning full shifts. They want to get a 
reserve — all the stock which was on 
hand having been depleted by the heavy 
trade of this summer. 

Linseed Oil: — This week has not seen 
any changes in price here. There seems 
to be plenty of flax seed, but still diffi- 
culty is being experienced in getting this 
through to the crushers, and for that rea- 
son the local demand is still well up with 
the supply. A somewhat easier condi- 
tion seems likely and those who need 
large quantities might well wait a little 
time before buying. 

Turpentine: — The market lacks any 
interesting feature. Prices remain the 
same as last week, and there is no great 
reason to expect a change in one direc- 
tion or the other. Turps fluctuate with 
little cause, however, and a movement, 
either up or down, would not cause sur- 
prise. That a movement of importance 
will come, is however, entirely unlikely. 
No Further Rise Immediately. 

White Lead : — The scarcity of the raw 
material, and the high prices which have 



to be paid for this, are the causes for 
the recent advance. The only question 
when the manufacturers met to consider 
future action, was as to the extent of 
the rise which would be made, 'fthat an 
advance was necessary all agreed. Fin- 
ally it was decided that 1(5 cents would 
cover the recent advances in raw ma- 
terial. There seems no certainijy that 
this will be the last upward movement, 
but it is hardly likely that there will be 
another for a few weeks. 

Prepared Paints: — Still there is a lit- 
tle talk of. an advance here, but owing 
to the lower figure at which oil is to be 
obtained, a change is not likely to come 
in the next few weeks. A lower price 
is absolutely out of the question, but it 
would seem" that the present figures 
would hold for some time. 

No Possibility of a Decline. 

Glass : — This situation has improved 
somewhat. Still stocks are rather low, 
but some cargoes which have recently 
reached Canada have prevented an im- 
mediate shortage. Talk of political 
trouble in Belgium is still in the air, but 
it hardly seems likely that this will come 
immediately. Lower prices in glass, for 
which some have been looking, are out 
of the question. An advance seems quite 
likely, but there is little reason to ex- 
pect this at once. 



TORONTO. 

Toronto, Aug. 8. — The volume of bus- 
iness is still remarkably large. The 
usual mid-summer slump has been, in 
fact, chiefly conspicuous by its absence. 
The paint manufacturers are still busy 
and there seems every probability that 
they will continue busy right through 
the summer. Some state that they have 
not yet caught up with their orders. 
The activity is not confined to any one 
line, but is felt in every branch. Ac- 
cessories, such as brushes, boat pitch, 
kalsomine, pumice stone, etc., are selling 
briskly. 

White Lead Advances. 

White Lead: — The market has been 
featured by another advance, this time 
of 15 cents. It has been felt for some 
time that this advance was inevitable. 
Pig lead has become dearer and more 
scarce all the time. In fact, it has been 
well-nigh impossible to secure supplies 
and as a result the corroders have been 
at a serious disadvantage. The advance 
declared of 15 cents is a moderate one 
in view of all the circumstances. It is 
considered quite within the possibilities, 
therefore, that the price will be advanc- 
ed again shortly. ■ As- the prevailing 

54 



price here now is $7.95, the prediction of 
eight-cent white lead bids fair to be 
fulfilled. 

The supply is still small here and the 
jobbers are finding it hard to fill orders. 

Linseed Oil: — There has been no 
change in the situation as regards lin- 
seed oil and the price asked is still 96 
for raw and 99 for boiled. Demand is 
reported to be fair. Those in touch with 
the situation do not seem to anticipate 
any further weakening in the price for 
some time at least. , 

Turpentine Down. 

Turpentine : — The price here has been 
reduced one cent, making it 66 cents. 
The weakening is due to the continued 
depression of the primary markets. The 
price at Savannah has been slowly ham- 
mered down. Demand here is fair at 
the present time. 

Putty: — The volume of trade in putty 
is showing a steady improvement. Prices 
remain the same as follows : — Standard 
bulk in casks, $2.40; in 100-lb. drums, 
$2.55; in 25-lb. drums, $2.65; bladder in 
barrels, $2.80. Pure putty prices are as 
follows: Bulk in casks, $3; in 100-lb. 
drums, $3.40; in 25-lb. drums, $3.50; 
bladder in barrels. $3.40. 

Glass : — There are no developments in 
the situation but the importers and job- 
bers are keeping both eyes on the Bel- 
gium field. Uneasiness is still felt on 
the score of possible future developments 
in that country. 

It is felt that the fall trade in glass 
will attain to record proportions, in view 
of the great amount of building being 
done. Consequently, any stoppage of 
the supply from Belgium would be 
doubly serious. 

Prepared Paint: — Demand continues 
good. Although most orders are of the 
sorting variety some orders for fall re- 
quirements are being placed. 



WINNIPEG. 

Winnipeg, Aug. 8. — There is a con- 
siderable scarcity in dry lead corrod- 
ers and grinders have never yet caught 
up with the shortage occasioned by 
British labor troubles in the early 
part of the season. Prices are, how- 
ever, unchanged. 

Linseed oils and turpentine are 
steady and in good demand, and there 
is no falling off in requirements for 
both dry and mixed colors. Orders for 
fall house renovating goods, stains, 
varnishes, etc., are coming in quite freely 
and there is a heavy business now doing 
in lubricating oils.- 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



B-H "ENGLISH" PAINT 

70% Pure White Lead -30% Pure WhiteZinc 

100% PURE PAINT 



Why Experiment when 
you don't have to? 

You can settle the question of quality in paint for yourself and your custom- 
ers at once and for all time, by handling a paint bearing a formula guarantee 
showing it is made on a white base of 70 per cent, pure white lead and 30 per 
cer.t pure white zinc — 100 per cent, pure paint. 

This is the guarantee on every can of B-H "ENG- 
LISH" Paint. 

And all this large percentage of white lead is Brandram's B.B. Genuine — 
The standard of the world. We are in a position to use this large proportion of 
white lead because we are corroders and grinders of white lead — the only 
paint makers in Canada who corrode and grind white lead. 

You recognize, and your customers recognize, that this guarantee formula 
means the highest grade of goods that can be made. It settles the question of 
quality — and quality counts. 

Highest quality paint brings customers , brings them back again — and their 
friends with them. 

Highest quality paint gives you confidence, and your clerks 
confidence, to go after business and to get business. 

Write to-day for dealers' price list and data on 
the 1912 Fall Advertising Campaign back of B-H 
English " Paint. Address our nearest office. 




BR^ 


lNDR/ 


lM - H E 


IcffjaT* 


SON 

■■ LIMITED 


Montreal 


Halifax 


St. John 


Toronto 


Winnipeg 



55 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



CURRENT MARKET QUOTATIONS 



These prices are tor such qualities and 
quantities as are usually ordered by re- 
tail dealers on the usual terms of 
credit, the lowest figures being for 
larger quantities and prompt pay. 
Large cash buyers can frequently make 
purchases at better prices. The 
Editor is anxious to be informed at once 
of any apparent errors in this list, as 
the desire is to make it perfectly ac- 
curate. Retailers desiring to get in 
touch with firms selling any articles on 
which quotations are made can do so by 
writing the editor. 

METALS AND METAL PRODUCTS. 

ANTIMONY. 

Cookson's or Eallett's, per lb. .8 60 8 26 

BABBIT METAL 

Canada Metal Company— Imperial, 
genuine, 60c.; Imperial tough, 60c; 
White Brass, 48c ; Metallic, 46c ; Special, 
33c; Harris heavy pressure, 25c; Her- 
cules, 20c; White bronze, 15c; Star 
frictionless, 10c ; Alluminoid, 9c ; Mogul, 
6c; No. 3, 6%c; No. 4, 6c per lb. 

Tallman Brass & Metal Co.— Arctic 
Metal.— XXX Genuine, 50c; Superior, 
15c; A Special, 35c; Hoo Hoo, 25c; 
"A," 20c; "B," 18c; "C," 15c; "D," 
12c; No. 1. 10c; No. 2, 8c; No. S, 6c 

MagnolU Metal Co.— Magnolia, 25c; 
Defender, 20c; Mystic, 17c; Kosmic, 
16c 

BOILER PLATES AND TUBES 

Montreal. Toronto 
Plates, % to % Inch, per 

100 lbs 2 20 2 20 

Heads, per 100 lb 2 45 2 45 

Tank plates, 3-16 inch 2 30 2 40 

Tubes per 100 feet, 1% Id. 9 50 9 00 

2 ". 8 26 8 50 
2% ". 10 60 10 00 

3 ". 12 00 12 10 
3% ". 15 00 16 30 

4 ". 19 25 19 45 
BRASS. 

Spring sheets, up to 20 gauge... 26 
Rods, base % to 1 inch, round.. 22 
Tubing, seamless base, per lb.. 25 
Tubing, iron pipe size , 1 inch 

base 25 

Copper tubing, 4 cents extra. 

BRASS GOODS, VALVES, ETC. 
Ground work, 65 p.c. 
Standard Compression work, 65 p.c 
High grade compression work, 60 p.c 
Cushion work, 65 per cent. 
Fuller work, 70 p.c; No. 0, 75 p.c, and 
1 and 2 basin cocks, 70 p.c. 
Flatway stop and stop and waste cocks, 

65 p.c : roundway, 60 p.c. 
J.M.T. Globe, Angle and Check Valves 

65 p.c; Standard, 65 p.c. 
J.M.T. Radiator Valves, 60; Standard, 

65; patent quick-opening valves, 70 and 

10 p.c 
Jenkins' Valves— Quotations on applica- 
tion to Jenkins' Bros., Montreal. 
COPPER 
„ .. Per 100 lb. 

Casting ingot $19 00 

Cut lengths, round bars, % to 2 

in 26 00 

Plain sheets, 14 oz„ 14x48 

inches, 14xS0 inches 28 00 

Copper sheet, tinned, 14x60 

14 oz. 29 00 

Copper sheet, planished, 14x60, 

base 36 00 

Brazier , msheets, 6x4 28 00 

COPPER AND BRASS WIRE 
Brass, 60 p.c; copper, 62% p.c 
IRON AND STEEL 
In car lots. Montreal. Toronto 

Canadian foundry, No. 1 19 50 

Canadian foundry, No. 2 19 00 

Middlesboro, No. 3 pig iron 18 00 19 00 
Summerlee, No. 2 pig iron 20 00 22 60 

Carron, special 20 00 

Can-on, soft 19 75 

Cleveland, No. 1 18 75 jo'jo 

Clarence, No. 3 18 00 20 75 

Jarrow 17 75 20 60 

Glengamock 22 60 

Radnor, charcoal iron 32 00 32 60 

iyresome. No. 3 1875 

Ferro Nickel pig iron (Soo) 25 00 

Steel billets, Bessemer or 

open hearth, f.o.b. Pitta- 

. bu . I « ; 27 50 

Angles J base 2 60 2 60 

Common bar, per 100 lb. 1 90 2 06 
Forged iron, per 100 lb. 2 05 2 20 
Refined iron, per 100 lb... 2 15 2 30 
Horseshoe Iron, per 100 lb. . . 2 15 2 30 

Mud steel 1 95 2 15 

Sleigh shoe steel 190 2 15 

Iron finish machinery steel 

(domestic) 1 95 j 15 

Iron finish steel (foreign).. 2 26 2 26 
Reeled machinery steel .... 2 85 3 00 

Tire steel 2 00 2 35 

Sheet cast steel 15 15 

Toe calk steel 285 2 (0 

Mining cast steel 07% 06 

High speed 65 66 

Capital tool steel 50 . 

Cammell Laird is 

Black Diamond tool steel.. 08 08 

Corona tool Bteel 06% 

Silver tool steel 12% 

Cold Rolled Shafting. 

9-16 to 11-16 Inch 3 06 

% to 1 7-16 inch 05V4 

1 Me to 3 inch ::.:: :::: o« 

Montreal, 25 and 2. Toronto, 30. 
BLACK SHEETS 

Montreal. Toronto 
10 gauge 2 40 2 50 



12 gauge 2 30 2 55 

14 gauge 2 20 2 35 

17 gauge 2 20 2 45 

18 gauge 2 20 2 46 . 

20 gauge 2 20 2 45 

22 gauge 2 25 2 65 

24 gauge 2 25 2 65 

26 gauge 2 35 2 66 

28 gauge 2 40 2 80 

CANADA PLATES 

Ordinary, 62 sheets 2 90 2 90 

All bright, 52 sheets .... 3 70 4 00 

Galvanized— Apollo D. Crown Ordinary 

18x24x52 4 45 4 45 4 35 

60 4 70 4 70 4 60 

20x28x80 8 90 8 90 8 70 

20x28x80 910 9 40 9 20 

GALVANIZED SHEETS (CORRU- 
GATED) 

22 gauge, per square 6 10 

24 gauge, per square 5 00 

26 gauge, per square 3 85 

28 gauge, per square 3 66 

Less 10 p.c 

GALVANIZED SHEETS 
B.W. Queen's Fleur- Gordon Gorbal'a 
gauge Head de-Lis Crown Best Best 
16-20.... 3 60 3 35 3 60 3 60 
22-24.... 3 65 340 365 366 

26 405 3 80 105 105 

28 125 100 126 125 

Colbome Crown— 3.65, 3.70, 3.76, 1.00. 
Less than case lots 10 cents per hd. 
extra. 
"Comet" sheets— 

22 8 65 

24 3 70 

26 3 76 

28 1 00 

Apollo brand— Montreal Toronto 

24 gauge, American.... 3 60 345 

26 gauge, American 3 85 3 60 

28 gauge, (26 English) 4 10 3 95 

10% oz., equal to 28 

English 135 125 

IRON PIPE 
List Black Galv. 
%-inch and 

%-inch $ 5 60 66 p.c 61 p.c 

%-inch 8 50 71 p.c 60 p.c 

%-inch 11 60 76 p.c 65 p.c. 

1-inch 16 50 75 p.c. 65 p.c. 

1%-inch 22 50 75 p.c 65 p.c 

1%-inch 27 00 75 p.c. 65 p.c. 

2-inch 36 00 76%p.c 66%p.c 

2%-inch 67 60 76%p.c 66%p.c 

3-inch 75 50 76%p.c 66%p.c. 

3%-inch 95 00 76 p.c. 65 p.c. 

4-inch 108 00 75 p.c. 65 p.c 

IRON PIPE FITTINGS 
Canadian malleable, 40; cast Iron, 65; 
standard bushings, 70; headers, 60; 
flanged unions, 65; malleable bushings, 
65; nipples, 75 and 10; malleable, lipped 
unions, 66. 

SOIL PIPE AND FITTINGS 
Medium and extra heavy pipe up to 6 
inch, 65 p.c, 7 and 8 in. pipe, 50 p.c. 
Light pipe, 60, fittings, 70 p.c. 

RANGE BOILERS 
30-gallon, Standard, $4.75; extra heavy, 
$7.00. 

KITCHEN SINKS 
Cast iron, 16x24, $1; 18x30, $1.16; 18x36, 

$1.95. 
Flat rim enameled sinks, 16x24, $2; 
18x30, $2.35; 18x36, $3.50. 

HEATING APPARATUS 

Sot Water Boilers— 47 and 15 p.c. 
o't Water Radiators— 45 and 15 p.c 
Steam Radiators— 46 and 15 per cent. 
Wall Radiators — 40 and 15 per cent. 
Specials— 25 p.c 

OLD MATERIAL 
Dealers' buying prices : 

Montreal Toronto 
Heavy ocpper and 

wire, lb 11 1114 

Light copper bottoms.. 09 09% 

Heavy red brass 10 10% 

Heavy yellow brass 08 08% 

Light brass 06 06% 

Tea lead 02% 02% 

Heavy lead 02% 02% 

Scrap zinc 03 04 

No. 1 wrought iron . . 02 10 00 
Machinery cast scrap, 

No. 1 16 00 14 50 

Stove plate 12 50 13 00 

Malleable 9 00 9 00 

Miscellaneous steel .... 5 00 6 00 

Old rubbers 09 08% 

LEAD. 

Montreal 

Domestic (Trail) pig, 110 lbs 5 50 

Imported pig, per 100 lb 5 50 

Bar pig, per 100 lbs 5 75 

Sheets, 2% lb. sq. ft., by roll 5 75 

Sheets, 3 to 6 lb., ft 6 00 

Cut sheets He. per lb. extra. 

Cut sheets to size, %c per lb. extra. 

LEAD PIPE. 
Lead Pipe and Waste, 15 per cent. 
Caulking lead, l%c. per pound. 
Traps and bends, 40 per cent. 
SOLDER. 

Per lb. 
Montreal. Toronto 
Bar, half-and-half, guarant'd 27% 27% 

Wiping 024% 025 

SHEET ZINC. 

5-cwt. casks 8 25 (00 

Part casks 8 50 150 

SPELTER. 
Foreign, per 100 lb. .... T 50 18 



TIN AND TINPLATES. 
Lamb and Flag and Straits— 

56 & 28-lb. ingots, 100 lb. . .$52 00 $50 00 
Redipped Charcoal Plates— Tinned 
MLS, Famous (equal Bradley) 

Per box 

I C, 14x20 base $7 00 

I X, 14x20 base 8 25 

I X X, 14x20 base 9 60 

Raven and Murex Grades — 

I O, 14x20 base 6 00 

I X, 14x20 base 6 00 

I X X, 14x20 base 7 00 

I X X X, 14x20 base 8 00 

"Dominion Crown Best"— Double. 
Coated, Tissued. 

I C, 14x20 base 7 00 7 00 

I X, 14x20 base 8 25 8 25 

I X X, 14x20 base 9 50 9 60 

"Allaway's Best"— Standard Quality. 

I C, 14x20 base 160 

I. X., 14x20 base 5 50 

I. X. X., 14x20 base 6 60 

Bright Cokes 
Bessemer Steel— 

I C, 14x20 base 125 

20x28, double box 8 60 

Charcoal Plates— Teme 
Dean or J. G. Grade— 

I C, 20x28, 112 sheets T 50 

I X, Terne Tin 9 00 

Charcoal Tin Boiler Plates. 
Cookley Grade— 
XX, 11x56, 60 sheet bxs.) 
XX, 14x60, 50 sheet bxs.) .... 7 00 
XX, 14x65, 50 sheet bxs.) 
Tinned Sheets. 
72x30 up to 24 gauge, case 

lots 8 00 7 35 

72x30 up to 26 gauge, case 

lots 786 

WIRE. 
Annealed Cut Hay Bailing Wire. 
No. 10, $3.80; No. 11, $3.90; No. 12 and 
13, $4; No. 13%, $4.10; No. 14, $4.25; No. 
15, $4.50; in lengths 6 inches to 11 
inches, discount 30 per cent.; other 
lengths 20c per 100 lbs. extra; if eye or 
loop on end adds 25c per 100 lbs. to the 
above. 

Clothes Line Wire. 
No. 7 wire solid line. No. 17, $4.90; 
No. 18, $3; No. 19. $2.70; 6 wire solid 
line, No. 17, $4.45; No. 18, $3.10; No. 19, 
$2.80. All prices per 1,000 ft. measure; 
6 strand. No. 18, $2.«0; No. 19, $2.90. 
F. o. b. Hamilton, Toronto, Montreal, 
London. 

Coiled Spring Wire. 
High Carbon, No. 9, $2.00 In cars. 
Fine Steel Wire. 
Discount 25 per cent. List of extras. 
In 100-lb. lots: No. 17, $5; No. 18, 
$5.50; No. 19, $6; No. 20, $6.65; No. 21, 
$7; No. 22, $7.30; No. 23, $7.65; No. 24, 
$8; No. 25, $9; No. 26, $9.60; No. 27. 
$10; No. 28, $11; No. 29, $12; No. 30, 
$13; No. 31, $14; No. 32, $15; No. 33, 
$16; No. 34, $17. Extras net. Tinned 
wire, Nos. 17-25, $2; Nos. 26-31, $4; 
Nos. 30-34, $6. Coppered, 75c; oiling, 
10c; in 25-lb. bundles, 15c; In 6 and 
10-lb. bundles, 25c; in 1-lb. hanks, 25c; 
in %-lb. hanks, 38c; in %-lb. hanks, 
50c. ; packed in casks or cases, 15c ; 
bagging or papering, 10c 

Hay Wire in Coils. 
$2.35 base f.o.b., Montreal, Toronto, 
Hamilton and London, 

Galvanized Wire. 
From stock, f.o.b. Montreal— 100 lbs. 
Nos. 4 and 5, $2.80; 6, 7, 8, $2.75; 9, 
$2.30; 10. $2.80; 11, $2.85; 12, $2.45; 13, 
$2.55:14, $3.15. In car lots straight or 
mixed. 

Poultry Netting. 
2-in. mesh, 19 w.g., 60 and 2% p.c off. 
Other sizes, 60 and 5 p.c. off. 
Poultry netting staples, 55 per cent. 
Smooth Steel Wire. 
No. 0-9 gauge, $2.25 base; No. 10 
gauge, 6c extra; No. 11 gauge, 12c ex- 
tra; No. 12 gauge. 20c extra; No. 13 
gauge, 30c extra; No. 14 gauge, 40c ex- 
tra; No. 15 gauge, 55c extra; No. 16 
gauge, 70c extra. Add 60c for copper- 
ing and $2 for tinning. 

Extra net per 100 lb.— Oiled wire 10c. 
spring wire $1.25, bright soft drawn 15c. 
charcoal (extra quality) $1.25, packed 
in casks or cases 15c, bagging and 
paperings 10c, 50 and 100-lb. bundles 
10c, In 25-lb. bundles 15c, in 5 and 10- 
lb. bundles 25c, in 1-lb. hanks, 60c. in 
%-lb. hanks, 75c, in %-lb. hanks, $1. 
Wire Cloth. 
Painted Screen, in 100-ft. rolls. $1.65 
per 100 sq. ft.; in 60-ft rolls, $1.70 per 
100 sq. ft. 

Wire Fencing. 

Galvanized barb 2 15 

Galvanized, plain twist 2 75 

Car lots and less. 
Dominion special field fencing, S3 1-3 
p.c. small lots; extra 5 p.c 
F.O.B. Montreal. 

Wire Rope. 
Galvanized. 1st grade. 6 strands, 21 
wires. %, $5; 1 inch. $16.80. 

Black. 1st grade. 6 strands, 19 wires, 
%, $5. 1 inch, $15.10. Per 100 feet f.o.b. 
Toronto. 

Wrought Staples. 

Galvanized 2 80 

Plain 2(0 

PAINTS, OILS AND GLASS. 
Bam Paint 

Tn barrels, 1-gal. tins 80 85 

In barrels, 5 -gal. tins .... 80 8S 



Beeswax. 
Per lb. 10 

Chemicals. 

In casks per lb. 
Sulphate of copper (bluestone) . . 07 

Litharge, ground 06 

" flaked 06% 

Green copperas (green vitrol).... 01 

Sugar of Lead 01 

Colors in Oil. 

Venetian red, 1-lb. tins pure 09 

Chrome yellow, pure 18 

Golden ochre, pure 11 

French ochre, pure 09 

Chrome green, pure 11 

French permanent green, pure.. 15 

Signwriters' black, pure 17 

Marine black, 25 lb. irons 06 

Enamels. 
Per gallon in quart tins. 
M. L. Floorglaze (Imperial V. & O. 

Co 180 

Cee Pee Co. enamel 1 60 

Sterling Enamels 3 20 

Anchor Floorlustre 1 80 

Glue. Per lb. 

French medal 10 

German common sheet 10 

German prima 15 

White pigsfoot 15 20 

Brantford medal 10 

golden medal 11 

brown sheet 10 

solder sheet 13 

gelatine 22 

" white gelatine 20 

" white glue 12 

100 flake 10 011 

Perfection amber ground, No, 1230 6 13 
Ground glues at same prices. 
Brantford all-round glue, %-lb. pack- 
ages, 10c, %-lb., 15c; 1-lb., 26c Dis- 
count. 

XXL til 

XL 8 11% 

CL 12 

C 0U 

Paris Green. 

Montreal Toronto 

Drums, 50 and 100 lbs 18% 18% 

Packets, l-lb„ 100 in case. . 20% 20% 
%-lb. " ..0 22% 22% 

Tins, 1-lb., 100 in case 21% 21% 

Paris White. 

In bbls 8 90 

Pigments, 

Orange Mineral, casks 09 

100-lb. kegs 09% 

Prepared Paints. 

Per gallon 
in qt. tins 
Sherwin-Williams paints, base... 2 00 
Canada Paint Co.'s pure .. 1 76 2 00 
Globe house paint (Windsor).. 1 10 
"New Era" house paint (Wind- 
sor 185 

Ben J. Moore Co.'s "Egyptian" 

Brand 160 

Moore's pure linseed oil, H.C.. 1 65 
Brandram-Henderson's "English" 2 00 

Ramsay's paints, pure 1 70 

Ramsay's paints, Thistle 110 

Martin-Senour, 100 p.c pure .... 2 00 

Senour's floor paints 1 60 

Sterling Pure 1 60 

Maple Leaf Paint (Imp. V. & 

C. Co.) 

Jamieson's Crown and Anchor 

brand 1 60 

Plaster of Paris. 

Per barrel 30 

Pine Tar. 

Half -pint tins, per dozen 60 

Putty. 

Standard 

Bulk in casks 2 20 

" 100-lb. drums 2 61 

Bladders, in bbls. 2 75 

Red Dry Lead. 
Genuine, 560 lb, casks, per cwt 4 75 6 75 
Genuine, 100 lb. kegs " 5 25 6 50 

No. 1 casks, per 100 lbs 4 25 4 26 

No. 1 kegs, per 100 lbs ITS 175 

Shingle Stains. 

In 5-gallon buckets 76 

Turpentine and Oil. 

Montreal Toronto 
Can. Prime white petroleum, 

gal 011 013 

U.S. Water white " 15% 14% 

U.S. Pratt's astral " 19 16% 
Castor oil, per lb., in bbls. 08 09 

Motor Gasoline single bbls 22 

Benzine, per gal. single bbls .... 20% 
Pure turpentine, single bbls 66 66 

Wood Turpentine 60 

Turpentine, second run 60 

Linseed Oil " Raw.... 95 96 
boiled. 98 99 
Rosin, "G" grade, bbl. lots, 

100 lbs 3 25 

Varnishes. 

Per gal. cans. 

Carriage, No. 1 160 

Pale durable body 3 50 

" hard rubbing 3 00 

Finest elastic gearing 3 00 

Elastic Oak 150 

Furniture, polishing 2 00 

Furniture, extra 128 

No. 1 0*6 

" Union 90 

Light oil finish 1 36 

Gold size Japan 2 00 

Turps, brown japan 1 10 

No. 1 brown Japan 1 10 

Baking black Japan 1 35 

No. 1 black Japan 0(5 

Benzine black Japan ( Ti 



56 



HARDWARE AND METAL 





The maximum of profit in your Paint Department can only be obtained by handling _ a 
clean-cut, stock of quality paints, backed by the manufacturer's forceful co-operation in 
direct support of the dealer. 

Minerva Paints and Paint Specialties 

The Famous British Brand 

have proven a fast-moving, satisfactory and profitable line to handle wherever featured. 
There is no skimping in the measure put in every "Minerva" Can. Full Imperial Measure 
every time — not wine or short measure. 
Investigate our proposition. It will pay you well. 

Ask any Minerva Agent. 




({Canada), JwwmB. 

377-387 Carlaw Ave., TORONTO 

Established in England in 1834. 



WINNIPEG— Pinchin, Johnson & Co. (Canada) Ltd. 
128 Princess Street. 

REGINA— Peart Bros. Hardware Co., Ltd., Distri- 
butors for Southern Saskatchewan. 

SASKATOON— The Saskatoon Hardware Co., Ltd., 
Distributors for Northern Saskatchewan. 



CALGARY — The Western Supply & Equipment Co., 
Ltd., Distributors for Southern Alberta. 

EDMONTON— The Western Supply & Equipment 
Co., Ltd., Distributors for Northern Alberta. 

VANCOUVER— Wm. N. O'Neil Co., Limited, Dis- 
tributors for British Columbia. 

(N-13) 





Steel Tanks and Self-Measuring Pumps 
for Paint Oils 

They avoid all the loss and inconvenience sus- 
tained under the old method. The steel tanks are 
air-tight and will not permit the oil to gum or 
stick. The pumps measure the oil according to the 
Imperial Standard, directly into the customer's can. 
They count the gallons pumped and compute the 
charge for fractional gallons. 

THE BOWSER PAINT OIL SYSTEM 

will put every cent of profit into your pocket, where 
it belongs. With a Bowser your paint oil depart- 
ment will be as clean and inviting as your shelf 
hardware department. It draws trade. 

Why not investigate now and increase your 
paint oil profits. Your fellow merchants are using 
them. They'll help you. Ask for book No. 15. 



Do you know any of 
these Bowser users? 



Samuel Hobbs, 

1434 Queen St. W. 
Toronto 

Geo. Ecclestone, 

Bracebridge, Ont. 

Manville Hardware 
Company, 

Prince Albert, Sask. 

J. H. Ashdown, 

Calgary, Alta. 

Arthur Latham, 

Moose Jaw, Sask. 



Cochrane Hardware 
Company 



S. F. BOWSER & COMPANY, INC., TORONTO *><*« Bros 

66-68 FRASER AVENUE 

For Twenty-seven Years Manufacturers of Self-measuring Pumps, Tanks, Gasoline and 
Oil Storage Systems.lDry Cleaning Systems, etc. 



Toronto 



Regina, Sask. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Crystal Damar 2 60 

No. 1 " 2 26 

Pur* asphaltum 1 40 

Oilcloth 160 

Lightning dryer 86 

Elastilite Tarnish 2 25 

Copaline varnish 2 26 

Oranitine floor finish 2 25 

Jamieson's floor enamel 1 76 

Sherwin-Williams kopal Tarnish. 2 60 
Canada Paint Co.'s sun Tarnish. 2 26 

"Kyanixe" Interior Finish 2 40 

"Flint-Lac," coach 188 

B.E. Ltd. "Sold Medal." in 

cases 2 26 

Dependon Lt, H. Oil Finish.... 1 55 

BTerlastic Floor 2 65 

Flattine floor finish 3 00 

Elastics exterior finish 4 26 

Stovepipe Tarnish, % pints, per 

gross 8 00 

Pure white shellac Tarnish, in 

barrels 1 76 

Pure orange shellac Tarnish, in 

barrels 1 60 

No. 1 orange shellac Tarnish, in 

barrels 1 SO 

Window Glass. 
Siae United Double 

Inches. Star Diamond 

Under 26 $4 26 $6 26 

26 to 40 4 66 6 75 

41 to 60 6 10 7 60 

61 to 60 6 35 8 60 

61 to 70 5 75 9 75 

71 to 80 6 26 11 00 

81 to 85 7 00 12 60 

86 to 90 16 00 

91 to 95 17 50 

96 to 100 20 60 

Toronto, 25 p.c 

Montreal prices, no discount. 
Size United Inches Star 

Under 26 $3 05 

26 to 40 3 26 

41 to 60 3 65 

61 to 60 3 90 

61 to 70 4 15 

White Lead Ground in Oil. 

Montreal Toronto 
Per 108 lb. 

"Anchor," pure 7 80 7 95 

Brandram's B.B. Genuine. 8 80 8 95 
C.P.C. decorators, pure ... 7 80 7 80 
Crown and Anchor, pure. 7 80 8 95 

Elephant, Genuine 8 05 8 20 

Essex Genuine (Windsor) 7 55 

Island City Decorators' 

pure 7 80 7 95 

Lily Pure 7 80 7 95 

Moore's Pure White Lead 7 95 

Monarch (Windsor) 8 05 

Munro's Select Flake White 8 05 8 20 

Purity, CO. Co.'s Ltd 7 65 

Ramsay's Pure Lead 7 80 7 95 

Ramsay's Exterior 7 55 7 70 

Sterling Pure 7 95 

Tiger Pure 7 80 7 95 

Western Schedule. 

Terms— 2 p.c 30 days or net 3 months 
from date of shipment. Packages 26 
lbs. and over. 500-lb. kegs, 16c per 100 
lbs. lower. Delivery— F.O.B. Toronto 
or Hamilton; London, 5c per 100 lbs. 
extra. Contracts as required until 15th 
May, 1911. 

White Zinc (Dry) 

Extra Red Seal, V.M 07% 

White Zinc in Oil. 

Pure, In 25-lb. irons 10 

No. 1 " " 07 

No. 2 " " 05% 

Whiting. 

Plain, in bbls 70 

Gilders bolted in barrels 1 00 

HARDWARE. 
Adzes. 

Carpenters', per doz. 12 50 14 00 

Plain ship " 18 00 22 00 

Axles and Hatchets. 

Single bit, per doz 8 00 9 00 

Double bit " 10 00 12 00 

Bench Axes 6 75 10 00 

Broad Axes 22 75 25 00 

Hunters' Axes 6 80 6 00 

"Boys" Axes 6 75 6 50 

Lathing hatchets 4 70 10 00 

Shingle hatchets 1 45 t 76 

Claw hatchets 1 70 6 80 

Barrell hatchets 5 50 6 85 

Anvils. 

Buckworth, per lb 1014 

Ammunition. 

"Dominion" Rim Fire Cartridges and 
C.B. caps, 50, 10 & 2V4 p.c; B.B. caps, 
60, 10 and 2% p.c; Centre Fire Pistol 
Cartridges, 25 and 2% p.c. ; Centre Fire 
Sporting and Military Cartridges, 10 
and 10 p.c; Primers, 10 and 2% p.c; 
Brass Shot Shells, 45 and 12% p.c; 
Shot Cartridges, discount same as ball 
cartridges, f.o.b. any Jobbing point east 
of Manitoba. Net 90 days. 

"Crown" Black Powder, 30 and 10 
p.c; "SoTereign" Bulk Smokeless 
Powder, 30 and 10 p.c; "Regal" Dense 
Smokeless Powder. SO and 10 p.c - 
"Imperial" Shells, both Bulk and Dense 
Smokeless Powder, 30 and 10 p.c. Empty 
Shells, 30 and 10 p.c. 90 days net. 

Ordinary drop shot. AAA to dust, 
$7.50 per 100 lbs., net list.; 
cash discount, 2 per cent. 30 days; 
net extra as follows, subject to 
cash discount only; Chilled. 40c; buck 
and seal, 80c; no. 28 ball, $1.20 per 100 
!bs. ; bags less than 25 lbs., %c per lb.; 
F.O.B. Montreal, Toronto, Hamilton. 
London, St. John and Halifax, freight 
equalized. 

Augers and Bits. 
Ford's anger bits 30 and 10 



Irwin's auger 47Vi 

Gilmour's auger 60 

Rockford auger 60 and 10 

Gilmour's car 47% 

Clark's expansive 40 

Jennings' Gen. auger, net list. 
Tobin High Speed Bits, 50 and 10. 
Tobin Never Choke, 60 and 10. 
Barn Door Hangers. 

doz. pairs. 

Steams wood track 4 60 6 88 

Zenith 9 00 

Atlas, steel covered 5 00 6 80 

Perfect 8 00 1100 

New Milo, flexible 6 00 

Double strap hangers, dozen 

sets 6 60 

Standard jointed hangers, 

dozen sets 6 45 

Steel King hangers, doz. sets 6 40 

Storm King and safety hang- 
ers 6 25 

Storm King rail 4 26 

Crown 4 85 

Crescent 6 60 

Sovereign 7 25 

Chicago Friction, Oscillating and Big 

Twin Hangers, 5 per cent. 
Steel, track, 1 x 3-16 in. (100 ft,). S 25 
Barn Door Latches. 

Challenge, dozen 2 26 

Defiance, dozen 2 75 

Gem, dozen 7 50 

Bells. 
Door bells, push and turn, 45 and 10 

p.c. 
Cow bells, 65 p.c. 
Sleigh bells, shaft and hames, pair, 

22c up. 
Sleigh bells, body straps, each, $1,15 

up. 
Farm bells, No. 1, $1.65. 

Belting. 
Extra, 60, 10 and 10 per cent. 
Standard. 60, 10, 10 and 10 per cent. 
No. 1, not wider than S in., 60, 10, 

10 and 10. 
Agricultural, not wider than 4 in., 76 

per cent. 
Lace leather, per side, 80c; cut laces, 

85c. 

Bird Cages. 
Brass and Japanned, 40 p.c 

Bolts and Nuts. Per cent. 
Carriage Bolts, common, new, 

$1 list. 
Carriage Bolts, % and smaller 70 
Carriage Bolts, 7-16 and up 
Carriage Bolts, Norway Iron 

($3 list) 60 

Machine Bolts, % and less. . 60, 10 * 10 
Machine Bolts, 7-16 and up.. 60 

Plough Bolts 55, 5 ft 10 

Blank Bolts 60 

Bolt End 60 

Sleigh Shoe Bolts, % and 

less 60 and 10 

Sleigh Shoe Bolts, 7-16 and 

larger 55 and 05 

Coach Screw, new list 7 

Nuts, square, all sizes, 4%c per lb. off. 
Nuts, hexagon, all sizes, 4%c per lb. off. 
Stove rods, per lb.. 5% to 6c 
Stove Bolts. 80 

Building Paper, etc 

Tarred Slater's paper, per roll 70 

O. K. paper. No. 1. per roll 75 

(I. K. paper. Xo. 2. per roll 70 

Plain Fibre. No. 1. per iW ft. roll 45 
Plain Fibre. No. 2, " . . 27 

Tarred Fibre, No. 1, per 400 ft. 

roll 55 

Tarred Fibre, No. 2 " . . 35 

Tarred Fibre Cyclone. 25 lb., per 

roll 65 

Dry Cyclone. 15 lbs 46 

Plain Surprise, per roll 40 

Resin sized Fibre, per roll 40 

Asbestos building paper, per 100 

lbs 4 no 

Heavy straw, plain and tarred, per 

ton 37 50 

Carpet Felt, per 100 lbs 2 50 

Tarred wool roofing felt, per 100 lb 1 80 
Pitch. Boston or 8ydney, per 100 

lbs 7" 

Pitch, Scotch, per 100 lbs 65 

Heavy Fibre. 32' * 60', per 100 lb. 3 no 

2 Ply Ready Roofing, per sq fO 

3 Ply Ready Roofing, per sq 95 

2 Ply complete, per roll 1 15 

3 Ply complete, per roll 1 35 

Liquid Roofing Cement, brls., per 

gal 15 

Liquid tins Cement 20 

Crude Coal Tar, per barrel 3 5" 

Refined Coal Tar, tins, per doz... 1 ?5 

Refined Coal Tar. per barrel 4 60 

Shingle varnish, per barrel 4 50 

Caps, per lb 06 

Nails, per lb 05 

Mop cotton, per lb 15 

Butts. 
Plated, bower barff & Nickel. No. 241, 

45 per cent. 
Wrought brass, 45 p.c. o(T revised list. 
Cast iron loose pin. 60 p.c 
Wrought steel fast joint and loose pin, 

7" p.c. 
Crescent brands, 70 per cent. 

Cement and Firebrick. 
Canadian Portland, bags, per 

bbl 1 55 1 70 

White Bros. English 2 00 2 05 

"Lafarge" cement, in wood 3 40 

Fire brick, Scotch, per 1,000 23 00 28 00 

English 17 00 21 00 

American, low... 23 00 25 00 
high.... 27 50 35 00 

Fire clay (Scotch), net ton 5 60 

Chalk and Pencils. 
Carpenters Colored, per gross 65 80 
" lead pencils, p. gr 2 40 6 75 



Chisels. 

Cold chisels, 5 x 6 in., doz 2 20 

Bevel edge, 1 inch, doz. 2 60 

Chain. 
Proof coU. per 100 lb.. % in., $6.00; 
5-16 in., $4.85; % in., $4.25; 7-16 in., 
$4.00; % in., $3.75; 9-16 in., $3.70; % in.. 
$3.65; % in., $3.60; % in., $3.45; 1 in.. 
$3.40. 

Stall fixtures, 35; trace chain, 45; jack- 
chain, iron, 50; jackchain, brass, 50; cow 
ties, 40; halter chains, 50 and 5; tie outs, 
75; coil chain, 50 and 5; hammock chains, 
galvanized, 35 and 5. 
Chums. 
No. 0, $9; No. 1, $9; No. 2, $10; No. 
3, $11; No. 4, $13; No. 5, $16; f.o.b. To- 
ronto, Hamilton, London and St. Marys, 
40 per cent.; f.o.b. Ottawa, Kingston 
and Montreal, 37% and 10 per cent. 
Clamps. 

Malleable swivel head, 4 in. 2 60 

" adjustable, 4 in. 7 60 

Carpenters, 3 feet S 60 

Conductor Pipe. 

2 inch, in 10 foot lengths 3 SO 

j " " " 4 00 

4 " " " 6 28 

5 " " " 7 26 

6 " " " 8 80 

Cotter Pins. 
Cotter pins, 90 p.c. Montreal. 

Copper and Nickel Ware. 
Copper boilers, kettles, 40 and 5 p.c 
Copper tea and coffee pots, 40 & 5 p.c. 
Copper pitts, 30 and 5 p.c. 
Foundry goods, hollow ware, 45 p.c 

Door Knobs. 
Canadian knobs, 45 and 10 per cent. 
Porcelain, mineral and jet knobs, net 
list. 

Door Sets. 
Canadian, 45 and 10 per cent. 
Door pulls, 60 per cent. 

Door Hangers (Parlor) 
Single sets, each (Easy brand) .... 180 

Double sets, each 3 26 

Unbreakable rail, 100 feet 6 08 

Door Springs. 
Chicago (coil), 25 per cent. 
Reliance (coil), 20 per cent. 
Draw Knives. 

Carpenters 6 inch, doz 6 25 

Folding handles, 8 inch, doz 1 80 

Drills. 

Bit stock drills, 2-32 in., doz 17 

Escutcheon Pins. 
Steel, discount 50 per cent. 
Brass, 55 per cent. 

Eavetroughs. 

8 inch in 100 foot lengths 2 90 

10 " " " 3 15 

12 " " " 3 68 

15 " " " 5 25 

Add extra 10c per 100 ft. O.G. Round 
Bead Trough. 

Factory Milk Cans. 
Mils cans and pails, 35 p.c 
Hand delivery and creamery cans, 40 p.c 
tvailways cans, 45 p.c 
Cream cans, 40 p.c. 
Creamery trimmings, 75 and 12% p.c 

Faucets. 
Common, cork-lined, 35 per cent 

Farrier Knives. 
Buckworth, 50 p.c. 

File3 and Rasps. Per cent. 

Disston's 70 and 18 

Great Western. American .... 70 and 10 
Kearney & Foot, Arcade .... 70 and 10 
J. Barton Smith, Eagle .... 70 and 10 

McClellan. Globe 70 and 10 

Black Diamond 60 and 10 

Delta Files 60 

Nicholson 62 2-3 

.lowett's (English list) 27% 

Siiear & Jackson (English list) 35 
Forges. 

Blacksmiths portable, 135 lbs 9 85 

Galvanized Ware. 
luitTerin pattern pails, 45 per cent. 
Flaring pattern, 45 per cent. 
Galvanized washtubs, 45 per cent. 

Grindstones. 
Over 40 lbs. and 2 in. thick, per 100 

lbs 110 

Smaller sizes extra. 
Hammers. 

Tack, iron, doz 35 

Ladies claw, handled, doz 60 

Adze eye nail hammer, 10 or., doz. 1 25 

hickory handle, 1 lb., doz. 6 25 

" straight claw, 1 lb., doz. 7 00 

Farriers hammers, 10 oz., doz 5 60 

Tinners setting, % lb., doz 4 50 

Machinists, % lb., doz S 20 

Sledge, Canadian, 5 lbs. and over. 06 
Sledge, Masons, 5 lbs. and over. 08 

Sledge, Napping, up to 2 lbs 09 

Harrest Tools. 
50 and 5 per cent. 
Sidewalk and stable scrapers, net $2.25. 
Wood hay rakes, 40 and 10 per cent. 
Lawn rakes, net. 

Halters (Snap and Ring). 

Jute Rope, %-inch, per gross 8 00 

" " %-inch, per gross 10 60 

" " %-inch, per gross 13 60 

Leather, 1-lnch, per doz 4 00 

Leather, 1%-inch, per doz 6 20 

Web 2 45 

Sisal Halters (Snap and Ring). 
%-in., $9.00; 7-16-in.. $10.28; %-in., 
$11.40; 9-16-in., $13.20; %-in., $15.00. 

Hinges. 
Blind, discount 50 per cent. 
Heavy T and strap, 4-in., 100 lb. 

net 7 25 

Heavy T and strap, 5-in., 100 lb. 

net • 7 00 

Heavy T and strap. 6-in., 100 lb. 
net 6 76 



Heavy T and strap, 8-in.. 100 lb. 

net 6 60 

Heavy T and strap, 10-in. and 

larger 6 26 

Light T and strap, discount 66 p.c 

Screw hook and hinge- 
under 12 in., per 100 lb. 4 0C 

over 12 in., per 100 lb. S 68 

Crate hinges and back flaps, 65 and 6 
p.c 

Chest hinges and hinge hasps, 66 p.c 
Hinges (Spring) 

Spring, per gross— No. 6, $16.10; No. 18, 
$16.10; No. 20, $9.50; No. 50, $17.58, 
No. 61, $7.76; No. 128, $16.10. 

Screen door sets— No. 2250, $14.95; No. 
2260, $19.55; No. 2275, $21.85; No. 1192. 
$19.55. 

Chicago hold back screen door, iron, 
gro., $12. 

Chicago spring hinges, 15 p.c. 

Triplex spring hinges, 40 p.c 

Chicago surface floor (6,000), 46 p.c. 

Garden City fire house hinges, 12% p.c 

"Chief" floor hinge, 50 p.c 
Hooks. 

Wrought iron hooks and staples— 

% x 6, per gross I 26 

5-16 x 5, per gross 3 40 

Bright wire screw eyes, 60 p.c. 

Bright steel gate hooks and staples. 

Iron screw hooks, 60 and 20 p.c 

Iron gate hooks and eyes, 60 & 20 p.c. 

Crescent hat and coat wire, 68 p.c A 

Stove pipe eyes, kitchen and squart 
hooks, 66 p.c. 

Horse Nails. 
M.R.M. cold forged process list, 10th 

January, 1912. Price per 

Size Length 25-lb. box. 

Nos. 3 1%-inch $4 10 

4 1%-inch 3 76 

5 1 15-16 3 50 

6 2% 3 10 

7 2 5-16 2 90 

8 2% 2 75 

9 2 11-16 2 60 

10 2% 2 60 

11 3 1-16 2 45 

12 3% 2 45 
Horseshoes. 

Iron shoes, light, medium and heavy. 
No. 2 and larger, $3.90; No. 1 and 
smaller, $4.15; snow pattern, No. 2 and 
larger, $4.15; No. 1 and smaller, $4.40; 
"X.L." steel shoes, new light pattern, 

1 to 6, No. 2 and larger, $4.35; No. 1 
and smaller, $4.60; "X.L." steel shoes, 
feather weight, pattern all sizes, No. I 
to 4, $5.75; special countersunk steel, all 
sizes, 0-4, $6.25; toe weight steel shoes, 
all sizes. No. 1 to 4, $6.75. F.O.B. 
Montreal. 

Toecalks Standard, J.P. & Co., 
"Blunt" No. 1 and smaller, $1.50; No. 

2 and larger, $1.26; "Sharp" No. 1 and 
smaller, $1.76; No. 2 and larger, $1.50 
per box. Put up in 25-lb. boxes. 

Horse Weights. 
Taylor-Forbes, 4%c 

Ice Cream Freezers. 
White Mountain, 6c per lb. 

Knives. 
Hay knives, net list. 
Clauss, 60 and 25 per cent. 

Kitchen Enameled Ware. 
White ware, 75 per cent. 
London and Princess, 50 per eent. 
Canada, Diamond, Premier. 68 and 18 

per cent. 
Pearl, Imperial, and granite steel, M 

and 10 per cent. 
Premier steel ware, 46 per cent. 
Star decorated steel and white. 26 per 

cent. 
Hollow ware, tinned steel, 46 per sent. 

off. 
Enamelled street signs. 48 per cent. 

Kitchen Sundries. 
Asbestos mats, 60 p.c. 

Can openers, per doz 6 48 9 76 

Mincing knives, per dez. ... 6 68 I 91 

Potato mashers, wire, per das. 6 66 * 74 

" wood, per doi. 6 68 6 84 

Tege table slicers, per dez 2 26 

Universal meat chopper, No. 1 .... 1 IS 

Enterprise chopper, each 1M 

Spiders and fry pans, 66 and 

5 per cent. 
Star Al Chopper, 5 to 32 ... 1 36 4 16 
106 to 103.... 1 S6 i 08 

Kitchen hooks, bright 6 68 

Toasters, 60 per cent. 

Fire shovels, 50. 

Oil stoves and ovens. 68 and II. 

Ladders. 
I t* 6 feet, 12c per foot; 7 t» 1 ft., lie. 
Extension ladders, 15c per foot ap. 

Lan teres. 
Japanned ware, 45 per cent. 
Ne. 2 or 4 Plain Cold Blast, per 

dos I Tf 

Lift Tubular and Hinge Plain. 

per doz 6 88 

Japanning, 50e per dozen extra. 
Prism globes, per dozen, $1.28. 
Lamp wick, 60 per cent. 
Lawn Hose. 
Competition grade lawn hose, 76 aad 6. 
Lawn Mowers. 

D. Maxwell & Sons.— *-lnch open 
wheel, 3 knives, 1? in., $5.10; do., I 
knives, $6.25; 9-inch wheel, 3 knives, 
12 in. sizes, $6.75; do., 4 knives, $7.25; 
10%-inch wheel. 4 knives, 12 in. sizes. 
$8.50; ball bearing do.. $10; do., 5 knives, 
$10.50; 50 per cent, f.o.b. factory. 

Locks and Keys. 
Canadian, 45 and 10 per cent. 



58 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



"Ready" Roofing and 
"Black Diamond" Tarred Felt 

These products are fully guaranteed to completely satisfy 
both dealer and user. They are backed by years of effi- 
cient service. Any skilled mechanic can easily lay them. 
The profits are well worth your while. Write to-day for 
prices and particulars. 

Let us also quote you prices on WRAPPING PAPER. 

11 Cyclone" and "Joliette" 
Building Papers 







A^oMt^eal. . 



The Mark of High Quality 



RED 



S 



BRAND 

WINDOW 

GLASS 







GLASS 

BENDERS 

TO 

THE 

TRADE 



■ 



TH £ TORONTO PLATE GLASS IMPORTING CO., Limited 

PLATE, WINDOW, FIGURED, STAINED, WIRED, BENT, MIRROR 

and ORNAMENTAL GLASS 

DON ROADWAY TORONTO 




Increase Your Sales 

by selling goods that create enthusiasm among 
users. These kind of goods can be easily 
obtained in 



HEINISCH SHEARS 



The dealer will find it a pleasure to handle them, as they bring good profits, and guarantee him against 
come-backs. High quality and perfect temper does it. We also manufacture Tailors' Shears, Trimmers, 
Tinners' Snips, etc. Ask your jobber for them. 



R. HEINISCH'S SONS COMPANY 



NewarK, N.J., U.S.A. 




"WORLD" 
BABBITT METAL 



FOR GENERAL MACHINE SHOP, MILL OR FOUNDRY USE 



or any place where a good metal is required. 



25c.net perlb. 



Freight paid on 100.1b lots to 
your nearest railway station. 



We know "World" Brand to be a pood Babbitt 
and will give you satisfaction, even if you are pay- 
ing a higher price. 



T. McAVITY 3L SONS, Limited 

ST. JOHN, N. B. and WINNIPEG 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Lumbermen's Supplies. 

Cant hooks, «»zen, from 12 89 

Axes, dozen, tmm ( 60 

Axe handles, dozen, from 1 15 

Cross cut saws, per foot .... 6 25 43 

Axe wedges, dozen 25 

Ball and heel calks 4 00 4 25 

Mallets. 
Tinsmiths', 2%x5% in., per doz.. 1 25 
Carpenters', round hickory, 6 in., 

per doz 1 95 

Lignum Vitae, round, 5 inch, per 

doz 2 40 

Caulking, No. 8, oak, per doz — 15 00 

Mats. 
Wire door mats, standard, 16x24, 

doz S M 

Metal Polish. 

Tandem metal polish paste 6 08 

Axoline brass cleaner, 100 in pkge ( 50 

Miners Supplies. 
Mattocks, 6 lb., 18 inch, (6 dozem. 
Picks, 6 to 7 lb., $4.65 dozen. 
Pick handles, $1.85 dozen. 
Prospectors' hammers, 16%e per lb. 
Drilling hammers, 6 cents per lb. 
Crowbars, 3% cents per lb. 

Mops and Ironing Boards. 

Mops, per doz 1 20 1 50 

Folding ironing boards 16 25 18 00 

Nails. Wire 

1—1% inch 3 30 

1% inch 3 00 

1%— 1% inch 2 75 

2—214 inch 2 65 

2%— 2?4 inch 2 50 

J-3% inch 2 45 

J%— i inch 2 40 

4% inch 2 35 

5, 5%, 6 inch (base) 2 30 

Cut nails— Montreal, $2.40; Toronto, 

$2.60. 

Miscellaneous wire nails, T5 per cent. 

Coopers' nails, 33 1-3 per cent. 

Pressed spikes, % diameter, per 101 

lbs 2 86 

Oakum. 

Plumbers.... per 100 lb 4 51 

Oilers. 

Kemp's Tornado and MeClary't 
Model galvanized oil can, with 
pump, 5 gallon, per dozen II 00 

Davidson oilers, 40 per cent. 

%inc and tin, 50 per cent. 

Coppered oilers, 50 per cent. «ff. 

Brass oilers, 50 per cent. 

Malleable, 25 per cent. 

Plated Goods. 

Holloware, 40 per cent, discount. 

Flatware, staples, 40 and 10; fancy, 10 
and 50. 

Hutton's "Cross Arrow" flatware, 42% 

per cent. "Singalee" and "Alask," 

Nevada silver flatware, 42 per cent. 

Pieced Ware. 

Discount, 35 per cent. 

10-qt. flaring sap buckets, $5 p.c. 

6, 10 and 14-qt. flaring pails, 35 p.c 
Copper bottom tea kettles and boilers, 

35 per cent. 
Coal hods, 40 per cent. 
Boiler and tea kettle pitta, 35 p.c 

Planes. 
Wood bench, Canadian, 40, American, 

25 per cent. 
Wood, fancy, 30 to 35 per cent. 
Stanley planes, $1.55 to $3.60, net list 

prices. 

Pliers and Nippers. 

Button's genuine, 37% to 40 per cent. 

Plough Lines. 

Russian snap per gross 30 00 

Indian snap " 25 00 

Pumps. 
Berg's whig pump, 75 per cent. 

Razors. per doz. 

Boker's 7 60 U 00 

Boker's King Cutter 15 00 

Henekel's 7 60 20 00 

Gillette Safety, each } 75 

Star Safety Razor, 33 1-3 p.c 
Rope and Twine. 

Sisal rope 09% 

Pure Manila Rope 12% 

"British" Manila 10 

Cotton, 3-16 inch and larger 24 

Russia Deep 8ea line, % in. diam. 

and over, 17; under % in., 18. 
Jute, % and upwards, 10c; under %. 

10%c. 

Lath yarn, single 08% 

Lath yarn, double 08% 

Sisel bed cord, 48 feet, per doz.. 65 
Sisel bed cord, 60 feet, per doz. 80 
8isel bed cord, 72 feet, per doz. ( 95 
Cotton clothes line, 18 per cent. off. 

Bag, Russian twine, per lb 8 27 

Wrapping, cotton, 3-ply twine... 26 
" 4-ply twine... 50 

Mattress twine, per lb 46 

Staging " " B35 

Refrigerators. 
Sanderson-Harold, 40 per cent. 
Galvanized, 45 per cent. 

Rivets and Burrs. 
Iron Rivets, black and tinned, 60, 10 

and 10, 
Iron Burrs, 60 and 10 and 10 p.c. 
Copper Rivets, usual proportion burrs, 

35 and 7% per cent. 
Copper Burrs only, 22% per cent. 
Extras on Coppered Rivets, %-lb. pack- 
ages lc per lb.; %-lb. pkgs., 2c lb. 
Tinned Rivets, net extra, 3c per lb. 
Coppered Rivets, net extra, 2%c per lb. 

Rivet Sets. 
Canadian, 35 to 37% per cent. 
Rules. 

Boxwood, No. 68, 2 foot, doz 1 15 

Ivory, No. 1282, 2 foot, each .... 3 50 

Sad Irons. 
Mrs. Potts, No. 66, polished, per 

„/et 80 

Mrs. Potts. No. 60, nickel-plated, 

per set OK 



Mrs. Potts, handles, japanned, per 

gross 8 40 

Common, plain 4 25 

plated 5 60 

Asbestos, per set 1 60 

Sand and Emery Paper. 
Sand and emery paper, 40 per cent. 

Sash Weights. 
Sectional, 1 lb. each, per 100 lb... 2 25 
Sectional, % lb., each, per 100 lbs 2 40 

Solid, 3 to 30 lbs 165 

Sash Cord. 

No. 8, per lb 33 

Saws. 
Atkins Hand and Crosscut, 25 p.c. 
Disston's Hand, 15 per cent, 
Simonds Hand, 15 per cent. 
Shurley & Dietrich, 40 and 35 p.c 
Spear & Jackson, 40 per cent. 

Saw Sets. 
Canadian discount, 40 per cent. 

Screen Doors and Windows Doz. 
Common doors, 2 or 3 panel, wal- 
nut stained, 4-in, style 7 80 

Common doors, 2 or 3 panel, grain- 
ed only, 4-in. style 8 10 

Beaver window screens, 14x18, open 

28% inohes 160 

Perfection window screens, 14x15, 

open 22% inches 1 80 

Model window screens, 14x22, open 

36% inches 2 25 

Scales. 
Gumey Standard, 35; Champion, 60 
per cent. 

Burrow, Stewart & Milne — Imperial 
Standard, 35; Weigh Beams, 35; Cham- 
pion Scales, 45. 

Fairbanks Standard, 30; Dominion, 
50 ; Richelieu, 50. 

Warren new Standard, 35; Champion, 
45, Weigh Beams, 30. 

Scythe Snaths. 
Canadian, 40 per cent. 

Screws. Per cent. 

Wood F.H., bright and steel. 85 10 15 2% 

R.H., bright 80 10 15 2% 

F.H., brass 75 10 15 2% 

R.H., brass 70 10 15 2% 

F.H., bronze 70 10 15 2% 

R.H., bronze 65 10 15 2% 

Drive screws 85 10 15 2% 

Set, case hardened 60 

Square cap 60 and 05 

Hexagon cap 46 

Bench, wood, per doz $5 00 

" iron, per doz 4 25 

Screws (Machine). 

Flat head, iron and brass, 35 per cent. 

Fillister head, iron, 30; brass, 25 p.c. 

Screw Drivers. 

Sargent's, per dozen 65 100 

North Bros., No. 30, per doz 16 80 

Scissors and Shears. 
Clauss, nickel scissors and shears, 60; 
Japan, 65; tailors, 40; pruning, 70. 
Seymour's, 60 and 10 per cent. 
Acme Shear Co., nickel-plated and 
Japanned, 40 per cent. 

Shelf Brackets. 
No. 140, 65 and 10 per cent. 

Skates and Hockey Sticks. 
Starr skates, 37% per cent. 
Boker, hockey, 30c upwards; spring 
Empire hockey sticks, $3.00, $3.60. 
Micmac and Rex sticks, $4.00, $6.00. 
Pucks, net, $1.50. 

Shovels and Spades. 
Canadian No. 1 grade, 60 and 2% p.c 
off; No. 2 grade, 55 and 2% p.c off; 
No. 4 grade, 45 and 5 p.c. off. 
Canadian, No. 1 and 2 grade, 60 and 
2% p.c; No. 3 and 4 grade, 60 and 
2% per cent. 

Scoops. 
Grade 1, 2, 3, 50 and 5 per cent. off. 
Grade 4, 50 per cent. off. 
Squares. 
Disston's, 60 and 10 per cent. 
Stanley Try Squares, size 7%, doz. 

net $2 85 

Snaps. 
Harness, 25 per cent. 

Soldering Irons. 
Base, per lb., 28 cents. 

8tamped Ware. 
Plain, 75 and 12% per cent. 
Returned, 75 and 6 per cent. 
Tinners' trimmings. 75 and 5 p.c 

Sap Spouts. 
Bronzed iron with hooks, per 1,000 7 60 
Eureka tinned steel, hooks, per 

1,000 8 00 

Staples. 

Poultry netting, 100 lbs 5 70 

Bed, 100 lbs., No. 14 6 75 

Blind, per lb 12 

Coopers' staples, 45 per cent. 
Bright spear point, 75 per cent. 

Stable Fittings. 
Dennis Wire 4 Iron Co., S3 1-3 p.c 

Stove Boards. 
Lithographed, 60 and 10. 
Stovepipes. 

5 and 6 inch, per 100 lengths 7 62 

7 inch, per 100 lengths 8 18 

Nestable, 40 per cent. 

Stovepipe Elbows. 
5 and 6-inch, common, per doz... 1 22 

7-inch, per doz 1 35 

Polished, 15c per dozen extra. 
Thimbles, 70 per cent. 

Stocks and Dies. 

No. 20 Beaver Die Stock 18 75 

Stones— Oil and Scythe. 

Washita per lb. 25 37 

Hindostan •' 06 10 

slip " 18 20 

„, Axe " .... o 10 

Deer Creek " .... o 10 

Deerlick " .... o 25 

" Axe " .... o 15 

Lily white " .... o 42 

Arkansas " .. i so 



Water-of-Ayr " .... 10 

Scythe per gross 3 50 5 00 

Tacks, Brads, Etc. 
Carpet tacks, blued, 80 and 10 p.c; 
tinned, 85; (in kegs), 40; cut tacks, 
blued, in dozens only, 80 and 10; % 
weights, 60; Swedes cut tacks, blued and 
tinned, bulk, 85 and 5, in dozens, 75 
and 10; Swedes, upholsterers', bulk, 90; 
brush, blued and tinned, bulk, 70 and 
10; Swedes, gimp, blued, tinned and 
japanned, 82%; zinc tacks, 35; leather 
carpet tacks, 35; copper tacks, 45; cop- 
per nails, 50; trunk nails, black, 65 
and 10; trunk nails, tinned and blued, 
65 and 10; clout nails, blued and tinned, 
65 and 10; chair nails, 35 and 10; 
patent brads, 40 and 10; fine finishing, 
40 and 10; lining tacks, in papers, net; 
lining tacks, in bulk, 15; lining tacks, 
solid heads, in bulk, 75; saddle nails, in 
papers, 10; saddle nails, in bulk, 15; 
tufting buttons, 22 line im dozens only, 
60 ; zinc glaziers' points, 5 ; double point- 
ed tacks, papers, 90 and 10; double 
pointed tacks, bulk, 55; clinch point 
shoe rivets, 45 and 10; cheese box tacks, 
87%; trunk tacks, 80 and 28; strawberry 
box tacks, 80 and 10. 

Tape Lines. 
Universal, ass skin, N». 714. 66 ft., 

doz 3 06 

Lufkins, linen, No. 404, 66 ft., ea. 94 
steel, No. 264, 66 ft., each 3 60 
Chesterman's linen, No. 1822, 66 ft. 

each 1W 

Chesterman's MetaUie, Ne. 1821.. 1 85 

Steel, No. 1840, SO ft 

Trowels. 
Disston's, 10 per cent. 

Thermometers. 
Tin case and dairy, 75 to 75 and II p.*. 

Tinners' Snips. 
Discount 35 per cent. 

Tinners' Trimmings. 
Discount, 45 per cent. 
Plain and returned, 75 and 19%. 

Traps (Steel Game). 
Newhouse, 30 per cent. 
Hawley & Norton, 40, 10 and 5 p.*. 
Victor, 69 and 5 per cent. 
Oneida Jump (Star), 60, II and 5 p.c 
Traps (Rat and Usuh) Doz. 

Out O' Sight Mouse Traps I 10 

Rat Traps 1 26 

Easy Set Mouse 45 

" Rat 95 

Blizzard Mouse Traps 45 

Rat Traps 8 95 

Hold-Fast (formerly Devil) Mouse 

Traps 126 

Hold-Fast (formerly Devil) Rat 

Traps 80 

6-Hole Tin Chokers 80 

Vises. 

Per pound I II 12% 

Hinged pipe vise, 25 lbs 3 55 

Saw vise 4 69 6 09 

Blacksmiths', 60; parallel, 45 per cent. 
Washing Machines. 

New Ontario 4126 

Round, re-acting, per doz 81 25 

Square, re-acting, per doz 77 60 

Dowswell 62 50 

New Century, Style A 101 25 

Ideal Power 180 00 

Daisy 73 25 

Stephenson 74 00 

Puritan Motor 165 00 

Connor, improved 62 50 

Ottawa 66 00 

Connor Ball Bearing 112 60 

Connor Gearless Motor Washer... 180 00 
20 per cent. 

Wringers. 

Royal Canadian, 11 in., doz 47 75 

Eze, 10 in., per doz 46 75 

Bicycle, 11 inch 60 50 

Trojan, 12 inch 100 00 

Challenge, 3 year, 11 inch 63 25 

Ottawa, 3 year, 11 inch 58 25 

Favorite, 6 year, 11 inch 61 75 

20 per cent. 

Wheelbarrows. 

Navvy, steel wheel, dozen 21 26 

Garden, steel wheel, dozen 32 40 

Whiffletrees. 

Tubular steel whiffletrees, 28 in... 70 

34 in... 1 00 

36 in... 1 26 

" * neckyokes, 36 in.... 1 06 

" " doubletrees, 41 in.. 96 

lumbermens, 44 In.. 1 16 

Wood Handles. 

Second growth ash fork, hoe, rake and 

shovel handles, 40 per cent. 
Extra ash fork, hoe, rake and shovel 

handles, 45 per cent. 
Nos. 1 and 2 ash fork, hoe, rake and 

shovel handles, 50 per cent. 
Carriage neckyokes and whiffletrees, ash 

35, hickory, 40 per cent. 
Team neckyokes, oval and round 'whiffle- 
trees, hickory and ash, 35 per cent. 
All other ash goods, 40 per eent. 
All hickory, maple and oak goods, 35 
per cent. 

Wrenches, 
Agricultural, 67% per eent. 

Wrought Iron Washers. 
Canadian, 50 per cent* 

WINNIPEG HARDWARE 
QUOTATIONS. 

Ax Handles— Oval and octagon, s.g. 
hickory, $3.50; No. 1, $2.40; 2, $1.95; 
p.g. oak, $2.90. 

Augur Bits— "Irwin" bits, 47%; other 
lines, 70 and 10 per cent. 

Barb Wire— Lyman 4 pt„ $1.86 f.o.b. 
Fort William; $2.26 per spool of SO rods 
f.o.b. Winnipeg; Guidden 2 pt., $1.74 
f.o.b. Fort William; $2.12 per spool of 
80 rods f.o.b. Winnipeg; Baker 2 pt.. 



$1.73 f.o.b. Winnipeg; Waukegan 2 pt., 
$1.74 f.o.b. Fort William; $2.12 per spool 
f.o.b. Winnipeg; Alberta 2 pt., $1.73 
f.o.b. Fort William, $2.05 per spool 
f.o.b. Winnipeg; American special, 2 
pt., $1.45 f.o.b. Fort William; $1.73 
per spool f.o.b. Winnipeg ; plain twist. 
$2.80 f.o.b. Fort William, $3.20 per 100 
lb., f.o.b. Winnipeg; coil spring wire, 
No. 9, $2.07 per 100 lbs.. Fort William; 
$2.50 at Winnipeg. 

Bolts— Carriage, % and smaller, 66; 
7-16 and larger, 55; machine, % and 
under, 60 and 5; 7-16 and over, 55; ma- 
chine set screws, 65; plough bolts, 50; 
square and hexagon nuts, cases, 3 
small lots, 2%; stove bolts, 77%. 

Bar Iron— Bar iron, $2.50; Swedish 
iron, $4.25; sleigh shoe steel, $2.65; 
spring steel, $3.40; machinery steel. 
$3.50; tool steel. Black Diamond, 100 
lbs., $8.50; Jessop, $15. 

Blocks— Steel, 50 per cent. ; wood, 60 
per cent. 

Cut Nails— $3.15 per keg base. Wire 
nails, base, $2.80 Winnipeg; $2.35 Fort 
William. 

Copper— Sheet and planished copper. 
30c per lb. Tinned, 24c. Copper wire, 
3-inch gage, 24c to 20-inch gage, 29c. 

Crowbars— 4%c per lb. 

Corrugated Iron and Roofing, etc.— 
Corrugated iron, 28 gauge, $3.87; 26 
gauge, $4.18; pressed standing seamed 
roofing, 28, painted, $2.84; 26, $3.24. 

Canada Plates— Half-polish, 6 and 7- 
inch, $3.40; 8-inch, $3.60; full polish, 6 
and 7-inch, $4.25; 8-inch, $4.50. 

devices— 7%c per lb. 

Enamelware— Canada, 60; Imperial, 
60; Premier, 50; Colonial, 60; white, 70 
and 5; diamond, 50; granite, 60 per 
cent. 

Files— American, 75 p.c; Black Dia- 
mond, 60 p.c; Nicholson's, 65 p.c 

Galvanized iron — Apollo, 16 gauge, 
$3.80; 18. $3.85; 20, $3.90; 22 and 24, 
$4; 26, $4.29; 28. $4.60; 30 gauge or 
10% oz., $4.80; Queen's Head, 20, $4; 
24, $4.20; 26, $4.60; 28, $4.80. 

Galvanized Ware— 37% per cent 

Grindstones— Per 100 lb., $1.65. 

Horseshoes— "M.R.M." and "Bell" 
iron, No. to 1, $4.90; No. 2 and larg- 
er, $4.65; snowshoes. No. to No. 1 
$5.15; No. 2 and larger, $4.9C; steel No. 
to 1, $5.35; No. 2 and larger, $5.10; 
featherweight, $6.50. 

Horse Nails— "M.R.M." cold process 
—No. 3, $4.30; 4, $3.80; 6, $2.75; 6, 
$3.30; 7, $3.05; 8, $2.86; 9, $2.75; 10, U 
and 12, $2.65, in 25-1 b. boxes. 

Harvest Tools— 50, 5 and 5 per cent. 

Hinges— Light T and strap, 66 per 
cent. 

Hooks— Brush, heavy, per dozen, $8.76; 
grass, $1.70. 

Iron Washers— Full box, 40 per cent.; 
smaller lots, 36 per cent. 

Iron Pipe. Black— %, $2.25; %, $2.30; 
%, $3.10; %, $3.66; 1, $5.30; 1%, - 
1%, $8.60; 2, $10.90; 2%, $17.40; 3, $22.85; 
3%, $30; 4, $34.35; 4%, $38.80"; 5, $43.30; 
6, $56.10. 

Galvanized-%, $3.10; %, $3.20; %, 
$4.10; %, $4.90; 1, $7.06; 1%, $9.60; 1%, 
$11.50: 2, $14.80. 

Logging Chain— % in., $7.60; 6-16 in., 
$6; % in., $5.50. 

Lanterns— Cold blast, per dozen, $7; 
coppered, $9; dash, $9. 

Poultry Netting— 67% per cent. 

Pig Dead— $6. Lead Pipe— Full coil, 
$7.00 per cwt. ; cut coil, $8.00 per cwt. 

Lead Waste— $7.00. 

Rivets and Burrs— Iron rivets, 65 per 
cent.; copper, No. 8, 32c; 10, S4e; 12, 
36c; eopper burrs. No. 8, *4c; 10, *7c; 
12, 51c; copper rivets and burrs. No. 8, 
44c; 9, 32c; 10, 47c; coppered. No. 8, 
17c; 9, 17%c; 10, 18c. 

Rope— Sisal, 8%c; Pure Manila, 12%c; 
British Manila, 9%c; lath yam, 9c 

Staples— Bright wire, $2.50 f.o.b. Fort 
William; $2.90, Winnipeg. 

Steel Squares— 40 off new list. 

Shovels— Discounts on No. 1, No. 2, 
60 and 2% per cent.; No. 3, No. 4, 60 
and 2% per cent.; No. 1 scoops, 60 and 
6 per cent.; all other grades, 45 and 
6 per cent.; fifty cents per dozen net 
is added to equalize eastern freights. 

Solder— Half and half, $32 per cwt. 

ScrewB— Bright iron round head, 82% 
and 10 p.c; flat head, 67% and 10 
per cent. ; round head, brass, 72% and 
10 per cent.; flat head, brass, 77% and 
10 per cent.; coach, 65 per cent. 

Staples— Bright wire per cwt., $2.50 
at Fort William; $2.90, Winnipeg. 

Linseed Oil— Raw, per gal., $1.05; 
boiled, per gal., $1.08. 

Turpentine— Per gal., barrel lots, 80c 

Dry Colors— White lead in ton loo, 
decorators' pure $7.75; decorators' spe- 
cial, $7.25; in small lots advance price 25 
cents per cwt.; red lead, kegs, $6.60; 
yellow ochre, in barrel lots, 2%c; less 
than barrel lots, 3c; golden ochre, bar- 
rels, 3%c; less than barrels, 4c; Vene- 
tian red, barrel, $2.50; less than bar- 
rels, $3.00; American vermilion, 15c; 
English vermilion, $1.00 per lb.; Cana- 
dian metallic oxides, barrel lots, 3a, 
3%c; English purple oxides, in casks, 
3%c; less quantities, 4c per lb. 

Putty— Casks, $2.90 per cwt.; blad- 
ders, in barrels, $3.15; bladders, ISO-lb. 
cases, $3.40. 

Paris Green— 22 cents per 112-lb. 

Paris Green— 21% cents per 112-lb. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



RESULTS 

Count more than does 
LOUD TALK 



DEALERS who handle 



JAMIESON'S 




PURE 

PREPARED PAINTS 

AND VARNISHES 



Brands : 

CROWN AND ANCHOR 

ISLAND CITY 

RAINBOW 



GET AS RESULTS:— 

Satisfied Customers. 
Satisfactory Profits. 
A Satisfactory reputation. 

For they have our rep- 
utation of over fifty years 
standing behind them. 

Why not get the benefit ? 



R. G. Jamieson & Co., 

Limited 

ESTABLISHED 1858 
Owning and Operating 

P. D. Dods & Co., Limited 
Montreal and Vancouver 




Pure Ready Mixed 

PAINT 

Will Enable You To 

Procure Many New Paint 

Customers 

This trade-winning paint 
is made from pigments 
which are purchased in' 
the best market in the world, and com- 
bining them with Pure Manitoba Lin- 
seed Oil, using the latest and most up- 
to-date mills and mixers, we are enabled to turn out a 
class of paints that cannot be equalled by any other house 
in Canada. 

This Paint successfully withstands all Western Climatic 
Changes. Its durability is far from being equalled. 

Be an agent for this paint — it pays big profits. Sold under 
written guarantee. 

Write at once for full information. 

G. F. STEPHENS & CO. 

WINNIPEG, 




LIMITED 



CANADA 



Branch at Calgary, Alta. 



MURESCO 

30,000,000 POUNDS SOLD IN 1911 

WHY? 



BECAUSE 



It covers more surface and covers it better with 
one coat than any other similar material on the 
market. 

Of the nature of its ingredients it is highly sanitary. 

It does not rub off, crack, peel, blister or show laps 
when properly applied. 

It is so easily applied. 

Every lot manufactured is carefully tested before 
shipping. 



Send for Color Cards and Literature. 

Benjamin Moore & Co., Limited 



TORONTO 



NEW YORK 



CLEVELAND 



CHICAGO 



61 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Condensed or "Want" Advertisements 



Those who wish to sell or buy businesses or stocks, obtain 
competent help, connect with satisfactory positions or secure 
aid in starting new enterprises, should not fail to use the 
Want Ad. Advertisement Page of HARDWARE AND METAL. 

It is the central market place of the hardware trade 
throughout Canada. 



There is always someone somewhere looking for just 
such proposition as you have to offer. 

RATES (payable in advance : — 

2c. per word first insertion. 

lc. per word subsequent insertion. 

Sc. additional each insertion when Box Number is required 



ARTICLES FOR SALE 



COMPLETE SET TINSMITH'S TOOLS — 
cost over $250. Will sacrifice for $135. List 
on application. McBrieu's Hardware, Bloor 
West, Toronto. (32) 



BUSINESS CHANCES 

FIRST-CLASS HARDWARE BUSINESS FOR 
sale — on C.P.R. main line, Eastern Alberta. 
Stock $8,000.00. Yearly profits $6,000.00 to 
$7,000.00. Apply Box 1661, Saskatoon, Sask. 
(35l 

SPLENDID WHOLESALE AND RETAIL 
business for sale, in one of the finest dis- 
tricts of Western Canada. Write for par- 
ticulars. H. H. Pigott & Co., Ltd., Winnipeg, 
Canada. (35) 

OLD ESTABLISHED HARDWARE, STOVES 
and plumbing in Eastern Ontario city; steady 
increase of sales at good prices; business al- 
ways showing a good return on investment; 
exceptional opportunity, stock being particu- 
larly well bought. Box 693, Hardware and 
Metal. 

THRIVING HARDWARE BUSINESS FOR 
•ale, consisting of shelf and heavy hardware, 
stoves, etc. Located in central part of On- 
tario; three railroads; turnover $50,000; stock 
$10,000, which is being reduced. Excellent 
chance to buy at rate on dollar. Retiring 
♦torn business. Box 618, Hardware and Metal, 
Toronto. (52tf) 

FOR SALE.— A. 1 HARDWARE BUSINESS 
in good Manitoba town on two lines of rail- 
way. Stock $7,000. Terms to suit. Good reas- 
on for selling. Apply to Box 692, Hardware 
and Metal. (32) 

FOR SALE 1 NO. 282 W. PEASE HOT 
Water Boiler in good condition ; used two 
seasons, $90.00 f.o.b. Berlin. P. Hymmen Co., 
Ltd., Berlin, Ont. (34) 

H. H. PIGOTT & CO., LTD., BUSINESS 
Brokers and Financial Agents, 286 Bannatyne 
Ave., Winnipeg, Man. Businesses bought, sold 
and traded. Locating advice free. Many 
years in wholesale trade give us practical 
knowledge and strongest connections. 

HARDWARE AND FURNITURE— IN SAS- 
katchewan, on Outlook extension. Stock $5,- 
000; store $3,600: $3,600 cash and balance ar- 
ranged with wholesalers. Railway service 
just started, and business is increasing very 
rapidly. Profits should run from $3,000 to 
$5,000. H. H. Pigott & Co., Ltd. 

HARDWARE— IN SASKATCHEWAN — ON 
main line of C.N.R. Stock $5,000; turnover 
$22,000. Sales this year $3,000 ahead of last. 
Owner wants $3,000 cash, and will arrange 
balance on easy terms. H. H. Pigott & Co., 
Ltd. 

HARDWARE — IN MINING TOWN IN 
Southern Alberta. Stock $3,500. Sales aver- 
age about $1,400 monthly; can be largely in- 
creased. Can rent store for $30 month. Light 
competition. H. H. Pigott & Co., Ltd. 

HARDWARE AND IMPLEMENTS — ON 
main line of G.T.P., in Saskatchewan. Stock, 
hardware $3,000, implements $2,500. Terms, 
one-half cash on hardware, $1,000 on imple- 
ments; balance easy. H. H. Pigott & Co., 
Ltd. 

HARDWARE— $2,500 cash, with monthly pay- 
ments for balnace, will handle a $4,000 stock 
in Saskatchewan town of 400. Store can be 
leased for $25 per month. Business will pay 
at least $2,000 over expenses. H. H. Pigott 
& Co., Ltd. 

WRITE US IF YOU WANT TO BUY OR 
sell. Our booklet, "Business Opportunities 
and Investments in Western Canada," will 
interest you. H. H. Pigott & Co., Ltd., Win- 
nipeg, Man. (32) 



SITUATIONS VACANT 



WANTED— TINSMITH WITH AT LEAST 3 
years' experience. Apply, stating wages, T. 
Young & Son, Hanover, Ont. (32) 

WANTED— GOOD ALL ROUND TINSMITH, 
will hire or give the tinshop on a percentage. 
State experience, wages expected, married or 
single. Steady job to the right man. A. 
M. Carscadden, Fort Saskatchewan, Alberta. 
(33) 

WANTED— A RELIABLE, AMBITIOUS MAN 
in every town to look after the entire circu- 
lation of our thirteen publications. Work 
very remunerative. Mac-Lean Publishing Com- 
pany, 143-149 University Ave., Toronto, Ont. 
(tf) 

WANTED — FIRST - CLASS HARDWARE 
clerk for retail hardware store; must be good 
salesman, good stock keeper, one well up on 
builders' hardware. State experience, wages 
expected, married or single. Steady job to 
the right man. Address in own handwriting, 
J. B. Kernaghan, Prince Albert, Sask. (32) 



SITUATIONS W ANTED 

TRAVELLER HAVING PROVED HIS ABIL- 
ity by greatly increasing his firm's business) 
in the territory covered and being an aggres- 
sive salesman wishes to secure a position with 
manufacturing concern. Box 668. Hardware 
and Metal. Toronto. 18— 21t 



TECHNICAL BOOKS 

HINTS FOR PAINTERS, DECORATORS, 
and paperhangers^Practical and useful hook 
treating on the preparation of surfaces, ma- 
terials used, mixed paints, operations, taste 
in color, graining, paperhanging, estimating 
cost of work, useful recipes, etc. Price 15 
cents postpaid, or two sets for 25c while thev 
last. MacLean Publishing Co., Technical Book 
Dept.. 143-149 University Ave.. Toronto. 



MISCELLANEOUS 

ADDING TYPEWRITERS WRITE, ADD OR 
subtract in one operation. Elliott Fisher, 
Limited, Room 314, Stair Building, Toronto. 

COPELAND - CHATTERSON SYSTEMS — 
Short, simple. Adapted to all classes of busi- 
ness. Copeland-Chatterson Co., Ltd., Toronto 
and Ottawa. (tf) 

DOUBLE YOUR FLOOR SPACE— BY IN- 
stalling an Otis-Fensom hand-power elevator 
you can use upper floors as stock room or 
extra selling space, and increase space on 
ground floor. Costs only $70. Write for cata- 
logue "B," Otis-Fensom Elevator Co., Traders 
Bank Building, Toronto. 

FIRE INSURANCE — INSURE IN THE 
Hartford. Agencies everywhere in Canada. 

THE NATIONAL CASH REGISTER COM- 
pany guarantee to sell a better register for 
less money than any other house on earth. 
We can prove it. Make us. The National 
Cash Register Co., 285 Yonge Street, Toronto. 

WAREHOUSE AND FACTORY HEATING 
systems. Taylor-Forbes Company, Limited. 
Supplied by the trade throughout Canada. 

(tf) 

YOU CAN 

from us. 
writers of 
built and 
and $20.00 
of better 
Write for 
Co., Ltd., 
Canada. 



BUY A REBUILT TYPEWRITER 
We have about seventy-five type- 
various makes, which we have re- 
which we will sell at $10.00, $15.(in 
each. We have also a large stock 
rebuilts at slightly higher figures, 
details. The Monarch Typewriter 
46 Adelaide St. West, Toronto, 
(tf) 



AGENT WANTED 



IMPORTANT BRITISH COMPANY MANU- 
facturing high grade protective paints, enam- 
els, varnishes and coatings, contractors to 
British Admiralty, and leading shipbuilders 
and engineers, desire to be represented in 
the Dominion. Director will be in Canada 
about September, and could interview persons 
or companies who might do business or take 
up agencies. Apply XX, care of Hardware 
& Metal, Montreal. (35) 



PRICE TICKETS 



PRICB TICKETS FOR WINDOW SHOW 
goods. Black lettering on white card marked 
25c, Mc, T5c, $1, $1.25, $1.M, $1.75, $2, $2.5», $S, 
$*.5t, $5. Dossn In set, per set 25 cents post- 
paid. Technical Book Dept, 143 University 
Avenue, Toronto. (tf> 



Interested ? 



In Buying a Business 

In Selling a Business 

In Engaging a Clerk 

In Securing a Position 

In Buying a Typewriter 

In Selling a Showcase 

In Disposing of a Desk 

In Selling Tinsmith's Tools 

In Securing Shelf Boxes 

Then Use 

A Hardware and Metal Want Ad. 

It should find for you among 
the thousands of Canadian 
hardwaremen AT LEAST 
ONE individual who is vitally 
interested in your proposition. 

HARDWARE AND METAL reaches the 
retailer, the wholesaler, the manufac- 
turer, the clerk and the traveller, the 
men to whom you wish to sell or from 
whom you would buy, 

No Other Paper Reaches 
All These Men 

RATES: 
(PAYABLE IN ADVANCE) 
2c. per word, first insertion, 
lc. per word subsequent insertion, 
5c. extra per insertion for box number 
if desired. 

Hardware and Metal 

MONTREAL TORONTO WINNIPEG 



When writing advertisers kindly 
mention having seen the adver- 
tisement in Hardware and Metal. 



62 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Merchants 

and 

Salesmen ! 



Would you be willing to pay 
$2.00 to hear some of the lead- 
ing authorities on salesmanship 
express their opinions on this 
all-important subject? In 

BRAIN-POWER BUSINESS 
MANUAL 

125 Presidents, Vice-Presi- 
dents, General Managers, Sales 
Managers and Star Result Get- 
ters, have contributed of their 
knowledge and experience on 
such phases of the subject as: — 
The Selling Profession. 
Education and Training. 
Before the Interview. 
Getting Interviews. 
The Approach. 
Selling Talk. 
Answering Objections. 
Selling Tactics. 
Closing Sales. 
Cash with Order. 
Samples. 

Getting the Price. 
Credits and Terms. 
Cancelled Orders. 
Territory. 

Long vs. Short Trips. 
Finding New Customers. 
Salesmen's Relation to House. 
Salesmen and Advertising. 
Expense Accounts. 
Promotions. 
Bribes. 

Conduct Toward Customer. 
Special Tactics. 
Character and Conduct. 
183 pages, 5% x 8% inches. 

PRICE $2.00 

TECHNICAL BOOKS. 

143-149 University Ave. 

TORONTO 



i "RUSSWIN" 

BUILDERS 1 HARDWARE 

We are jobbing agents for the famous "RUSSWIN" 
line of builders' hardware. Our stock contains the lat- 
est and most artistic designs on the market to-day. By- 
selling "RUSSWIN" LOCK SETS you will be in the 
best position to get the CONTRACTORS' business in 
your town. 

COAL CHUTES 

Agents for Manitoba and Saskatchewan for the DOWN 
DRAFT COAL CHUTE. A large stock always on 
hand. 




WINNIPEG 



EDMONTON 




New Era Paint 

IS AN EXCELLENT 
STOCK PAINT 

It stays in condition and when sold gives 
greater satisfaction than others. 

Its surface-covering qualities are above the aver- 
ige and it wears splendidly. 

The result is a steady and increasing demand for 
New Era Paints, which it will pay you to supply. 



STANDARD PAINT & VARNISH CO., LTD. 

WINDSOR, ONT. 



Queen City Water White 

GVES FER1XCT LIGHT 

FOR SALE BY DEALERS EVERYWHERE 




63 



HARDWARE AND METAL 




Can of 

Ramsay's Paints 

is the best trade clincher and satisfaction producer that you 
could use on a steady or a prospective paint customer. This 
is true because of the exceptional quality of the argument 
found in every can — the paint itself. Make your first sale 
of Ramsay's Paints and the paint will make all the rest to 
that customer. 



Why not " fix it " so as to always be 
ready with the right can of "The Right 
Paint to Paint Right." 

let's talk about a stock. 

A. Ramsay & Son Co. 

MONTREAL 

Paint Makers Since '42, 

WESTERN DISTRIBUTORS: 

Revillon Wholesale. Limited. Edmont<--, 
A. McBride & Co.. Limited. Calgary. 
R. Begg & Co , Limited, Vancouver. 



oe 




Our 
Leaded 
Art Glass 
isofthehighest 
grade manufact- 
ured. Being the larg- 
est manufacturers of 
this line in Canada we can 
also give you the low 
est price consist- 
ent with high 
quality 



GLASS 



of Every Description 
for 
uildings 




HOBBS 

MANUFACTURING CO 



If you 
have not al- 
ready received 
a copy of our 132 
page catalogues we 
would be pleased 
to send one. 



LIMITED 



OFFICES AND FACTORIES 

London Toronto Winnipeg Montreal 



64 



HARDWARE AND METAL 




Here is the ideal 
varnish for the 
dealer to sell. 



There is a general demand for a good general 
purpose varnish that embodies what is best in 
varnish and yet is not too high in price. It is 
just this particular need that we had in mind 
when we perfected and brouhgt out 

SUN VARNISH 

For Inside and Outside Use 



It is a clear, bright, hard varnish, made of Copal Gum, just the thing 
for use on wagons, agricultural implements, store fronts, doors, porch 
ceilings, boats. Inside it can be used for woodwork, furniture, bath- 
rooms, etc. For the floors use Sun Waterproof Floor Varnish. 



THE CANADA PAINT CO., Limited 

Paint, Varnish and Dry Color Makers, Linseed Oil Crushers 

Factories and Offices — Montreal, Toronto, Winnipeg. Oxide Mines — Red Mill, P.Q. 



65 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Books for the Metal Workers 

Any of the following books sent prepaid on receipt of price 

WRITE FOR CATALOGUE 



THE NEW METAL WORKER PATTERN BOOK 

A treatise on pattern cutting as applied to all 
branches of sheet metal work. By George W. Kit- 
tredge. 430 pages; 744 illustrations ; size 10x13 
inches. Cloth bound. Price $5.00. 

ART OF COPPERSMITHING. 

A practical treatise on working sheet copper into 
all forms. By John Fuller, Sr. 327 pages; 474 
engravings; size 10 x 6$ in. Cloth bound. Price 
|3.00. 

SHEET METAL WORK. 

A manual of practical self-instruction in the art of 
pattern drafting and construction work in light and 
heavy-gauge metal, including sky-lights and roofing, 
cornice work, etc. By Wm. Neubeeker. 267 pages; 
358 illustrations; 6} x 9} inches. Half -Morocco 
binding. Pries $ 3.00. 

A PRACTICAL WORKSHOP COMPANION. 

For tin, sheet iron and copper plate workers. By 
LeRoy J. Blinn. 296 pages; 170 figures. Size 5 x 
7i inches. Price $2.50. 

SHEET METAL WORKERS' INSTRUCTION. 

3y Joseph H. Rose. 300 pages. Profusely illus- 
rated. Price $2.00. 

THE ROOFING, CORNICE & SKYLIGHT MANUAL. 

175 pages; 170 illustrations and 13 plates; size, 6 
x 9J inches. Cloth bound. Price $1.50. 

BAUGHMAN'S BUYER & SELLER COST TABLES. 

A cost book for everybody having cost to figure by 
the piece, pound, foot or ton, from 2£c per hundred 
to $ a hundred. Leather bound. Price $1.50. 

TINSMITHS' HELPER & PATTERN BOOK. 

With useful rules, diagrams and tables. By H. K. 
Vosburgh. A new revised edition; 120 pages; 53 
figures; size 4i x 6| inches. Cloth bound. Price 

41.00. 



TWENTIETH CENTURY SHEET METAL WORKER. 
By H. E. Osborne. Gives short, concise explan- 
ations which should be easily understood by title young 
apprentice, and are sufficiently scientific for the prac- 
tical use of the journeyman. 86 pages; size 5i x 
7}; illustrated. Cloth bound; Price $1.00. Paper 
Cover; Price 60c. 

PRACTICAL METAL PLATE WORK. 

By Paul N. Hasluck. 247 illustrations; 160 pages. 
Price 75c. 

TREATISE ON THE GEOMETRICAL DEVELOPMENT 
OF ROUND AND OVAL CONES. 

With easy examples of their application. For the 
use of beginners and practical sheet-iron and tin- 
plate workers. By John Fuller, Sr. 52 pages; 87 
figures; size 4J x 6J inches. Cloth bound. Price 
75c. 

MENSURATION FOR SHEET METAL WORKERS. 

As applied in working ordinary problems in shop 
practice. By W. Neubeeker. 51 pages; 70 figures; 
51 x 7| inches. Cloth bound. Price 50c. 

TABLES GIVING THE LENGTH OF BARS FOR SKY- 
LIGHTS, AND RAFTERS FOR ROOFS. 

84 pages; bond paper; handy pocket size. Cloth 
bound. Price 50c. 

THE METAL WORKER SHOP CARDS. 

Made of Manila Board; 11 x 14 inches; eyeletted 
for hanging up in the shop. No. 1. — Table of the 
quantity of tin required for roofs. No. 2. — Table 
of the diameters, areas and circumferences of circles. 
Price 25 cents each. 

EASY LESSONS IN ROOF MEASUREMENTS. 

By W. Neubeeker. Twelve lessons on figuring the 
amount of material required to cover a given sur- 
face in flat, hipped or irregular shaped roofs. 31 
pages, 5% x 8 inches; 12 illustrations. Paper cover. 
Price 25c. 

HOUSE CHIMNEYS. 

A series of articles on chimney tiuubles and their 
remedies. 62 pages; 5\ x 8inches; 40 illustrations. 
Paper cover. Price 25c. 



MACLEAN PUBLISHING COMPANY 

TECHNICAL BOOK DEPARTMENT 
143-149 University Avenue - TORONTO, ONT. 



66 



HARDWARE AND METAL 




XbePh 



Paint Store Mevn 




ofttje 



"If you would succeed you 
"Quality" and "Profit" trip 
They get profit too high, 
der what was wrong 



MARTIN 
SENOUR 



is a real business insur 
a reasonable profit will 
The dealers who know say so. 
and our proposition to insure your 




must mind your Ps and Qs." 

up too many business men. 

quality too low, and won- 

when the crash comes. 



| PAINT 

b 00%P(JRE 



ance. Its quality and 
make your business boom. 
Write today for the proof 
business the same way. 



THE MARTIN-SENOUR CO., Limited 



MONTREAL 



Pioneers of Pure Paints 
CHICAGO WINNIPEG 



LINCOLN 



The Dougall 

Varnish 

Company, 

Limited 

J. S. N. DOUGALL, President 

305 Manufacturers Street, 
Montreal, Canada 



Associated with MURPHY VARNISH CO., U.S.A 




HARDWARE AND METAL 



Battery Users 
in the West 

have learned to rely upon 
X CELL Dry Batteries for vital- 
ity, long life and great recuper- 
ative powers. Being made in 
the West, they reach custom- 
ers much fresher than imported 
or Eastern-made cells. 

X CELL 

Dry Batteries 

will please your trade. Our No. 8 has become the 
standard all over Western Canada for engine work 
and heavy duty. Handle a battery that is well 
made, well advertised and well liked. 

LET US PUT YOU IN TOUCH 
♦WITH THE NEAREST JOBBER 

Canadian Carbon Company 

OF WINNIPEG, LIMITED 

Bury and Irish Ave., - - Winnipeg 

E. W. HANNA, President and Managing Director 




"ATLAS" BRAND 

BLUE BACK EMERY CLOTH 
SAND OR FLINT PAPER 

GARNET PAPER in Reams or Rolls 
EMERY in ten pound packages 

"FLORA" KNIFE POLISH J^.. 

The leaders in this line. 

Already introduced and known to the trade. 

Good Goods and Good Profits. 

Samples for the asking. 

The London Emery Works Co. 

LONDON, ENG. 

Canadian Representative:- 

W. FRANK MURPHY 

55 St. Francois Xavier St. - Montreal, Can. 



FROM STOCK 




Only 20 lbs. Pressure Required 

The 

Supreme Test 

The supreme test of a Washer's worth 
is the way the Washer washes. Try it 
out with the Dirty Shirt test. Take an un- 
usually dirty but originally white shirt, 
run it through the Portland Water Power 
Washer, and you'll find that the shirt itself 
is not only perfectly clean (provided, of 
course, that the dirtiness of the shirt isn't 
due to paints, etc.), but that the neck and 
wrist bands too are spotless. 

The Portland is a trouble-less washer — 
it relieves all washer worries. 

Made complete in our own factories — 
washer, motor, and furniture finished tub. 

If you're looking for a quality washer 
that's really worth while get after your 
hardware jobber, or write direct to us. 

HENDERSON & RICHARDSON 

Formerly J. A. HENDERSON 
Board of Trade Building, MONTREAL 

SOLE CANADIAN AGENTS FOR 

PORTLAND MFG. CO., - Portland, Mich. 

The Largest Manufacturers of Washing Machines 
in the World 



68 



H A R D W A RE AND MET A L 




HIGHEST IN PUBLIC FAVOR 

A quarter of a century of favorable 
service has made 

"BANNER" BURNERS 



the recognized standard of excellence. 

Many burners with so-called improve- 
ments are a positive menace to their 
users. 

Can you afford to be identified with 
these? Your stove is judged by what 
you sell. Banner Burners ensure safety 
and satisfaction to your customer, and 
a good profit to you. 



LOOK FOR THE COVERED RASE 

A sure prevention from fire arising 
from the oil-soaked collection of dead 
insects, charred wick ends, etc., found 
in other burners. 



SOLD UNIVERSALLY AND BY ALL JOBBERS 



Ontario Lantern & Lamp Co., Limited 



HAMILTON, 

MONTREAL. P.O. 
30 St. Dlzier St. 



BRANCHES: 



ONTARIO 

WINNIPEG, MAN. 
56 Albert St. 




. 



QUALITY 

The word that explains the 
popularity of 

INTERNATIONAL 

VARNISHES AND VARNISH SPECIALTIES 

Regularly specified by architects 
and employed by the most dis- 
criminating consumers in Canada. 

Those best able to judge pronounce 
International Products UNAP- 
PROACHABLE IN QUALITY. 

Is anything else but the best good 
enough for you to feature ? 

Why not enhance your reputation 
and profit by handling the Inter- 
national Line? 

Sold only in Cans containing Full 
Imperial Measure. 




TORONTO 



WINNIPEG 



Canadian Factory of Standard Varnish Works. 

NEW YORK CHICAGO LONDON 

BERLIN BRUSSELS MELBOURNE 

Largest in the world and first to establish definite 
standards of quality. 

N-12 



69 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Friedr. Baurmann & Sons, Solingen, Germany 

Manufacturers of High Grade Razors and Safety Razors 




fit 



DWARF" brand RAZORS 




Will bring you satisfied customers. Made of the best 

English Crucible Steel — guaranteed hand forged and hand 
ground — very carefully tempered by special secret 
process ensuring highest results. 
Write for our catalogue. 

Canadian Agents : 

Hupfeld Ludecking & Co. 

Montreal, - Box 1076 




"ONE MINUTE" Washers and Wringers 



Imitated in Construction — Unequalled in Quality 

This machine will increase your washer profits. It 
contains all the qualities that are essential to make 
it the most satisfactory to both dealer and user. 

Communicate with us NOW and get full particulars— it will pay you 

ONE MINUTE WASHER CO., TORONTO 

MacKENZIE BROS., Winnipeg, Man., Sask. and Alberta 
CANADA STOVE AND FURNITURE CO., Montreal 



STANDARD CHAIN COMPANY 




COIL, RAILROAD, LOGGING, DREDGE, STEAM SHOVEL, WAGGON and 

BRIGHT CHAIN of all kinds. 
EVERYTHING IN WELDED CHAIN. 
Write for prices Prompt shipment. 

ELECTRIC WELDED TRACES A SPECIALTY 

Selling Agents: ALEXANDER GIBB, St. Nicholas Building, MONTREAL 




SS. E MORRIS & BAILEY STEEL CO. 

PITTSBURG, PA. 

Manufacturers of 

COLD ROLLED STRIP STEEL 

For Deep Drawing, Blanking, Forming, all kinds of Bending. Has Bright Finish 
for Nickel Plating, Rolled accurate to Gauge. Made in all tempers and in any 
thickness from .002" to .250. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 




MAPLE CITY 
OILERS 



-Q— 0- 



No. 600 A A 
Wide Mouth 



We manufacture the 
most complete line of 
oilers made in America, 
including Pump, Engin- 
eers', Machinists', Mow- 
ing Machine and Rail- 
road Oilers, Tallow Pots, 
Engineer Sets, Torches, 
Lamps, etc. 



MAPLE CITY MFG. CO. 

MONMOUTH, ILLINOIS, U.S.A. 



There Will Be A Large Demand 
For the 

CORONA ROASTER 

After Once Introduced 




This is a roaster that has become indispensable in 
thousands of homes. 

It is very attractive, and is sure to find ready buy- 
ers in your vicinity. 

A double air jacket, yet all of one piece of steel. 
The hard, glossy enamel is as easily kept clean as a 
dinner plate. Has no seams to cause trouble, or 
creases to make it hard to clean. 

Absolutely guaranteed and backed by our long re- 
tained reputation for high quality. 
Write us for catalogue and full particulars. 

The Enterprise Enamel Co. 

BELLAIRE, OHIO 



THE 4 CARDINAL 
VIRTUES OF THE 
FOX FLOOR SCRA- 
PING MACHINE 

1. Simple of Construction. 

2. Easy to Operate. 

3. Leaves a Perfect Finish. 

4. Inexpensive. 

Every Fox Scraper is guaranteed 
to do perfect work. 

Manufactured by 

FOX SUPPLY 

112 King Street 
BROOKLYN, WIS. 



m. 




THE FOX FLOOR SCRAPER IS SOLD BY:— 



The E. Cavanagh Co. 

Ltd. 

Montreal 

Durand Hardware Co. 
Montreal 



The James Walker Hardware 
Co., Ltd. 
Montreal 

Frothingham & Workman, Ltd. 
Montreal 



Prompt deliveries will be made. 
Write for Catalogue and Prices. 



NATIONAL 



Steel Rim Locks 




have, through their past service, 
proved that they are the easiest 
operated, most durable, and abso- 
lutely the safest on the market. 

They cannot get out of order, as 
they are extremely simple and 
extra strong where strength is 
most needed. 



=/>. 



If you do not know 
the National Lock, 
get acquainted, as 
it means more 
money for YOU. 

Order from your 
jobber. 

National Hardware 

Company. Ltd. 

0RILL1A ONTARIO, CANADA 




71 



HARDWARE AND METAL 




GOODS THAT LAST 

WHEN YOU ARE IN THE MARKET FOR 

Wire Cloth 

Perforated Sheet Metals 
General Wire and Iron Work 

Consult us. We have goods that 
have a clean record, ensuring the 
buyer his money's worth and the 
dealer a good profit. 



Do not hesitate about 
sending us your order or 
specify our goods when 
ordering throughj your 
Jobber. 

Have you a copy of our 
new catalogue ? 

Canada Wire and Iron Goods Company 

HAMILTON, ONT. 

We Specialise in all kinds of Steel Cells. Steel 'Work. Etc., for Prisons. 
Jails and City Lockups. 




"Where Quality Counts" 

Our Up-to-date 
Restaurant Urns 




The quality and attrac- 
tiveness of our URNS 
have put them in the fore- 
most places in the finest 
Restaurants and Hotels in 
the country. 

They are guaranteed to 
be satisfactory and bring 
the best results. 

Our URNS are not ex- 
pensive — you will have a 
quick seller and a reason- 
able profit. 

Write for our proposition. 

THE 

BUFFALO MFG. 

COMPANY 

Buffalo, N.Y. 

Canadian Representatives : 

H. F. Mcintosh & Co., 
28 Toronto St., Toronto 



Ent h usi asm 



To sell goods and make profit 
you must develop this quality. 
Home made goods always did 
make you feel that way. That 
is why so many hardwaremen 
throughout 'Western Canada are 
selling our 

METAL CEILINGS, SHINGLES, 
SIDINGS AND CORRUGATED IRON 

and making nice profits. 

They have'seen them made. They 

know they are right. They can 

get them in a hurry. 

All these things will be at your 

service when you hook up with us. 

WRITE TO-DAY. 

Winnipeg Ceiling and Roofing Co. 



P.O. Box 2186 H. 



Winnipeg, Man. 



More-Profit Pumps 
—Real Profit 

No use to sell a pump that makes 
trouble for a dealer with his customer. 

The trouble is remembered. The cost 
of repairs is dead loss 
of time and temper. 
The dealer suffers. 

" Aremacdee" 
hand and motor 
metal pumps for 
force or lift use, 
every kind, are 
shown in the big 
catalogue. 

Dealers, ask for prices and terms. 
Get real profits on your metal pump 
sales. 

The R. McDOUGALL GO,, Limited 

CALT, CANADA 




72 



HARDWARE AND METAL 




ON DON BAR IRON 



is the best line of bar iron 
that money can buy. It pos- 
sesses a uniformity of tex- 
ture, toughness, and easy 
workability that means per- 
fect satisfaction both to you 
and to your customers. And 
the price is as low as we can 
make it without sacrificing 
anything of its quality. 



London Rolling Mill Co., Ltd. 

LONDON CANADA 

SALES AGENTS 
Ontario — Baines & Peckover, Toronto 
Manitoba — Bissett & Loucks, Limited, Winnipeg 




r 




K.. 



Show your Cus- 
tomers This Up- 
to-Date Bit Ex- 
tension 

The Ford Bit Exten- 
sion is not to be class- 
ed with the ordinary 
Extension ■ — Clumsy, 
hard to work and in 
general unsatisfactory. The 
Ford is a model of simplic- 
ity — simple in construction, 
simple to adjust and simple 
to use. It embodies the 
best points of other makes, 
and has several exclusive 
features that make it paramount. 
No other Bit Extension contains 
so many practical features. No 
other can do the work so easily 
nor as well as the Ford and 

No other is as easy 
for you to sell 

For the Ford has more selling 
points than any other Extension 
and each Ford feature affords a 
convincing selling argument. You 
can hand a man a Ford and tell 
him positively and convincingly 
that no other extension equals 
the Ford in simplicity of con- 
struction, number of practical 
advantages, facility of operation, 
time and labor saving features, 
convenience, wearing qualities, 
and in the ultimate satisfaction 
desired through better results. 
The Ford comes to you highly 
recommended, fully guaranteed, 
and with a steadily increasing 
demand. We have an excellent 
.proposition. Will you write for 
circulars, prices, etc? 

FORD AUGER BIT CO. 

Holyoke, Mass. 



NICKEL 

The Canadian Cupper Co, 

NICKEL FOR 
NICKEL STEEL 

The Orford Copper Cn. 



WRITE US FOR 
PARTICULARS AND PRICES 



General Offices 

43 EXCHANGE PLACE 

NEW YORK CITY 




Trade 



Buy 



The ^1 
White" 
Mop 
Wringer 




WHITE MOP 
WRINGER CO. 

FULTONVILLE, 
N.Y. 




OAKEY'S 

The original and only 
Genuine Preparation 
for Cleaning Cutlery, 
6d. and is. Canisters. 

'WELLINGTON' 

KNIFE POLISH 

JOHN OAKEY & SONS, Limited 

Manufacturerm of 

Emery, Black Lead, Emery, Glass 
and Flint Cloths and Papers, etc. 

Wellington Mills, London, England 




HARDWARE AND METAL 



The McGlashan, Clarke 12 Dwt. K/l/veS 




ate made of the best Crucible Steel, finished by methods devel- 
oped during years of successful manufacture, plate with 12 dwts, 
pure silver, put up in neat Rack Boxes containing one-half dozen. Every box contains our guarantee. 

The McGlashan, Clarke Co., Ltd., Niagara Falls, Canada 

Winnipeg. Man. 



AGENTS 



J. Mackay Rose. 88 McGill St., Montreal. Que. N. F. Gundy, 61 Albert St.. Toronto, Ont. David Philip, 291 Portage Ave. 
Benj. Rogers. Charlottelown, P.E.I. 



Dealers! 



HERE'S YOUR CH ANCE 
TO MAKE A SPLASH. 



This Mantel or any of our "70" different designs, fitted with our Electric Grate 
requires no chimney, therefore anyone building a house can have a Mantel 
complete for less than the actual cost of a chimney. 

Write for the "dope" — Your contractors will fall for it. 
Don't forget — We have the best line of Gas and Coal Grates in the country. 

The Barton Netting Company, Limited 

38 Ouelette Avenue, Windsor, Ont. 

Our Motto -"QUALITY" 




<t 



TMCRMO 

The Washer 



Easy to Sell 




That makes the Washday Bright 

Its improved motion absolutely elim- 
inates washday drudgery caused by 
hard working ma- 
chinery. It is the 
easiest washer to op- 
erate and washes 
clothes thoroughly iu 
shortest time. 
The Thermo Washer 
is built to last and is 
solid and substantial. 
Working parts are 
simple and cannot 
get out of order. 
Thermo Washers are 
attractively designed 
and well finished and 
find ready buyers 
everywhere. 
Before restocking 
your washer depart- 
ment get full descrip- 
tive matter and 
prices. 

Drop us a card NOW. 



THE LONDON FOUNDRY CO., LTD., ££K 

F. J. Schuch (Western Ontario Agent), 19 Jarvis Street, Toronto: 
MacPherson & Teetzel, Vancouver, B.C. (British Columbia Agents.) 



FIX UP YOUR CHIMNEYS 



Even the best stove or furnace will be unsatisfactory if the 
chimney does not draw well. But the 



"Zephyr Ventilator 



ff 



will give a good draft to any chimney. It will even allow the 
burning of soft coal in the stove, with good results. 

We want you to sell the "Zephyr 
Ventilator" in your town. There is 
money in it, and the satisfaction that 
it gives will bring you new custom- 
ers. The "Zephyr" cannot be 
excelled for ventilating the rooms 
of Clubs, Steam Laundries, etc. 
The "Zephyr" makes high chim- 
neys unnecessary. 

Brockville, Ont., Jan. 23rd, 1910. 
Messrs. J. W. Harris Mfg. Co., Ltd., 

129 Sanguinet St., Montreal. 
Dear Sirs : 

Enclosed you will find my cheque 
to cover account of the last of the 
many of your "J. W. Harris Rotary 
Ventilators," which I have installed 
here, and I have much pleasure In 
saying that in every case they have 
given perfect satisfaction. 
Yours truly, 

W. H. HARRISON. 

Made by 

The J. W. Harris Mfg. Co., Ltd. 

Contractors 

Montreal 




74 



HARDWARE AND METAL 




"OAKVILLE" PURE ALUMINIUM 
COOKING UTENSILS 

Each article made from a single piece of Aluminium. No cracks or seams, will not scorch 
or burn. Heat passes through aluminium two or three times as fast as through tin or 
iron, cooking food more quickly. Highly polished finish, making excellent displays on 
shelves or windows. Their fine appearance, hacked by their finer quality, make them 
quick sellers. 

Our Guarantee — If the goods are not satisfactory, return them at our expense and -we will return your money, or credit your account. 

WRITE FOR TERMS AND FULL PARTICULARS. PROMPT SHIPMENT. 

THE WARE MFG. CO., LIMITED, Offices: 220 King St. W., Toronto Factory at Oakville, Ont. 



■WILL OUTWEAR ANY WARE" 




We have the finest machinery and every facility for producing best 
quality 

WIRE NAILS AND STAPLES 

These nails have perfect heads and points, and we have taken spe- 
cial care in the drawing to obtain a regular gauge. Every keg is 
guaranteed to be full weight. 

We also recommend our WIRE BALE TIES, and and A WIRE 
as the best on the market. 

Write at once for prices and full particulars. 

THE LAIDLAW-BALE TIE CO., LIMITED - HAMILTON 



GEO. W. LAIDLAW, Vancouver, B.C. 



HARRY F. MOULDEN. Winnipeg, Man. 







W. & B. Wrenches Give 
Longer Service Economy 

In manufacturing '' W. & B." Wrenches we begin right by using only 
carefully selected steels for this special purpose. 

Then the various manufacturing processes of forging, milling and 
finishing are given the most critical attention. 

The result is true wrench economy that may be found in the most com- 
plete line of wrenches in the world. 

Just ask your jobber for " W. & B." Wrenches and see that 
"W. & B." Diamond Trade Mark is stamped on each one. 

The Whitman & Barnes Mfg. Co. 

Established 1854 

ST. CATHARINES, - - - ONTARIO 

Stocks carried at Winnipeg and Montreal 



Tools of Quality 

Trade 




Mark 
Bear These Marks 




Tools of Quality 

Trade 



waB 




Mark 
Bear These Marks 



IE 



75 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



BLACK DIAMOND FILE WORKS 



ESTABLISHED 1863 

Twelve Medals of 
Award at 

INTERNATIONAL 
Expositions. 




INCORPORATED 1895 
Special Grand 
Prize 

GOLD MEDAL 

Atlanta, 1895 



Copy of Catalogue will be sent free to any interested File User upon application. 



G. & H. BARNETT COMPANY, 



PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



Owned and operated by Nicholson File Co. 




Attractive, Convenient, Durable, Reasonable in Price. 



Our Patented Metal Shelf Boxes will improve the appearance of 
your store, and will enable you to give your customers quicker 
and more efficient service. 
Advise us space you have available for shelf boxes and shelving, 



and we will sketch out plan and give you our best price for 

same. 

Send for illustrated catalogue, it will interest you. 

Cameron and Campbell, - Toronto 




Maxwell's JEWEL 



MAXWELL'S "JEWEL" 

FOOD CHOPPER 

is a quick-cutting, smooth-working, thoroughly reliable Canadian-made 
machine at a price which makes sales easy. 

Made in four sizes, with full equipment of cutting plates for every 
class of work. 

Write for Catalogue of Maxwell Food-Cutters, Washers, Churns, etc., 
to— 

DAVID MAXWELL & SONS, St. Mary's, Ont 



McKinnon 

Electric-Welded 

Coil Chain 




McKinnon 
Swell-Weld 
Coil Chain 



25% • 
More Weld 



25% 
More Strength 



25% 
More Wear 



Perfect 
Stock 



Sales Office : 
BUFFALO, N.Y. 



+ 



Perfect 
Welding 



Perfect 
Product 

MADE BY 




MADE IN 
CANADA 



McKINNON CHAIN COMPANY 



§ See The 

Swell? 



Factory : 
ST. CATHARINES, ONT. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



WHY NOT SELL THE 

DECORATOR STEP LADDER? 

It Pays Good Profits and Gives Satisfaction 



This ladder is especially adapted 
for use by the Decorator. The 
Shelf is nearly level with the top 
step and folds down readily be- 
tween legs so that the Decorator 
with shelf takes up no more room 
than without. The ladder folds 
compactly within the width of 
the risers, therefore being 
easily carried or stored. 



A rod passes under each 
step, assuring solidity 
and the rope lock is used. 

Shelf is extra. 



Put this ladder in 
stock at once — The 
result will surprise 
you. 



Write for complete 
catalog on ladders. 




The Stratford Mfg. Co., Limited 

STRATFORD - - CANADA 




r 



STAR 

HACK SAW 

BLADES 



Perform good service throughout the world. 
Hack Saw Blades with the (Star) Trade Mark will stand 
up to any class of work, cut with every stroke and have 
surpassed all Hack Saw Blades in quality and service for 
over 25 years. 



Quick 
Clean 
Cuts with 
A Star 



Star Blades with four- 
teen teeth to the inch 
are suitable for all 
classes of work except 
tubing with walls of 
less than 1-16 inch in 
thickness. For this, use 
Star Blades with 24 
teeth to the inch. 



Two 
Styles 
For Every 
Purpose 



The reasons which made Star Blades good to sell also 
make them good to use. Write us for our interesting 
proposition. 



Our free book, 
ing for. 



'Tool Practice," is worth while send- 



MILLERS FALLS COMPANY 

28 Warren Street .:. NEW YORK 




There is a Nicholson-made File 
for every filing purpose 




Among the many other reasons why dealers should handle Nicholson-made files is 
their great range of shapes and grades. Each file for each purpose is made in the shape 
and of the grade of steel that our long specialized experience has shown to be the very 
best for the purpose. 

In Canada, the favorite Nicholson-made files are: 



"AMERICAN 
"EAGLE" 



» 



"ARCADE" 
"McCLELLAN' 



l» 



"GREAT WESTERN" 
"KEARNEY & FOOT" 



"GLOBE" 
"J. B. SMITH" 



Sell these lines. You are backed by all the great prestige of the Nicholson File Com- 
pany, and your file stock is the line acknowledged to be the standard of file quality. 
Your jobber can supply you. 

Nicholson File Company, Port Hope, Ontario 



77 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



"I TELL YOU IT'S A GREAT SAW." 

That expression applies with 
equal force to Simonds Cres- 
cent Ground Cross-Cut Saws 
and Simonds Hand Saws. 



Many dealers handle 
both lines. Do you? 

Simonds Canada Saw Co., Limited 

Montreal, P.Q., St. John, N.B., Vancouver, B.C. 

IN THE U.S.: THE SIMONDS MFG. CO. 




elys ely'S DANDY 

JANITOR MOP tUI UUHn,M 

ISP'No. 8 for men 



No. 21 for women 1E3 

Others are not just as good 




Mop Wringer and Bucket 

COMBINED 

Others are not just as good. 

Be sure that each bears the name 
ELY'S DANDY 

Made in three sizes, 10 qt., 14 qt. 
and 22 qt. ; guides, posts and step 
of malleable iron; lever of wrought 
iron, finished in black enamel ; 
cedar buckets, three hardwood rolls. 
The most popular mop wringer on 
the market. 



THE O.J. ELY 
MFG. CO. 

ERIE, PA. 

Get our catalogue of 
Mop Sticks, Mop Wring- 
ers, Brush Holders, Car- 
pet Beaters, Broom Hold- 
ers, Etc. 




"Try Us for Service 
and Quality" 



We carry a 
large stock of 

Wholesale Plumbers' Supplies, 

from which we can 
make immediate ship- 
ments. 

Drop us a card and get 
FREE copies oj Blue 
Prints for septic tanks. 



The John Stevens Co., Ltd. 

WINNIPEG. 



THE AYLMER STOCK 
AND TOWN PUMP 

Extra Heavy Set-Length Reversible Spout 

Six-Inch Stroke 



This pump is designed to meet a 
demand for use with cylinders of 
large capacity. 

In wells not over twenty feet 
it has an easy capacity of over a 
barrel a minute when fitted with 
5 or 6-inch cylinders. When used 
in tubular wells, the buckets can 
be withdrawn through the top, 
same as illustrated by Fig. 41, 
Page 34, of our catalogue Number 
14, and for stock, town or factory 
purposes we cannot recommend it 
too highly. 

WRITE FOR OUR 
BIG FREE CATALOGUE. 

The Aylmer Pump & 
Scale Co., Limited 

AYLMER, ONTARIO 




78 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



GET THE GENUINE 



DOES THE REPUTATION of GARLOCK 
PACKING mean anything to you? 

Does the fact mean anything to you that 
GARLOCK PACKINGS are giving eminent 
satisfaction the country over and everywhere 
Engineers who know insist on the installation 
of Genuine GARLOCK? 

This big and insistent demand for GARLOCK 
PACKING is the demand for quality. 

Imitators are making Packings that look like 
GARLOCK and are trying to sell them because 
they look like GARLOCK. 

Sometimes these imitations are sold as being 
"just as good as GARLOCK." If they were as 



good, they would be sold on their own merits 
and not on the established reputation of 
GARLOCK. 

Sometimes these imitations are substituted 
when "GARLOCK" is asked for. To prevent 
you getting an imitation and assist you in 
identifying the genuine, we have marked every 
piece of Spiral Packing with this mark of quality 



TRADE 




MARK 



The GARLOCK Catalogue tells all about Genuine 
GARLOCK Products. WRITE FOR IT TO-DAY. 



THE GARLOCK PACKING COMPANY 

HAMILTON, - ONTARIO 

PIONEERS IN THE PACKING BUSINESS 



Copper Sheets 



M. & L. Samuel, Benjamin &. Co. 

CORNER KING STREET AND SPADINA AVENUE 

TORONTO 



79 



HARDWARE AND METAL 




We are the World's 
Largest Manufacturers 
of Pure Lampblacks. 
This has been gained by 
giving our trade intrin- 
sic value for money re- 
ceived— a value that 
cannot be obtained in 
any other lampblack. 

If in doubt, let us 
submit you the evidence 
of dealers who know, by 



gaermanmrn 



^V ncut mam wum co. ..■.** 



sending you copies 
their repeat orders. 

Better give our Lamp- 
black a trial— it will cost 
you nothing if dissat- 
isfied. 

Write to-day. 

Wm. H. Evans, 232 
James St., Montreal; 
E. Fielding, 34 Yonge 
St., Toronto; H. W. 
Glassco, Winnipeg. 



Wilckcs Martin Wilckes Company 

NEW YORK, M. ) 



USA 



You Want to Earn More, 
Don't You? 



Your answer is Yes, Certainly! 

The first essential is to find a way. 

We are going to solve this problem for you. 

You can suit yourself as to whether you 
give up your present position or not. If you 
choose, you can devote only spare time to 
our proposition. 

If you are enterprising and intelligent, and 
willing to work for $7.00 or $8.00 a week 
during your spare hours, for the first two or 
three weeks of your connection with our 
staff, we can put you on the road to success. 

After a few weeks, when you have had a 
little experience at our business, you can 
earn from $25,00 to $50.00 per week. 

Write for full particulars to 

THE MACLEAN PUBLISHING CO. 

143-149 University Ave. Toronto, Ont. 



JOSEPH RODGERS & SONS 

SHEFFIELD, ENG. "««ed 

Avoid imitations of our 



CUTLERY ^ ^L* jtj* 

By seeing that this exact | _jj^_ 

mark is on each blade. ^AjdAiTcn \€>^ 

SOLE AGENTS FOR CANADA 

James Hutton 6§k Company 

MONTREAL 



TANK LUGS 




For Round Rods, also Flat Bands on Silos, Tanks, Pen- 
stocks, etc. Malleable Iron, best quality, all sizes. 

OTTERVILLE MANUFACTURING CO., LIMITED 

0TTERVILLE. ONTARIO 



Cap Screws, Set Screws, Studs 

Special Milled Work 

Cold Pressed Nuts 

Uniform Product, Accurately Machined 

Canada Foundry Company 



MONTREAL 

HALIFAX 

OTTAWA 



LIMITED 

HEAD OFFICES 
TORONTO 
CANADA 



WINNIPEG 

VANCOUVER 

ROSSLAND 



BRASS TUBING, BRASS ROBS, 

SHEET BRASS, SHEET COPPER, 

METAL SPINNINGS 

150,000 Pounds 
We carry the Stock. You draw from it. 



CDrsj 



ARE 
YOU 
ALIVE 



To the possibilities which a Want 

Ad. in Hardware and Metal 

holds for you ? Do you know that 
for a few cents you can gain the 
attention of every hardware re- 
tailer, wholesaler, manufacturer and 
clerk in Canada ? 

RATES : payable in advance. 
2C. per word first insertion, 
ic. per word subsequent insertions. 
5C extra if box number is desired. 

Hardware and Metal 

TORONTO - MONTREAL- WINNIPEG 



80 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



This Is UTICA'S 1909 Staple Puller 



Manufactured by the 



Utica Drop Forge Co. 

Utica, N.Y. 




UTICA QUALITY 

is known everywhere. 

TRADE 
REQ. U. 8. MARK PAT. OFFICE 

All goods carry this trade-mark. 



Sold in Canada by 



SMITH HARDWARE CO., Limited 



240 LEMOINE STREET 
MONTREAL 



STAMPED 

ON THS 



Corporate Mark 



GENUINE 
ARTICLE 



Granted 1780, 



Jonathan Crookes & Son 

Sheffield, England 

PEN, POCKET 6 SPORTING 
KNIVES, RAZORS, &c. 

For Sale by Loading Wholesale Houses 



Do Not Be Misled by Inferior Imitations. 




There is but one 



1 PRENTISS 

VISE 



Made by 



Prentiss Vise Company 

Hardware Building. 106-110 Lafayette St., Cor. Walker St., NEW YORK 

Sale Agents for Canada : A. Macfarlane & Co., Coristlne Bldg.. Montreal. 

Sole Agent* tor Groat Britain : Chat. Neat & Co., 112 Queen Victoria St., London, E. C. 




SCREW AND STRAP HINGES 

for Barn Doors, Gates, etc, 

Ours have GIMLET-POINTED Hooks, with CUT Coach-Screw Thread. 
Get our prices. 

NUTS 

We can ship immediately from stock, Square and Hexagon 
Sizes for bolts up to 1 1-2 inches thick. 

Send us your orders 




LONDON, CANADA 




THE PHAPIN-CTEPHENS PO., 

xvuies p.n 



UNION w FACTORY 

E MEADOW, CONN..U.S.A 



81 



No Horse Can Break the 



OPEN 



makes no difference how 
he lunges, jumps or jerks. 
No difference who hitches 
up, the hames will be 
tight and exert the same 
pressure every day. So 
good that we guarantee it 
and authorize you to re- 
fund the price to any dis- 
satisfied user. Sells for 
25c. but leaves you a pro- 
fit of 50 per cent., or $1 on 
every dozen. Costs you 
$2 a dozen. See "Kling" on 
the lever. Descriptive cir- 

ular on request, 
c 

The National Safety Snap Co., Inc., Dept.33, Wilmington. 0., U.S.A. 

Sole manufacturers of the Klingsn ap and Kling Hame Fastener. 

D. C. Ross & Co., 56 Colborne Street, Toronto, Ont, 

Canadian Distributing Agents 




HARDWARE AND METAL 



DIRECTORY OF MANUFACTURERS 

Hardware and Metal receives, almost daily, enquiries for the names of manufacturers of various lines. 
These enquiries come from wholesalers, manufacturers and retail dealers, who usually intimate they 
have looked through Hardware and Metal but cannot find any firm advertising the line in question. 
In many cases these firms are anxious to secure this information at once. This page enables manu- 
factures to keep constantly before the trade lines which it would not pay to advertise in larger space. 



BATTERY ZINCS. 



EMERY WHEELS. 



Battery Zincs, Fuse 
Wire, Wire Solder 

The CANADA METAL CO., LTD., 
Fraser Arenue, Toronto. 



BABBITT METAL. 




BUILDERS' SUPPLIES. 



Bell Phone 3033 



P.O. Box 367 



Bosse <3& Banks 

Steel Beams, Columns, Plates, Gas 

and Water Pipes, Contractors', 

Municipal and Builders' Supplies 

Machinery and Specialties. 

Board of Trade Building; 

36 ST. PAUL STREET, - QUEBEC 



CHAPLETS. 




£RIE GREY IRON 
CHAPLETS 

Ml Foundry Supply 
Jobbers. 

S. Cheney & Son, Manlius.N.Y. 



CLIPPERS. 



mrs 

SUFFICIENT, 

SEND FOR CATALOGUE TO 
American Shearer Mfg. Co., Nashua.NH.US 

Wlebuteh &, Hilger, Ltd., special New York 
Representatives, 106-110 Lafayette Street. 




E TO ^iW 



COAT HOOKS. 



Ask your Jobber for 

GOLD COIN WIRE HAT and COAT HOOKS 

Made by 



JAMES & REID 
Perth, 0nt. 





Canadian 

Hart Wheels 

443 Barton Si. East, Hamilton 

Corundum and Binary Wbtala 

Grinding Maehlnas, Bstvtr 

Oil Stones. 



FLOOR SPRINGS. 



The Best Door Closer Is 

Newman's Invincible Floor Spring 

Will close a door silently against any pressure of wind. 
Has many working advantages over the ordinary spring 
and has twice the wear. In use throughout Great Britain 
and the Colonies. Gives perfect satisfaction. Made only by 

W. NEWMAN & SONS 
Hospital Street Birmingham 



HOUSE NUMBERS. 



STEEL 



STAMPS 

LETTERS 

FIGURES 



HAMILTON STAMP & STENCIL WORKS. LTD.. 
HAMILTON. ONT. 



COAL BAGS. 



Coal Bags made of No. 2 or No. 6 
heavy duck, well sewn with heavy twine 
and rivited. 
Waterproof Horse and Wagi.n Covers. 

WRITE FOR SAMPLES AND PRICES 

Raymond Bros., London, Ont. 



IRON. 



PIG 


IRON 


STEEL PLATES, 


BARS and ANGLES 


BAR 


IRON 


David C. Mitchell & Co. 


118 Queen St. • 


Glasgow, Scotland 



MANUFACTURERS* AGENT. 



Western Distributors, Limited 

CUSTOMS BROKERS 
Wholesale Commission Merchants and 
Manufacturers' Aeents, Cars Distributed, 
Warehoused and Forwarded. Warehouse 
on Transfer Track. Business solicited. 
OUR POSITION IS YOUR OPPOR- 
TUNITY. 

SASKATOON, WESTERN CANADA 

82 



ALEXANDER GIBB 

Manufacturers' Agent and Metal Broker, 
St. Nicholas Bids., Montreal 



Representing Canadian, British and Ameri- 
can Manufacturers. Correspondence in- 
vited from firms wishing to be represented. 



RIVETS AND STEEL PRODUCTS. 



The PARMENTERBL'LLOCH CO., Ltd. 

GANANOQUE, ONT. 

Iron and Copper Rivets, Iron and Copper Burrs, 
Bifurcated and Tubular Rivets, Wire Nails, 
Copper and Steel Boat and Canoe Nails, 
Escutcheon Pins. Leather Shoe and Overshoe 
Buckles, Felloe Plates, 



Keep in mind the dominant fact that 
mankind from its first appearance on the 
earth has been schooled by nature to 
look for signs; for invitations to taste; 
for suggestions as to what to wear. Tell 
your story briefly, forcibly, truthfully, 
and address it through the p op t . media 
and you can successfully apply advertis- 
ing as a me<k**s to increased distribution. 



HOOKb. 



HOOKS L v d er .iVe y . le 

We m»!:; hooks as 
our principal output. 
Before buying send for 
our prices. Every hook 
has the patented metal 
clasp which makes it in- 
destructible. Samples 
on request. 
ATLAS MANUFACTURING COMPANY 




121 Water St. 



New Haven Conn. 



When writing advertisers 
kindly mention having seen 
the advertisement in this paper 



A want ad. in this paper will 

bring replies from all 

parts of Canada. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 




Send For Our New Catalog 



Most 'pit !•.' line of 



SCREW DRIVERS AND 
SMALL TOOLS 



PIONEER TOOLS 

The Southington Mfg. Co., • Southington, Conn. 



.> §5 



Make 
ONE POUND 

of TOOL STEEL 
EQUAL 10 LBS. 
in FORGED took. 

Write for Oatalog. 



TOOL HOLDERS 

TOOL HOLDERS 

For LATHE8 and PLANERS 

All kinds— All sizes. 

ARMSTRONG BR08. TOOL 00. 

106 N. Francisco Ave. 
GHI0ACO, U.S.A. 



J. A. HENCKELS 



$L twin'works CUTLERY J fW 




Pocket Knives, Scis- 

%£*&£££ Agents F.W. Lamplough & Co., 



9 DeBresolts St. 
MONTREAL 




The INFALLIBLE GLAZIER'S DIAMOND 

Just the Tool for Inexperienced Glass Cutters 



CARRIAGE 
SPRINGS & AXLES 
ANCHOR 




BRAND 



THE CUEIPH 8PRINC A AXLE CO. 

UMim 

CUELPH. OHT. 




Made by 

A. SHAW & SON, London, Eng. 

GODFREY S. PELTON & SON, Canadian Agents, MONTREAL 



Sharratt & Newth's Glaziers' Diamonds 

are unequalled for cutting and wearing qualities. 





To be obtained from Dealers in Glass, Hardware and 
Painters' Supplies. 



GALVANIZED FENCE HOOK S^~»55 a Woo " en p,c * ete 

f ENCE HOOtt^l 

f tiff I I v/iiji-l/ auu mill 

# " LINE WIRE, ST. 

London, Ont. 




WIRE NAILS, OILED SPRING 
BARB and PLAIN FENCE WIRE. 
OILED and ANNEALED CLOTHES 
LINE WIRE, STAPLES, etc 



The Western Wire and Nail Co., Limited, 



Reproduction of 

NEW SEYMOUR SHOW CARD 

12-in. by 15-in. , in Handsome Colors. 

Shear and Hand stand out in high relief, being cut 

out. A show card will be sent to every dealer 

sending his business card with request to 

Henry T. Seymour Shear Co. 

Selling Aienls. WIEBUSCB & HILGER, Ltd., New York 



"ACME" 



are the strongest and sharpest low-priced Shears and Scissors 
on the market. 



Why were 15,000 pairs of Acme Shears sold daily 5 years ago; and why are 30,000 pairs of Acme 
Shears sold daily to-day ? 

Because "Acme" on a shear or scissor spells tatitf action to the customer at a low price and a 
handsome profit to the dealer with greatly increased sales. 
Special Representatives, Wiebusch & Bil|er, Ltd., New York City. 
MR. DEALER: Write your jobber to-day for prices on the "Acme" line, supple- 
ment your high-priced shears with "Acme" shears and scissors and watch the 
gratifying results. 
Jobbers should write 
for our W-2 Cata- 
log u e , illustrating 
themostcompleteline 
of shears and scissors 
manufactured. 



The No. 701 Oval Steel Screw Straight Trimmer 
is one of our newest patterns. 



TBE ACHE SBEAR CO., U25-195 Knowlton St.,) BRIDGEPORT, CONN., U.S.A 





Pease Foundry Company pease pacific YawewNumaA 



TORONT O 



VANCOUVER 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Peterboro Hardware 




Door Knockers add greatly to the appearance 
of a door. They are rapidly coming into 
vogue. Peterborough Door Knockers sup- 
plied to match any of our designs. A sample 
on your show cases will interest customers. 

Peterborough Lock Mfg. Co., Ltd. 

PETERBOROUGH, ONT. 



SHEET COPPER 

Prompt Shipment 
Stock or Import 

B.&S.H, Thompson & Co. 

LIMITED 

MONTREAL, QUE. 



®: 



Oil 



II 



Why not make 1912 the most profitable saw year in 

your history? 







Vancouver Branch, 109 Powell St. 



ATKINS STERLING SAWS 

MADE IN CANADA 

THEY are Quality Saws. They appeal to the best 
mechanics and are backed up by an aggressive 
advertising campaign that pays. Write us for 
full information. It will cost nothing to at least investi- 
gate the merits of this important line. Address 

E. C. ATKINS & CO., 

MAKERS OF STERLING SAWS 

HAMILTON, ONTARIO 

U.S. Factory, Indianapolis, Ind. 



=11 



84 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Malleable Iron Castings 

for Carriages and Special 
Castings of all Kinds 

Manufactured by 

P. KYL_ £ 

MERRICKVILLE. ONT. 




METAL GRILLS 
WICKETS 

and 

RAILINGS 

in Iron, Brass and Bronze 

Suitable for all requirements. 

Send for Catalogue. 

Dennis Wire and Iron Works Co., 

Limited 
London, Ontario 



O.K. THIMBLES 




Every new house In your town meui a 
prospect for several O.K. Stove Pipe Thimbles. 
You should carry a food supply in stock and 
be ready to supply them when wanted. 

O.K. Thimbles are made for both floors and 
partitions. They can always be put In place 
Instantly. Your customers will prefer them to 
any other Stove Pipe Thimbles they can buy. 



METAL 5MIN0LE&SIDING C? LTD 

PRESTONC MONTREAL 



FOB 8AXK BY JOBBERS OB BY THE 
MANUFACTURERS. 



-PUMPS- 

All Hinds 
Hay Unloading Tools. 
Barn Door Hangers. 

The word "MYERS" assures 
QUALITY. Better writ* to us. 

F. E. MYERS & BRO. 

ASHLAND, OHIO 

J. H. ASHDOWN HARDWARE CO. 
Winnipeg, Calgary and Branch Houses 



Steel Sheets for Deep Stamp- 
ing and Enamelling Purposes 

Comet Brand" 



« 



Also Dark Blue, P.C.R. and C.A. 

Sheets, also Galvanized Canada 

Plates. 

Makers 

W. Gilbertson & Co., Limited 

Sole Canadian Sale* Agent 

ALEXANDER GIBB 

St. Nicholas Bldg. - Montreal 



NOVA SCOTIA STEEL 
6 COAL CO., Limited, 

NEW GLASGOW, N.S. 



Manufacturers of 



FERRONA 
PIG IRON 

and SIBMBHS-MABTIK 

OPEN HEARTH STEEL 



Jardine Universal Ratchet 
Clamp Drill 

Died In factories of all kinds for 
hurried machine repairs 

All machine shops and railway 
■hope should have It. 

Bridge builders, track layers, 
and structural metal workers 
hare constant use for It. 

Sand lor Description. 



A. B. JARDINE & CO. 

HESPELER ONTARIO 




THE ORDERS FOR 

ERMALINE 
Cooking Bags 

COME ROLLING IN 
ALL THE TIME 



What share are you 
getting of this trade ? 

Have you yet investi- 
gated this new system 
of cooking ? 

Are you not willing to 
carry a line which is a 
sure money maker ? 



Write for samples and 
Particulars to-day to 

Edward Lloyd, Ltd. 

508 Eastern Townships 
Bank Building 



Montreal, 



Canada 



85 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Watch for Hardware and Metal's Annual Fall 
Number, which will be mailed August 31st. 

It will be the most interesting and most attractive 
number we have ever issued. Canadian hardware- 
men will have occasion to feel proud of it. 

Every page will contain ideas that will help you to 
make or save more money in your hardware store. 
The time you invest in reading it will earn you big 
dividends. 

Advertisers will find in Hardware and Metal's 
Annual Fall Number the most economical means of 
instantly reaching the entire Canadian hardware 
trade, with advertisements of lines suitable for 
fall selling. 

Write us for prices of advertising space. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 

Canada's Only Weekly Hardware Paper 

Montreal Toronto Winnipeg New York Chicago 

London, England 






86 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



^ 



YOUR HEATING CONTRACTS SHOULD BE CLOSED EARL? 

THIS IS POSSIBLE WHEN YOU SPECIFY 

SUNSHINE FURNACES 



^ 




"McClary" on Goods 
is a Quality Name. 



% 



THEIR INSTALLATION BRINGS MORE 
BUSINESS AND BIGGER PROFITS TO YOU 

THE ADVICE OF OUR HEATING DEPARTMENT IS AT YOUR DISPOSAL 

MXIar/S 



Order from our near- 
est branch to-day. 



Toronto, Montreal, London, Vancouver, St. John, N.B. 
Hamilton, Winnipeg, Calgary, Saskatoon 




HARDWARE AND METAL 



m m in. m m-mtB-m>>$mm» » » « 



D. PERES Barrel iffTl Brand CUTLERY 




(Razors, Pocket Knives and Scissors.) 





Canadian Agents: GREEFF-BREDT & CO.JORONTO %t£t£Z"ti£&%T- '"" 



Office: H. J. Stafford. 426 King's Hall 



AN IMPROVED WAFFLE IRON 

Aluminum or Iron Plates— High or Low Bases 
Ball and Socket Joint — Enameled Wood Handles. 

SALES ARE INCREASED 

when Stover Irons are handled. 

Send for circular showing where the Stover Iron is different from 

others and why they sell faster. 

We also make a large line of dampers, clips, pokers, lifters, registers 

andirons, etc., that will interest you at this season of the year. 

Stover Manufacturing. Co., 709 East Street, Freeport, 111. 





BIBB 
COCK 




DOUBLE BATH 
COCK 



MORRISON'S 

J.M.T. Cushion Compression Work 

(With Tee Handle and China Index Handle) 

These cocks will last for years under ordinary care without the 
necessity of renewing the washers. This gives them a decided 
advantage over the ordinary type. 

Constructed of Two Rubber Discs or washers, between 
which is inserted a Metal Disc. The top washer is 
contained in a cup-shaped holder — this prevents 
spreading and allows the washer to maintain a 
vertical pressure upon the seat. 

The dealer who sells these cocks will give the best 
satisfaction. Our guarantee is your protection. Try 
them for good profits, 

Write us for samples and prices 




BASIN 
COCK 



The James Morrison Brass Mfg. Co., Ltd 



93-97 Adelaide Street West 



TORONTO 



HARDWARE AND METAL 

INDEX TO ADVERTISERS 

Occasionally advertisements are inserted in the paper after the index has been printed. The insertion of the Adver- 
tiser's name in this index is not part of the advertising order. The index is inserted 
solely for "the convenience of the readers of the paper. 



Acme Shear Co 

American Shearer Co 

Armstrong Bros. Tool Co. 
Andrews Wire Wks., Ltd.. 

Angle Mfg. Co 

Atkins & Co., E. C 

Atlas Mfg. Co 

Aj'lmer Pump & Scale Co. 



Barker, D. J., & Son 16 

Barton Netting Co 74 

Bosse & Banks 82 

Bowser, S. F., & Co., Ltd 53 

Brandram-Henderson, Ltd. ., 51 

Buck Stove Co., Wm 16 

Buffalo Mfg. Co 72 

Burmans Clippers 30 

Burrow Stewart & Milne 18 

Burmeister & Wain's Export Co., 

Ltd 12 



Cameron & Campbell 76 

Canada Foundry Co 80 

Canada Paint Co., The 65 

Canada Metal Co 82 

Canada Steel Goods Co 8 

Canada Wire & Iron Goods Mfg. 

Co 72 

Canadian Carbon Co., The 68 

Canadian Copper Co 73 

Can. Fairbanks-Morse Co., Ltd — 2 

Canadian Ferrosteel Co 18 

Canadian Hart Wheels 32 



Canadian Tube & Iron Co. 
Can. Heating & Ventilating Co. 
Cartland & Son, Jas. 



25 
14 
17 

Carborundum Co., The 1 

Caverhill, Learmont & Co 29 

C'hapin-Stevens Co., The 81 

Cheney & Sons, S 82 

Chicago Spring Butt Co 

Inside back cover 

Connor & Son, J. H 31 

Crookes & Son, Jonathan 81 

Cummer-Dowswell, Ltd 21 



Davidson, Thos., Mfg. Co 8 

Directory of Manufacturers 82 83 

Disston, Henry, & Sons 28 

Dennis Wire & Iron Co 85 

Dominion Cartridge Co 

Outside front cover 

Dorkin Bros 26 



Dougall Varnish Co 67 

Dreis, Edward 22 

Ely Mfg. Co., Theo. J 78 

Enterprise Enamel Co 71 

Erie Iron Works 13 

Findlay Bros 16 

Ford Auger Bit Co 73 

Fox Supply Co 71 

Garlock Packing Co 79 

Gibb, lAexauder 84 

Gilbertson & Co., W 85 

Gloeckler, Bernard 27 

Goodell-Pratt Co 5 

Greet Bredt & Co 88 

Greening, B., Wire Co 20 

Guelph Spring & Axle Co 83 

Gutta Percha & Rubber Mfg. Co., 

Inside back cover 

Hall Zryd Fdry. Co 15 

Hamilton & Son, C. J 23 

Hamilton Stamp & Stencil Wks... 82 

Harris, J. W., Co 74 

Heinisch, R., Sons Co 55 

Henderson & Richardson 68 

Hobbs Mfg. Co 64 

Howland, H. S., Sons & Co 7 

Hupfeld Ludecking & Co 75 

Hutton, Jas., & Co 80 



Imperial Varnish & Color Co. 
International Varnish Co. 



James & Reid 

Jamieson & Co., Ltd., R. C. 
Jardine, A, B., & Co , 



Kyle, P. 



Laidlaw Bale Tie Co 74 

Lamplough, F. W 83 

Leslie, A. C, & Co 31 



Lewis Bros. , Ltd. 

Lloyd, Ed 

London Emery Wks 

London Bolt & Hinge Works 

London Foundry Co 

London Rolling Mill Co 

Lowe Bros., Ltd 



Lufkin Rule Co Inside back cover 

Luther Grinder Mfg. Co 11 

McArthur, Alex., & Co 55 

McAvity & Sons, T 55 

McClary Mfg. Co 12 87 

McDougall, R., Co 72 

McGlashan-Clarke Co., Ltd 74 

McKinnon Chain Co 76 

Magnolia Metal Co 28 

Maple City Mfg. Co 71 

Marshalltown Trowel Co 9 

Martin-Senour Co 67 

Martin Co., The L 17 

Maxwell, D., & Sons 76 

Metal Shingle & Siding Co 21 



Millers Falls Co. 

Mitchell & Co., David 

Moore & Co., Benjamin 

Montreal Hdwe. Mfg. Co 

Morris & Bailey Steel Co 

Morrison Brass Mfg. Co., Jas. 
Myers & Bro., F. E 



National Acme Mfg. Co 20 

National Hardware Co 71 

National Safety Snap Co 81 

Newman, W., & Sons 82 

Nicholson File Co 77 

Northern Aluminum Co 10 

North Bros. Mfg. Co 1 

Nova Scotia Steel & Coal Co 85 

Oakey, John, & Son 73 

Ohio Foundry Co 18 

Oneida Community, Ltd. 

Outside back cover 

Ontario Lantern & Lamp Co., Ltd. 68 

One Minute Washer Co 70 

Otterville Mfg. Co 80 

Parmenter Bullock Co., The 82 

Pease Fdry. Co 83 

Peterborough Lock Co 84 

Pittsburg Camp, Brass & Glass Co., 

The 4 

Pinchin-.Tohnson & Co., Ltd 53 

Pink, Thos 19 

Prentiss Vise Co 81 



Queen City Oil Co. 



Ramsay, A., & Sons Co. 
Raymond Bros 



63 



Richards Wilcox Mfg. Co 4 

Robertson Mfg. Co., Ltd., P. L... 92 
Ross Rifle Co 92 

Sapho Mfg. Co 32 

Samuel, M. & L., Benjamin & Co. 79 

Seymour, Henry T., Shear Co 83 

Sharratt & Newth 83 

Shaw, A., & Son 83 

Sheet Metal Products Co 2 

Shurly-Dietrich Co., Ltd 25 

Simonds Canada Saw Co 78 

Smith Hardware Co 81 

Southington Mfg. Co 83 

Sorby, Robt., & Sons 17 

28 
82 
S8 
59 
70 
23 
13 
6 
57 
78 
28 



Soren Bros, 

Spooner, Alonzo W., Ltd. ... 

Stover Mfg. Co 

Standard Paint & Varnish Co 

Standard Chain Co 

Standard Rule & Level Co. 

Standard Stamping Co 

Steel Co. of Canada, Ltd 

Stephens, G. F., & Co 

Stevens Co., Ltd., The Jno.. 

Stewart, Jas., Mfg. Co 

Still, J. H Inside back cover 

Stratford Mfg. Co 77 



Tallman Brass & Metal Co 80 

Thompson, B. & S. H 84 

Toledo Cooker Co 14 

Toronto Plate Glass Importing Co. 55 

Townsend & Co., S. P 23 



Utica Drop Forge Co. 
Utilities, Limited 



81 



Want Ads 58 

Walker Bin & Store Fixture Co... 5 

Ware Mfg. Co 74 

Western Distributors, Ltd 82 

Western Clock Mfg. Co 

Inside front cover 



Western Wire & Nail Co. 

Wheeler & Bain 

White Mop Wringer Co 

Whitman & Barnes Mfg. Co 

Wilckes-Martin-Wilckes Co 

Winnipeg Ceiling & Roofing Co 

Winnipeg Paint & Glass Co., Ltd. 
Wright, E. T., & Co 



Yale & Towne 



MAKE YOUR PARCELS 
ADVERTISE YOU 




You can make each parcel that goes 
out of your store advertise you. The 
advertisement will go into many houses 
where you could not otherwise get 
it and will identify your name with 
quality and satisfaction that the pur- 
chaser gets from your goods. 

The Automatic Printing Device 
prints the advertisement on the wrapp- 
er by the action of unrolling the paper 
No extra work. No trouble. 



Write for our Leaflet which describes 
the details and advantages of this 
valuable device and gives you prices. 



UTILITIES LIMITED 

73 Bank of Ottawa Bldj.. • MONTREAL 




NO SHOOTING AT RANDOM 



when you use Hardware and Metal " Want Ads." 

From Nova Scotia to British Columbia not a town is missed 
in which there is a Hardware Dealer or Manufacturer interested 
in the hardware trade. 

If there is a man in Canada interested in our proposition a 
" Want Ad." in Hardware and Metal will find him. 

Rates, 2c. per word for first insertion. 

lc. per word for subsequent insertions. 
5c. additional each insertion when box number is desired. 

SEND CASH WITH ORDER. 

HARDWARE AND METAL, 



MONTREAL. 



TORONTO 



WINNIPEG 



Knowledge 
Is Power 



Every hardwareman ean get valuable pointers and make his business a 
more profitable proposition if he will study the experiences of experts 
who have 'made good.' Our Technical Books for hardwaremen eover a 
wide range of subjects, among which may be mentioned Metal Working 
Books, Hardware Window Dressing, Store Business Methods, Paints and 
Painting, Salesmanship and Sales Plans and Advertising. We hare also 
the very latest books on the plumbing and heating problems. 

TECHNICAL BOOKS, 143-149 University Ave., TORONTO 

89 



HARD W A 1 1 IC A N D M E T A J , 



CLASSIFIED LIST OF ADVERTISEMENTS 



Abrasive Wheels 
London Emerj Works, London, Eng. 
Carborundum Co., Niagara Fall*, N.Y. 
Canadian Hart Wheel*, Hamilton. 

Aluminum Ware 

Hero Mfg. Co., Philadelphia. 

Northern Aluminum Co., Toronto. 

StoTer Mfg. Co., Freeport, 111. 

Ware Mfg. Co., Toronto. 

Wonderahine Limited, Toronto. 
Ammunition 

Dominion Cartridge Co., Montreal. 

Remington Anal Union Metallic Cart- 
ridge Co., New York. 

Animal Traps 

Oneida Community Ltd., Oneida, N.I. 
Anchors 

Henderson ft Bichardson, Montreal. 
Star Expansion Bolt Co., New York. 

Auger Bits 
Ford Auger Bit Co., Holyoke, Mats. 
Spear ft Jackson, Sheffield, Eng. 
Tobin Arms Mlg. Co., Woodstock. 

Babbitt Metal 

Canada Metal Co., Toronto. 
Magnolia Metal Co., Montreal. 

Alonzo W. Spooner, Ltd., Port Hope, 

Ont. 
Tallman Brass A Metal Co., Hamilton. 

Bar Iron 

Henderson ft Richardson, Montreal. 
8teel Co. of Canada. Hamilton. 
London Rolling Mills Co., London. 

Bale-Ties 

Laidlaw Bale-Tie Co., Hamilton, Ont. 
Bar Urns 

Buffalo Mfg. Co., Buffalo. N. T. 
Bath Room Fitting's 

Buffalo Mfg. Co., Buffalo, N.T. 

8. Stemau ft Co., Brookljn. N.T. 

Belting; 

Dominion Belting Co., Ltd., Hamilton 
Sadler ft Haworth, Montreal. 

Belting:, Hose, etc. 
Gutta Pereha and Rubber Mfg. Co., 
Toronto. 

Bird Cases 

E. T. Wright ft Co., Hamilton. 

Binder Twine 

Plymouth Cordage Co., N. Plymouth. 
Mass. 

Bolts and Nuts 
London Bolt and Hinge Works, Lon- 
don, Ontario. 
The Steal Co. of Canada, Ltd., Ham- 
ilton. 
National Acme Mfg. Co.. Montreal. 

Boilers and Radiators 
Pease Foundry Co., Toronto. 
Oumey Foundry Co., Toronto. 

Bolts — Expansion 
Star Expansion Bolt Co., New York. 

Brackets Shelf 

Atlas Mfg. Co., New Haven, Conn. 
P. & F. Corbin, New Britain, Conn. 
Stanley Works, New Britain, Conn. 
Brass Goods. 
Jas. Cartland ft Son, Ltd., Birming- 
ham, Eng. 
Evered & Co., Smethwick, Eng. 
Henderson & Richardson. Montreal. 
Tallman Brass & Metal Co., Hamilton 
Stover Mfg. Co., Freeport, 111. 

Brass, Sheets, Tubes and Rods. 

Henderson & Richardson, Montreal. 
Tallman Brass & Metal Co., Hamilton 

Brushes. 
Meakins & Sons, Hamilton. 
Stevens-Hepner Co., Port Elgin. 

Bridle Rings — Galvanized, Brass 
and Plain. 

Star Expansion Bolt Co., New York. 
Builders' Tools and Supplies. 

Canada Wire & Iron Goods Mfg. Co., 

Hamilton. 
Caverhill, Learmont & Co., Montreal. 
Howland, H. 8. Sons & Co., Toronto. 
Lewis Bros. & Co., Montreal. 
Lufkin Rule Co., Saginaw, Mich. 
North Bros. Mfg. Co., Philadelphia, 

Pa. 
Stanley Rule & Level Co., N. Britain 

Builders' Hardware. 
Belleville Hardware & Lock Mfg. Co., 

Belleville. 
Canadian Yale & Towne, St. Cath- 
arines. 
P. & F. Corbin, New Britain, C. 
May ft Padmore, Birmingham, Eng. 
National Hardware Co., Orillia. 
Peterborough Lock Mfg. Co., Peter- 
borough. 
Butts. 
Canada Steel Goods Co., Hamilton. 
P. ft F. Corbin, New Britain, C. 
Cans 

Taos. Davidson Mfg. Co., Montreal, 
MeClary Mfg. Ce., Toronto. 



The Sheet Metal Products Co. of Can- 
ada, Ltd., Montreal, Toronto, 
Winnipeg. 

Carriers, Cash and Parcel 

Hamilton Brass Mfg. Co., Hamilton. 

Carpet Sweepers 

Bissell Carpet Sweeper Company, 
Grand Rapids, Mich. 

Carriage Heaters 

Chicago Flexible Shaft Co., Chicago. 
Carriage Springs and Axles 

Guelph 8pring and Axle Co., Guelph. 

Cartridges 
Dominion Cartridge Co.. Montreal. 

Cash Registers 

National Cash Register Co., Toronto. 
Cattle and Trace Chains 

Greening, B., Wirs Co.. Hamilton. 

McKinnon Chain Co., St. Catharines 

Oneida Community Limited. Niagara 
Falls, Ont, 

Cement 

Canada Cement Co., Montreal, P.Q. 

Alf. Rogers, Ltd., Toronto. 

B. ft 8. H. Thompson * Co., Montreal 

Churns 
Connor, J. H-. ft Sons. Ottawa, Ont, 
Cummer-Dowswell Ltd., Hamilton, Ont 
MaxweU, David, ft Sons, St.Mary I, Ont 

Chafing Dishes 
Buffalo Mfg. Co., Buffalo. 
8. 8temau ft Co., Brooklyn, N.T. 

Chaplets 
S. Cheney 4 Son, Manlius, N.T. 

Chicken Coops. 

Triangle Mfg. Co., Freeport, 111. 

Clippers — All Kinds 
American Shearer Mfg. Co., Nashua.NH 
Chicago Flexible Shaft Co.. Chicago 
Coates Clipper Mfg. Co., Worcester. 

Mass. 

Clocks 

The Western Clock Mfg. Co.. La Salle, 
111. 
Clothes Reels and Lines 

Cummer-Dowswell Ltd., Hamilton. Ont 

Hamilton Cotton Co., Hamilton. 
Clothes Wringers 

Cummer-Dowswell Ltd., Hamilton, Ont 

American Wringer Co., New Tork City 

Lovell Mfg. Co., Erie, Pa. 
Cold Rolled Strip Steel 

The Morris ft Bailey Steel Co., Pitta- 
burg, Pa. 
Cordage 

Hamilton Cotton Co., Hamilton. 

Plymouth Cordage Co., N. Plymouth. 
Mass. 
Cow Ties 

Greening, B., Wire Co., Hamilton. 

McKinnon Dash end Metal Co.. St. 
Catharines. 

Oneida Community, Ltd.. Niagara Falls 

Cuspidors 

Buffalo Mfg. Co., Buffalo, N.T. 
Thos. Davidson Mfg. Co., Montreal. 
McClary's, London, Ont. 
The Sheet Metal Products Co., of 

Canada, Ltd., Montreal, Toronto, . 

Winnipeg. 

E. T. Wright & Co., Hamilton. 
Cutlery — Razors, Scissors, etc. 

Caverhill, Learmont & Co., Montreal 
Crookes, Jonathan & Son. 
Dorken Bros. & Co., Montreal. 
Greeff. Bredt Co., Toronto. 
Henderson & Richardson. Montreal. 
Heinisch's, R., Sons Co.. Newark, N.. I. 
Howland, H. S.. Sons & Co., Toronto 
Hutton, Jas., & Co., Montreal. 

F. W. Lamplough & Co., Montreal. 
McGlashan, Clarke Co., Ltd., Niagara 

Falls. 
Door Bolts. 

Montreal Hdwe. Mfg. Co., Montreal. 
Door Checks. 
Wm. Keating, Toronto. 
Canadian Yale & Towne, St. Cath- 
arines. 
P. & F. Corbin, New Britain, C. 

Door Hangers. 

F. E. Myers & Bro., Ashland, O. 
Richard Wilcox Mfg. Co., Aurora, 111. 

Door Springs. 

Stover Mfg. Co., Freeport, ni. 
Drawer Pulls. 

P. & F. Corbin, New Britain, C. 

Stover Mfg. Co., Freeport. 111. 
Drills, Brick and Stone. 

Star Expansion Bolt Co., New Tork. 

Whitman ft Barnes Mfg. Co.. St. 
Catharines. 

DrUIs— High Speed 

Alexander Gibb, Montreal. 



Drinking Cups 

Hero Mfg. Co., Philadelphia. 
Dry Batteries 

Canadian Carbon Co., Winnipeg. 
Eavetroughs 

Thos. Davidson Mfg. Co., Montreal. 

McClary's, London, Ont, 

The Sheet Metal Products Co. of Can 
ada, Ltd., Montreal, Toronto, Win- 
nipeg. 

E. T. Wright ft Co., Hamilton. 

Metal Shingle ft Siding Co., Preston. 

Wheeler ft Bain, Toronto. 
Emery or Corundum Wheels 

The Carborundum Co., Niagara Falls. 

N.Y. 
Canadian Hart Wheels Limitsd, Ham 

ilton, Ont. 
London Emery Works, London, Eng. 
Electric Fixtures 

The Barton-Netting Co., Ltd, Windsor 
Ont, 

Jas. Morrison Brass Mfg. Co., Tor- 
onto. 

Emery Cloth 

London Emery Works, London, Eng. 
Jno. Oakey & Sons, Ltd., London, 

Eng. 

Emery Wheels. 

London Emery Works, London, Eng. 
Jno. Oakey & Sons, Ltd., London, 

Eng. 

Enameled Ware 

Thos. Davidson Mfg. Co.. Montreal. 
The Sheet Metal Products Co.of Canada 
Ltd., Montreal. Toronto, Winnipeg 
McClary's, London, Ont. 
Escutcheon Pins 

The Parmenter ft Bulloch Co., Gana- 

oque, Ont. 
Steel Co. of Canada, Ltd., Hamilton. 
Fencing — Woven Wire 

The Steel Co. of Canada, Ltd., Ham- 
ilton. 

Banwell-Hoxie Wire Fene* Co., Ham- 
ilton. 

McGregor, Banwell ft Co., Walksr- 
ville. 
Files and Rasps 

Barnett Co., G. ft H., Philadelphia, Pa 

Delta File Works, Philadelphia. Pa. 

Disston, Henry, ft Sons, Philadelphia, 

Nicholson File Co., Port Hop*. 
Simonds Canada Saw Co., Ltd., 

Montreal. 
Spear A Jackson. Sheffield, Eng. 
Firearms and Ammunition 

Harrington ft Richardson Sons Co., 
Worcester, Mass. 

C. J. Hamilton & Son, Plymouth, 
Mich. 

Tobin Arms Mfg. Co.. Woodstock. 
Fire Escape** 

Canada Foundry Co., Ltd., Toronto. 

Dennis Wire ft Iron Co., London. 
Fire Grates. 

Ohio Foundry & Mfg. Co., Steuben 
ville. O. 
Fine Irons 

Stover Mfg. Co., Freeport, IB. 
Fire Place Furnishings 

The Barton-Netting Co., Ltd., Wind- 
sor, Ont. 
Flint Paper 

London Emery Works, London, Eng. 

Jno. Oakey & Sons, Ltd., London, 
Eng. 

Food Choppers 

Enterprise Mfg. Co., Philadelphia, 

D. Maxwell * Sons. St. Mary'*. 
Foot Warmers 

Chicago Flexible Shaft Co., Chicago. 

Forging* 

Steel Co. of Canada. Limited, Hamil- 
ton. 

Furnaces, see Stoves 

Galvanizing 

Canada Metal Co., Toronto. 
Thos. Davidson Mfg. Co., Montreal. 
The Steel Co. of Canada, Ltd, Ham 
ilton. 

Galvanized Iron 

W. Gilbertson ft Co., Ltd., Alex. 
Gibb, Montreal, Agent. 

Henderson ft Richardson, Montreal. 
John Lysaght, Ltd., Bristol, Newport 
and Montreal. 

B. & 8. H. Thompson ft Co., Mont- 
real. 

Gas Fixtures 

The Barton-Netting Co., Ltd., Wind- 
sor, Ont, 

Jas. Morrison Bras* Mfg. Co., Toronto 
Glass 
Hobbs Mfg. Co., London. 
Toronto Plato Glass Imp. Co., Toronto 
Winnipeg Paint & Glass Co., Winnipeg 
Consolidated Plate Glass Co.. Tor- 
onto. 

A. Ramsay ft Son, Montreal. 

B. ft S. H. Thompson ft Co.. Mont 
real. 



Glass, Ornamental 

Consolidated Plat* Glass Co., Toronto 

Hobbs Mfg. Co., London. 

Toronto Plat* Glass Importing Co.. 

Toronto. 
Winnipeg Paint ft Glass Co., Winni- 
peg. 
Glass Paper 
London Emery Works, London, Eng. 
Jno. Oakey & Sons, Ltd., London. 
Eng. 

Glass, Wired 
Hobbs Mfg. Co., London. 
Toronto Plat* Glass Imp. Co., Tor- 
onto. 
Winnipeg Paint ft Glass Co., Winni- 
peg. 
Consolidated Plat* Glass Co., Toronto 
Glaziers' Diamonds 
Pelton, Godfrey 8. 
Sharratt ft Newth, London, Eng. 
Winnipeg Paint ft Glass Co., Winni- 
peg. 
Glue 

The Canada Glue Co., Ltd., Brant- 
ford. 

Henderson ft Bichardson, Montreal. 
Grinding Machinery. 

London Emery Works, London, Eng. 
Grindstones 

Riehards-Wilcox Mfg. Co., Aaron, 

American Gricdtr Mfg. Co., Mil- 
waukee. 
Guns 

Harrington ft Richardson Arms Co. 

Worchestor, Mas*. 
Tobin Arms Mfg. Co., Woodstock, Ont. 
C. J. Hamilton ft Son, Plymouth 

Mich. 

Hammers 
Stovtr Mfg. Co., Freeport, IU, 
Whitman ft Barn** Mfg. Co., 8u 

Catharines. 

Handles 

§P',. J V, H "„ Uf «- °»ii, 8t - Thomas. 
W. C. Crawford Co., Tilbury. 

Hardware, Metal Window. 

Canadian Yale ft Towne, St, Cath- 
arines. 

P. & F. Corbin, New Britain, Cena. 
Hay Unloading Tools 

F. E. Myers ft Br*., Ashland, Ohio. 
Hinges 

Canada Steel Goods Co., TT.mii t^ 

Cowan ft Britten. Gananesu*. 

Montreal Hardware Co., Montreal 

Th* 8tanl«y Works, New Britain, 
Conn. 

Hinges, Spring 

S* hJe ? ^ B ?Fi°* Butt °*" Chicago. 
Standard Mfg. Co., Shelby, Ohio. 

Hockey Sticks 

Still, J. H. Mfg. Co., 8t. Thomas. 
St, Marys Wood Specialty Co., »U 
Marys. 

Hooks 

P. & F. Corbin, New Britain, Coud. 
Hwderson * Richardson, Montreal 
Steel Co. of Canada, Limited, Ham 

ilton. 
8tov*r Mfg. Co., Freeport, BL 
Hoop Iron 

The Steel Co. of Canada, Ltd., Ham 

ilton. 

Hoops— Steel and Wire 

Laidlaw Bale-Tic Co., Hamilton, Oat. 
Horseshoes and Nails 

Steel Co. of Canada, Ltd., Hamilton 
Ice Cream Freezers 

North Bros. Mfg. Co., Philadelphia. 

The Sheet Metal Products Co.of Canada 
Ltd., Montreal, Toronto. Winnipeg 
lee Cutting Tools 

North Bros. Mfg Co., Philadelphia, P* 
Iron and Steel Bars 

c He . nd , eraon * Richardson, Montreal. 

Steel Co. of Canada, Limited, Hamilton, 

London Rolling Mill Co., London. 

Iron Pipe 

Steel Co. of Canada. Ltd.. Hamilton. 
Canada Tub* ft Iron Co., Montreal 
Iron Pumps 

D Tl "« er „ PuM f? *. 8 "» J » °*>. *rt»*r. 
R. McDougall Co., Gait. 
Red J»cket Mfg. Co., Davenport, lowa 
F. E. Myers ft Bro., Ashland, Ohio. 

Knife Polish 

London Emery Works, London. Eng. 
Jno. Oakey & Sons, Ltd., London. 
Eng. 

Ladders, Step. 

Otterville Mfg. Co., Otterville, Ont. 
Btratford Mfg. Co., Stratford, Ont. 
Ladders — Shelf 
Hamilton Bras* Mfg. Co., Hamilton. 
•>'• E, _. M ?5I? * Br# " Artlnmd, Ohio. 
C nt r< ^ *• °°-' •*-■*•'•" 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



LaiDiK, Acetylene 

Maple City Mfg. Co., Monmouth, 111. 
Lampblack 

The L. Martin Co., New Tork. 

Wilekes Martin Wilekes Co., New Tork 

Lanterns 
Thoa. Davidson Mfg. Co., Montreal. 
The Sheet Metal Products Co.of Canada 
Ltd., Montreal, Toronto, Winnipeg 

E. T. Wright ft Co.. Hamilton. 

Lawn Fencing 

Canada Wire ft Iron Goods Mfg. Co., 
Hamilton. _ 

B. Greening Wire Co., Ltd., Hamil- 
ton. 

McGregor Banwell ft Co.. Walkerrflla 

Banwell Hoxie Wire Fence Co., Ham- 
ilton, 

Lawn Mowers 
D. Maxwell ft Bona, St. Mary'i. Ont 
Supplee Hardware Co., Philadelphia 
Clipper Lawn Mower Co., Dixon, 111. 
8. P. Townaend ft Co., Orange, N.J. 
Whitman * Baraee Mfg. Co., St. 
Cathartnei. 

Lawn Swings 

F. E. Myers * Bro., Ashland, Ohio. 
Stratford Mfg. Co., Stratford, Ont. 

Lightning; Reds 
Hamilton Brass Mfg. Co., Hamilton, 
Ont. 
Locks, Knobs, Escutcheons, etc. 

BellCTills Hdw. and Lock Mfg. Com- 
pany, Bellerllle. 

Canadian Tale ft Towne, St. Cath- 
arines. _ . , _ 

P. & F. Corbin, New Britain, Conn, 

May & Padmere, Birmingham, Eng. 

National Hardware Co., Orillia. 

Peterborough Leek Mfg. Co., Peter- 
borough, Oat. 
Lumbering Tools 

Pink, Thos., ft Co., Pembroke, Ont 
Manufacturers' Agents 

Gibb. Alexander, Montreal. 

Melntosh, H. ¥., ft Co., Toronto. 

Western Distributors Ltd., Saskatoon. 

Mantels and Grates 

The Barton-Netting Co.. Ltd., Wind- 
sor, Ont. 
Match Boxes 

Storer Mfg. Co., Freeport, 111. 
Metals 

Canada Metal Co.. Toronto. 

CaTerhill, Learaaont A Co.. Montreal. 

Gibb, Alexander, Montreal. 

Henderson A Richardson, Montreal. 

Leslie, A. C, A Co., Montreal. 

Lysaght, John, Bristol, Eng. 

Magnolia Metal Co., Montreal. 

McKechnie Bros., Birmingham, Eng. 

Nora 8cotia Steel and Coal Co., New 
Glasgow, N.S. 

Samuel, Benjamin & Co., Toronto. 

Alonzo W. Spooner, Ltd., Port Hope, 
Ont. 

The Sheet Metal Products Co.of Canada 
Ltd., Montreal, Toronto, Winnipeg 

Tallman Brass A Metal Co., Hamilton 

Thompson, B. A 8. H. A Co., Montreal 

Metal Lockers 
Canada Wire A Iron Goods Mfg. Co., 

Hamilton. 
Dennis Wire A Iron Co., London, Ont. 

Metal Shingles, Sidings, Etc. 

Gait Art Metal Co., Gait. 
Metallic Roofing Co.. Toronto. 
Metal Shingle and Siding Co., Preston. 
Metal Polish, Emery Cloth, Etc. 
Oakey, John, A Sons, London, Eng. 
John C. Wilson, Ottawa. 

Metal Store Fronts 

Canada Foundry Co.. Ltd., Toronto. 
Mop Holder 

Theo. J. Ely Mfg. Co., Erie, Pa. 
Mop Wringers 

Theo J. Ely Mfg. Co., Girard, Pa. 

White Mop Wringer Co., FultonTille. 
N.Y. 
Nail Pullers 

The Bridgeport Hdw. Corp., Bridge- 
port, Conn. 

Smith Hardware Co., Montreal. 

Nails, Wire 

Laldlaw Bale- Tie Co., Hamilton, Ont. 

Parmenter A Bulloch Co., Gananoque. 

P. L. Robertson Mfg. C, Milton, Ont. 

Steel Co, of Canada, Limited, Ham- 
ilton. 
Oilers 

Thos. Davidson Mfg. Co., Montreal. 

Hero Mfg. Co., Philadelphia. 

Maple City Mfg. Co., Monmouth, 111. 

The Sheet Metal Products Co.of Canada 
Ltd., Montreal, Toronto, Winnipeg 

Wricht, E. T. A Co., Hamilton, Ont. 
OH Stones 

Canadian Hart Wheels, Hamilton, Ont 

Carborundum Co., Niagara Falls, N.T. 
OH Stoves 

McClary Mfg. Co., London. 

Queen City Oil Co., Toronto. 
Oil Tanks 

Bowser, S. F., A Co., Toronto. 



Ornamental Iron and Wire 
Canada Wire A Iron Goods Mfg. Co.. 

Hamilton. 
Dennis Wire A Iron Co., London, Ont 
Packing 

Garlock Packing Co., Hamilton, Ont. 
Paints, Oils, Varnishes 
Berry Bros., Limited, Walkerrile, Ont. 
Brandram Henderson, Montreal. 
Canada Paint Co., Montreal, 
Canadian Oil Companies. Ltd., Tor- 
onto. 
Dougall Varnish Co., Montreal. 
Glidden Varnish Co.. Toronto. 
Imperial Varnish and Color Co., Tor- 
onto 
International Varnish Co., Toronto. 
R. C. Jamieson A Co., Ltd., Montreal 
Lowe Bros., Ltd., Toronto. 
Martin-Senour Co., Montreal. 
Moore, Benjamin A Co., Toronto. 
Pinchin, Johnson Co., Toronto. 
Pratt A Lambert Inc., Bridgeburg, 

Can. 
A. Ramsay A Son Co., Montreal. 
Sherwin-Williams Co., Montreal. 
Standard Paint and Varnish Co., 

Windsor, Ont 
Q. F. Stephens A Co.. Winnipeg, 

Man, 
Winnipeg Paint A Glass Co., Winni- 
peg. 
Paint and Tarnish Remover 
Chadeloid Chemical Co., New York. 
Dougall Varnish Co., Montreal. 
Imperial Varnish A Color Co., Tor- 
onto. 
Perforated Sheet Metals 
Canada Wire and Iron Goods Mfg. 

Co., Hamilton. 
Qreenine-. B.. Wire Co., Hamilton. 
Pier Iron 
Henderson A Richardson, Montreal, 
Steel Co. of Canada, Limited, Ham- 
ilton 
Samuel Benjamin ft Co., Toronto. 
A. C. Leslie ft Co., Montreal. 
Pipe, Wrought Lead and 
Gnlvnnfzeri 

Steel Co. of Canada, Limited, Ham- 
ilton. 

Canadian Tube ft Iron Co., Montreal. 
Pliers 

Henderson ft Richardson, Montreal. 

Smith Hardware Co., Montreal. 
Poultry Netting 

Greening, B., Wire Co., Hamilton, 
Ont. 

John Lysaght, Ltd., Bristol, Newport 
and Montreal. 
Pruning Knives 

International Tool Co., Detroit. 
Pumps 

Canada Foundry Co., Ltd., Toronto. 

R. McDougall Co., Gait. Ont. 

F. E. Myers ft Bro., Ashland. Ohio. 

Red Jacket Mfg. Co., Davenport, Iowa. 
Pumps, Power 

Canadian Fairbanks-Morse Co.. Ltd., 
Montreal, 
Putty 

Brandram-Henderson Co. Montreal. 

Canada Paint Co., Montreal. 

Sherwin-Williams Co., Montreal. 

Pinchin-.Tohnson A Co., Toronto. 

Steel Co. of Canada, Ltd., Hamilton. 
Rat Traps 

Canada Wire ft Iron Goods Mfg. Co.. 
Hamilton. 

Lovell Mfg. Co., Erie, Pa. 

Oneida Community, Ltd., Niagara 
Falls. 
Razors 

Gillette Safety Razor Co., Montreal. 

Qreeff-Bredt ft Co., Toronto. 

Jonathan Crookes ft Son, Sheffield. 
Eng. 

Dorkpr Bros, ft Co., Montreal, 

Jss. rfntton ft Co.. Montreal. 

Kampfe Bros., New York. 
Raznr Blades. 

S ■riTAmlinrrnr, f'hrfedemfabrik. 
Sch'-fn-ihrrc. Germany. 
Razor Hones 

Canadian Hart Wheels, Ltd., Ham- 
ilton. 

Carborundum Co., Niagara Falls, N.T. 
"ar.nr Strops 

J. R. Torrey ft Co., Worcester, Mass. 
Registers 

Jas. Stewart Mfg. Co., Woodstock, 
Ont. 

Canadian Ferrosteel Co., Bridgeburg. 
Rivets 

Steel Co. of Canada, Hamilton. 

Parmenter ft Bulloch Co., Gananoque. 

P. L. Robertson Mfg. Co., Ltd., Mil- 
ton West, Ont. 
Roofing Supplies 

Barber Asphalt Co.. Philadelphia. 

Brantford Roofing Co.. Brantford. 

Canadian Snpply Co., Toronto. 

Dominion Roofing Co. of Canada. 
Ltd., Toronto. 

Gait Art Metal Co., Gait. Ont. 

McArthur. Alex., * Co., Montreal. 

Metal Shingle ft Siding Co., Preston. 
Ont. 

Metallic Roofing r«.. Toronto. 

United Roofing ft Mfg. Co., Phila- 
delphia. P». 

Winnipeg Paint ft Glass Co., Winni- 
peg. 



Rope 

independent Cordage Co., Toronto. 
Rules and Gauges 

Jas. Chesterman ft Co., Ltd., Shef- 
field, England. 

Lufkin Rule Co., Windsor. 
Saws 

Atkins, E. C, ft Co., Indianapolis, 

Ind. 
Disston. Henry, ft Sons, Philadelphia. 
Drabble ft Sanderson, Sheffield, Eng. 
Shurley Dietrich Co., Ltd., Gait, Ont. 
Simonds Canada Saw Co., Montreal. 
Spear ft Jackson, Sheffield, Eng. 
Scales 

Aylmer Pump A Scale Co., Aylmer, 

Ont. 
Burrow, Stewart ft Milne Co., Ham- 
ilton. 
Renfrew Scale Co., Renfrew, Ont. 
Screen Door Sets 
P. ft F. Corbin, New Britain, Conn. 
Stanley Works, New Britain, Conn. 
Screws, Nuts, Bolts 
National Acme Mfg. Co., Montreal. 
Steel Co. of Canada, Limited, Ham- 
ilton. 
Screws, Wood 
P. L. Robertson Mfg. Co., Milton, 

Ont. 
Steel Co. of Canada, Hamilton. 
Scythe Stones 

The Carborundum Co., Niagara Falls. 
New York. 
Shears, Scissors 

Acme Shear Co., Bridgeport, Conn. 

R. Heinisch'a Sons Co., Newark, N.J. 

Henry T. Seymour Shear Co., New 
York. 

J. Wiss A Sons Co., Newark, N.J. 
Shelf Boxes 

Cameron A Campbell, Toronto. 
Shellacs 

Berry Bros., Walkerville. 
Shovels and Spades 

Spear ft Jackson, Sheffield, Eng, 
Sieves and Screens 

Canada Wire A Iron Goods Mfg. Co., 

Hamilton. 
B. Greening Wire Co., Ltd., Hamil- 
ton. 
Silverware 
McGlashan, Clarke Co., Niagara Falls. 
Oneida Community, Ltd., Niagara 
Falls. 
Sporting Specialties. 
Marble Arms & Mfg. Co., Gladstone. 
Mich. 
Sprayers 
Cavers Bros., Gait, Ont. 
T. Collins Mfg. Co., Toronto. 
Thos. Daridson Mfg. Co., Montreal. 
The Sheet Metal Products Co.of Canada 
Ltd., Montreal, Toronto, Winnipeg 
E. T. Wright A Co., Hamilton. 
Spramotor Co., London. 
Springs 

B. Greening Wire Co., Ltd., Hamilton 

Henderson ft Richardson, Montreal. 
Spring Hinges, Etc. 

Chicago Spring Butt Co., Chicago, DJ. 

Standard Mfg. Co., Shelby, Ohio. 
Stains, Shingle 

Berry Bros., Walkerville. 
Stains, Wood 

Berry Bros., Walkerville. 
Staples 

B. Greening Wire Co., Ltd., Hamilton 

Steel Co. of Canada, Ltd., Hamilton. 
Steel— High Speed 

Alexander Gibb, Montreal. 

Henderson A Richardson, Montreal. 
Steel— Cold Rolled Strip 

Morris A Bailey Steel Co., Pittsburg. 
Steel W're Hoop* 

Steel Co. of Canada, Ltd., Hamilton. 
Stencils 

Hamilton Stamp ft Stencil Co., Ham- 
ilton, Ont. 

McClary's, London, Ont. 

The Sheet Metal Products Co.of Canada 
Ltd., Montreal, Toronto, Winnipeg 

E. T. Wright ft Co., Hamilton. Ont. 
Herod Machine ft Stamping Co., 

Brantford. 
Store Ladders 

Hamilton Brass Mfg. Co., Hamilton, 
Ont. 

F. E. Myers ft Bro., Ashland, Ohio. 
Stoves, Furnaces 

Burrow, Stewart & Milne Co., Ham- 
ilton. 

Findlay Bros., Carleton Place. 

Clare Bros. & Co.. Preston. 

Holland Furnace Co., Holland, Mich. 

Thos. Daridson Mfg. Co.. Montreal. 

McClary's, London, Ont. 

Pease Foundry Co., Toronto. 

D. J. Barker A Co.. Pieton. 
Stoves, Gas. 

Burrow, Stewart A Milne Co., Ham 
ilton. 

McClary Mfg. Co.. London. Ont. 
Tacks 

The Steel Co. of Canada, Ltd., Ham- 
ilton. 
Tapes 
Jas. Chesterman A Co., Sheffield, Eng. 
Lufkin Rule Co., Windsor, Ont. 
Tiling— Wall and Floor 
The Barton-Netting Co., Ltd., Wind- 
sor. Ont. 



Tin Plate 
Henderson ft Richardson, Montreal. 

A. C. Leslie A Co., Montreal. 

B. A S. H. Thompson A Co., Mont- 
real. 

M. A L. Samuel, Benjamin ft Co., 
Toronto 
Tools 

The Chapi" ■)&<■» ens Co., Pine Mead- 
ow, Conn. 
The Good ell Pratt Co., Greenfield, 

Mass. 
Spear A J season, Sheffield, Eng. 
Allan lulls Edge Tool Co., Gait. 
Armstrong Bros. Tool Co., Chicago. 
Robt. Son.y A Sons, Sheffield. 
Stanley ttule ft Levtl Co., New 

Britain. 
Intemationaj Tool Co., Detroit. 
Tools — MetaJ Workers' 

Brown-BoggF Co., Hamilton. 
Tool Grinders 

American Grinder Mfg. Co., Milwaukee 

Wis. 
Luther Grinder Mfg. Co., Milwaukee, 
Richards-Wilcox Mfg. Co., Aurora, 

Trucks 

Aylmer Pump A Scale Co., Aylmer, 
Ont. 

Burrow, Stewart & Milne Co., Ham- 
ilton. 

Renfrew Scale Co., Renfrew, Oo. 
Varnishes: See Paints 

Berry Bros., Limited, Walkerville, Oast 

Dougall Varnish Co., Montreal. 

Glidden Varnish Co., Toronto. 

International Varnish Co., Toronto. 

Pratt A Lambert, Bridgeburg. 
Ventilators 

Harris, J. W., Co., Montreal. 
Vises 

Henderson ft Richardson, Montreal. 

Hollands Mfg. Co., Erie. Pa. 

Chaa. Parker Co., Meriden, Conn. 

Prentiss Vise Co., New York. 
Washing Machines, Etc. 

J. H. Connor ft Son., Ottawa, Ont 

Oummer-Dowswell Ltd., Hamilton, Oat 

Henderson & Richardson, Montreal. 

D. Maxwell ft Son, St. Mary's, Ont, 

One Minute Washer Co., Toronto. 

London Foundry Co., London. 
Wall Plaster 

Manitoba Gypsum Co.. Winnipeg. 
Waffle Irene 

Stover Mfg Co., Freeport, IB. \ 

Wagons — Children's 

Wodstoek Wagon Co., Woodstock. 
Washers 

P. L. Robertson Mfg. Co., Mitten. 

Ont. 
Steel Co. of Canada, Limited, Hamilton 
White Lead 

Brandram-Henderson Co., Montreal. 
Steel Co. of Canada, Limited, Hamilton 
Wholesale Hardware 
CaTerhill. Learmont ft Co., Montreal 
Howland, H. 8.. Sons ft Co., Toronto 
Lewis Bros, ft Co., Montreal. 

Window Guards 

Canada Wire ft Iron Goods Mfg. Co.. 
Hamilton. 

B. Greening Wire Co., Ltd., Hamilton 
Wire Guards 

B. Greening Wire Co., Ltd., Hamilton 
Wire Doer Guards 

B. Greening Wire Co., Ltd., Hamilton 
Wire— Iron, Steel, Brass and 
Copper 

B. Greening Wire Co., Ltd., Hamilton 

Henderson ft Richardson, Montreal. 

Laidlaw Bale-Tie Co., Hamilton, Ont. 

P. L. Robertson Mfg. Co., Milton, Ont. 

Steel Co. of Canada, Limited, Hamilton 
Wire Mats 

Andrews Wire Works of Canada, Ltd.. 

Watford, Ont 
Canada Wire ft Iron Goods Mfg. Oe.. 

Hamilton. 
B. Greening Wire Co., Ltd., Hamilton 
Wire Goods, Bright 

Steel Co. of Canada, Limited, Hamilton 
Wire Goods 
Canada Wire ft Iron Goods Mfg. Oe., 
Hamilton. 
Wire Machinery 

Ed Brand, 47] Moss Lane., Manchester 

Eng. 
Wire Products 

Andrews Wire Works, Watford, Oat 
Wire Rope. 

The B. Greening Wire Rope Co., Ltd. 
Hamilton. 
Wire Springs 

B. Greening Wire Co., Ltd., Hamilton 

Henderson ft Richardson, Montreal, 

Jas. Steele Limited, Gnelph, Ont 

Wood Finishes 

Berry Bros., Walkerville. 
Wrenches 

Cochran Pips Wrenea Oe. 

Whitman ft Barnes Mfg. Oe., M. 
Catharines. 

Bemis ft Call Hdwe. ft Teal Oe,, 
Springfield, Mass. 



91 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Raise The Percentage of Your Sales 



"%*#*" 




& 



• 280 Galibre 
HighVeloeity 



You can sell 
any sportsman 
who needs a good 
rifle a "Ross 



.280" (HighVeloeity) more readily than some cheaper and perhaps 
more or less well known make. Moreover, every such sale means 
a satisfied customer, and a very nice profit for you. 

It's worth your while to think over the "Ross High Velocity" 
proposition. 



ROSS RIFLE CO. 



QUEBEC 



RO s?cfH? D ON WOOD SCREWS 

The hardwareman who is wide awake can make excellent 
profits by boosting this new wood screw. 

The square hole, into which a specially made screwdriver fits, 
has become extremely popular with every user. With this the 
woodworker can do the work in less time and without danger of 
destroying the wood, as the screwdriver cannot slip. 



~^m 




T 

o 




We are also manufacturers of Hand Drivers, Yankee Bitt, 
Brace Bits, Rivets, Burrs, Washers, Nails, Wire, etc. 

Write for catalogue and prices. 
The P. L. Robertson Manufacturing Co., Limited, Milton, Ont. 

TORONTO WAREHOUSE, 19 JARVIS STREET - F. J. SCHUCH, Agent 




92 



HARDWARE AND METAL 




AXE HANDLES 



Every dealer should get acquainted with 
STILL'S Axe Handles. 

Progressive dealers all over the country 
are increasing their trade and profits by 
handling our QUICK SELLING SPECI- 
ALTY. 

STILL'S AXE HANDLES REPRE- 
SENT ALL THAT IS BEST IN QUALITY 
OF MATERIALS, SKILLED WORKMAN- 
SHIP AND COMPLETE MANUFACTUR- 
ING FACILITIES. 

Meet the coming demand with a fair 
trial order. We assure satisfaction. 

J.H. STILL MFG.C0.,Ltd. 



ST. THOMAS, 



ONT. 



C 



HICMC 



O 



TRADE BUILDING 

Have you a stock of Spring Hinges that have 
distinctive selling features which your salesmen 
can offer and which would make the prospective 

purchaser buy them and no 

other? 

CHICAGO "RELAX" 
SPRING HINGES 

are in great demand. They 
are substantial in construction 
and readily applied. The 
EXCLUSIVE FEATURE of 
spring action release, allowing 
the door to be placed at any 
desired position and automatically re-engaging 
when the door is closed, is of recognized merit and 
utility. 

S«»nd for Catalogue VI 26. It fully illustrates and describes 
the most complete line of Spring Hinges manufactured. 

Chicago Sprhjg^utt (£ompmj# e 




CHJCAGO 




NEW YORK 




DYAND^ 
E CUP N?£ 



THE "HANDY ANDY" FORCE CUP 

FOR HOUSEHOLD USE 

Enables anyone to keep the waste pipes of sinks, basins, 
baths, tubs, etc., free and clear, and in a safe and 
sanitary condition. 

THERE'S A GOOD SALE FOR THEM 

L MANUFACTURED SOLELY BY 

I The Gutta Percha & Rubber Mfg. Co. of Toronto, Limited 

Toronto Montreal Halifax Winnipeg Calgary Vancouver 



MEASURING TAPES 

MUST BE ACCURATE 

To sell well they must also be of the most improved design ; particularly adapted 
to the work they have to do ; durahle and reliable. 



Those that bear 
this Trade-Mark 



fUFKIN 



are the leaders of the field because they have always given satisfaction. THEY 
ARE DOMINION MADE. 




FOR SALE BY 
ALL JOBBERS. 



th e fi/FKiN Rule (?o. ofQanadaJtd. 

W/NDSO/tONT. 



CATALOGUE 
ON REQUEST 




Canadian Factory—Niagara Falls, Ont. 



IN THIS ISSUE— "A PROPER SYSTEM FOR WINDOW TRIMMING." 

HARDWARE-METAL 



Vol. XXIV. 



Published Weekly by 

THE MACLEAN PUBLISHING COMPANY, LIMITED 

Publication Office: Toronto, Canada 
Aug. 17, 1912 



No. 33 




| Good Profits Are Within Your Reach | 



ROGERS' 
Portland Cement 



is recognized by all leading contractors for its great 
strength, evenness of set and uniformity of its action. 

Why Not Sell Cement? 

On account of the popularity of this cement, a display 

will work wonders in procuring the contractors' patronage. 

Our cement is up to the Government standard and is 

guaranteed to give satisfactory results. Do not delay. 

Remember, an OPPORTUNITY to procure EXTRA 

PROFITS confronts you. 

WE SHIP PROMPTLY 

ALFRED ROGERS LIMITED 

28 West King Street, TORONTO 

N. J. DINNEN & CO., 
Western Sales Mgrs., WINNIPEG 



s«s5s DMn*Bssss!9B09sasefMsaswaai<8S9a9(iiMMMMMM* & mm"'- 






/"Vl 

I; 






'•"£1 



h. 














;*•<•■ 





HARDWARE AND METAL 



The Razor For Which Men Willingly 
Pay a Five Dollar Bill 

With some razors you have to depend for sales on cheapness. You 
make but a paltry profit, and the purchasers are soon convinced that 
they paid quite enough for what they got. 

"With other razors some special selling plan is depended on — a month's 
free trial of the regular razor, or a trial razor at a fraction ol the price 
asked for the regular model. 

THE GILLETTE SAFETY RAZOR 

easily outsells them all, and on this ground only — that it gives a REAL 
SHAVE — the best a man can enjoy. 

No cut prices or other special inducements are needed to coax men to 
take home the GILLETTE. Over a million a year willingly buy it out- 
right, and pay the full price for it. 

As for trial models, no shaving device has ever been produced to sell 
at less than $5.00 which COULD successfully demonstrate the smooth 
perfection of the GILLETTE shave. Therefore we offer no trial model. 

If you want a live, clean, 
high-class razor trade, at 
profitable, protected prices, 
and no returns or dissatis- 
faction — 

Concentrate on the GILLETTE 
— it pays. 



The Gillette Safety Razor Co. 

of Canada, Limited 

Office and Factory : 

THE NEW GILLETTE BUILDING 
ST. ALEXANDER STREET, MONTREAL 



^Gillette 



KNOWN THE 



WORLD OVER 




HARDWARE AND METAL 




A few of our beautiful line of 

Cut Glass Knobs 



HIGH-CLASS BUILDERS' 

HARDWARE of all kinds for 

high-class buildings, banks, offices, 

residences, etc. 

The Belleville Hardware and Lock Manufacturing Go. 

LIMITED 



Head Office and 
Factory 



BELLEVILLE 
Canada 




HICAC 

irare mm 




A SUGGESTION 

Have you a stock of Spring Hinges that have 
distinctive selling features which your salesman 
can offer and which would make the prospective 

purchaser buy them and no 

other? 

Chicago "Triplex" 
Spring Butts 

offer this advantage to you. 
The appearance, durability and 
finish of this article are unsur- 
passed, and in consideration of 
prices that are conservative in respect to value, 
the up-to-date dealer cannot afford to neglect 
this profitable business. 

Send for Catalogue M 26. It fully illustrates and describes 
the most complete line of Spring Hinges manufactured. 




(CKitaso Spritjfi%ttti£otiipcnj& 



CHICAGO 




\a 



NEW YORK 



Made by 

North Bros. 
Mfg. Co. 

PHILADELPHIA, PA 



A New Line 

"Yankee " Plain Screw Drivers 

Strong, durable, well balanced tools, of the same high 
quality of material and workmanship as other "Yankee" 
Tools, which to-day are without equal. 

The blade and ferrule are highly polished, the 
handle of hardwood, finished in dull black, 
making a handsome appearance. 

Each tool is thoroughly tested and the 
blades positively guaranteed not 
to turn in the handle. 
SJjSft^. Your Jobber Will Supply You 

No. 90, Standard Style, Four- 

""^*?W II 'Ullfefe, teen Sizes, 2 to 30 in. 

©fe^ll^. No - 95 ' Cabinet Style, 

^llfllllllW. ^2 H!^ (Slim Blade) 

^- Eleven Sizes, 2} 

to 15-V in. 




1 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



TU "T*C1 IPQF" PI I1MPFR includes pump jack and 

1 llC Hil^L-ill OL rJJlVlrCiIV GASOLINE ENGINE COMPLETE 



1 




EVERY UP-TO-DATE FARMER WILL BUY^ONE 

There is no longer any excuse for not having a good supply of water anywhere at any time. 
The Eclipse Pumper has been designed especially for this service, to pump water when you want 
it to, and at small expense. It is independent of wind or weather, and will pump from even the 
deepest wells — in fact, it will pump as much water as a 10 or 12-foot windmill running in a 
20 mile wind. It uses about one pint of gasoline per hour. Think of it, over 1,000 gallons of 
water pumped against a head of over 80 feet on one pint of gasoline. 

This pump should be sold by every dealer — the profits are consistent and reliable, and the 
demand is certain to increase. 

Write for full particulars. Keep one in stock. 



The Canadian Fairbanks-Morse Co., 

LIMITED 



MONTREAL 
ST. JOHN 
OTTAWA 



TORONTO 

WINNIPEG 

CALGARY 



SASKATOON 
VANCOUVER 
VICTORIA 




SM p Enamelled Tea and Coffee Pots 
• ill* I m are popular sellers everywhere 




Prices 

on 

Application 




Our Brands, "DIAMOND," "PEARL" and White Enamelled Wares, will satisfy 
the most critical patrons. Our stock is complete, and we can ship promptly. 



SEND US YOUR ORDERS 



The SHEET METAL PRODUCTS CO. of Canada, Limited 

Successors to KEMP MANUFACTURING COMPANY j 

MONTREAL TORONTO WINNIPEG 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



PERFECTION ASH SIFTERS 



HEAVY GALVANIZED STEEL 

Effect a Great Saving in the expense of heating, besides affording a Cleanly 
and Dustless means of disposing of ashes. 

The Simplest,' Quickest, Cleanest and most effective method of Saving 
Cinders and Unburnt Coal ever put before the people 

The Removable Top Casing makes it very easy to get at the interior. The 
Gravity Dust Damper in the outlet prevents dust going out with coal and 
cinders. 

The Stationary Screen in the Hopper, together with the Tapering Rotary 
Screen, sifts large quantities of ashes quicker and cleaner than any other sifter. 




Showing Interior. 



It 



TRIUMPH ASH SIFTERS 

HEAVY GALVANIZED STEEL 

A Practical, Effective and Durable Sifter at a moderate price. Sifts 
Ashes Thoroughly and Quickly. 

The General Construction is very much the same as the Perfection 
Sifter, except that it does not have the Stationary Screen in the bottom 
of the Cinder Chute. 

Has Heavy Galvanized Steel Body and Can Cover, Double Lock 
Seamed, Revolving Cylinder of Heavy Galvanized Hardware Cloth, 
with Galvanized Steel Bands at the ends. 




NEVER BREAK 
ASH or GARBAGE CANS 

Extra Heavy Corrugated Galvanized Steel, with 
Heavy Band Riveted to Top and Bottom Rims. 

Galvanized Wrought Steel, Riveted Side Handles. 

Strongest and Best Ash Can on the Market. 



Sold Without Cover. 



Two Sizes 



i 



18 in. diameter, 25 in. high. 
16% in. diameter, 25 in. high. 




Shown on Can. Sold Without Can. 




CAN OR BARREL COVER 

Fits 18-inch Can or common wood 
barrel. 

Far superior to wood cover. It 
laps over side of barrel, keeping 
out rats and insects. 



INVESTIGATE THIS LINE BEFORE YOU BUY 
It is now time you were preparing to buy your Fall requirements. 

LEWIS BROS., LIMITED, MONTREAL 



OTTAWA 



TORONTO 



VANCOUVER 



HARDWARE AND METAL 




Success Lamps 

the Best Sellers in 

Canada 

There's nothing fancy about them. 
They're just plain, solid, substantial, 
serviceable lamps. All metal, centre 
draft, easily wicked, easily cleaned — 
they're built to give light. And believe 
us, they do. 



Success Lamps Will Bring 
Customers to Your Store 

For they're lamps that everybody needs. Your own 
success depends a lot on the salability of your stock. And 
you can find nothing more salable. 

You'll want your Fall Stock soon. Mail a postal to our 
Canadian office. 

The Pittsburgh Lamp, Brass & Glass Co. 

General Offices and Factories ; PITTSBURGH. Pa.. U.S.A. 



Canadian 
Branch 




119WortleyRoad, 
London, Ont. 



R. E. DAVIS. Special Representative. 



D 



ON'T base your judgment of the 
Angle Lamp on what you know of 
other oil burning lamps. It is as dif- 
ferent as the selling policy of the 
Angle Manufacturing Company is differ- 
ent to that of other lamp manufacturers. 

We are not dominated by the oil produc- 
ers. The Angle Lamp saves oil — just as 
the Angle policy saves profits for the deal- 
ers. We do not 
sell Angle Lamps 

through jobbers. One 
dealer in a town has an 
exclusive right to sell 
them. Our Protec- 
tive Distributor Policy 
keeps him free from 
competition. 




All Styles, 1 to 8 Burners. 



Let us write you about 
it. 



Angle Manufacturing Co. 

244-24b West 23rd Street, 
New York City 



j/ A Bur- Nor Special 




. 



Bur-Nor Hatchets 
Never Lose Their Heads 

And 

Their Blades Are Finely 
Tempered. 



Value and satisfaction considered, you 
cannot go astray in stocking our Bur-Nor 
all Steel Hatchet. The Blades are carefully 
tempered in oil, the handles are strong- 
ly reinforced, and are fifty per cent, 
stronger than second growth hick- 
ory. All parts are firmly rivet- 
ed under tremendous pres- 
sure. 

We solicit investiga- 
tion before buy- 
ing for fall. 



Get our Prices 
And Catalogue. 
To-day's the Day 



Burgess -Norton Mfg. Co. 

Geneva, 111., U.S.A.. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 




dad Lake 



t&arbcrAspfi? 1 
sjymg Company 





THE TRINIDAD-LAKE-ASPHALT 




appeals to owners of buildings with large roof-surface as well as those 
of smaller buildings. 

It is used on factories, warehouses, train-sheds, auditoriums, and 
similar buildings that take a lot of covering. 

The natural asphalt makes Genasco last, and it is economical, both 
in first cost and last cost. This means big orders for the alert dealer. 

Are you getting your share of Genasco business? 

Write us for full information; then order from your jobber. 

THE BARBER ASPHALT PAVING COMPANY 

Largest producers of asphalt, and largest manufacturers of ready roofing in the world 

PHILADELPHIA 
NEW YORK SAN FRANCISCO CHICAGO 

The Kant-leak Kleet, for smooth surface roofings makes their appli- 
cation easy and sure. Prevents nail leaks. Does away with cement. 

Caverhill, Learmont & Company, Distributing Agents— Montreal, Winnipeg and Vancouver. D. H. Mowden & Co., Ltd., 2 t York St., ' ondon, Otit. 






96 

HAND VISE 



One of the main features of this Hand Vise is its parallel jaws. 

No matter how far you open them, provided you don't unscrew 

the wing nut, you will always find the jaws parallel. 

Although we show our 96 Hand Vise here, it is only one tool of 

the many which we make. 

The line in its entirety comprises over 1,200 tools and devices, 

which are fully shown and described in Catalog No. 10. 

SEND FOR ONE. 

G00DELL-PRATT COMPANY 



GREENFIELD 




MASS., U.S.A. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



THE 

STEEL COMPANY OF CANADA 

LIMITED 



Our Mills 

Can Ship Immediately 

From Stock 

BOLTS and NUTS, 
PRESSED SPIKES, STOVE 

BOLTS, STOVE RODS, 
TACKS, HAY BALING 

WIRE 



DISTRICT SALES OFFICES: 

HAMILTON, TORONTO, MONTREAL, WINNIPEG 

W. A. MacLennan, Vancouver, B.C. H. G. Rogers, St. John, N.B. 

J. B. H. Rickaby, Victoria, B.C. Geo. D. Hatfield, Halifax, N.S. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 




Send Us Your Letter Orders 



We are justly proud of the efficiency of our Letter Order 
Department. Our aim is to be of real service to our custom- 
ers, and this section of our organization is well equipped 
to handle all orders promptly. The more you use our Letter 
Order Service, the better service we are enabled to give you. 

Send us your Orders 

H. S. Howland, Sons & Co., Limited 

Wholesale Hardware 



WE SHIP PROMPTLY 



TORONTO 

GRAHAMS NAILS ARE THE BEST 



OUR PRICES ARE RIGHT 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Crescent 




Brand 



Crescent Brand HARDWARE 




Butt Hinges 



Strap Hinges 



Tee Hinges 



Barn Door Hangers Parlor Door Hangers 
Trolley Hangers Hinged Hasps Shelf Brackets 



Wrought Staples 



Rollston Pulleys 



Gate Hooks 



Wagon Hardware 



Steel Sheets 



Bands 



Etc. Etc. Etc. 



Bars 



Rods 



Wire 



. CANADA STEEL GOODS CO., Limited 

HAMILTON - - - CANADA 





— ^y t( f f\ f\ j • 




HARDWARE 

WINDOW DRESSING • 


iou may oecume a r radical 
1 Window Dresser for $2.50 

This is the first book ever written 


— 


devoted exclusively to Hardware Win- 
dow Display, and is a really newand 
good book. It is a practical, up-to- 
date collection of ideas of the most 
expert window dressers in the 
world. There are hundreds of dis- 
plays in the book that can be put in 
at practically no expense — anyone of 
them will bring enough extra trade 
to the store to pay for the book 
many times. 

256 Pages 8x11 Inches 300 Illustrations 

Price $2.50i (Payable in Advance) 
Send (or Descriptive Circular 

■ Technical Books, l^-l^g University Ave., Toronto 



HARDWARE AND METAL 




L 



Stanley Door Trim Plane 



THIS new Plane will make mortises for Butts, Face Plates, Strike 
Plates, Escutcheons, etc., without the use of a butt gauge or 
chisel. In fact it might very properly be termed a mechanical 
chisel. C It is also a very superior Router Plane for surfacing the 
bottom of grooves or other depressions parallel with the general 
surface of the work. C. The Plane is japanned, has nickel plated 
trimmings, rosewood handles, and three forged steel cutters. 

Send for Special Circular 



No. 171 



Length.,11 Inches Weight, 3 Pounds LlSt, $2.75 



New Britain. Conn. U.S.A. 






HARDWARE AND METAL 




36 YEARS 

AND GOING STRONG 



Magnolia? Metal commonly runs ten and fifteen years, and sometimes twenty 
years, but here is a record that tops them all. Estimating nine hours as an aver- 
age working day, the time that the Magnolia bearings have run in the Ice Ma- 
chine mentioned below is equivalent to thirty-six years service and they are still 
running in good condition. 

THE BRYN MAWR REAL ESTATE CO., 
ENGINEER DEPARTMENT. 

Bryn Mawr, Pa., May 13th, 1912. 
Gentlemen : — ■ 

In answer to yours of May 8th, I wish to say that I have been using Magnolia Metal 
for about twenty years. 

I have an Ice Machine on which the main bearings and crank pins were filled with 
Magnolia Metal sixteen years ago. 

The Main bearings are still in first-class shape, but two years ago our Engineer tried 
to run without oil on the main crank, and we had to rebabbitt it. 

This machine runs continuously for five months during Summer, and averages eighteen 
hours a day the rest of the year. The principal use I have made of Magnolia Metal is for 
bearings on Ice Machines, High Speed Engines. Air Compressors and bearings on some 
Pumps, and I find that it gives satisfaction wherever used. 

Yours truly, 

WM. SCHOCH. 



SPECIAL OFFER 

PRACTICAL ENGINEER POCKET 
BOOK— 700 pages, over 2,000 subjects. 
Price 40c post paid. We import these 
books, in large numbers, from England, 
as an advertising medium, and give En- 
gineers benefit of low price. They are 
highly spoken of. Address Montreal 
Office. 



Sold by leading dealers everywhere or 

MAGNOLIA METAL CO. 

Office and Factory : 

225 St. Ambroise St. - MONTREAL 






The"RENFREW"Handy Two-Wheel TRUCK SCALE 



7 



44 



A Convenience and Protection for Farmers " 



^ 



This is a scale that pays the dealer A VERY ATTRACTIVE PROFIT— a scale that is becoming more 

and more popular every day with farmers. 

It is absolutely accurate and has many advantages over the common scale. 

With this scale in his possession the farmer knows the exact weight of the products he is selling— he 

is armed against short weights. 

The "RENFREW" TRUCK SCALES are GOVERNMENT TESTED and have been awarded their 

GOVERNMENT CERTIFICATE without question, and are backed by our WRITTEN GUARANTEE 

to be just as represented, and to give a long, reliable service. Capable of weighing anything from a 

single pound to 2000 pounds. 

The "RENFREW" TRUCK 

SCALES are rigidly built and will 

stand all kinds of rough usage. 

LET US SEND YOU ONE. Show 

it to every farmer who comes into 

the store, and see how many you 

can sell. 



Write for Circulars and prices NOW. 

Renfrew Scale Co. 

RENFREW, 0NT. 




10 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Sell GLUE in packages-it means less handling—more profit 

BRANTFORD 

ALL AROUND 

GLUE 

weighed and wrapped ready to 
hand over the counter. 

NO MUSS— NO FUSS- 
NO LOSS OF TIME 
V4 pounds, Y 2 pounds, pounds. 
Everybody's Glue Size, in pounds 
only. 

The quality is there and will be 
maintained. 

ASK YOUR JOBBER FOR PRICES 
AND DISCOUNTS 

PROTECT your show-cases by 
using the 

BRANTFORD COIN 
MAT 

same as cut at left in Blue 

and Orange. 

WRITE US FOR ONE. 

CANADA GLUE GO. 

LIMITED 
BRANTFORD, ONT. 

Manufacturers of Glue and 
Gelatine of all kinds and for 
all purposes. 




Who seeks and will not take when once tis 
offered shall never find it more. 

Antony and Cleopatra. 



EVERY WORKMAN in our factory has absolute confidence in the Babbitt Metals we 
manufacture. 

EVERY WORKMAN in our factory knows that nothing but the purest raw material is 
used, this and the knowledge that his efforts are appreciated inspires him to do his best. 

EVERY WORKMAN in our factory is proud of the reputation attained by 

HARRIS HEAVY PRESSURE 

"The Babbitt Metal without a fault" 

and of assisting to produce a Babbitt Metal which is acknowledged by all engineers as the 
best for all general machinery bearings. 

MOST HARDWAREMEN CARRY IT IN STOCK 
Do You 7 If not, write for prices 

The Canada Metal Co., Limited 

Head Office and Factory: Fraser Avenue, TORONTO 



Branch 
Factories : 



Brennan St., 
MONTREAL 



Chambers St., 
WINNIPEG 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



The BIG DEMAND has made it possible for 
us to establish plant in Canada to build the 

Chicago Steel-Bending Brakes 

This Brake is 

a Necessity to the 

Sheet Metal Dealer 

it enables him to bend sheet metal easily and 
with an accuracy that cannot be obtained 
through hand work. 

This is just the machine for the busy dealer — 
it will save him much time and labor. 

Can be easily operated by one man — he 

doesn't need a helper. 

Built for a large variety of work. 

Write us to-day for Catalog. Full particulars 
and prices given. 

EDWARD DREIS Chatham, Ontario 




z5Y 

TRADE DISCOUNT 



**m m — » 



OFF price list A-17 



METAL CEILINGS & WALLS 

WRITE US FOR THIS LIST 
The Gait Art Metal Co., Limited ( Dept"C") 

GALT, ONT. 



r 



12 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



LUNDY 




SHOVELS 



Have All The Qualities That Are Essential to Rapid Sellers 

Our shovels are not experiments, but products that have been proven superior to other'brands. 

They are made from Open Hearth Crucible Steel. The strap is extra strong, being double ply and carefully welded. The 
point of the blade is never heated during the process, adding extra strength there also. 

LUNDY SHOVELS IN VARIOUS STAGES OF CONSTRUCTION _ „. . 

Our shovels yield a splendid profit 

and are the best insurance against dissatisfied cus- 
tomers — they^are the kind that bring larger business. 

LUNDY SHOVELS are excellently finished and 
are very attractive. 

We make three grades so as to completely meet 
the requirements of the trade. 

If yourj jobber does not handle them, write us 
direct. 

We guarantee quick shipments and complete 
satisfaction. 

GIVE THEM A TRIAL. 

The LUNDY SHOVEL 
AND TOOL CO., Ltd. 

General Office and Works : 

PETERBORO, ONTARIO 

SELLING AGENTS : 

Delorme Bros., Montreal ; Tees & Persse, Ltd.. Winnipeg; 

Tees & Persse of Alberta, Ltd., Calgary ; E. E. Crandall, 

Vancouver, B.C. ; N. B. Misener, Toronto. 




A Necessity to EVERY DEALER Who'Handles Sheet Metal ! 

Our Combined Lever Punched Slitting Shears 



T 



SAVE MUCH TIME AND LABOR 



HIS is a machine that is constructed of the best 
material and made to stand years of hard service. 



If you handle sheet metal and are not now using one of 
these machines you should install one at once. You 
will find it indispensable after a trial. 

They slit any length or width of sheet required up to 
their capacity. Made in two sizes, viz. — Nos. 10 and 11. 
No. 10 will slit No. 12 gauge sheet iron, soft steel or bar 
iron 1/4" x 2" or 3/8" round, and will punch a 5/16" hole 
in 1/4" iron or its equivalent in lighter metal. 

No. 11 is the same as No. 10, only heavier and will cut 
No. 10 gauge sheet iron or punch a 3/8" hole in l/4" iron. 

Write for Full Particulars and Discounts. 

The Brown-Boggs Co., Limited 

HAMILTON, ONTARIO, CAN. 



13 




nMmmiinitinmim lunula ' ' ' I "' ll " l "" l " lu " ,1 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



For Quick and Satisfactory Sales Try 

"EMPIRE" 

HOT AIR REGISTERS 

These are two popular and very neat designs that are sure 
to attract those who are interested. 

The "Empire Special" Register meets the demand for a 
register with a large opening. Has all the qualities that are 
required to assure the complete satisfaction of the user. 





MOORISH DESIGN CAST REGISTER 
Made in full sizes from 7x10 to 12x15 



EMPIRE SPECIAL 

New design, made in full sizes from 7x10 

to 12 x 15 

Made in Japanned, nickel-plated and oxidized 

Write us to-day for full particulars, catalogue 
and discounts. 

Others dealers are making good profits by handling 
this line — you can do the same. We guarantee to 
please you. Do not Delay. 

THE 

Canadian Heating & Ventilating 
Company, Limited 

OWEN SOUND ONTARIO 

Or The Canadian Heating and Ventilating Co. Branch : 
521 Henry Avenue, Winnipeg, Man. 



r &RARMS(& 



q Right in every hardware store is the most logical place for a line of reliable, accurate, and 
moderate-priced single guns. 

For ridding premises of pests — snakes, rats, chucks and the many kinds of crop and poultry de- 
stroyers, the Harrington & Richardson single guns are specially suited. 

Cfl There is a large and growing demand for an economical and efficient weapon for just that 
purpose, as well as for occasional hunting. 



Here's the gun 



TRADE 






Specifications, 12 to 28 gauge— 26 to 32 inch barrel— ejecting or non-eiecting— f;ne black walnut stock — hard 
rubber butt plate — weight 5' 4 to 6><. lbs., according to gauge and barrel. For black or smokeless powder. 

<fl These guns are quick sellers. They are made and sold under the broad H. & R. guarantee of 
quality, reliability and satisfaction. With a few of these II. & R. guns in stock, the hardware 
dealer is equipped for a profitable and increasing trade. 

Our 40-page catalogue is yours for the asking. It contains valuable selling points for every hard- 
ware dealer, and shows the complete II. & R. line. Ask for it now while you think of it. 

Harrington & Richardson Arms Co., !&£££££. 



14 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



The Extra Long Fire Travel of 

The Pilot 
uccess Furnace 



s 




Is one of the many quick selling features of this high grade 
furnace. It prevents heat from going to waste up the chimney — 
keeps the home comfortable at a saving in fuel. 

The Pilot Success gives a trade winning satisfaction. Every 
user is an enthusiastic advertiser. 

Write at ones for full description. 

The Hall Zryd Foundry Co., Ltd 

HESPELER, ONTARIO 



15 



HARD W A RE AND MET A L 




If You Want Big Profits 
Sell Our Lines of 

Hinges, Butts, Hasps, Etc. 



The Quality is the Highest 

Our products are made from the choicest metals, by im- 
proved machinery and by long experienced workmen. 
Absolutely guaranteed to give satisfaction. 

Write for samples and prices. 

COWAN & BRITTON 

GANANOQUE, ONT. 




WASHING MACHINE HINGE 





You Can Increase Your Range Sales 

by handling our lines. Besides having a fuel saving grato 
that is a strong selling feature, they have a 

FUEL SAVER 

that also saves from 15 to 25% of the fuel and makes it 
possible for the housekeeper to have the fire under per- 
fect control at all times, hence no waste of fuel is 
incurred. 

Write at once for full particulars and prices. You 
cannot afford to overlook our trade-winning ranges. 

D. J. BARKER & COMPANY - Picton, Ontario 



Here is YOUR Chance 

to make your range department more 
profitable and more satisfactory. 

Happy Thought "Ranges 

are known from one side of the 
continent to the other and re- 
commended by every house- 
wife who ever used them. 

The "HAPPY THOUGHT" 

works equally well with coal 
or wood and gives a longer 
and more reliable service 
than any other. 

This is not a claim, but a 
fact, and we can prove it. 

Get a "HAPPY THOUGHT" 

Catalog at once. Each sale 
brings a good profit. 

The William Buck 
Stove Co., Limited 

Saskatoon Vancouver Brantford Montreal Winnipeg 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



EXPANSION 
BOLTS 



Somebody's Going To Get It 
—It Might As Well Be You 

We are receiving inquiries every day from people who have occasion to buy Expansion 
Bolts — these inquiries might just as well go to you — if you could see some of the letters 
from Dealers thanking us for sending them business, you would not hesitate to send 

for our 90 day Special Dealers' Proposition. We can refer in- 
quiries only to those who have our goods. 

It's easier to sell to a man when he's in your store than it is to 
get him to come. We are paying to get men to come to you. 
Can you supply them ? 

Star Expansion Bolt Co. 

CATALOGUE DEPT. 36 

147-149 Cedar Street, New York City 

Bacon Bros., 377 St. Paul St.. Montreal, Can.: Turner & Walker, 147 Bannatyne Ave.. Winnipeg. Can. 
H. F. Mcintosh & Co.. 28 Toronto St., Toronto, Can. 




New Process Saws 



GIVE RESULTS 
FROM WHICH 
YOUR STORE 
WILL BENEFIT 




'////////v///////A'/////y/////////^^yy//y/'/y/y/////////////^/^/////////////////^//^^^^ 



VANADIUM STEEL SAWS -double mermaid brand 

This is the best saw that it is possible to make, regardless of cost. 

The New Process is very high in temper and requires sharpening less frequently 
than any other on the market. Our aim has always been quality and our business 
shows it. 

The New Process Saw makes every user enthusiastic, and enthusiastic users are 
good advertisers for your store, as they will not only come again, but will indirectly 
bring you many new customers. 

Let us send you full particulars. 




Your Jobber Has Them 



Note Our Brands 



Write To-day 



Spear & Jackson, Limited 



SHEFFIELD 



ENGLAND 



MERMAID 



FRANK H. SCOTT (Canadian Agent) 
Coristine Building, MONTREAL 




l.F. M'-PJiOG 



17 



HARD W A RE AND METAL 

—THE DEFIANCE- 



THE MOST POWERFUL 
REGISTER IN THE WORLD 




Fits a stack head EIGHT INCHES deep, and accom- 
modates either a 12 in. or a 14. in. supply pipe. 
Write for prices. 

Canadian Ferrosteel Co., Limited 

BRIDGEBURG. ONTARIO 




No. 1186 Coal Grate 



MANUFACTURED BY 



The Ohio Foundry & 
Manufacturing Co. 

STEUBENVILLE. OHIO, U.S.A. 



Manufacturers of all styles of coal 
or gas burning fire-place goods, 
as well as andirons and wrought 
fire-place trimmings. 



IMPERIAL — STANDARD - SCALES 

400 Varieties Accurate, Durable, Well Finished 
Send for the large 128 page catalog and prices, No. 66 • 



Butchers' Scales 

Bathroom Scales 

Confectioners' Scales 

Dairy Scales 

Druggists' Scales 

Foundry Scales 

Grain Warehouse Scales 

Grain Elevator Scales 

Grocers' Scales 

Tea Scales 



Platform 
Scales 

All Capacities 

300 Lbs. to 
3000 Lbs. 




Letter and Postal Scales 

Railway Depot Scales 

Railway Track Scales 

Rolling Mill Scales 

Salt, Meat and Fish Scales 

Stock Scales 

Steelyards 

Weigh Beams 

Union Scales 

Etc. 



The Burrow, Stewart & Milne Co., Limited 

HEAD OFFICE AND WORKS : HAMILTON 
Offices and Warehouses at Toronto, Montreal and Winnipeg 

18 



HARDWARE AND METAL 




The Hardwareman 

who is not 
handling our 



"Metallic" 

Ceilings and Walls 

is not making as much 
money as he might. 

How about you ? 

WRITE US FOR CATALOGUE AND PRICE-LIST. 




There is nothing to touch " Metallic " 
for Kitchen Ceilings and Walls. 



THE METALLIC ROOFING 00. OF CANADA, Limited 



TORONTO, ONT. 



MANUFACTURERS 



WINNIPEG, MAN. 



Pink's 

Lumbering 

Tools 

MADE IN CANADA 

The Standard Tools in every province of the Dominion, New Zealand, Australia, Etc! 
We manufacture all kinds of lumber tools. Light and Durable. 

Send for Catalogue and Price List. Long Distance Phone No. 87. 

Sold throughout the Dominion by all Wholesale and Retail Hardware Merchants. 




Manufacturers 
of 



The Thos. Pink Company, Ltd., 

PEMBROKE, ONT. 



Lumber Tools 



19 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



New Process Steel Wire Trace Chains 



Tie Out Chains 
Halter Chains 



Dog Chains 
Cattle Chains 



THE MOST SATISFACTORY CHAIN TO HANDLE 




TIE OUT CHAINS 





CATTLE CHAINS— Close Ring 



CATTLE CHAINS— Open Ring 



MANUFACTURED BY 



THE B. GREENING WIRE CO., Limited 

HAMILTON, Ont. MONTREAL, Que. 




Bicycle hub cut from a solid bar of 
machinery steel 2y 2 in. diameter. 



Have You Work 

Like This ? 



Where a fine finish, accurate holes, and a 
clean cut-off is required? We will make this 
piece, or any other that can be made on a screw 
machine. Special prices on quantities of a kind, 
and the best service obtainable. A quotation 
will cost nothing. Send in your samples. 

For Standard Nuts, Cap and Set Screws, etc., 
the NAMCO trade mark is a sign of quality. 
All these parts are carried in stock for imme- 
diate shipment. 

The "Special Products" booklet gives cus- 
tomers a better idea of the Acme Quality and 
Service. Send for it. 




"NAMCO 



The National- Acme Mfg. Co. 

Screws, Bolts, Nuts and Special Milled Parts 

Montreal: DeCourcelles & G.T.R. 

ST. HENRI 




NAMCO 



20 



HARD W ARE AND METAL 



Preston Metal Garages 



have met with such favor among automobile owners that 
they are becoming known all over the country. In order to 
handle inquiries coming in we want agents all over the 
country. 

Every auto owner is a prospect. Write to-day for full infor- 
mation in regard to the agency for your territory. 



MENTION HARDWARE AND METAL 



MetalShingle&SidingC 



PRESTON ONT. 



MONTREAL QUE 



Hi 






l-iw 



wm 



, 



Mi 



P 






You Can Sell These Machines NOW! 

They're hot weather washers because they wash clothes thoroughly without any labor 



They Run Themselves 







MADE BY 



Agents : 
W. L. Haldimand & Son, 

MONTREAL 

H. F. Moulden & Son, 

WINNIPEG 



Cummer-Dowswell, Limited 

HAMILTON, ONTARIO 



21 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Hoe, Rake, Shovel, 

Axe, Adze, Pick, Sledge, 

Hay Fork, Manure Fork, 

Peevie, Spike Maul, 

Cant Hook, 

Hammer 

HANDLES 
Of Quality 

WHIFFLETREES 

DOUBLETREES 

NECKYOKES 



Our factory is located in the centre of 
the Hickory, Oak and White Ash belt of 
the Province of Ontario, therefore, we 
are in a position to secure raw materials 
of the very finest quality and at the 
lowest possible cost. 



The many repeat orders which we are 
constantly receiving are proof positive 
that our goods and their profit-yielding 
qualities appeal to the trade. 



WRITE FOR CATALOGUE 
AND PRICES NOW. 

W. C. CRAWFORD CO. 

LIMITED 
Tilbury, .... Ontario 





13! 



No Dirt 
Can Lodge 

in the 
"All-Metal" 



Opportunity is 
Before You 

Your opportunity for selling wash- 
boards lies in the "all-metal" kind. 
The housewife is quick to see its ad- 
vantages, and big sales are assured. 

The Meakins* 

Sanitary 
Washboards 

have no joints or wooden parts to catch 
and hold the dirt or germs, which 
means it is sanitary. 

Meakins' Sanitary Washboards are 
built on scientific principles. They are 
made in one piece, and will last twice 
as long as the old-fashioned wooden 
boards. It will pay you well to stock. 

MEAKINS & SONS 

Hamilton, - Ontario 



9,9. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



ELYS DANDY SUREHOLD BLANKET FASTENER 





THEO. J. ELY MFG. CO. 

ERIE, PA. 

Sample pair sent on receipt of 10c. to cover postage 





TOWNSEND MOWERS 



HAND MOWERS and HORSE MOWERS 



All Our Hand Mowers 
Are Ball Bearing 

SENT ON THEIR MERITS 



Write for Catalog 

S. P. Townsend CEL Co. 

ORANGE. N. J. 




The Hamilton 
RIFLES 



22 
CALIBER 



have reached the height of mechanical perfec- 
tion, being well balanced, accurate and abso- 
lutely safe. 

They have few working parts, which are very simple and can be easily kept 
clean. 

Both old and young will buy this attractive rifle on sight and you will benefit 
by their enthusiasm over its excellent service. 

Put it in stock — give it a fair trial, and if unsatisfactory return at our 
expense. 
GET OUE CIRCULARS AND PRICES. FOR SALE BY JOBBERS. 

C- J. Hamilton & Son, Plymouth, Mich. 



WHERE 

QUALITY, ACCURACY and 
DEPENDABILITY 
are Combined 




CORRUGATED IRON— Straight or Curved 

Every sheet is stamped absolutely straight and uniform. 

Conductor Pipe Eavetrough Elbows Skylights 

Ridge Roll Valleys and Ventilators 

WHEELER & BAIN 1%™?, TORONTO 



23 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



THE 4 CARDINAL 
VIRTUES OF THE 
FOX FLOOR SCRA- 
PING MACHINE 



1. Simple of Construction. 

2. Easy to Operate. 

3. Leaves a Perfect Finish. 

4. Inexpensive. 

Every Fox Scraper is guaranteed 
to do perfect work. 

Manufactured by 



m. 




FOX SUPPLY CO 

112 King Street 
BROOKLYN, WIS. 



THE FOX FLOOR SCRAPER IS SOLD BY :— 

The James Walker Hardware 
Co., Ltd. 
Montreal 



The E. Cavanagh Co 

Ltd. 

Montreal 



Durand Hardware Co. 
Montreal 



Frothingham & Workman, Ltd. 
Montreal 



Prompt deliveries will be made. 
Write for Catalogue and Prices. 




NATIONAL 
S ^ L LOCK 

The National lock is superior 
to all others in simplicity of 
construction, strength, durabil- 
ity and quality of finish. 

It will attract the best hard- 
ware buyers to your store. It 
will give perfect satisfaction. 



The world 
needs a trouble 
saver — we have 
it. Let us con- 
vince you be- 
fore you buy. 
Write for sam- 
ples and prices. 

National 
Hard-ware 
Co., Ltd. 

ORIUIA, ONTARIO. CANADJ 




Davidson's Cleveland Filter 



Enameled Royal Blue Outside 
with a Snowy White Interior 

CAPACITY— 12 QUARTS 

Filters through a natural stone making it impossible for the 
typhoid germ to get below into the drinking water. They are 
easy to clean and keep sanitary as all that is necessary is to 
scrub off the sediment collected on the top of the stone and the 
filter is again in perfect condition and ready for good service. 
The top vessel of filter is furnished with a bail handle and the 
base has side handles and a nickel plated faucet. New stones 
can easily be refitted when needed. 




DIMENSIONS— 11x18 



The Thos. Davidson Manufacturing Company, Limited 

MONTREAL WINNIPEG TORONTO 



24 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



THE BLUE BAND 



IDENTIFIES 
IT AS A 



HAMILTON BUCKET OR NIOBE PAIL 



The Best on Earth 




Get the right color and you will have the 
"WRIGHT" goods. 

These Buckets and Pails are extra heavy, 
and suitable for use by contractors, railroads, 
boats, city corporations, etc. 

Each Pail is made from two blanks, thus 
having only two side seams. The bottom 
cannot fall out, and the pails are guaranteed 
not to leak. 

Write us for further 
partlcuars and price. 

E. T. Wright & Co. 

(H. G. WRIGHT) 

HAMILTON CANADA 




CANADIAN TUBE & IRON CO., 



LIMITED 
Montreal, Canada 



OUR NEW BOLT AND NUT DEPARTMENT is now in operation, 
and we are fully equipped for the manufacture of: 



CARRIAGE BOLTS, COACH AND LAG SCREWS, 

TIRE BOLTS, MACHINE BOLTS, 

SLEIGH SHOE BOLTS, PLOW BOLTS, 

TRACK BOLTS, SQUARE NUTS, HEXAGON NUTS, 

BOILER RIVETS, TINNERS' RIVETS, 

ETC. 



ASK YOUR 
JOBBER FOR 




<J 



TRADE MARK 

BRAND 



OUR WROUGHT PIPE 

Black and Galvanized, Sizes 1/8 in. to 4 
in., is thoroughly inspected and tested to 
600 lbs. pressure, and every length is 
branded with our trade mark. 



Also NIPPLES 

Black and Galvanized 
All Sizes. 




CANADIAN TUBE & IRON CO., LIMITED, MONTREAL, 



Works : 
Lachine Canal 



MAPLE LEAF 




" Improved Racer" Cross Cut Saw 

This saw has proved itself to be the fastest cutting saw in use to-day. 
The cut illustrates the wide blade, but we also make this saw in 
a narrow pattern, thin back, which is especially well suited for small 
timber or pulpwood. All "MAPLE LEAF" saws are fully guaranteed. 

WHEN ORDERING SPECIFY "MAPLE LEAF." 

Shurly-Dietrich Co., Limited 



GALT, ONTARIO 



25 



and 



VANCOUVER, B.C. 






HARDWARE AND METAL 



Quick Action Means Business in These 

McClary's 
GRAIN SCOOPS and GRAIN BASKETS 

will be in demand by your Farmer Friends — but they must 
get quick service — 

McClary Grain Scoops are made from heavy gauge and 
strongly handled. 

The Grain Baskets are made from heavy gauge galvanized 
iron — strong and lasting in quality. 




MXIaryS 



London, 
Ontario 



McClary 's 
Ship Quick 



Toronto Montreal London Vancouver St. John, N.B. Hamilton Winnipeg Calgary Saskatoon 



BIGGEST BARGAIN EVER OFFERED IN 

SINGLE SHOT RIFLES 

"Mauser" Model 71 Converted 




Bolt Action, Caliber, 11 m-m or 43. Used but converted, GUARANTEED SATISFACTORY 
and almost INDESTRUCTIBLE. Length over all 39 in. Length of Barrel 20 inches. 
Weight 7 lbs. The Breech Block, Lock and all working parts are made of Fine Tool Steel. 

This Rifle is very popular with the Officers of the German Army for target practice It 
is splendid for hunting Deer and Larger Game. Very handy in the bush, very strong and 
light in weight. A safety lever locks the Rifle, so that it cannot be fired, nor tne breech block 
opened until the lever is released ; this device makes it absolutely safe. As there is going to 
be a heavy demand for this rifle, we would ask every hardware dealer to order their supply 
early, and avoid being disappointed. 

FOR SALE BY ALL LEADING WHOLESALE HARDWARE FIRMS 



26 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



# 



TOUR HEATING CONTRACTS SHOULD BE CLOSED EARLY 

THIS IS POSSIBLE WHEN YOU SPECIFY 

SUNSHINE FURNACES 





"McClary" on Goods 
is a Quality Name. 



\ 



THEIR INSTALLATION BRINGS MORE 
BUSINESS AND BIGGER PROFITS TO YOU 

THE ADVICE OF OUR HEATING DEPARTMENT IS AT YOUR DISPOSAL 

MXIaryS 



Order from our near- 
est branch to-day. 



Toronto, Montreal, London, Vancouver, St. John, N.B. 
Hamilton, Winnipeg, Calgary, Saskatoon 



27 



S 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



J.M.T. 



GLOBE VALVES 

GIVE A TRADE-WINNING SATISFACTION 

They have been on the market for the past 25 
years. Their popularity and reputation as 
strictly high grade articles are universally re- 
cognized by steam users and the engineering 
trade throughout the Dominion. All parts are 
made proportionately correct in design, and all 
valves are carefully tested and fully guaranteed 
to give highly efficient service. 

Made in three weights— STANDARD, MEDIUM 
J.M.T. and EXTRA HEAVY. 

Send us your next order — a trial will convince you 
that they sell quickly at a good profit. 




WRITE TO-DAY 



The James Morrison Brass Mfg. 
Co., Limited 

Manufacturers and dealers in a complete 
line of Plumbing and Heating Supplies. 

93-97 Adelaide Street West, TORONTO 



COSMOS 




ONE OF OUR MODERN DESIGNS 

Particulars on Request. 

P. & F. GORBIN 

Division 

The American Hardware Corporation 
NEW BRITAIN, CONN. 
P.&F.Corbin P.&F.Corbin P. & F.Corbin Division 
of Chicago of New York Philadelphia 



msssnl 



"As nearly perfect as you could make 
them — This is what one of the largest dealers 
said a few days ago with reference to the polished 
handles on our 

Klondike and 
Jubilee Brooms 

The finest corn, high-class workmanship and 
a perfect handle will produce a Broom easy to 
sell and on which a good profit can be made. 

Now is the time to order a supply. 

Stevens-Hepner Co., Limited 

PORT ELGIN - ONTARIO 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



HANGING FLY CATCHERS 

are more effective than any other kind. 

Our "FLYOSCOPE CATCHERS" will 
secure every fly where used. 

They are cleaner than swatting and 
more sanitary. 

Only a limited supply left. 




" THERMAL" 

ELECTRIC IRONS 

The Good Iron at a 
Reasonable Price 




Our element or heat generator is so arranged that 
every atom of heat serves to best advantage. Most 
shapely iron made. It sells easily. New everlasting 
plug now sent with eaSch one. 



or 



MONTREAL 



29 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



3 




Made In Your Own Country 

By Your Own Workmen 



Guaranteed to be perfect in every particular 



DOMINION CARTRIDGE CO., Limited 

MONTREAL - QUEBEC 



ARROWandNITRO CLUB 

Steel Lined SHOT SHELLS 



REMINGTON 

UMC 




^0Z^M For Surer, Cleaner Shooting 



RECOMMEND 

Arrow and Nitro Club 

The Speed Shells 

TO YOUR CUSTOMERS 

Surer, because speedier. The steel lining grips the pow- 
der charge with just the exact compression that puts 
every ounce of drive into the shot. 

Cleaner, because the "factory loaded" pattern hasn't a hole or a "wing tip" in it. 

It's safe to teach your trade to use the shells that were winners at Olympic 
Games, Grand American Handicap and at 1 5 of 16 Great National Handicaps. 

For better trap and field averages advise the use of Arrow 
and Nitro Club Steel Lined Shells in any make of shotgun 

Remington Arms-Union Metallic Cartridge Co. 

299-301 Broadway, New York City 



30 



Proper System for Window Trimming 

It is Essential That the Dresser ofDisplays Should Proceed Along De- 
finite Lines — Have a Fixed Appropriation to Cover Expense — Yearly Schedules 
of Displays are Advisable — File All Pictures of Window Displays — Have a 
Work Room at the Rear. 



Ever stop to consider the importance 
of having a system to govern your win- 
dow dressing operations? It is needed 
in that department just as much as in 
any other part or department of the 
store. A short talk along the line of 
window trimming system will be of in- 
terest, therefore. It is a subject which 
has not been given a great deal of at- 
tention. 

First and foremost, there should be 
an appropriation to cover all expenses. 
This appropriation should be made a 
yearly one. The window trimmer will 
then be in a position to purchase what 
supplies he requires and will be more 
apt to plan new ideas and arrange ef- 
fective trims. An ambitious window 
trimmer is a great asset to any business. 
At the same time, the setting of a de- 
finite appropriation will limit the ex- 
pense of the windows to a certain fig- 
ure. This is equally important with the 



advantage first pointed out. Ambition 
and initiative are most valuable in a 
window dresser when combined with fin- 
ancial prudence. 

A Regular Schedule. 

It is important that your system 
should cover the selection of the articles 
to be included in displays. All lines of 
goods are entitled to their share of win- 
dow publicity, and it will take consider- 
able planning on the part of the win- 
dow dresser to see that all lines are fea- 
tured at the proper times. 

This can be accomplished by follow- 
ing out a simple routine plan. The in- 
dex in the jobbers' catalogues will list 
practically every article carried in stock. 
Go over the list carefully and check out 
each article which should be used at 
some time during the year. Then draw 
up twelve lists, one for each month, 
putting down each article in the month 



when it could be displayed with best re- 
sults. This schedule can be revised as 
occasion arises but it will provide a 
good working basis and will obviate the 
possibility of certain lines being lost 
sight of. 

Keep Pictures on File. 

The window trimmer should have a 
filing system of his own. His work 
calls for a continual succession of new 
ideas on the matter of arrangement of 
display. Even the most clever will 
some times run short of original ideas 
and the necessity then arises for some- 
thing to fall back upon. 

It is advisable to clip out and pres- 
erve every picture of a window display 
that comes to- hand. There will be ideas 
in all of them. For instances, if all the 
pictures of window displays which have 
appeared in Hardware and Metal were 
carefully clipped out and filed away, the 




Display of tools in the window of Sutherland and Stelck, Dauphin, Man. 
It was dressed by Blake Phillips. 



31 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



possessor would have at his command a 
never-failing source of new ideas. 

The filing should be done in a syste- 
matic way. Classify all pictures into 
groups such as tools, paint, stoves, kit- 
chen utensils, etc. It will then be easier 
to turn up and find the pictures desired. 
To keep the pictures in good shape, it 
will be found advisable to paste them up 
in books. 

Co-operate With Others. 

In this connection, it may be pointed 
out that the window dresser should not 
hesitate to consult the other members 
of the staff and to ask their assistance 
and advice on all possible occasions. It 
is an old saying that "two heads are 
better than one." Some of the clerks 
may be able to supply just the very idea 
that the trimmer has been cudgeling his 
brains to find without result. Co-opera- 
tion should be carried out in this as in 
all other branches of the business. 

Have Work Room. 

Now as to the actual work. If you 
can find a room upstairs, where work 
can be done without interruption, or a 
place at the rear, appropriate a certain 
space to correspond with the dimen- 
sions of the window. In this space you 
will be able to plan out displays and ar- 
range details before ever going into the 
window. This is really a very import- 
ant phase of successful window trim- 
ming. With a "dummy" window to 
work in, the trimmer can arrange more 
original and complete displays than 
would be the case if he waited until the 
window were cleared for action. It is 
impossible to go into a window and ar- 
range a trim, knowing absolutely how it 
is going to come out. It is more than 
likely that difficulties will be encounter- 
ed and, as time will be limited, the dis- 
play will have to be left imperfect. 

The false window space is especially 
important in planning displays on an 
extraordinary scale. Where elaborate 
effects are desired, it is necessary to 
give unusual attention to measurements 
and details. The writer knows a young 
hardwareman who started to plan and 
arrange a display two months before it 
went into the window. It was a wonder- 
ful display. 

Preparing "Effects." 

This false space can be used also for 
the preparation of panels and back- 
grounds. Place your background boards 
on boxes or kegs and finish them off 
with a covering of soft-finished cloth or 
some other suitable material. Then 
place and attach the articles, having 
care to arrange them in the form of a 
design. Use a ruler frequently to make 
sure that the articles are attached equi- 
distant from the edge. The slightest ir- 
regularity will be noticed from the out- 
side when the panels are in place. By 



preparing the background and panels in 
this way, absolute accuracy can be ob- 
tained, which is impossible if all the 
work is done in the window. 

Likewise, more elaborate effects can 
be obtained. It is possible to arrange 
borders around background and panels. 
The hardware stock stock offers several 
excellent pieces of merchandise for this 
purpose. Rope and chain can be handl- 
ed easily and fastened into many geome- 
trical shapes; the same would apply to 
zigzag rules, which always make an at- 
tractive border; carpenter's chalk, fast- 
ened with long, fine nails, has also been 
used frequently, although it is more dif- 
ficult to handle. 



SUMMED UP. 

Have a settled appropria- 
tion for displays. 

Draw up Schedule of goods 
to be displayed each month. 

File aivay all pictures of 
ivindoxo displays in trade jour- 
nals. 

Seek co-operation of other 
members of the staff. 

Have false window space at 
rear or upstairs in which to 
plan and work out each dis- 
play before starting in the 
window. 

Prepare background and 
panels before placing them 
in the xoindow. 

Never discard material. It 
ivill come in handy again. 



Keeping Fixtures. 

The corner thus appropriated for the 
use of the window trimmer will serve for 
the storage of fixtures. To secure best 
results, a certain number of fixtures are 
absolutely essential. Pyramids, pedes- 
tals and steps are of great assistance 
in preventing monotony and in 
bringing about original effects. They 
can be constructed with little or no ex- 
pense. Rough lumber on pieces of 
packing cases will serve the purpose. As 
they are always covered, the crudity of 
construction and roughness of the ma- 
terial will not show. 

The complaint is often heard: — "I 
would arrange better displays but I 
haven't the material to work with. 
That's all I have— just the empty space 
in the window." A clerk who once 
voiced that complaint in the hearing of 
the writer had not been doing anything 
for a solid half hour. It was a morning 
in midsummer and customers were few 
and far between. If he had utilized 
32 



the spare time on his hands, he could 
have knocked together a few suitable 
fixtures. If he had cared to employ his 
spare time for a few days in that way, 
he would soon have had a complete 
equipment at his disposal. 

Never Discard Material. 

It does not pay to discard any ma- 
terial after dismantling a display, un- 
less it is so worn that it could not be 
used again. Everything will come in 
handy afterward. By careful preserva- 
tion of all material, the outlay for win- 
- dow displays can be kept very low. 

Special Displays. 

The window trimmer should keep 
wideawake to what is interesting the 
public. If he can introduce into his 
displays something which refers to a 
matter of great public interest, he is 
sure of attracting wide attention. Holi- 
day trims are always successful and 
special celebrations should always be 
"played up." The display on the pre- 
vious page is a good illustration of this 
point. It was shown in the store win- 
dow of Sutherland & Stelck, Dauphin, 
Man., in June during the week of the 
Grand Lodge convention of the Knights 
of Pythias. Delegates from the pro- 
vinces of Manitoba and Saskatchewan 
were in the place in large numbers and 
the display attracted considerable at- 
tention. The window was dressed by 
Blake Phillips, who won a prize in the 
Christmas window contest conducted 
last year by Hardware and Metal. 

Some details with reference to the 
construction and arrangement of this 
window will be of interest. The back- 
ground was five feet high, by eight feet 
wide. It was built of light frame work 
covered by plaster board. Mr. Phillips 
has found this material good when it is 
necessary to attach tools, paint brushes, 
etc. He sometimes uses 1-inch poultry 
netting with suitable covering. 

The general color scheme of the dis- 
play was blue, yellow and red — the col- 
ors of the Knights of Pythias. Blue was 
used for the background and was the 
predominant color throughout, the red 
and yellow being used for trimming. In 
the centre of the window was a repres- 
entation of the coat of arms of the ord- 
er. Narrow braid was used to cover up 
the edges of the centre design, thus, 
making the colors more distinct. The 
letters F. C. and B. were made with 
braid, horse nails being tacked over 
them. The letters stood out very prom- 
inently as a result, especially at night 
when the lights were on. 

The same three colors were used in 
the base of the window — blue in the 
centre, yellow to the left and red to the 
right. Carpenters chalk in red, yellow 
and blue was also used. 



Granite Ware Both Cheaper and Better 

The Ninth Article in the Price Series, Explaining How Saucepans, Kettles, and 
Similar Granite Articles Have Actually Fallen in Price During the Past Fifteen 
Years Despite the Advance in Metal. The Quality of the Goods Too Has Been 
Improved — Changes in Size Make Comparisons Difficult. 



If it is possible for a task to be at 
the same time pleasant and unpleasant, 
then the task of tracing the price 
changes which have come in granite ware 
during the past fifteen or twenty years 
may be_ so described. It is pleasant to 
find that the price of the various granite 
articles have declined rather than ad- 
vanced, but it is unpleasant to find num- 
bers and sizes have so changed that the 
task of comparison is made difficult — 
in some cases almost impossible. 

It might be thought, when an article 
in the modern catalogues is found bear- 
ing the same number as a similar article 
appearing in the catalogues of fifteen 
years ago, that these could be' considered 
as alike, and could therefore be com- 
pared. But such a supposition would be 
a mistake. Sizes have changed, and 
what is denoted by a certain number is 
not always the same as it was a decade 
or more ago. On the whole there has 
been a tendency to reduce the size of 
pots and pans. This appears to have 
resulted from United States competition. 
In the States contents has been describ- 
ed by wine measure, instead of by Im- 
perial measure. This made a difference 
which Canadian manufacturers had to 
meet, in order that their goods, quoted 
by number, might appear the same as 
the product of their competitors from 
across the line. Otherwise an American 
line would have seemed cheaper, but 
would, in reality, have been smaller and 
possibly dearer. 

Sizes Not What They Seem. 

But these United States manufacturers 
made their products still smaller, so that 
a number, and the quarts or pints the 
article is said to contain, does not mean 
at all what it would seem to the unex- 
perienced. Thus a saucepan bearing a 
certain number 14 years ago was ex- 
plained in the catalogues as containing 
% of a quart. The same number in the 
present day catalogues represents a 
saucepan which is actually smaller, but 
which is said to contain one quart. 

These facts are brought out here, not 
to confuse the reader — for the reader is 
likely conversant with this somewhat 
strange state of affairs; or will appre- 
ciate it when it is once brought to mind 
: — but merely to make it plain that the 
comparisons which are here made are 
fair comparisons. They are not com- 
parisons of old and new articles hearing 
the same numbers, but which are yet 



quite dissimilar in size; but rather are 
comparisons of articles which are sim- 
ilar in size — similar indeed in every- 
thing except workmanship, wherein there 
has been an advance, so that granite ware 
of to-day is much superior to that sold 
in the early nineties. 

In the days that are passed — that are 
fifteen years passed — graniteware was 
single coated. Now practically all the 
saucepans and other articles are double 
coated, the finish thus being made a 
good deal better — a good deal more en- 
during. 

A Ten Per Cent. Decrease. 

But even leaving this improvement 
out of the question, prices compare ex- 
ceedingly favorably with those quoted in 
those old days. Seamless milk or rice 
boilers, for instance, cost fourteen years 
ago — reckoning on the catalogue prices, 
and figuring with the discount then in 
force — $5.40 a dozen. The milk boiler 
of to-day, which compares with this in 
everything except finish, where it is su- 
perior, can be secured for $4.86 a dozen. 
A decrease, as it will be seen, of some- 
thing like ten per cent. 

Bread pans show a somewhat smaller 
change. Fifteen years ago these were 
quoted at $12.80 a dozen, while to-day, 
pans of similar size, are to be purchased 
for $11.52. An exceedingly good reduc- 
tion, especially in face of higher labor, 
higher rents, and a somewhat higher 
cost of metal. 

Improvement in Style. 

Tea kettles show an interesting state 
of affairs. Tin kettles have advanced 
about 15 per cent., while granite kettles 
show a decrease in price. Some sizes 
have advanced slightly, but generally 
there has been a decline. 

The kettle that is known to the trade 
as No. 8., for example, was listed fifteen 
years ago at a figure, which, with dis- 
counts, made the selling price $8.00 a 
dozen. To-day the kettle of similar 
size is marketed at $7.20 a dozen. 

But this point too must be borne in 
mind here. The style, as well as the 
finish of this kettle has been greatly 
changed and greatly improved. The 
bottom was, in those by-gone days, made 
out of several pieces. To-day it is one 
solid bit of metal. Thus it is given 
greater strength, and much greater last- 
ing qualities. 

More instances might be quoted. 
Saucepans, too, on the whole, are selling 
33 



for less now than they were a score or 
more years ago. Some sizes show a 
slight advance, but that is the result of 
difficulties in cutting — there being per- 
haps more waste, owing to the new, and 
better, shape of the articles, than there 
was. But on the whole, as has been 
said, prices are lower. 

The Explanation. 

How is this the case ? How can manu- 
facturers make for less, articles for 
which the material costs more? How 
can this be done in face of a great ap- 
preciation in property values which ne- 
cessitates the payment of a higher rent, 
or the setting aside of a larger sum to 
equal what might be secured for the 
property were it hired out instead of be- 
ing used? How is cheaper selling pos- 
sible when labor costs have advanced so 
materially ? 

One reason, of course, is efficiency of 
machinery. With the pasing years the 
plants have been improved. More can 
be done now in less time. Then the de- 
mand for the articles has greatly in- 
creased, and as everyone knows the 
greater the number of articles needed, 
the smaller will the cost per hundred be. 
There is a limit to that — a point at 
which the price will not decrease as pro- 
duction increases; but it has not been 
reached in graniteware as yet. 

It is worth noting that in those lines 
where there has been an increase in 
price rather than a decrease, there has 
often been a falling off, rather than an 
increase in the demand. 

But the long and short of this ques- 
tion is that prices have dropped, and not 
risen — that efficiency is the only thing 
which has been on the upward move. 

— @— 

NEW SCHEME FOR PARCELS POST. 

A zone system of parcels post is pro- 
vided for in a bill introduced in the 
Senate by Senator Bourne, chairman of 
the Committee on Post-offices and Post- 
roads. The rates are the lowest yet 
suggested, but the Post-office Department 
expresses the opinion that the system 
would be self-sustaining. 

Eleven-pound packages are authorized, 
and 15 cents fixed as the charge for max- 
imum packages in cities. For one-pound 
packages the rate is 5 cents, and a cent 
is added for each additional pound. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



HARDWARE AND METAL 

(ESTABLISHED 1888.) 

THE MACLEAN PUBLISHING CO., LIMITED 



handle. If such proves to be the case, the bill will be a 
failure. As it is in the nature of an experiment, failure 
would probably mean the final abandonment of the pro- 
ject. Blessings often come in disguise. 



JOHN BAYNE MACLEAN 



President. 



Publishers of Trade Newspapers which circulate in the Provinces 
of British Columbia, Alberta, Saskatchewan, Manitoba, Ontario, 
Quebec, Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, P. E. Island and New- 
foundland. 

CABLE ADDRESSES 
CANADA: Macpubco, Toronto. ENGLAND: Atabek, London, Eng. 

OFFICES 
Montreal - 701-702 Eastern Tp. Bk. Building 
Toronto - - 143-149 University Avenue. 
Winnipeg 34 Royal Bank Building. 

Vancouver, B.C. - H. Hodgson, 18 

London, Eng. - E. J. Dodd, 88 Fleet St. E.C. 
New York R. B. Huestis, 115 Broadway, N.Y. 
Chicago A. H. Byrne, 140 South Dearborn St 
France John F. Jones & Co., 31bls Faubourg 



Phone Main 1255. 

Phone Main 7324. 

Phone Garry 2313. 

Hartney Chambers. 

Phone Central 129G0 

Phone 2009 Rector 

Phone Rand 3234. 

Montmnrtre, Paris. 

SUBSCRIPTION 

Canada, $2; United States, $2.50; Great Britain and Colonies, 8s 
6d ; elsewhere, 12s. 

PUBLISHED EVERY SATURDAY. 



IMPROVE THE STORAGE FACILITIES. 

A few weeks ago, Hardware and Metal called attention 
to the fact that it is not uncommon for western farmers 
to be forced to take lower than market price for their 
wheat, owing to the fact that the elevators are crowded 
in the fall. In order to get the best grades of wheat 
stored, it is often necessary to allow it to be stored with 
lower grades. The farmer pockets the loss with as good 
grace as he can summon; for the only alternative is a 
total loss on the grain. 

Commenting on the information published in Hardware 
and Metal, a correspondent says: "I have been 'up 
against' some very peculiar cases where the farmer has 
been forced to take a very much lower price for his 
product than the market price. After hearing the various 
stories, I have come to the conclusion that what you said 
was more than justified. I certainly would like to* see 
a strong case presented to the eastern manufacturers and 
jobbers as well as to western concerns." 

The question is a serious one. In every instance where 
the western farmer is unable to store his grain or is com- 
pelled to do so at a low rating, a loss is created which is 
passed on. The dealer suffers and through him the job- 
ber and manufacturer. In a rapidly growing country like 
the West, a certain amount of loss through lack of ade- 
quate facilities is inevitable but, from all reports, the con- 
dition we have pointed out has become acute in some sec- 
tions. 

Immediate steps should be taken to find a remedy. 

© 

PARCELS POST FIGHT IN UNITED STATES. 

It seems to be conceded that a Parcels Post measure 
will be enacted in the United States before long. The 
Bourne Bill now pending has heavy support behind it 
and both national parties have endorsed it in their plat- 
forms. 

However, the advocates of Parcels Post have finally 
surrendered to the long-and-short-haul argument which 
has been advanced for the reform of express rates. The 
Bourne Bill provides for a zone Parcels Post, the charge 
being made proportionate to the actual cost of the haul, 
taking into consideration the distance and the amount of 
handling. 

The bill now pending is said to be such a mass of con- 
tradictions and impracticable conditions that it will be 
extremely cumbersome, if not absolutely impossible, to 



PROPER PRICING NECESSARY. 

"How much are your wheel barrows?" asked a man 
of a Montreal hardware dealer. He had heard that there 
were bargains to be secured at this store, and being con- 
nected with a hardware establishment, he went to find out. 

"We have barrows at $2.50," said the proprietor. 

' ' No, ' ' said a clerk who heard the quotation as he pass- 
ed, "that is too low a price." 

Upon this the dealer went away to make a few in- 
quiries. In a minute he returned, admitted he had made 
a mistake, and said the price would be $4.50. 

A big difference, that. The barrows, the inquirer 
knew, were sold at about $32.50 a dozen. So the dealer 
would have lost approximately 20c on every barrow he 
sold — lost that without any account being taken of over- 
head expenses. But the $4.50 charge was as incorrect the 
other way. With a dealer across the street selling the 
barrows at $3.00 this man could not hope to secure such 
a figure. Indeed he did not secure it, though he had sold 
four barrows at $2.50, the price he had first asked. 

This merely is an instance of what is happening daily. 
Men are selling so close that there is no real profit — and 
not because they are making the line a leader, but appar- 
ently because they have lost track of the buying cost. 

There is a dealer, for instance, who is retailing cement 
at 40c a bag. He has to pay 37c for this, and out of 
that 3c gross profit he has to pay for any bags which are 
injured. 

Only one end awaits a man who carries on business on 
such lax lines. He must fail. 

Pricing is an end of the business which possibly de- 
mands the closest attention. It is the work of the head 
men. They must figure what their competitors are doing. 
They must consider all expenses. They must make a profit 
which will enable them to add to capital. Pricing is a 
work to be done scientifically. No hit or miss system will 
do. It will miss practically every time. 

@ 



SYSTEM IN WINDOW TRIMMING. 

Window trimming has bcome such an important phase 
of retail merchandising that more attention is being paid 
to it than ever before. In the average store, however, 
interest in the subject has not yet reached the pitch where 
a definite system is worked out to govern the displays. 
Nevertheless system is needed if best results are aimed at. 

Some suggestions are given in the leading article in 
this issue which are worthy of consideration. It is not 
our intention to comment here on the various points 
made, but we desire to place particular stress on the sug- 
gestion that the window trimmer needs assistance. No 
matter how fertile the imagination or how resourceful the 
mind, there will be times when the most skilfull will be 
lacking in ideas. It is always possible to learn from 
others. No better plan could be devised than the careful 
filing of all pictures in trade papers and magazines. 
Every picture will have a suggestion or contain a hint 
which may some day be utilized. Some men pride them- 
selves on 'their originality and scorn to avail themselves 
of any assistance. Their viewpoint is narrow^ and they 
are not as likely to develop and improve in their work as 
are those who learn from what others are doing. 



34 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



POINTED EDITORIALS. 

Pricing deserves a great deal more careful consideration 
than it gets. 

* * * 

In these days it pays to meet even discourtesy with 
courtesy — indeed, it always did. 

• • * 

Only two more weeks before the fall special number 
of Hardware and Metal appears ! 



Wisdom is knowing what to do next; skill is knowing 

how to do it. 

• * * 

Rope has jumped in price again. An article dealing 
with the subject in the issue of August 3rd indicated that 
such an advance might be expected. 



It is encouraging to note that Graniteware is both 
better and cheaper than it was fifteen years ago — and 
this in face of raw material advances. 



Rope has advanced, but has not yet attained the aver- 
age price of by-gone years. Since the supply is reduced, 
and cost of production high, this fact is significant. 

* • • 

It begins to look as though the summer of 1912 would 
pass without much evidence of the two commonest fea- 
tures of summer weather — excessive heat and a slump in 

trade. 

* • • 

The desire to kill something, an instinct hard to 
account for but unmistakably prevalent, will soon mani- 
fest itself. Hunting days are not far off. Got your stock 
of guns, ammunition and hunters' supplies ready? 

* * * 

Brass goods are advancing in price. This is the ine- 
vitable result of the immense advance in the sale of this 
ware. Brass fern pots, kettles and umbrella stands are 
now found in practically every city home, whereas a few 
years ago a brass article was a rarity. 

* • * 

Like Oliver Twist, the West is asking for more ; only 
the demand is an incessant one and applies to all lines. 
It uses up everything that comes along and looks for fresh 
supplies. So large has western consumption been this 
year that serious shortages have been reported in a num- 
ber of lines. 

* * * 

Reading of the reasons for the recent failure of an 
Old Country hardwareman, one is inclined to believe that 
he was the reincarnation of the inimitable Harold Skim- 
pole. Business was a pleasant jest, money a commodity 
for fools to figure with, necessary but irksome to handle 
and impossible to keep. It is not difficult to pick out a 
number of lesser Skimpoles in the trade. 

* * * 

The word "gun" is one of the most flagrantly mis- 
used in the English language. It is used severally and 
indiscriminately to describe a gun, a revolver or a can- 
non. If a man says, "he drew a gun on me," one is left 
to pleasantly surmise whether the gun-man referred to 
pulled a revolver or a rifle or if perchance he had a can- 
non concealed about his person. 



Clearing the Barnacles 



A HARDWARE traveler tells of an incident which 
•**■ came to his attention recently. It has a moral, so 
we will repeat it. 

An old established hardware business in Ontario 
changed hands some time ago and stock-taking was 
proceeded with before the new proprietor took over the 
premises. It was conducted most thoroughly. Every 
nook and cranny in the old store was turned inside out 
with the result that some unusual discoveries were made. 
Articles were found which had not seen the light of day 
for many a long year. Behind packing cases, on top of 
shelves, were goods which had been bought in the early 
nineties. Dust-coated, hopelessly antiquated in pattern, 
they were valuable only as relics of a misty commercial 
past. Goods were dug up from all parts of the store 
which the old proprietors had forgotten they ever had 
in stock. The retiring firm had taken stock regularly but 
had not been very rigid in their methods; as was amply 
demonstrated. 

The obvious moral is that the hardware dealer must 
take stock regularly and thoroughly if he wants to keep 
his stock up-to-date and prevent losses through depreci- 
ation of goods. But it goes deeper than that. 

Ever let your correspondence get ahead of you for a 
few days? When a man is in a hurry — and everyone 
more or less is on the rush these stirring and strenuous 
days — it is hard to resist the temptation to pile the let- 
ters up in a rack and leave them until to-morrow. To- 
morrow is postponed probably for a few days and by 
the time that stack of letters is finally taken in hand, it 
has become so big that it is almost impossible to catch 
up. Letters have the habit of accumulating. Shirk for 
a few days and you find yourself floundering in a morass 
of unanswered correspondence. 

Again. Ever "keep batch" while your wife accumu- 
lating unpaid bills and a healthy tan at the sea shore? 
If so, you have probably fallen into the grievous error of 
letting the dishes collect with the intention of polishing 
them all up at once. Recall the uncanny and utterly in- 
comprehensible way in which the dirty dishes increased 
and multiplied until they seemed to cover the kitchen 
table? 

The same applies to everything. Give things a chance 
to accumulate and the results will be most astonishing. 
The dripping of water in a cave forms in the course of 
time a monster stalactite. 

Now for the application of the moral that we have al- 
ready hinted at. The retail merchant has to keep his 
business right up to the minute in every particular if he 
wants to reap the fullest measure of success with the 
smallest degree of labor and trouble. He cannot let 
things accumulate on him — work, stock or debts. 

If he gets behind with his work, he will not be able to 
manage the business either satisfactorily or expeditiously. 
Slipshod, careless methods will creep in. 

If he allows stock to accumulate on his hands, he will 
soon find customers thinning out rather than accumulat- 
ing. Goods will become unsaleable, the general appear- 
ance of the store will suffer. 

If he lets book debts accumulate, putting off the day 
of collection, it is only a matter of time before the sher- 
iff steps in. 



35 



Aiming to Help Others, Helped Himself 

W. F. Macpherson Started Demonstrating at Fall Fair, to Assist the Society 
Having This in Charge, But He Soon Found He Was Benefiting, Too — Exhibit 
Brings Direct and Indirect Results — Value of Keeping List of Those Interested 
in Display. 

Written for Hardware and Metal by W. F. Macpherson, Prescott, second vice- 
president of the 0. R. H. and S. D. A. 



The primary object which induced me 
to arrange an exhibit at the local fall 
•fair was to help out the society which 
had the affair in charge. A number of 
the merchants got together and decided 
to prepare booths, so that there would 
be a creditable showing in the main hall. 
This proved to be one of the cases where 
in helping others we were helping our- 
selves. I can speak certainly for my- 
self, for as a direct result of the exhibits 
made I have received many inquiries. 
There is no doubt in my mind that this 
is a style of advertising which brings 
results. 

It is a number of years now since our 
first booth was arranged. Every fall 
since we have had an exhibit, changing 
the main feature each year — thus not 
only giving the people something new 
to inspect, but making them appreciate, 
possibly better than they did before, 
that we carry a wide line of goods. 
People's Memories Long. 

One thing which strikes me as exceed- 
ingly strange, the longer I am in busi- 
ness, is the retentiveness of people's 
memories. They seem to bear in mind 
the exact place, and the exact circum- 
stances under which they saw a certain 
article which appealed to them, or for 
which they feel a need. It is this very 
thing which makes fall fair exhibiting 
of real value. Possibly the sales made on 
the spot would not be large enough to 
justify the expenditure which the booth 
means — though I must say we sold a lot 
of electrical goods last year — but the 
future sales, which are at least partially 
due to the exhibit, make that mode of 
advertising profitable. Often months 
elapse, and then we make a sale of good 
size, which is directly traceable to that 
fall fair exhibit. 

Public exhibits of this nature are in 
many respects similar to window dis- 
plays, and are always examined by a 
large number of prospective buyers. In 
this way they are a help to merchand- 
ising. But they differ from a window 
in this respect, that they make possible 
a more direct demonstration. Questions 
cannot be asked and answered through 
a window, but they can be and are asked 
and answered over the counter of an 
exhibition booth. 

Keep Clerk in Charge. 

This is a side of the question which 
it is well to keep in mind. A good dis- 
play — especially one which has some 
unique feature — will attract attention, 
and prove a good advertisement for the 




W. F. Macpherson, second vice-presi- 
dent of the O.R.H. & S.D.A. 

particular line shown, and for the store ; 
but the value is more than doubled if 
a clerk is put in charge of the booth. 
In many cases it would not be neces- 
sary to have him in constant attendance, 
but the man should be there when people 
are crowding through the building. 

Such a clerk — if he be the right man 
— can do a great deal, not only to make 
the display more effective at the time, 
but to make it prove of greater benefit 
to us in the future. He can explain the 
goods shown, and the number of re- 
quests for such explanation is remark- 
able. There is no doubt whatever that 
many people come to fairs to learn. The 
young people may attend only for the 
grand stand performance, but a large 
number of the older heads come to see 
something new. 

Handing Out Advertising. 

Then we have found it wise to cir- 
culate pamphlets and advertising matter 
at the fair. People expect to get some- 
thing when they stop in front of a 
booth. A great many keep what is given 
them, and future events prove that they 
carefully read the advertising matter. I 
always send any circulars which may 
have accumulated to the booth, and these 
the clerk passes out — using some discre- 
tion as to where he places them. This 
makes exceedingly good bait. 
36 



A clerk, on the spot, moreover, is able 
to see who are really interested in the 
goods shown. He knows those who make 
the most inquiries, who want to know 
the price ; and he knows that these would 
be interested to hear more about the 
article. These are the prospective pur- 
chasers, and we have made it a point to 
keep a list of these. Here is one of the 
advantages in doing business in a place 
of only moderate size. The clerk will 
personally know a large number of those 
who pause in front of our booth. He 
will know others by sight ; and will have 
little difficulty in ascertaining the names 
of the few with whom he is unfamiliar, 
but who show keen interest in the dis- 
play. 

Valuable Mailing List. 

This list of prospects is one of the 
best things we get from the exhibit. It . 
furnishes us with a mailing list which 
contains practically no deadwood. Every 
one of those people we know are interest- 
ed in one or more of our lines, and let- 
ters and descriptive matter sent to them 
from the office will bring results. We 
know they will. They have in the past. 

We cannot but realize that the day 
of the county fair is passing. People 
are going to the big fairs, held in the 
large centres. Yet the fall fair is still 
a power in the town and country. It 
may be small in comparison with the 
few really large exhibitions, but it means 
more to the retail merchant than do these 
large exhibits. The number of people 
gathered there is small comparatively, 
but all who do attend are residents of 
the district in which the retailer does 
his business. They are all buyers, and 
it is well worth while to cultivate their 
acquaintance; to impress them with the 
high quality of the goods you carry ; and 
to take steps to secure their enquiries. 

© 

THE CEMENT SITUATION. 

Montreal, Aug. 14. — F. P. Jones, gen- 
eral manager of the Canada Cement Co., 
who has just returned from a tour of the 
West, gives an optimistic view of the 
cement trade in Western Canada. 

He states that every dealer is well sup- 
plied with cement, and there are large 
quantities in stock at Calgary, Exshaw, 
Fort William, and Port Arthur waiting 
for orders. 



Meeting Difficulties of the Tin Shop 

Thos. Griffin of Arnprior Has Found One Great Trouble With This Department 
— He Has Overcome This and is Reaping Great Benefits From This Part of His 
Business. 



Often it is said of the tin shop, that 
while it is good in some respects — while 
it helps the hardware department in 
many ways — it is an expensive luxury. 
Now there is good reason to believe that 
it is a luxury which more than pays for 
itself; but despite this there is no use 
shutting one's eyes to the difficulties 
which a tin shop does present. Rather 
it is better to face these difficulties, and 
to discuss how these have been overcome, 
and to plan how they may be still more 
discounted. 

Thos. Griffin, of Griffin and Brennan, 
Arnprior, is a believer in the tin shop. 
He feels sure that it helps the hardware 
business, and that, taken separately, it 
earns good money. Nevertheless Mr. 
Griffin admits that the tin shop does pre- 
sent difficulties, and the greatest of these, 
he considers, relates to the workmen. 
Not that these are hard to secure — 
though this is often the case — but rather 
that there is so much time between jobs, 
during which the men's wages go stead- 
ily on. 

What of the Slack Times? 
In a place of moderate size, at least, 
that between-job-time cannot be prevent- 
ed; It is doubtful if it can be entirely 
avoided in large cities, but in towns of 
average size there are bound to be such 
quiet periods. What is to be done then, 
to keep the expenditure in such seasons 
from more than eating up the profits 
which are made on the various jobs? 

Well one thing, as Mr. Griffin tells it, 
is to remember those slack seasons when 
figuring on a job. The profit secured 
from that job has got to do something to- 
ward offsetting the expenses in the slack 
times. 

But there is another way of providing 
for the expenses of the tin shop during 
the quiet days. The men, though not 
working on any outside job, yet need not 
be idle. They can be kept busy on pails 
and stove pipe. Of course there is a 
slight objection to this — for this is the 
work set aside for the long period of 
winter inactivity — nevertheless work on 
pails at any time is hardly work wasted. 
A good stock is always needed, and nev- 
er is there much trouble disposing of 
these. At present, for instance, a trade 
with the lumbermen is starting. They 
want these hand made pails. They have 
found them serviceable and they are will- 
ing to pay a good price for them. To 
this class of buyer alone Mr. Griffith dis- 
poses of a good part of his men's mid- 
job work. 



Where Big Profits Come. 

But this is just a way of providing for 
the expenses and making a fair profit. 
The big profit comes from the jobs, and 
from what the jobs mean. Mr. Griffin, 
for instance, declares that one of the 
greatest benefits his firm derives from 
their tin-shop is by reason of the as- 
sistance it gives in selling stoves. 

"Stoves, with us, are never altogether 
quiet," remarked Mr. Griffin, in speak- 
ing of this subject. "We sell them in 
summer and winter, and I know that 
our tin shop helps us to achieve this re- 
sult. Our men, working on various 
buildings, learn where stoves are needed. 
When we oversee the work we find this 
out, and we speak of our stoves. Thus 
are people interested. Then people 
know we are accustomed to out up stove 
pipes, and to do similar work. Perhaps 
we have served them in that way, and 
as a result they naturally think of us 
when they think of stoves. 

"We always install our stoves. I be- 
lieve it is the right way. If people put 



them up themselves the stove may not 
work properly, and then the stove is held 
responsible — also the firm that sold it. 

Helps Sale of Roofing. 

Roofing is a large and growing bus- 
iness to-day, and this, Mr. Griffin states, 
is helped by the operation of a tin de- 
partment. Galvanized roofs, of course, 
could hardly be handled by men who are 
not prepared to put them on. But the 
sale of other roofings too is helped by the 
tin-shop. People come to know that 
such-and-such a firm did the work on 
such-and-such a roof — news of this style 
travels fast in moderate sized places. 
They therefore come to think of this 
firm whenever they think of a roof. 
When they feel the need of one them- 
selves they naturally consult this dealer, 
no matter what particular style of roof 
is wanted. It is then for the dealer to 
suggest the material which he thinks best 
for the particular building. The sale 
will be his. 



Soya Bean Oil and Efficient Driers 



At the annual convention of the Cana- 
dian Association of Master Painters held 
at Gananoque, a report of which has al- 
ready appeared in Hardware and Metal, 
an address on soya bean oil was deliver- 
ed by Henry A. Gardner, of the Ameri- 
can Institute of Industrial Research. 
Some extracts from his paper will be 
found of considerable interest to hard- 
waremen. , 

Of the various oils which have been 
under test as constituents of paint ve- 
hicles, one of the most important and in- 
teresting is that which is crushed from 
the soya bean. Many investigators are 
working upon problems connected with 
its use, and we may soon expect to gain 
a degree of knowledge of its value and 
limitations, equal to that which we now 
possess regarding linseed oil. The writer 
wishes to state that he is not in a posi- 
tion to give out at the present time any 
definite information regarding the dur- 
ability of soya oil as compared to lin- 
seed oil. Such information will, how- 
ever, be available within a year or so. 

According to Piper, the r-oya plant has 

been grown with success in nearly any 

part of that region which is bounded in 

the north by the state of Pennsylvania, 

37 



in the east by the Atlantic ocean, in the 
west by the Missouri river, and in the 
south by a line one hundred miles north 
of the gulf. The writer is inclined to 
believe, however, that soya beans may 
be profitably raised in nearly every part 
of the country. Experiments are under 
way at the present time to determine 
whether this is true. The resistance 
which the soya plant offers to excessive 
moisture and drought, seems to be only 
secondary to its properties as a nitrogen 
gathering plant. After its introduction 
into the soil, the plant becomes naturally 
inoculated with a form of bacteria which 
produces root nodules which have the 
property of carrying into the ground 
nitrogen compounds from the air, thus 
greatly enriching the soil. 

The great consumption of cottonseed 
oil for the production of food products 
has caused the cottonseed crusher to look 
to some other oil to make up for the de- 
ficiency of cottonseed oil which has at 
times been threatened. Soya oil has 
naturally been proposed for this purpose, 
and between seasons there have been 
crushed many tons of soya beans, in 
various southern states. The farmer is 
therefore already aware of the value of 
the soya plant. 



Complete Course of Sheet Metal Work 



By L. W. KOSER 



In prob. 31 we show the method of 
developing the patterns for an ellipti- 
cal shaped article. 

First draw the outside elliptical line 
by the method shown in example 4. 
Then the base line A-B of Fig. 2. Then 
the vertical center line C-D high 
enough to give the desired pitch to the 
sides of the vessel. 

Then draw a line from A to D and 
from B to D. 

Draw the line S-R the desired dist- 
ance above the base line A-B, or the 
height it is desired to make the vessel. 

Then the outline A-B-S-R represents 
the elevation of the article. 

Now in drawing the patterns for an 



elliptical article by this method, we 
assume that it is simply two cones of 
different heights, for instance, the" 
sides having the large curve are consid- 
ered as two parts of a large cone, and 
the sides having the small curve are 
considered as two parts of a small cone. 

We now have the plan and elevation, 
the plan shows the measurements of the 
top and bottom, and the elevation shows 
the pitch of the sides. 

What we want to get now is the rad- 
ius for drawing the patterns for the 
sides and ends. 

We then construct a diagram as 
shown by Fig. 3, in the following man- 
ner: Draw the base line X-Y of Fig. 3 



equal to the diagonal line K-V of Fig. 
1. Then project a vertical line from Y as 
Y-W. 

We now want to draw the slanting 
side the same pitch or slant as shown on 
the elevation Fig. 2, so we place one 
point of the dividers at C Fig. 2, and 
the other point at A, and with the divid- 
ers thus set we transfer this distance to 
the line X-Y of Fig. 3 as shown by the 
space from X to E. 

Then project a vertical line from E 
as E-F, making it equal to the line C- 
D of Fig. 2. Then carry a line from X 
through the point F and continue it un- 
til it meets the line Y-W. 

Then the space from W to X would be 




ExaMPU * I 





E X ^ rA p l_ e if JL 



L 




&t * 



_*■-- * t 

- vf y 



Fi<}.4 



3 h r 



pRoeLem 3/ 






jl~s--. 



38 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



the radius for drawing the pattern for 
a cone having the same slant and curve 
as the sides of the ellipse. 

Let us now develop the pattern for the 
large side of the ellipse prob. 31. Set 
the point of the compass at W and the 
lead at X, and with any convenient 
point as centre as P, describe an arc. 

Lay off on this arc the stretchout of 
one side of Fig. 1 as from 1 to 7. Draw 
lines from 1 and 7 into the point P. 
This gives us the bottom line of our 
pattern. 

Now set off the distance A-S of Fig. 
2 on the line 1-P, as 1-Z. Then with P 
as centre and the lead at Z swing the 
arc Z-L. This completes the side of 
the pattern; the opposite side would be 
the same. 

We now want to get the radius for the 
small ends. 

We therefore transfer the space K-0 
of Fig. 1 to the line X-Y of Fig. 3, as 
shown by the space X-G. Then project 
a vertical line up until it meets the slant 
line, as shown by G-M. 

Then M-X is the radius for drawing 
the patterns for the small ends. Place 
the point of the compass at M and 
the lead at X. Then with the lead 
placed at 1 Fig. 4, and the point on the 
line 1-P, describe an arc and lay off on 
this the stretchout of the end of Fig. 1 
as from 1 to 13, and draw a line from 
the point 13 to the point N. 

Set the point at N and the lead at Z 
and describe an arc Z-T. Thus complet- 
ing the pattern; allow for flanges. 

@ 

Hardware Letter 
Box 



Canadian and American Helical Spring 
manufacturers. ' ' 

We do not know of any such paper 
published. The Morgan Spring Co., 
Worcester, Mass., manufacture these 
springs. — Ed. 



Coopers' Stoves. 

W. W. Rockwell, Kentville, N.S. — 
"Will you kindly advise me as to names 
of firms making stoves for coopers' 
use? 

Brown, Boggs Co., Ltd., Hamilton, 
Ont.— Ed. 

Alaska Freezers. 

W. Bourque, Sherbrooke, Que. ■ — 
"Kindly let me know who manufactures 
the Alaska Freezer. ' ' 

Alaska Freezer Co., Winchendon, 
Mass., U.S.A.— Ed. 

Elevators. 

Jas. MacKay & Co., Ingersoll, Ont. — 
"Will you kindly give us names of 
Canadian Manufacturers of elevators?" 

Otis Fensom Elevator Co., Toronto; 
Turnbull Elevator Co., Toronto. — Ed. 
Helical Springs. 

Royal Spring & Bedding Co., Ltd., 
Guelph, Ont.- — "Can you supply us with 
a copy of Wire & Spring Journal? We 
wish to get into communication with 




The following items were taken from 
the issue of August 20, 1892:— 

"Jlobt. Munro)> the (managing 
director of the Canada Paint Co., 
left yesterday for the east. No de- 
cisive action has yet been taken by 
the city council with regard to his 
offer to establish a branch here. — 
Vancouve" News-Advertiser. 
Editor's Note. — Mr. Munro remained 
as head of the Canada Paint Co. until 
last year when the company was merged 
into the Sherwin-Williams Co., of Can- 
ada. 

* » * 

"Glendinning & Son, stove manu- 
facturers, who were burnt out late- 
ly, are asking the town of St. Henry 
for a bonus of $40,000, in ground 
suitable to erect their factory up- 
on." 

Editor's Note.— The firm of Glendin- 
ning & Son, have been out of business 
for some years now. 

» * * 

"John S. Moir, hardware merch- 
ant, Arnprior, though a young man, 
takes as kindly and systematically 
to business as a duck does to water. 
All the ingenious models and de- 
vices to be seen in his store for con- 
veniently handling and making a 
conspicuous showing of goods, illus- 
trate the kind of business man he 
is." 

Editor's Note. — Mr. Moir is still en- 
gaged in business and has been showing 
the same kind of energy and initiative 
right along. In the early part of the 
present year, a sketch of Mr. Moir ap- 
peared in Hardware and Metal, telling 
of his energy in taking up and pushing 

new lines. 

* * * 

"T. J. Trapp & Co., hardware- 
merchants, New Westminster,; B. 
C, have dissolved, T. J. Trapp con- 
tinuing." 

Editor's Note. — Mr. Trapp is still in 
business and is one of the most widely 
known hardwaremen on the coast. He 
recently completed an extended tour 
through Canada and the United States. 
39 



AN ESTIMATE OF THE DEMAND. 

Winnipeg, Aug. 3. — Careful compu- 
tations indicate that 120,000,000 pounds 
of binder twine will be required for the 
garnering in the crops of Minnesota, the 
Dakotas and the Canadian North-west. 
It is estimated the following amounts 
will be required by affected provinces 
and states : 

Pounds. 

Minnesota 25,000,000 

North Dakota 30,00.0,000 

South Dakota 12,000,0(10 

Manitoba 12,000,000 

Saskatchewan 25,000,000 

Alberta 16,000,000 

Total 120,000,000 

— ®— 

ZINC IN BRITISH COLUMBIA. 

Advices from United States Consul 
General David F. Wilber at Vancouver, 
state that according to the provincial 
mineralogist the smaller output of zinc 
in 1911 than in 1910 was due to the ab- 
sence of transportation facilities on 
the Kaslo and Slocan Railway. About 
six miles of track destroyed by forest 
fires in the summer of 1910 were not 
reconstructed last year. No zinc con- 
centrate was produced by the Slocan 
Star mill. 

There are three mills in Four Mile 
camp, Slocan Lake, equipped for pro 
ducing a zinc as well as a lead concen- 
trate, namely, the Van Roi, Silverton 
mines, and Standard. Of these, the Van 
Roi produced in 1911 concentrates con- 
taining more than 2,000,000 pounds of 
zinc, and the Silverton mines a much 
smaller quantity. 



WIDE USE OF ARSENIC. 

The production of white arsenic in the 
United States in 1911 was 3,132 tons, 
valued at $73,408, against 1,497 tons, 
valued at $52,305, in 1910, according to 
a report on arsenic by Frank L. Hess, 
just issued by the United States Geolog- 
ical Survey. The arsenic was obtained 
as a by-product of smelting operations. 
This output is much the largest ever 
made in this country, but owing to the 
low price and the distance of the smelt- 
ers from New York, the freight charges 
absorbed a large proportion of the pro- 
fit. 

During the year 4,996 tons of white 
arsenic, metallic arsenic, and arsenic 
sulphides, valued at $247,323, were im- 
ported. Of this amount 1,921 tons was 
white arsenic, with a value of $116,948. 
In addition 126,191 pounds of Paris 
green and London purple, valued at 
$4,972, were imported. The total pro- 
duction and importation of 1911 of ar- 
senic and all arsenic compounds amount- 
ed to 16,256,000 pounds. 



Lesson 19-Course in Card Writing 

Illustrating the Practical Use of Brush Outline Script, Introducing the Striped 
Effect in Making Fancy Cards. 

By J. C. Edwards. Copyright Canada, 1911. 



To be fair with the student in card- 
writing, we do not recommend the 
script lettering for ordinary cards. In 
the first place, it is too fine-lined to be 
easily read at a distance; in fact, a few 
feet away renders it almost unintel- 
ligible, only the wide strokes showing. 
Then, another point that favors the 
heavier type letter more than the fine 
scrip is the fact that the script does not 
lend itself to larger writing where a 
whole sentence or paragraph is requir- 
ed, as the more broken up it is the less 
readable it becomes, and it even be- 
comes unsightly. 

Script a Graceful Letter. 

However, the script, when gracefully 
written, may be used to advantage in 
many cases, and is quite desirable for a 
change for special style and exclusive 
window cards. To execute the script 
well, it requires a great deal of prac- 
tice to get a nice flowing effect. The 
proper slant, too, is very essential, and 
the more practice given the more grace- 
ful and easy will be the execution. 

Heavier Stroke for Cardwriting. 

The script usually taught and often 
used in card work is decidedly too light 
in the stroke, and should not be used, 
except for very fine window displays 
such as for jewelry, etc. We contend 
that any letter that cannot be read 
easily 'the width of a sidewalk is too 
light, and not at all in good form with 
merchandizing ideas of to-day. Of 
course, pretty much the same formation 
is used in all script letters, the differ- 
ence being in the heavy or shaded 
strokes, and even the fine lines may 
vary to a degree. 

Though in some cases the letters do 
no really join, yet they are given that 
appearance which is absolutely impera- 
tive, otherwise the words would be 
broken up, resulting disastrously to the 
reading of the inscription. 

Practice the various strokes found 
throughout the lesson — strokes such as 
No. 1 of "A," No. 3 of "B," No. 1 of 
"E," and so on, until you become 
thoroughly acquainted with them. Then, 
learn to associate the various strokes 
and arrange them so as to give the 
proper slant to the completed letter; 
for instance, take the letters "F" and 
"T" (the strokes are practically the 
same in these two with an addition in 
the "F"). Try the various effects 
that changing the strokes on these let- 
ters have, and end up by making them 
right as shown in the plate. 



-fund MxuMfar^ 

l/> it 1a -fi/fxjis ^ ^ 

£eact \fxG*ie/6 \^ 
ffiesi Miltiiwcl/ 

a &ma£f fioititecL 



The lined effect applied to the entire face of the card. 



Practice Making Circles. 

Take your fine pointed brush (a red 
sable rigger) and fill with ink, thinned 
so it flows readily, but not too easily, 
and practice making scrolls and circles, 
half moons, crescents, cymas, etc., un- 
til you get complete confidence in your- 
self, then join these together, forming 
letters, and end up with words. Follow 
the strokes indicated by the arrows and 
numbers, and watch your slant and 
spacing. 
The Cards, and How to Make Them. 

At first one would say that the work 
of ruling the fine double lines on the 
striped card was a waste of time. Yet 
the actual time spent in doing this was 
only a few minutes, and it gives such 
a decidedly different effect that we be- 
lieve it is worth the trouble. It makes 
a fancy card (not fancy like the other, 
but a novelty) out of a plain one. A 
ruling pen and "T" square was used 
for this purpose, making the stripes 1 
inch apart, leaving a white panel in the 
40 



centre for the wording. To demon- 
strate the use of the script lettering in 
the cards belonging to this lesson, it 
was necessary to use the lower case, as 
will be taught in the next and last les- 
son of this series. Script capitals can- 
not be used together to make up a 
word. 

The Lined Effect. 

A number of very catchy effects may 
be obtained by using the fine lines. One 
way is to line the letter as was shown 
in a previous lesson; another idea is to 
line the card around the letter and 
decoration, and yet another style, which 
is very effective, is to line the decora- 
tion as is shown in the accompanying 
card. 

The whole design and letering in this 
case was pencilled out, then outlined 
with a brush and ruled with a ruling 
pen, leaving the lettering open. The 
spray of roses and the ribbon was then 
given a tint — any desirable tint of very 
Continued on page 42- 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



(W*N 9 llhPrudk0UlllSiwScript 




Plate showing the various strokes used in brush outline script. 



41 



Progressive Hardware Retailing 



A Humorous Series of Window Cards — Firm Established an Auto Station in 
Front of Store — Clearing Out the Season's Goods — A Voting Contest For Piano. 



A TALK IN TOOL TERMS. 

Chatham, N.B. — In the windows of 
McDonald's hardware store this week 
was displayed an attractive array of 
carpenter's tools, which were shown in 
such a manner as to command attention 
from passers-by. And the advertising 
of them was a piece of novel and up-to- 
date work, drawing attention to almost 
every article shown in the window, or at 
least such as are most commonly in use 
by carpenters. On the day the dis- 
play was being made there appeared in 
the leading newspaper of the town, a 
dialogue supposed to have taken place 
outside the store and to have been over- 
heard by a newspaperman as follows: 
1 ' Ever see a spoke shave a plumb, Bob ? ' ' 
"No, but I saw a nail set a tee square 
and a monkey wrench a floor, Jack." 
"0, gimlets, brace up and have a bit 
of rabbet, plane." "Surely, if that's 
on the level, I'll have a slice." "As a 
rule, it's a square deal. I'm not trying 
to gouge you." "If you do I'll draw 
knife and drill your escutcheon. Does 
your knob compass that?" Awl of 
which is plane and augurs well for the 
business and adz prestige to the store. 

The idea was catchy and caught the 
fancy of large numbers of people pass- 
ing by who were won't to stop and gaze 
in at the display of tools and there is 
no doubt but that the sale of them was 
somewhat increased thereby, for many 
went inside and made purchases, the 
price list appealing to them. 



Editor's Note. — Better to be in ad- 
vance of the season than to allow the 
season to be in advance of you. The 
demand will soon start for hunting sup- 
plies. In some sections it has already 
started. It is wise, therefore, to begin 
the campaign at once. 



AN AUTO STATION. 

Rodney, Ont. — David Mistele, hard- 
ware dealer, has installed an auto-filling 
station at the corner of his hardware 
store. It is so placed that an auto may 
drive up and be filled through a hose 
from the pump. It is a time and labor 
saving device. 

Editor's Note. — The trade of the auto- 
mobile owner is worth going after. 
Anything that will serve to bring this 
trade is indeed advisable. 



START HUNTING CAMPAIGN. 

Wolseley, Sask.— G. F. Elsey & Sons 
have already started to feature their 
stock of rifles and ammunition. In their 
advertisement, they say: 

"Soon be shooting time again, 
(let ready. Get your gun picked out 
while there's a choice. We have 
them now. Call and see them." 



CLEARING OUT SEASON'S GOODS. 

The desirability of hardwaremen dis- 
posing of seasonable goods before they 
become unseasonable, through the medi- 
um of special efforts, has been strongly 
urged by Hardware and Metal. ' ' By- 
passer" writes in The Ironmonger along 
the same line as follows : 

For most tradesmen August has lit- 
tle to recommend it as a business month. 
Nor does the commercial traveler expect 
much of August ; he knows by experi- 
ence that his customer will explain a 
blank order-sheet by the plea, that 
"everybody is away." The holiday 
spirit is dominant, and there is not much 
commercial inspiration to be drawn by 
the shopkeeper who is left behind. But 
calmly to accept a "flat" period as be- 
ing in the nature of things is not pre- 
cisely the attitude to make it anything 
else. Every month should contribute 
its fair share of the > year's revenue. 
How to make a dull time bright and how 
most profitably to utilize the slack busi- 
ness seasons are problems worth serious 
consideration. A final review might well 
be taken of goods still on hand which 
are essentially articles of summer sale. 
Their room will be better than their 
company in the season which is ahead, 
and a little extra pushing now should 
effect some desirable clearances. A 
tradesman advertised recently that he 
was not holding a "season sale" as he 
had sold all his "season stock." That 
in itself was an admirable advertisement, 
but not everyone is so happily placed, 
and "season goods" carried over never 
have the same freshness as new goods. 
Therefore, to "get a move" on the dil- 
atory summer wares is an urgent Aug- 
ust duty, besides affording an oppor- 
tunity of encouraging the assistants by 
allowing them a small commission on 
such sales, and incidentally experiment- 
ing in the profit-sharing principle. 



A VOTING CONTEST. 

Trenton, Ont. — Bailey and Reynolds, 
hardware dealers of this place, have 
started a contest. Checks are given with 
42 



every purchase over a certain amount, 
each check entitling the customer to a 
certain number of votes. The winner of 
the contest will be given a piano. 

Editor's Note. — This method has been 
tried with success by a number of deal- 
ers. 



PETROLEUM BREAKS RECORD. 

Petroleum production in the United 
States in 1911 surpassed its own record 
made in 1910 by an increase of nearly 
11,000,000 barrels. In 1910 the output 
was 209,557,248 barrels. The total pro- 
duction of the world also surpassed all 
previous records, amounting to over 
345,000,000 barrels, and of this the Uuit- 
ed States produced more than 63 per 
cent. The value of this enormous out- 
put of oil in the United States for 1911 
was $134,044,752, the average price be- 
ing 60.8 cents a barrel. Final figures 
have been compiled by David T. Day, 
the petroleum statistician of the United 
States Geological Survey, and have just 
been made public in a statement issued 
by the survey. The increase for the 
year was caused principally by the gain 
in California, which was by far the 
largest producer, its output being over 
81,000,000 barrels. Another factor in the 
increase was the discovery of oil at Vin- 
ton, La., and the comparatively new 
Caddo field in Louisana also grew in 
importance. A find of high-grade oil at 
Electra, in northern Texts, was another 
notable event of the year. 



SHOW CARD WRITING. 

(Continued on page 40.) 

light wash colors so that the lines will 
show through what may be used. In 
this case, for reproduction, two shades 
of grey were employed. The lettering 
was then filled in with an opaque grey. 
Grey, of course, is rather a dead shade 
for window cards in practical use, and 
we would suggest brighter tints, which 
would blend with the goods being shown 
in the displays. 

For the small script lettering a pen 
may be used to outline. , 

Further particulars regarding pens, 
brushes, outfits, etc., may be had by 
writing to the editor of this paper, 143 
University Avenue, Toronto. 



Will Erect Store. 
Moose Jaw, Sask. — The Moose Jaw 
Hardware Co., have decided to erect a 
new building. 

Store Burned Out. 

Campbellton, N.B. — S.M. Moore, hard- 
ware dealer, has been burned out. The 
loss is covered by insurance. 
Death of Pioneer. 

Plum Coulee, Man. — William Stewart, 
one of the pioneers of this place, is 
dead. He was a hardware merchant and 
prominent in municipal matters. 
Hardwareman Married. 

Lucan, Ont.— Orel L. McComb, of Mc- 
Comb & Son, hardware dealers, was mar- 
ried to Mabel Tara, daughter of Mr. and 
Mrs. Edward Mara. They are taking a 
trip to Detroit, Cleveland. Buffalo and 
Toronto. 

New Sheet Metal Shop. 

New Westminster, B.C.— W. J. Gal- 
braith, formerly with Mahoney & Ken- 
nedy, has started the first exclusively 
sheet metal working shop in the city at 
524 Sixth street. 

Death of James Langmuir. 

Toronto, Ont. — After an illness last- 
ing three months James Langmuir, head 
of the wholesale paint and oil firm of 
James Langmuir & Co., passed away 
Sunday afternoon at his residence in 
St. Clair avenue. Mr. Langmuir was in 
his fifty-ninth year, and had been suf- 
fering from a conrplication of diseases. 
Death of J. W. Driscoll. 

In last week's issue mention was made 
of the death of J. W. Driscoll at Winni- 
peg. The late Mr. Driscoll was a resi- 
dent of Winnipeg for 28 years. He cele- 
brated his 71st birthday on Monday, 
Aug. 5, the day before his death He 
was born in County Cork, Ireland, in 
1841, came to Canada with his parents 
when he was 12 years of age. and resid- 
ed at Kincardine, Ont., until 1882, when 
he came to Winnipeg to open the west- 
ern branch of the McClary Manufactur- 
ing Company. He managed the com- 
pany's western affairs for 26 years and 
retired at Christmas, 1908. 



TRANSFERRING TO EDMONTON. 

Belleville, Ont. — R. C. Chown has re- 
turned after a trip to Edmonton, where 
his father, W. W. Chown, head of the 
Chown Hardware Co., has been for some 
years. While there, he made arrange- 



ments to take over the Ross Bros., retail 
hardware business. As a result the bus- 
iness here will be disposed of as soon as 
possible, as the terms of the purchase 
provide for taking over the business on 
September 20. It is proposed to operate 
the present store in Edmonton, together 
with that of Ross Bros., under the firm 
name of Chown Hardware Limited, as 
a joint stock company, with a capitali- 
zation of $150,000. 

W. A. A. Chown will remain in this 
city to close out the Belleville business. 
R. C. Chown will leave on September 9 




R.,C. Chown, who is going to Edmonton. 

for Edmonton to take over the manage- 
ment of the business there. 

The firm of W. W. Chown is one of 
the oldest in this part of the country. 
Recently the name has been given added 
prominence by R. C. Chown 's connection 
with the O. R. H. & S. D. A. The 
Chowns have been numbered among 
Belleville's most enterprising citizens, 
and their departure will be regretted. 

Personal Notes. 

Fred Karn, hardware merchant of 
Woodstock, Ont., is on a holiday trip to 
Minnesota. 

Ed. Goodwill, sales manager of Thos. 
Davidson and Co., is spending a vacation 
in New Brunswick. 

Charles E. Stewart of the James 
Stewart Manufacturing Co., Woodstock, 
43 



has returned from an extensive trip 
through Western Canada. 

Business Changes. 

Dauphin, Man. — The Dauphin Hard- 
ware Co. have dissolved partnership. 

London, Ont. — Kilpatrick Bros., have 
bought out the hardware store in East 
London, of C. W. Willits. The latter 
has gone West. 

Lethbridge, Alta. — Wilmot Bros., of 
Toronto, have started in the hardware 
business here. 

Factory Additions. 

Hespeler, Ont. — Hall, Zryd Foundry 
Co., are erecting an addition to their 
molding shop. 

Gait, Ont.— The Gait Stove and Furn- 
ace Co., have just completed a 115 by 
70 addition to their molding shop. 
New Retail Firms. 

Winnipeg, Man. — Belogus and Fiskin 
have started a hardware store. 

Bow Island, Alta. — Wilmot Bros, have 
started a hardware store. 

-m~ 

URGE EARLY BUYING. 

Herbert, Sask. — J. Funk & Co., are 
taking advantage of the reports of a 
binder twine shortage to urge on the pub- 
lic the wisdom of buying early. They 
say in their advertisements: 

"We have now a carload of binder 
twine. As there is sure to be a 
twine shortage this fall, you will be 
well advised to order early. But be 
sure that you get only the best." 
They are having some improvements 
made in the interior of their store. An 
office is being built on the south side of 
the store and this will make more room 
for the storing of goods. The interior 
will be rearranged. 

— ®~ 

WORLD'S LONGEST FENCE? 

The New York State Board of Water 
Supply will soon award the contract for 
constructing what will be one of the 
longest wire fences in the world. The 
fence, which is to enclose the new Asho- 
kan dam in the Catskills and the aque- 
duct property leading from it to the 
city, will be 150 miles long, or the dis- 
tance from New York to Albany. The 
posts are to be of concrete, and stone 
walls will enclose the property through 
villages. 



Weekly Market Report — Metals 



METAL NOTES. 

Business generally is brisk. 
Large orders are reported. 

Tin and copper are both re- 
ported firm again. 

There have been advances in the 
price of boiler plates and tubes, 
brass rods and copper products. 



MONTREAL. 

Montreal, Aug. 15. — During the week 
there have been a number of price ad- 
vances — the great majority of which 
have been expected. In each case the 
advance has been made necessary by 
reason of a higher price demanded for 
the raw material. 

Generally business has been exceeding- 
ly good. Large orders have been re- 
ceived, and thanks to some recent ship- 
ments it has been found possible to fill 
these fairly promptly. There are, how- 
ever, still some lines in which a short- 
age is felt, notably soil pipe and gal- 
vanized Canada plates. The demand for 
soil pipe has been exceedingly large. 
Those wanting it, and there are many 
such, seem willing to pay any price. But 
even so there is difficulty in furnishing 
them with the commodity. Galvanized 
Canada plates have been scarce for some 
time, but never so scarce as at present. 
It is thought that new supplies will be 
received soon, but even so there is a 
possibility that these prices may be 
advanced. The quotations on soil pipe 
are almost certain to be raised. 
Some of the Advances. 
Some of the changes, which have been 
struck locally are worth noting here. In 
boiler plates and tubes there has been 
a rise of 10c a cwt.- — a rise which can 
only be accounted for by the high cost 
of raw material. 

Tubes, too, have been set at a new 
figure, this being some 5 per cent higher, 
than the old prices. 

Also brass rods and tubing have been 
advanced a cent, a pound — a move also 
to be expected, is view of the recent up- 
ward tendency shown by copper. 

Copper goods have taken a similar 
jump, that is all except the ingot, which 
remains at $19. 

Lead. — On the primary market the 
price has shown a tendency to fall. This 
movement has not been noted here, but 
it is reported that stocks are much bet- 
ter than for some time past. The con- 
ditions are not normal yet, but they are 
much healthier than they have been of 
late. 

Iron.- — The metal continues high — con- 
tinues rising indeed. Therefore the ad- 



vances in certain iron products, and 
therefore the likelihood of some further 
advances. There is rather a scarcity of 
the pig, but nothing to cause fear of a 
real famine. The galvanized Canada 
plates, it appears, are scarcest in Mon- 
treal. But a larger supply is in sight 
and no really serious shortage is antici- 
pated. 

Tin. — The course continues upward. 
Apparently the market is under control, 
and the bulls are at present doing about 
what they like. High tin is looked for 
here throughout August and September. 

Copper. — After a period of lower 
prices copper has regained all that it 
lost and more. The metal is now selling 
briskly, and the market seems to have 
a strong appearance. Locally there is 
a good deal of metal to be had. 

TORONTO. 

Toronto, Aug. 15. — The general trend 
of business is very satisfactory. Indus- 
trially the country is busy and the 
manufacturers are ordering freely. 
Thus all metals are in active demand 
and, from present indications, are likely 
to remain so. 

"We are counting on a very active 
fall," said one man. "The one fly in 
the ointment is the scarcity in some 
metals. We have found it very hard to 
meet demands. In fact, we have had a 
shortage in at least one metal practically 
all year." 

"It is not possible to predict very 
far advance in the metal business," he 
continued. "Present indications lead 
us to believe, however, that we are go- 
ing to have a busy time all winter." 

There have been a number of changes 
in price — in tubes and in copper sheets. 
All lines of copper products practically 
have gone up. 

There is a tendency toward firmness 
noted in all metals, in fact. 

Tin. — There is a steady trade being 
done. Demand for tin keeps up no mat- 
ter what may transpire with regard to 
the price. At the present time the price 
is very firm. 

On the London market the bullish ele- 
ment have the upper hand and it is, 
therefore, anticipated locally that the 
price will continue high; that it may 
even reach a higher level than the pres- 
ent one. 

Strong Again. 
Copper. — In copper, the market has 
gone back again to the position it occu- 
pied some weeks ago. The market is 
stronger and a good confident tone pre- 
vails. The price of ingot copper has re- 
mained the same here but in copper pro- 
ducts there has been a pretty general 
advance. 

44 



The demand here has been heavy. 

Lead. — This metal is still pretty 
scarce. The local market cannot very 
well be judged by the primary markets 
as conditions are widely divergent. At 
the present time, lead is a little weaker 
on the American markets but no evi- 
desces of weakness have been discerned 
here. 

Spelter. — Business is steady, and the 
same term may be applied to the price. 

Antimony. — Little interest is being 
shown in antimony though there is a 
little demand. 

Pig Iron. — It was feared at one time 
that there would be a shortage but this 
is not regarded as a very likely con- 
tingent now. Still stocks are pretty 
light and the demand is as heavy as 
ever. 

In view of these conditions, the price 
is high and firm. Enquiries indicate 
that the iron trade for the future is 
well assured. 



WINNIPEG. 

Winnipeg, Aug. 12. — There is no 
change for the better in the plate situa- 
tion. Orders for galvanized or sheet iron 
take two months to ten weeks to get 
filled and a sharp advance in prices is 
generally anticipated. Sheet metal work- 
ers in the city are much hampered by the 
conditions at present prevailing. Lead 
and copper prices are still very firm but 
no further advances are recorded this 
week. 

Business in cement and structural 
iron and steel is still very active and 
with the present crop outlook maintained 
construction may be commenced on many 
large buildings this season instead of 
next. 

@ 

MOVE TO NEW QUARTERS. 

Reynolds & Jackson, manufacturers 
agents, Calgary, have moved into new 
quarters occupying three floors of a 
warehouse building, with a total floor 
area of 12,500 square feet. Reynolds & 
Jackson are both young men. Mr. 
Reynolds is an American by birth, hav- 
ing originally been a hardware dealer 
in the State of Iowa ; later traveler with 
the Malleable Iron Range Co., Bever 
Dam, Iowa. Following the same line he 
traveled for Rathbone & Sard, stove 
manufacturers, Aurora, 111., and a few 
years later was connected with Claire 
& Brockest, Winnipeg, which firm he at 
present represents. Mr. Reynolds there- 
fore has had a thorough stove and fur- 
nace training. Mr. Jackson was form- 
erly traveler in Western Canada for F. 
J. C. Cox, hardware specialty agent, 
Winnipeg, which position he has held for 
the past ten years. 



Weekly Market Report — Hardware 



HARDWARE NOTES. 

Business is brisk, the demand 
being pretty well distributed over 
all lines. 

Harvest tools are selling in 
large bulk. 

Rope has advanced again. 

A higher price has been set for 
shot. 



MONTREAL. 

Montreal, Aug. 15. — Again there has 
come an advance in rope, lS^c. now be- 
ing quoted in the price of pure Manilla. 
It is a price almost on a par with the 
high water mark reached in the last few 
years. The reason for the rise, is, of 
course, causing some conjecture. 

Generally a shortage in the supply — 
or rather a high figure demanded for 
the raw hemp, as the result of a shortage 
■ — is given as the real reason. But what 
is back of the shortage? That, as the 
late Mr. Hamlet would say, is the ques- 
tion. 

New List for Shot. 

Rope has not been the only hardware 
line to advance. Shot, too, has taken 
another upward step. The list price 
has had to be changed, since the recent 
advances have wiped out all the dis- 
counts. The new figures, therefore, are 
$8 per hundred pounds, net list, with 
all the old conditions applying, as out- 
lined in the current market reports. 

Generally business is exceedingly 
good. On all hands it is stated that 
trade has been better than it was last 
year. Profits, generally, should be a 
good deal larger. 

Seasonable Goods. — These lines are 
moving well. There has been a good de- 
mand for horse blankets, and for lant- 
erns, coal shovels, and even snow 
shovels the call has come. Preserving 
goods are moving better all the time, 
and for skates, and similar winter lines 
a demand is felt. 

Heavy Hardware. — The advance in 
iron pipe has rather tended to stimulate 
trade than to give it a set back. Dealers 
seem to be awake to the situation. 
They seem to realize that another ad- 
vance is more likely than a decline, and 
that, whatever the price, there is quite 
likely to be a shortage. 

Lead Pipe May Rise. 

An advance in lead pipe is being free- 
ly predicted. The present would seem 
a good season for those needing the 
goods to lay in a stock. Large orders, 
however, are not likely to be delivered 
immediately. 

Rope. — Pure Manilla, which has ad- 
vanced from 12V 2 to lSV^c has shown 



the biggest change; but British Manilla 
too, has been set upon a new price level, 
the list now reading lO^c. instead of 
10c. These two lines are the only ones 
to be changed, but indications are that 
other classes of rope will change too. 
Cotton is scarce now, and it appears 
very likely that the various styles of 
rope in which this is used, and also the 
cotton seine twine, will go up. The new 
level may not be struck at once, though 
that is far from unlikely. 

Blaming the Trusts. 

Generally the belief is that the trusts 
have something to do with the advance 
in Manilla rope. The hemp is under 
their control, and they are said to be so 
curtailing the supply as to get a high 
figure for this. Naturally as the value 
of the raw product advances, a some- 
what similar advance must be made in 
the finished product. 

Sporting Goods. — Shot, showing the 
quite considerable price change that it 
does, demands some attention. The cause 
for this advance, of course, is to be 
found in the pig lead situation. Not 
only is pig lead high in price, but it is 
exceedingly difficult to secure. There- 
fore the 50c. advance in the list price. 
It is not thought that another upward 
movement will come quickly. More prob- 
ably a small discount will be announced 
after more lead is in sight. But the fu- 
ture of lead is hard to read just at pres- 
ent. 



TORONTO. 

Toronto, Aug. 15. — Business continues 
brisk in all departments. The season 
when a slump is to be expected is now 
over, and the jobbers are anticipating a 
gradual increase in activity from now 
on. Already shipments of fall goods 
have commenced. 

The tendency in prices is still upward. 
In most lines prices are firm, while two 
changes are noted. Rope and shot have 
both advanced again. Other advances 
are said to be pending in lines which are 
affected by the high price of metals. 

Summer Goods: — The demand has fall- 
en off to an appreciable extent. While 
a few orders have been filled they have 
been small and entirely of the sorting 
order. Still, some refrigerators are still 
being called for, and, strange to relate, 
screen doors have also been in demand. 
The orders have been of a special nature, 
designed to fill specific needs. 

There is still some trade doing in pre- 
serving kettles and similar goods. 

Household Goods: — The demand in 
this department is very heavy. Enamel- 
ware is selling briskly. There is also a 
first-class demand noted for aluminum 
45 



ware. The public is becoming more in- 
terested all the time in this line and the 
sales of the retailer, quite apparently, 
are going up. 

Harvesting Tools : — Activity centres 
pretty well in harvest tools. There is 
now a steady movement in these lines. 
The farmers have started to work on the 
harvesting of the grain and are finding 
the need for tools so that the hardware 
dealers are meeting with a steady call. 
They in turn are ordering in big bulk 
from the wholesalers. 

Builders ' Hardware : — The call for 
builders' is gradually reaching high 
water mark. Buildings started in spring 
and early summer are now nearing com- 
pletion and a vast amount of hardware 
is being handled. The dealers are in 
some cases sending in sorting orders 
daily. In the city, the volume of bus- 
iness is extremely heavy. 

There is firm tone noted in all lines of 
builders' hardware. The advance in 
rope, noted elsewhere, affects this de- 
partment. 

Heavy Hardware: — Demand is heavy 
in all lines. The manufacturers, despite 
the heavy calls this year, have kept 
pretty well abreast of the demand. 

Rope: — There have been advances 
here, as noted elsewhere. 

Sporting Goods: — It cannot be said 
that business has suffered in sporting 
goods although the demand has undoubt- 
edly fallen off in some lines. Baseball 
supplies are not selling as briskly as 
earlier in the summer, but practically all 
other lines are keeping up in activity. 
For instance, golf and tennis goods are 
still big sellers. There is an increasing 
demand for guns, ammunition and hunts- 
men's supplies. 

Shot has been advanced in price. 

WINNIPEG. 

Winnipeg, Aug. 12. — Times are busier 
than ever in the hardware trade. Ev- 
erything is moving, but there is special 
activity just now in harvest tools and 
fall sporting goods. 

Builders' supplies are still very active 
and large shipments of window glass 
have been moving out during the week. 

Rope prices are higher and the consen- 
sus of opinion is that the limit is not yet 
reached. Pure Manilla is now at 15!/^ 
and British Manilla at 10%. 

Collections are fair for the time of the 
year, but no great improvement need be 
expected until the season's crop starts 
to move. 

Building permits are now well over the 
$15,000,000 mark. 



Weekly Market Reports— Stoves 



CONFIDENCE STRENGTHENED 

The absolute assurance of good 
crops in the West has strengthen- 
ed the confidence that the manu- 
facturers have felt in the fall 
stove trade prospects. It is now 
asserted with certainty that the 
demand will far exceed any pre- 
vious year. 

Shipments are pretty brisk, par- 
ticularly to Western points. 



MONTREAL. 

Montreal, Aug. 15. — No. price changes 
have come, to cause some interest in 
this, the between season, the season 
when the summer rush has stopped, and 
when the fall rush has hardly com- 
menced. However, it appears that there 
are to be price changes. They are in the 
air. What will these be ? Well it would 
seem that tin ware is to be advanced, 
and that Japanned goods will also move 
in an upward direction. The signs point 
this way, and it is an age when the right 
kind of men believe in the right kind of 
signs. 

The general reason which gives rise 
to the belief that these changes are 
coming, is of course, the scarcity and 
high price of tin. Despite fluctuations 
on the primary market, prices locally 
have remained high, and the material 
which the manufacturers are using is 
costing them dear. 

Building Delays Cause Trouble. 

Aside from the possibility of future 
changes the main interest is in estimat- 
ing the demand which is to come. News 
of a good crop in the West, and in the 
East too, for that matter, makes it seem 
that nothing will tend to stop the order- 
ing. A hot wave, which is expected 
here, will likely delay fall orders a 
little, but these have already started to 
come in, and will certainly grow in 
volume from now on. There is a good 
deal of shipping by water, but the great 
rush this way will start in another 
month. 

Furnaces. — This line has already com- 
menced to move well. The demand 
would be even better if it were not for 
some delays in building. These have 
prevented a number of heating engi- 
neers installing furnaces, and so have 
limited the orders. But dealers who 
keep furnaces in stock are now getting 
in a good supply. 



Ranges and Heaters. — The ranges are 
moving well. Already retail sales have 
started, some models being sold to those 
returning from the country. But the 
big demand will not commence for a 
month or so. More and more, however, 
dealers are coming to realize that a 
good stock brings good sales, and they 
are getting early orders in for fair- 
sized shipments. 

Heaters have hardly started to move 
yet. Orders are being booked, but these 
call for future delivery. 

Kitchen Ware. — All lines are moving, 
and moving rapidly. It is the season 
when many boilers and sauce pans are 
needed. Preserving is still being done, 
and more will be done during the com- 
ing weeks. Orders for this class of 
goods are large. Supplementary orders 
moreover, make it very evident that the 
retailers are getting rid of the goods in 
satisfactory fashion. 

Oil Heaters. — So far the retail de- 
mand for these is exceedingly small. But 
it is coming, and dealers, knowing this, 
and remembering the difficulty they had 
last year to get the supplies, are com- 
mencing to order. Oil heaters are gain- 
ing in popularity and seem certain to 
sell well. 



TORONTO. 

Toronto, Aug. 15. — The assurance of 
good crops in the West has meant much 
to the stove trade. While there was ev- 
ery evidence of a record fall trade and 
while the manufacturers have never lack- 
ed confidence, the surety of prosperity in 
the West was needed to absolutely in- 
sure the continuance of active conditions. 

It is now pretty well taken for grant- 
ed that the fall will see the largest de- 
mand for stoves that has ever been ex- 
perienced. The foundries are being 
pushed to their capacity to meet the ex- 
pected rush. Already there is a steady 
outward movement. Heavy shipments 
are now the order. The point has often 
been urged before, but we cannot refrain 
from stating that the dealer who is anxi- 
ous to avoid trouble and delays later 
would do well to see that they get ship- 
ment just as soon as possible. A word 
to the wise. 

Ranges: — Shipments on ranges are 
now divided into two classes, for imme- 
diate use and for fall trade. While the 
fall shipments are becoming heavy, there 
is also a brisk movement noted in small 
lots for present sales. Some dealers ap- 

46 



pear to be selling ranges at present more 
or less steadily. This is particularly the 
case in northern and western sections. 
There is a big demand from the west and 
shipments are being directed pretty 
largely that way. An effort is always 
put forth to get western supplies out 
early. 

Heaters: — Some are being shipped in 
more or less large quantities. This 
promises to be a good heater year. 
Furnaces Are Active. 

Furnaces: — In Toronto the furnace 
industry is already very active. So 
much building has been done this sum- 
mer that most heating contractors have 
as much work on their hands now as 
the j - can handle. 

The outlook is for an extremely active 
fall. Most dealers are anticipating that 
their needs will be heavier than ever and 
the manufacturers are straining them- 
selves to reach a position where they will 
be able to meet the increased demand. 

Gas Stoves: — While much quieter, the 
gas range trade is by no means dead. 
They are still moving out with surpris- 
ing steadiness. A large proportion of 
sales now are to fill contracts placed 
earlier in the season for new buildings 
and apartment houses. There have been 
scores of the latter erected in Toronto 
this year and as gas stoves are an es- 
sential part of the equipment, the de- 
mand from this source alone has been 
partly accountable for the heavy in- 
crease in gas stove sales this year. 

Accessories: — There is a good demand 
for heating accessories and supplies. 



WINNIPEG. 

Winnipeg, Aug. 12.— Athough the fall 
rush has not yet commenced there is al- 
ready a considerable movement in stoves 
to country points and in a couple of 
weeks the stove business will be a lead- 
ing feature. With the vast amount of 
building nearing completion throughout 
the country the demand for heaters and 
ranges cannot but be exceptionally good. 
Retailers are already beginning to dis- 
play and feature in advertising new and 
attractive lines. 

It is noticeable that the type of heater 
most in evidence is of the kind that will 
burn either wood or coal and it is un- 
doubtedly the stove of the future on the 
western prairies. Gas and electric cook- 
ing and heating apparatus are steady 
sellers. 



Methods of Retailing Paints and Varnishes 



Making a Corner in the Paint Trade 

The Methods of a Progressive Dealer — Canvassed Property 
Owners Who Had Houses for Sale or to Rent — The Argu- 
ments He Used — Splendid Results Achieved. 



Brown was a hardware dealer with 
ambition. He was doing pretty well, 
sufficient to get him his three meals a 
day and to lay by a little in the bank. 
But he was not satisfied with that. He 
wanted to get the most possible out of 
his business. 

The returns from one branch of the 
business dissatisfied Brown in particu- 
lar. He wasn't doing much with paint. 
He was selling a fair quantity and, as 
he was wise enough to eschew price 
cutting, making a fair profit. But the 
turnover in this department looked small 
to Brown when he strolled through the 
t6wn and saw on every side of him 
buildings fairly falling to pieces for 
want of paint. The possibilities were 
so great in the paint line that Brown 
determined to push it to the utter- 
most. 

Now it is all very well for a man in 
Brown's position — with an axe to grind, 
as it were — to realize the wisdom of 
using paint, but it is a more difficult 
matter to get the property owner to 
see it the same way. The property own- 
er has to foot the bill and, if there is 
one thing the average man is adverse to, 
it is footing bills. He will let matters 
slide for a long time, even when he rea- 
lizes that it is wrong, before he will 
spend his money. Thus, in the matter 
of paint, property owners are prone to 
neglect their buildings rather than 
spend a little money to have them re- 
decorated. It requires educational 
work on the part of the dealer to make 
them see- the error of their ways. 

Brown soon realized this when he be- 
gan to work on the men he deemed to be 
good paint prospects. The property 
owners he approached seemed to harbor 
the suspicion that there would be more 
in it for Brown than for them. 

Then a brilliant idea occurred to him. 
He made enquiries and collected a com- 
plete list of properties for sale and to 
rent. Then he called on the owners, one 
after another. 

"You want to sell (or rent) your pro- 
perty?" he would say. 

"Yes." 

"Then you can do it by making the 
property more attractive. People will 
rent or buy a house twice as fast if it 



appeals to them, to their sense of the 
beautiful. Spend a few dollars to have 
that house painted fresh and you can 
add a couple of hundreds to the price or 
a few dollars to the rent. It will im- 
prove your property and what's more 
you will get the money back almost im- 
mediately." 

That was his "opening sale." He 
had in addition a whole battery of ar- 
guments with which to bombard the 
sceptical. He believed what he was say- 
ing, and that went a long way. It lent 
a note of conviction to his talk. 

Some of the men refused to consider 
the proposition. They could rent their 
property anyway. Painting might or 
might not help them in the matter. One 
tiling was certain, it would mean outlay. 
Accordingly, they pooh-poohed Brown's 
graphically presented possibility of im- 
mediate results and increased profits. 

Others gave him a hearing. A few of 
them were convinced and decided to try 
it out. 

They Got Results. 

And they got results. The houses 
which were painted as a result of 
Brown 's solicitations were in practically 
all cases sold or rented almost imme- 
diately. Their fresh appearance at- 
tracted people seeking a home and they 
passed by the dingy places on each side. 

This was just the beginning of 
Brown's campaign. With his proofs to 
back him up, he went back at the others 
who had not paid any attention to his 
arguments before. He took a list with 
him, showing the dates on which cer- 
tain houses had been painted and the 
dates when they had been disposed of. 

"You did not see things my way be- 
fore," he would begin. "Now I have 
the proofs." And he would proceed to 
give them. 

He gradually convinced the majority 
of property owners with houses they 
wanted to dispose of, that they should 
repaint them as a preliminary step. It 
was more or less of a revolution, the 
previous plan having been to sell the 
house and let the new owner paint it if 
he wanted to; which he probably 
wouldn't. However, all were satisfied; 
the owners because they effected a sale 
or secured a tenant, the new comers be- 
47 



cause they had an attractive home and 
Brown most of all because he had work- 
ed up a big trade in paint. 

Extended his operations. 

But he was not through by any means. 
The homes which had been painted as a 
result of his solicitations had been ren- 
dered so attractive that other houses 
surrounding looked old and dingy and 
unattractive. Even a miser will seri- 
ously consider repainting his house 
when the man next door sets the ex- 
ample, for none of us like to be out- 
done in that way. Brown had many 
customers who were in this position and 
he did not neglect to prod them up on 
every possible occasion. 

"So-and-so's house is looking pretty 
nice," he would remark. "By the way, 
are you going to paint your property 
this year?" 

His sales increased and multiplied. 
The best part of it was that he was 
building up a permanent basis. He was 
convincing his customers of the value 
of paint so effectively that they would 
remain convinced. 

Other features of Campaign. 

But again it must be remarked, this 
was not all. He conducted a vigorous 
campaign in the store as well. His stock 
was placed well to the front of the es- 
tablishment. Dust, dinted tins and dis- 
colored labels were conspicuous by their 
absence. Everything was in apple pie 
order, well sorted up, fresh and attrac- 
tive. 

Paint was frequently seen in the store 
window. At least once a month, he ar- 
ranged a display of paint, varnish, 
brushes and accessories. This plan he 
followed, not during the active seasons 
only, but the whole year around. 

Paint figured prominently in his ad- 
vertising. He used cuts supplied by the 
manufacturers and his copy was snappy 
and convincing. 

Finally, he pushed the sale of quality 
goods and invariably attempted to per- 
suade customers who inclined to cheaper 
lines that it was not wise. This policy 
he pursued rigidly, being convinced 
that he could build a permanent trade 
only by giving absolute satisfaction. 
Cheap material does not give satisfac- 
tion in the long run. He did not want 
customers coming back in a couple of 
years' time telling him that his paint 
was no good. 

This is a brief resume of one dealer's 
success. It is not a suppositious state- 
ment but is based on actual facts. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Brown — his name is not Brown by the 
way — is in business to-day, and is doing 
what is generally termed a "whale of a 
trade." He has pretty well cornered 
the paint business in his section. 



What he has done others can do. The 
same methods might not apply in all 
cases. But if a dealer looks around he 
can always find ways and means of in- 
creasing his business. 



A Lesson in Paint Salesmanship 

How One Clerk Made a Sale ofWhite Paint for Interior Use 
— How He Should Have Done It — A Contrast in Methods of 
Salesmanship. 



A body of men who are making their 
presence felt in this age have as their 
motto: "To earn more, learn more." 
This might be changed somewhat to ap- 
ply to paint salesman, "To sell more, 
know more, and explain more." 

An instance which occurred in Mon- 
treal within the last week brings the 
need of "knowing" and "explaining" 
to mind. 

A lady, who did not know a great 
deal about paint, but who knows a good 
deal about arranging a home, decided 
that she wanted to paint the door in one 
of her bed rooms. This was, at the time, 
an imitation grain, and did not look 
very well, she thought; nor did it suit 
the room — the other woodwork of which 
was white. 

Right Goods, Wrong Instructions. 

The lady went to the paint depart- 
ment of a hardware store. She explain- 
ed what she wanted, and the clerk hand- 
ed over a white paint — a good white 
paint it was, too. But here the clerk's 
knowledge, or interest, ended. He did 
not explain how this should be applied. 
The lady asked a few questions, but was 
told that it would be all right, "just to 
put it on." So she went away with the 
right kind of goods, but the wrong kind 
of instructions. 

Now there are a number of ways of 
painting a door, but it will be generally 
agreed that this should be prepared in 
some way before the paint is applied. 
To see what a good salesman would sug- 
gest this question was asked of one who 
has made a reputation for himself. 

"If a lady told you she had a door 
which is now an imitation grain, and 
which she wants to paint white, what 
would you tell her?" 

Explain How to Do Work. 

This salesman was busy at once with 
some color cards. "I would try to 
learn something of the finish which she 
wanted," he said. "Then I would try 
to give her an idea of the best method 
of applying the paint. I suppose you 
mean that she intends to apply the paint 
herself?" 

"Yes," he was told. "That is the 
idea. Now how would you explain how 
to do the work." 

"Why," said the salesman, "that is 
easy to do, but it is harder to explain 



to another how I would do it. I always 
think an explanation should be made as 
simple as possible. If not the one in- 
tending to apply the paint will think 
the task is too difficult, and will give 
up the idea. In the case you cite I 
would merely advise the lady to get a 
little sand paper and sand paper the 
door thoroughly before she put a brush 
on it. This would take off a good part 
of the grain, and would leave the door 
in condition to take the paint. Then I 
would suggest that she use a ground 
paint, or that she apply two or three 
coats of the white paint. If a glossy 
finish was desired I would suggest that 
an enamel be used afterward. But I 
would make it very clear that an enamel 
has practically no covering qualities, 
and that the door would need to have 
its white appearance before the enamel 
were applied." 



There is the method of a competent 
salesman, in contrast to that employed 
by a man of comparatively little value. 
Both are real beings, and there is little 
doubt that their separate methods are 
but typical. Perhaps the first man did 
not really know much about the paint. 
The second man did know; and evident- 
ly he understood how to explain. 

It is not hard to see what the result of 
the first clerk's sale would be. The 
paint used would be good, but it would 
be poorly applied, and the result would 
hardly likely be satisfactory. Result? 
Why the dealer who carried the paint, 
and the manufacturer who made it, 
would both sink in the esteem of the 
user. And all because one man did not 
know his business, or was too lazy to 
take a little trouble. 

The second salesman would send the 
customer away with a pretty clear un- 
derstanding of the best method to 
adopt, in order to secure the best re- 
sult. The instructions would almost cer- 
tainly be followed — because they would 
not be too complex — and the work, in 
consequence, would be satisfactory. 
There would be benefit all round, 
therefore — benefit for the buyer, the 
seller, and the manufacturer. 

Paint salesmanship is not handing out 
a can of paint. It is explaining how 
the paint should be used, and those who 
realize this will be apt to secure a large 
part of the business. 



Conditions in the Flaxseed Area 



Linseed Oil has been high during the 
past summer, due primarily to a short- 
age of seed. As the hardwareman is 
very directly interested in the price of 
linseed oil, he is also interested in the 
question of flaxseed. 

The following estimate of the Cana- 
dian flaxseed crop will be of interest. 

With everything favorable, says the 
Paint and Varnish Record, the north- 
west and Canada should produce a 
bumper crop of seed, but there are too 
many uncertainties in the growing crop, 
and the maturity of the seed, especially 
in North Dakota, and in the Canadian 
Northwest, is still too far in the future 
for one to say with certainty what the 
outcome is going to be. 

Some very early frosts have been re- 
ported in the Canadian Northwest since 
the last review in this column, but thus 
far there have been few damage ad- 
vices. Most of the frosts were light, 
hardly enough to touch any of the 
growing plants, and they did not affect 
wheat at all, though flax, being a little 
less mature, might suffer where the other 
grain would not. The trade is rather in- 
clined to fear for the future, than to 
48 



take much stock in what the frost al- 
ready has done in the way of injury 
to flax. It is contended that when frost 
appears so early, there is likely to be a 
recurrence of it, and if this is the case 
the Canadian crop is still so susceptible 
to frost, and it is likely to be for some 
time, that it might suffer severely. A 
man just down from the Moose Jaw sec- 
tion of Saskatchewan reported to the 
writer that he never had seen such a 
prospect for a crop of seed in -the his- 
tory of the new industry in that pro- 
vince. Farmers told him that they had 
sown largely increased areas of seed, 
and that generally the weather had been 
just what had been needed for the plant. 
He declared that while there were frosts 
while he had been there, they had been 
so light that no one had paid much at- 
tention to them, and that they un- 
doubtedly had been magnified by dis- 
tance, until they had reached {rather 
large proportions this side of the Cana- 
dian line. It may be said, therefore, 
that, unless something unpropitious hap- 
pens io the erop, Canada will be near 
the front in the production of seed this 
year. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Are Your Stocks Right for Our 

FALL PAINTING CAMPAIGN 

to Help Dealers? 

We are about to advertise fall painting to the con- 
sumer. We turn over the business created to the nearest 
local M-L Dealer. We make it our policy to help the 
dealer sell our product. We rigidly guard the quality of 
our M-L Paint and other lines to give successful results 
for the dealer's benefit. 

We think the M-L Line is a good line to handle. If 
you think so, remember how glad we are to give you free 
samples and color cards. Write us 




M-L Floglaze 

is a perfect, hard-wearing finish 
for indoor furniture and wood- 
work. It also finishes buggies, 
farm implements, outdoor fur- 
niture, etc. Samples on request. 

M-L Paints 

are ready-mixed, made from the 
purest pigments and materials. 
They have good covering power 
and long service. In tins of all 
convenient sizes. 

M-L Flat Water Colors 

are applied to plaster, giving a 
dull matt effect, easily washed 
and non-spotting. In tins. Ask 
for cards. 

M-L Elastilite 

a safe, easily-applied high-gloss 
varnish for indoors and out, ex- 
cept floors. Weather proof. 
Good results are invariable. In 
tins for the local trade. 



The Decorative Aid Department Helps You to obtain and hold business. Color schemes furnished 
f -uj.e-.L- n ,. , free. Technical advice on paint questions. Stencils 

furnished for interior decoration work to help dealers develop this business. Use this department. 

Imperial Varnish and Color Co., Limited, Toronto 



Winnipeg Warehouse ; 
108 Princess St. 



Factory: 6-24 Morse Street 



Vancouver Warehouse ; 
365 Water St. 



JUST PRUDENCE h 



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y 

y 

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The simplest form of prudence for the Hardware merchant is to select, 
after careful comparison, the lines of products most conducive to the get- 
ting and holding of customers. Especially is this statement true in refer- 
ence to the Paint Department. 

Lowe Brothers' "High Standard" Liquid Paint has been a factor in 
increasing the trade of many merchants. Its superior spreading capacity 
— its greater hiding power — its uniformity and serviceability makes "High 
Standard" Liquid Paint the most valuable agency for the progressive 
Hardware Dealer. 

LET US SHOW YOU 



Lyon-Monkhouse 
Limited 

Salter and Flora 
Sts., Winnipeg. 




TORONTO 



Dayton New York 

Kansas City 
Boston Chicago 



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y 

y 

y 

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Weekly Market Report — Paints 



PAINT NOTES. 

Linseed oil has dropped 3 cents 
in Toronto. 

White lead may advance again. 
Stocks are still light. 

A firm tone is noted in glass. 

Business is very active in all 
lines. 



MONTREAL. 

Montreal, Aug. 15. — As far as prices 
are concerned quiet reigns in the paint 
market. Lead — the pyrotechnic per- 
former — has been quiet since its advance 
of last week. On the primary market 
there has been a slight decline in the 
prices of the pig, but this has not made 
the product any easier to obtain here, 
and certainly will not tend to force prices 
down. A new high level may be struck, 
but this is not now expected for some 
little time — a month or more at least. 

Business generally is remarkably good. 
If precedent were followed, things should 
be quiet now. They are a little quieter 
than during the spring and early summer, 
but the demand yet continues. Indeed, 
though the manufacturers have been 
keeping their works going full force, the 
task of stocking up has been interfered 
with greatly. Shipments are still de- 
manded. Old orders remain to be filled, 
and it is well nigh impossible to manu- 
facture more than the retailers are re- 
quiring. 

Prospects Are Good. 

Linseed Oil: — Speculation as to the 
coming Canadian crop is being freely 
indulged in. From reports of those who 
have just returned from extended trips 
through the west it appears everything is 
well with the flax so far. Unless some 
rainy weather, or some storms come to 
lodge the grain, the crop should be far 
in excess of that reaped last year. The 
oil giving quality of the seed, of course, 
will not be known for months to come. 

The likelihood — not the certainty — of 
a car shortage, is causing some alarm. 
But the flax should be harvested in good 
time, and stands a good chance of reach- 
ing the crushers at a fairly early date. 

Oil at present remains at the old 
prices, nor does an immediate change 
seem likely. 

White Lead : — Despite the high prices 
the demand continues good. Some of 
the orders call for future delivery, hav- 
ing evidently been placed by dealers who 
are anxious to guard against a future 
rise — dealers who were slow in reading 



the signs of high prices, or else who had 
not ordered enough under the old prices 
to fully meet their requirements. 
Interior Paints Moving. 

Prepared Paint : — Interior paints are 
commencing to take a prominent place. 
Floors are receiving attention, also doors, 
window frames and other parts of the 
house. The cool weather has brought a 
number home from the country early r 
and the need of doing some painting is 
evidently appealing to them. 

Certainly this class of paint is bein* 
ordered largely, along with the ever 
popular and ever reliable stains and var- 
nishes. Exterior paints, however, are 
also being- ordered. Especially are barn 
paints needed. 

Turpentine: — Little change to note 
here. The stocks are good, and any 
serious change in prices is not looked for. 
Glass Situation Unsettled. 

Glass : — No more talk of an advance 
lias been heard, but it is far from unlike- 
ly that an advance will come. Stocks are 
very fair, but any interference with the 
existing condition in Belgium — and such 
interference seems quite possible — 
would cause a shortage which would re- 
sult in considerable trouble. 



TORONTO. 

Toronto, Aug. 15. — The paint market 
here has been featured by a drop in the 
price of linseed oil. It came rather un- 
expectedly to some, but these who have 
been keeping in close touch with the 
market had anticipated that there would 
be a downward revision. 

Business all around is good. The sum- 
mer season is now practically over, and 
still there has been no sign of that one- 
time inevitable contingency — the sum- 
mer slump. Trade has been steadily 
and consistently heavy. It has been, in 
fact, a record paint year. More paint 
has been sold here than ever before. 

Oil is Cheaper. 

Linseed Oil: — The price of linseed oil 
has been dropped to 93 cents for raw 
and 96 for boiled, a decrease of 3 cents. 
As stated before, this slump while rath- 
er unexpected to some, has been antici- 
pated for some time. Still it has come 
rather sooner than had generally been 
expected. There are many contributing 
causes to this weakening in price. The 
prospect of a large flaxseed crop has un- 
doubtedly had something to do with it. 

The price will, in all probability, go 
still lower. Already there is some talk 
of 90 cents for raw and 93 for boiled. 
50 



Business at the present time is fairly 
brisk. 

Turpentine: — The price is still 66 
cents. There is a good seasonable trade 
being done. 

White Lead : --There have been no de- 
velopments in white lead. The prevail- 
ing price is still $7.95, but no one seems 
to expect that it will remain at this 
figure. Further advances are anticipat- 
ed. While no definite steps have been 
taken in that direction, it is pretty gen- 
erally recognized that another increase 
is inevitable in view of the scarcity and 
high price of the pig lead. 

There is a good demand for white lead 
and stocks here are still light. 

Glass: — The glass situation does not 
present any new features. Shipments 
from Belgium are coming through and 
there have not been any evidences of 
real trouble there yet. Still, the import- 
ers feel that they are not out of the 
woods yet. There is a good demand for 
glass and the impression prevails here 
that higher prices may come. 

Putty: — The volume of trade in putty 
is showing a steady improvemenl. Prices 
remain the same as follows: — Standard 
bulk in casks, $2.40; in 100-lb. drums, 
$2.55; in 25-lb. drums, $2.65; bladder in 
barrels, $2.80. Pure putty prices are as 
follows: Bulk in casks, $3; in 100-1\ 
drums, $3.40; in 25-lb. drums, $3.50; 
bladder in barrels, $3.40. 

Prepared Paint: — There has been a 
steady volume of trade. While sorting 
orders have made up the bulk of the de- 
mand there liar been some call for fall 
requirements. It is believed that the fall 
season will be a brisk one. 



WINNIPEG. 

Winnipeg, Aug. 12. — An advance of 
15 cents per cwt. on white lead is a fea- 
ture in paint circles this week. Lead 
prices are strong and it is not unlikely 
that there may be further increases in 
price both of the raw and manufactured 
material. 

Oils and turpentine are steady and un- 
changed. Glass is now moving freely 
with the market very firm and advances 
looked for. 

Eetail trade in paints and painters' 
supplies is excellent in the city and keep- 
ing up well at country points. There is 
a very larg - e amount of outside work in 
sight and a large amount of interior dec- 
oration to keep the trade busy for some 
time to come. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



BH "ENGLISH" PAINT 

70% Pure White Lead -30%Pure WhiteZinc 

100% PURE PAINT 



Why Experiment when 
you don't have to? 

You can settle the question of quality in paint for yourself and your custom- 
ers at once and for all time, by handling a paint bearing a formula guarantee 
showing it is made on a white base of 70 per cent, pure white lead and 30 per 
cent, pure white zinc — 100 per cent, pure paint. 

This is the guarantee on every can of B-H "ENG- 
LISH" Paint. 

And all this large percentage of white lead is Brandram's B.B. Genuine — 
The standard of the world. We are in a position to use this large proportion of 
white lead because we are corroders and grinders of white lead — the only 
paint makers in Canada who corrode and grind white lead. 

You recognize, and your customers recognize, that this guarantee formula 
means the highest grade of goods that can be made. It settles the question of 
quality — and quality counts. 

Highest quality paint brings customers , brings them back again — and their 
friends with them. 

Highest quality paint gives you confidence, and your clerks 
confidence, to go after business and to get business. 

Write to-day for dealers' price list and data on 
the 1912 Fall Advertising Campaign back of B-H 
English" Paint. Address our nearest office. 




LIMITED 



Montreal 



51 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



CURRENT MARKET QUOTATIONS 



These price* are for such qualities and 
fuantities a* an usually ordered by re- 
tail dealer* on the usual term* of 
credit, the lowest figures being for 
larger quantities and prompt pay. 
Large cash buyers can frequently nuke 
purchases at better prices. The 
Editor is anxious to be informed at once 
of any apparent error* in this list, as 
the desire is to make it perfectly ac- 
curate. Retailers desiring to get in 
touch with firms selling any articles on 
which quotations are made can do so by 
writing the editor. 

METALS AND METAL PRODUCTS. 

ANTIMONY. 
Oookson's or Hallett'*, per lb. .8 60 8 25 
BABBIT METAL 
Canada Metal Company— Imperial, 
genuine, 60c.; Imperial tough, 60c; 
White Brass, 48c. ; Metallic, 46c. ; Special, 
33c; Harris heavy pressure, 26c; Her- 
cules, 20c; White bronze, 16c; Star 
frictionless, 10c ; Alluminoid, 9c ; Mogul, 
Ec; No. 3, SVic; No. 4, Be per lb. 

Tallman Brass & Metal Co.— Arctic 
Metal.— XXX Genuine, 60c; Superior, 
45c; A Special, 36c; Hoo Hoo, 26c; 
"A," 20c; "B." 18c; "C," 16c; "D," 
12c; No. 1. 10c; No. 2, 8c; No. 3, 6c 
Magnoli* Metal Co.— Magnolia, 26c; 
Defender, 29c; Mystic, 17c; Kosmic, 
16c 

BOILER PLATES AND TUBES 

Montreal. Toronto 
Plates, % to % inch, per 

100 lbs 2 30 2 40 

Heads, per 100 lbs 2 55 2 65 

Tank plates, 3-16 inch.... 2 40 2 50 

Tubes, per 100 ft., 1% in.. 9 95 10 00 

2 "... 8 65 8 70 

2% "...11 00 11 00 

" 3 "...12 60 12 70 

3% "...15 75 15 80 

4 "...20 20 20 30 

BRASS. 

Spring sheets, up to 20 gauge.. 27 

Rods, base % to 1 inch, round. 23 

Tubing, seamless base, per lb.. 26 

Tubing, iron pipe size , 1 inch 

base 26 

Copper tubing. 4 cents extra. 

BRASS GOODS, VALVES, ETC. 
Ground work, 66 p.c. 
Standard Compression work, 66 p.c 
High grade compression work, 60 p.c 
Cushion work, 66 per cent. 
Fuller work, 70 p.c; No. 0, 76 p.c, and 
1 and 2 basin cocks, 70 p.c. 
Flatway stop and stop and waste cocks, 

65 p.c. ; roundway, 60 p.c. 
J.M.T. Globe, Angle and Check Valves, 

65 p.c ; Standard, 66 p.c. 
J.M.T. Radiator Valves, 60; Standard, 
66; patent quick -opening valves, 70 and 
10 p.c. 
Jenkins' Valves— Quotations on applica- 
tion to Jenkins' Bros., Montreal. 
COPPER 

Per 100 lb. 

Casting ingot $19 00 

Cut lengths, round bars, H to 2 

in 2700 

Plain sh?ets. 14 oz., 14x48 

inches, 14x60 inches 29 00 

Copper sheet, tinned, 14x60, 

14 oz 30 00 

Copper sheet, planished, 14x60, 

base 37 00 

Brazier', insheets, 6x4 29 00 

COPPER AND BRASS WIRE 
Brass, 60 p.c; copper, 62% p.c 
IRON AND STEEL 
In car lots. Montreal. Toronto 

Canadian foundry, No. 1 19 50 

Canadian foundry, No. 2 19 00 

Middlesboro, No. 3 pig iron 18 00 19 00 
Summerlee, No. 2 pig iron 20 00 22 60 

Carron, special 20 00 

Canon, soft 19 75 

Cleveland, No. 1 18 75 20 60 

Clarence, No. 3 18 00 20 75 

Jarrow 17 76 20 60 

Glengarnock 22 60 

Radnor, charcoal iron 32 00 32 60 

Ayresome, No. 3 18 76 

Ferro Nickel pig iron (Soo) 26 00 

Steel billets, Bessemer or 
open hearth, f.o.b. Pitts- 
burg 27 60 

Angles $ base 2 60 2 60 

Common bar, per 100 lb. 1 90 2 06 
Forged iron, per 100 lb. 2 05 2 20 
Refined iron, per 100 lb... 2 15 2 30 
Horseshoe iron, per 100 lb... 2 15 2 30 

Mild steel 195 2 15 

Sleigh shoe steel 1 90 2 16 

Iron finish machinery steel 

(domestic) 195 2 15 

Iron finish steel (foreign).. 2 25 2 26 

Reeled machinery steel 2 86 3 00 

Tire steel 2 00 2 35 

Sheet cast steel 15 16 

Toe calk steel 2 85 2 90 

Mining cast steel 07% 08 

High speed 65 66 

Capital tool steel 60 

Cammell Laird 16 

Black Diamond tool steel.. 08 08 

Corona tool steel 06% 

Silver tool steel 12% 

Cold Rolled Shafting. 

9-16 to 11-16 inch 06 

% to 1 7-16 inch 05% 

1 7-16 to 3 inch 65 

Montreal, 25 and 2. Toronto, SO. 
BLACK SHEETS 

Montreal. Toronto 
10 gauge 2 40 2 50 



12 gauge 2 30 2 66 

14 gauge 2 20 2 36 

17 gauge 2 20 2 46 

18 gauge 2 20 2 46 

20 gauge 2 20 2 46 

22 gauge 2 26 2 66 

24 gauge 2 26 2 66 

26 gauge 2 36 2 66 

28 gauge 2 40 2 60 

CANADA PLATES 

Ordinary, 62 sheets 2 90 2 90 

All bright, 52 sheets .... 3 70 4 00 

Galvanized— Apollo D. Crown Ordinary 

18x24x52 4 45 4 45 4 36 

60 4 70 4 70 4 60 

20x28x80 8 90 8 90 8 70 

20x28x80 9 40 9 40 9 20 

GALVANIZED SHEETS (CORRU- 
GATED) 

22 gauge, per square 6 10 

24 gauge, per square 6 00 

26 gauge, per square 3 86 

28 gauge, per square 3 66 

Less 10 p.c 

GALVANIZED SHEETS 
B.W. Queen's Fleur- Gordon Qorbal's 
gauge Head de-Lis Crown Best Best 
16-20.... 3 60 3 35 3 60 3 60 
22-24.... 3 65 340 366 366 

26 4 05 380 405 405 

28 425 400 425 426 

Colbome Crown— 3.65, 3.70, 3.76, 4.00. 
Less than case lots 10 cents per hd. 
extra. 
"Comet" sheets— 

22 8 65 

24 3 70 

26 3 75 

28 4 00 

Apollo brand— Montreal Toronto 

24 gauge, American 3 60 345 

26 gauge, American 3 85 3 60 

28 gauge, (26 English) 4 10 3 95 

10% oz., equal to 28 

English 4 36 4 26 

IRON PIPE 
List Black Galv. 
%-ineh and 

% inch ....$ 5 50 65 p.c. 50 p.c. 
% inch .... 8 50 70 p.c. 59 p.c. 
% inch .... 1150 74 p.c. 64 p.c. 

1 inch .... 16 50 74 p.c. 64 p.c. 
1% inch .... 22 50 74 p.c. 64 p.c. 
1% inch .... 27 00 74 p.c. 64 p.c. 

2 inch .... 36 00 75%p.c. 65%p.c. 
2% inch .... 57 50 75%p.c. 65%p.c 

3 inch .... 75 50 75%p.c. 65%p.c. 
3% inch .... 95 00 74 p.c. 64 p.c 

4 inch ....108 00 74 p.c. 64 p.c. 

IRON PIPE FITTINGS 
Canadian malleable, 40; cast iron, (6; 
standard bushings, 70; headers, 60; 
flanged unions, 65; malleable bushings, 
65; nipples, 76 and 10; malleable, lipped 
unions, 66. 

SOIL PIPE AND FITTINGS 
Medium and extra heavy pipe up to 6 
inch, 65 p.c, 7 and 8 in. pipe, 50 p.c 
Light pipe, 60, fittings, 70 p.c 

RANGE BOILERS 
30-gallon, Standard, $4.75 ; extra heavy, 
$7.00. 

KITCHEN SINKS 
Cast iron, 16x24, SI; 18x30, $1.15; 18x36, 

$1.95. 
Flat rim enameled sinks, 16x24, $2; 
18x30. $2.35; 18x36. $3.50. 

HEATING APPARATUS 

Sot Water Boilers— 47 and 15 p.c. 
dt Water Radiators— 45 and 15 p.c. 
Steam Radiators— 46 and 15 per cent. 
Wan Radiators — 10 and 15 per cent. 
Specials— 25 p.c 

OLD MATERIAL 
Dealers' buying prices: 

Montreal Toronto 
Heavy oepper and 

wire, lb 11 11% 

Light copper bottoms. 09 09% 

Heavy red brass 10 10% 

Heavy yellow brass .... 08 08% 

Light brass 06 06% 

Tea lead 02% 02% 

Heavy lead 02% 02% 

Scrap zinc 03 04 

No. 1 wrought iron . . 02 10 00 
Machinery cast scrap. 

No. 1 16 00 14 60 

Stove plate 12 50 13 00 

Malleable 9 00 9 00 

Miscellaneous steel .... 6 00 6 00 

Old rubbers 09 08% 

LEAD. 

Montreal 

Domestic (Trail) pig, 110 lbs 5 50 

Imported pig, per 100 lb 5 50 

Bar pig, per 100 lbs 5 75 

Sheets, 2% lb. sq. ft., by roll 5 75 

Sheets, 3 to 6 lb., ft 6 00 

Cut sheets %c. per lb. extra. 

Cut sheets to size, %c per lb. extra. 

LEAD PIPE. 
Lead Pipe and Waste, 15 per cent. 
Caulking lead, 4%c per pound. 
Traps and bends, 40 per cent. 
SOLDER. 

Per lb. 
Montreal. Toronto 
Bar, half-and-half, guarant'd 27% 27% 

Wiping 024% 25 

SHEET ZINC. 

5-cwt. casks 8 26 BOO 

Part casks 8 69 8 60 

SPELTER. 
Foreign, per 100 lb T 60 T 26 

62 



TIN AND TINPLATES. 

Lamb and Flag and Straits— 
66 & 28-lb. ingots, 100 lb. . .$52 00 $50 00 

Redipped Charcoal Plates— Tinned 

MLS, Famous (equal Bradley) 

Per box 

I O. 14x20 base $7 00 

I X. 14x20 base 8 25 

I X X, 14x20 base 9 60 

Raven and Murex Grades— 

I O, 14x20 base 6 00 

I X, 14x20 base 6 00 

I X X, 14x20 base 7 00 

I X X X, 14x20 base 8 00 

"Dominion Crown Best"— Double. 
Coated, Tissued. 

I C, 14x20 base 7 00 7 00 

I X, 14x20 base 8 26 8 25 

I X X, 14x20 base 9 60 9 60 

"Allaway's Best"— Standard Quality. 

I C, 14x20 base ? 4 60 

I. X., 14x20 base 5 50 

I. X. X., 14x20 base 6 60 

Bright Cokes 

Bessemer Steel— 
I C, 14x20 base 4 25 

20x28, double box 8 60 

Charcoal Plates— Terne 

Dean or J. G. Grade— 

I C, 20x28, 112 sheets T 60 

I X, Terne Tin 9 00 

Charcoal Tin Boiler Plates. 

Cookley Grade— 
XX, 14x56, 50 sheet bxs.) 
XX, 14x60, 50 sheet bxs.) .... TOO 
XX, 14x65, 60 sheet bxs.) 
Tinned Sheets. 

72x30 up to 24 gauge, case 
lots 8 00 7 35 

72x30 up to 26 gauge, case 
•ots j 86 

WIRE. 
Annealed Cut Hay Bailing Wire. 
No. 10, $3.80; No. 11, $3.90; No. 12 and 
13, $4; No. 13%. $4.10; No. 14. $4.26; No. 
16, $4.50; in lengths 6 inches to 11 
inches, discount 30 per cent.; other 
lengths 20c per 100 lbs. extra; if eye or 
loop on end adds 25c per 100 lbs. to the 
above. 

Clothes Line Wire. 
No. 7 wire solid line, No. 17, $4.90; 
No. 18, $3; No. 19, $2.70; 6 wire solid 
line, No. 17, $4.45; No. 18, $3.10; No. 19, 
$2.80. All prices per 1,000 ft. measure; 
6 strand. No. 18, $2.60; No. 19, $2.90. 
F. o. b. Hamilton, Toronto, Montreal, 
London. 

Coiled Spring Wire. 
High Carbon, No. 9, $2.00 in cars. 
Fine Steel Wire. 
Discount 25 per cent. List of extras. 
In 100-lb. lots: No. 17, $5; No. 18. 
$5.50: No. 19, $6; No. 20, $6.65; No. 21, 
$7; No. 22, $7.30; No. 23, $7.65; No. 24 
$8; No. 25, $9; No. 26, $9.50; No. 27, 
$10; No. 28, $11; No. 29, $12; No. 30, 
$13; No. 31, $14; No. 32, $15; No. 33, 
$16; No. 34, $17. Extras net. Tinned 
wire, Nos. 17-25, $2; Nos. 26-31, $4- 
Nos. 30-34, $6. Coppered, 76c; oiling, 
10c; in 25-lb. bundles, 15c; in 6 and 
10-lb. bundles, 25c; in 1-Ib. hanks, 25c; 
in %-lb. hanks. 38c; in %-lb. hanks, 
50c ; packed in casks or cases, 15c. ; 
bagging or papering, 10c 

Hay Wire in Coils. 
$2.35 base f.o.b., Montreal, Toronto, 
Hamilton and London. 

Galvanized Wire. 
From stock, f.o.b. Montreal— 100 lbs. 
Nos. 4 and 5, $2.80; 6, 7, 8, $2.76- 9 
$2.30; 10, $2.80; 11, $2.85; 12. $2.45; 13' 
$2.55:14, $3.15. In car lots straight or 
mixed. 

Poultry Netting. 
2-in. mesh, 19 w.g., 60 and 2% p.c off. 
Other sizes, 60 and 5 p.c. off. 
Poultry netting staples, 55 per cent. 
Smooth Steel Wire. 
No. 0-9 gauge, $2.25 base; No. 10 
gauge. 6c. extra: No. 11 gauge, 12c ex- 
tra; No. 12 gauge. 20c extra; No. 13 
gauge, 30c extra; No. 14 gauge, 40c ex- 
tra; No. 15 gauge, 55c extra; No. 16 
gauge, 70c extra. Add 60c for copper- 
ing and $2 for tinning. 

Extra net per 100 lb.— Oiled wire 10c, 
spring wire $1.25, bright soft drawn 15c 
charcoal (extra quality) $1.25, packed 
in casks or cases 15c, bagging and 
paperings 10c, 50 and 100-lb. bundles 
10c, in 25-lb. bundles 15c, in 5 and 10- 
lb. bundles 25c, in lib. hanks, 60c, in 
%-lb. hanks, 75c, in %-lb. hanks. $1. 
Wire Cloth. 
Painted Screen, in 100-ft. rolls, $1.65 
Pf„ r l™ sq. ft.; in 50-ft, rolls, $1.70 per 
100 sq. ft. 

Wire Fencing. 

Galvanized barb 245 

Galvanized, plain twist .. ..'.'. 2 75 

Car lots and less. 
Dominion special field fencing, S3 1-S 
p.c. small lots; extra 6 p.c. 
F.O.B. Montreal. 

Wire Rope. 
Galvanized. 1st grade. 6 strand*, 24 
wires. %, $5; 1 inch. $16.80. 

Black 1st grade. 6 strands, 19 wires, 
%. $5, 1 inch, $15.10. Per 100 feet f.o.b. 
Toronto. 
„ Wrought Staples. 

Galvanized 2 80 

Plata '.'.'.'.'.'. 2 60 

PAINTS, OILS AND GLASS. 
, Barn Paint. 

In barrels, 1-gal. tins 80 85 

In barrels. 5-gal. tins .... 80 9 86 



k Beeswax. 
It 

Chemicals. 

In casks per lb. 

Sulphate of copper (bluestone) . . 07 

Litharge, ground 06 

" flaked 06% 

Green copperas (green vitrol).... 01 

Sugar of Lead Ot 

Colors in Oil. 

Venetian red, lib. tins pure 09 

Chrome yellow, pure 18 

Golden ochre, pure 9 11 

French ochre, pure SB 

Chrome green, pure 11 

French permanent green, pure.. 16 

Signwriters' black, pure IT 

Marine black, 25 lb. irons 06 

Enamels. 
Per gallon in quart tins. 

M. L. Floorglaze (Imperial V. & C. 

„ Co. 180 

Cee Pee Co. enamel 4 60 

Sterling Enamels ., 3 20 

Anchor Floorlustre 1 80 

Glue. Per lb. 

French medal 10 

German common sheet 10 

German prima 16 

White pigsfoot IS 20 

Brantford medal 10 

golden medal 11 

brown sheet 10 

solder sheet 13 

gelatine 22 

white gelatine 20 

white glue 12 

100 flake 10 11 

Perfection amber ground, No. 1230 G 13 
Ground glues at same prices. 

Brantford all-round glue, %-lb. pack- 
ages, 10c, %-lb., 15c; 1-lb., 25c Di*- 
count. 

XXL 13 

£ T L 11% 

CL 12 

C 011 

Paris Green. 
_ Montreal Toronto 

Drums, 50 and 100 lbs 18% 18% 

Packets, 1-lb., 100 in case.. 20% 20% 
„. " %-lb. " .. 22% 22% 

Tins, Mb., 100 in case 21% 21% 

Paris White. 

In bbls 90 

Pigments. 

Orange Mineral, casks 69 

100-lb. kegs 09% 

Prepared Paint*. 

Per gallon 
in qt. tin* 
Sherwin-Williams paints, base... 2 00 
Canada Paint Co.'s pure .. 1 75 2 00 
Globe house paint (Windsor).. 1 60 
"New Era" house paint (Wind- 
sor 1 85 

Benj. Moore Co.'s "Egyptian" 

Brand 1 50 

Moore's pure linseed oil, H.O.. 1 66 
Brandram-Henderson's "English" 2 90 

Ramsay's paints, pure 1 70 

Ramsay's paints. Thistle 1 40 

Martin-Senour, 100 p.c. pure .... 2 00 

Senour's floor paints 169 

Sterling Pure 1 60 

Maple Leaf Paint (Imp. V. & 

C. Co.) 

Jamieson's Crown and Anchor 

brand 160 

Plaster of Paris. 

Per barrel 30 

Pine Tar. 

Half -pint tins, per dozen 60 

Putty. 

Standard 

Bulk in casks 2 20 

" 100-lb. drums 2 66 

Bladders, in bbl*. 2 75 

Red Dry Lead. 
Genuine, 560 lb. casks, per cwt 4 75 5 75 
Genuine, 100 lb. kegs " 5 25 6 60 

No. 1 casks, per 100 lbs 4 25 4 25 

No. 1 kegs, per 100 lbs 4 75 4 76 

Shingle Stains. 

In 5-gallon buckets 76 

Turpentine and Oil. 

Montreal Toronto 
Can. Prime white petroleum. 

gal 14 13 

U.S. Water white " 15% 14% 

U.S. Pratt's astral " 19 16% 
Castor oil, per lb„ in bbls. 08 09 

Motor Gasoline single bbls 22 

Benzine, per gal. single bbls 20% 

Pure turpentine, single bbls 66 66 

Wood Turpentine 60 

Turpentine, second run 60 

Linseed Oil " Raw.. ..0 95 96 
boiled. 98 99 
Rosin, "G" grade, bbl. lots, 

100 lbs S 26 

Varnishes. 

Per gal. cans. 

Carriage, No. 1 160 

Pale durable body S 60 

" hard rubbing 3 00 

Finest elastic gearing 3 00 

Elastic Oak 160 

Furniture, polishing 2 00 

Furniture, extra 1 20 

No. 1 96 

Union 90 

Light oil finish 1 36 

Gold size japan 2 00 

Turps, brown japan 1 It 

No. 1 brown japan 1 10 

Baking black japan 1 36 

No. 1 black japan IS 

Benzine black japan 76 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Hundreds of satisfied "MINERVA" Agents testify to the qualityfof 
MINERVA PAINTS, the famous British Brand, and to the increased 
profitable business created by our forceful, energetic help in direct 
support of their business. It's time you looked into the MINERVA 
PROPOSITION— it's profitable. 

ASK ANY MINERVA AGENT. NAMES FURNISHED ON REQUEST. 

PINCHIN, JOHNSON & CO. (CANADA), LTD. 

377-387 Carlaw Avenue - - Toronto 

128 Princess Street - Winnipeg 

DISTRIBUTORS AT CONVENIENT SHIPPING POINTS 



REGINA— Peart Bros. Hardware Co.. Ltd.. Distri- 
butors for Southern Saskatchewan. 

SASKATOON— The Saskatoon Hardware Co., Ltd., 
Distributors for Northern Saskatchewan. 

CALGARY— The Western Supply & Equipment Co.. 
Ltd , Distributors for Southern Alberta. 



EDMONTON— The Western Supply & Equipment Co.. 
Ltd.. Dislribu'ors for Northern Alberta. 

VANCOUVER— Wm. N. ONeil Co.. Limited, Dis- 
tributors for British Columbia. 

LETHBRIDGE— The Western Supply & Equipment 
Co.. Limited. 



CTNERVA@IS 



HOW ABOUT 
YOUR PAINT OIL DEPARTMENT ? 

If you could find a way to increase the profits in your paint oil de- 
partment you would at least investigate it, wouldn't you ? Then why 
not take the time NOW to increase your paint oil profit by in- 
vestigating the 

BOWSER PAINT OIL SYSTEM 

We have installed systems for many of your fellow merchants — 
it pays them — it will pay you. 

You can get one outfit or a dozen, just as your requirements de- 
mand. You don't have to invest much money but you get enormous 
returns. 

The Bowser not only prevents all waste and over-measure, but it 
gives your store tone and attractiveness. It draws trade because you 
can give better service and cleaner oil. The pumps measure the oil 
directly into the customer's can — no measures nor funnels. It com- 
putes the charge and counts the gallons. 

Send a card to-day for free book No. 15. 

S. F. BOWSER ®, COMPANY, INC., TORONTO 

66-68 FRASER AVENUE 

For Twenty-seven Years Manufacturers of Self-measuring Pumps, Gasoline and Oil Storage Systems, 

Dry Cleaning Systems, etc. 



53 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Crystal Damar 2 60 

No, 1 " 2 26 

Pure asphaltum 1 40 

Oilcloth 169 

Lightning dryer 85 

Elastilite Tarnish 2 25 

Copaline Tarnish 2 26 

Granitine floor finish 2 25 

Jamieson's floor enamel 1 75 

Sherwin-Williams kopal varnish. 2 60 
Canada Paint Oo.'a sun Tarnish. 2 26 

"Kyanize" Interior Finish 2 40 

"Flint-Lac," coach 1 89 

B.H. Ltd. "Gold Medal." in 

cases 2 26 

Dependon Lt H. Oil Finish.... 1 55 

Everlastic Floor 2 65 

Flattine floor finish 3 00 

Elastic* exterior finish 4 26 

Stovepipe Tarnish, V4 pints, per 

gross I 00 

Pure white shellac varnish, in 

barrels 1 76 

Pure orange shellac Tarnish, in 

barrels 1 60 

No. 1 orange shellac Tarnish, in 

barrels 1 JO 

Window Glass. 
Size United Double 

Inches. Star Diamond 

Under 26 S 4 26 $6 25 

26 to 40 4 66 6 75 

41 to 60 ill 7 60 

61 to 60 6SS 8 60 

61 to 70 6 76 9 76 

71 to 80 6 26 1199 

81 to 86 7 00 12 60 

86 to 90 15 80 

91 to 95 17 50 

96 to 100 20 50 

Toronto, 25 p.c 

Montreal prices, no discount. 
Size United Inches Star 

Under 26 J 3 05 

26 to 40 J 26 

41 to 60 SS5 

61 to 60 J M 

61 to 70 1 4 15 

White Lead Ground In Oil. 

Montreal Toronto 
... ^ p « r 1M lb. 

Anchor, pure 7 80 7 95 

Brandram's B.B. Genuine. 8 80 8 95 
C.P.C. decorators, pure ... 7 80 7 80 
Crown and Anchor, pure. 7 80 8 95 

Elephant, Genuine 8 05 8 20 

Essex Genuine (Windsor) 7 55 

Island City Decorators' 

pure 7 80 7 95 

Lily Pure 7 80 7 95 

Moore's Pure White Lead 7 95 

Monarch (Windsor) 8 05 

Munro's Select Flake White 8 05 8 20 

Purity, CO. Co.'s Ltd 7 65 

Ramsay's Pure Lead 7 80 7 95 

Ramsay's Exterior 7 55 7 70 

Sterling Pure 7 95 

Tiger Pure 7 80 7 95 

Western Schedule. 

Terms— 2 p.c 30 days or net 3 months 
from date of shipment. Packages 26 
lbs. and oyer. 600-lb. kegs, 15c per 100 
lbs. lower. Delivery— F.O.B. Toronto 
or Hamilton; London, 6c per 100 lbs. 
extra. Contracts as required until 16th 
May, 1911. 

White Zinc (Dry) 

Extra Red Seal, V.M 0714 

White Zinc in OIL 

Pure, in 25-lb. irons 10 

No. 1 " " 07 

No. I " " 05% 

Whiting. 

Plain, in bbls 70 

Gilders bolted in barrels 1 00 

HARDWARE. 

Carpenters', per doz. 12 60 14 00 

Plain ship " 18 00 22 00 

Axles and Hatchets. 

Single bit, per doz. 6 00 9 00 

Doable bit " 10 00 12 00 

Bench Axes 6 75 10 00 

Broad Axes 22 75 25 00 

Hunters' Axes 5 00 6 00 

'' B °y. 8 " Axes 675 6 50 

Lathing hatchets 4 70 10 00 

Shingle hatchets 145 6 76 

Claw hatchets 170 6 00 

Barrell hatchets 5 50 6 85 

Anvils. 

Buckworth, per lb 1014 

Ammunition. 

"Dominion" Rim Fire Cartridges and 
£' B ;„ caps ' «>. 10 & 214 p.c; B.B. caps, 
60 10 and 2% p.c; Centre Fire Pistol 
Cartridges, 25 and 214 p.c; Centre Fire 
Sporting and Military Cartridges, 10 
and 10 p.c; Primers, 10 and 214 p.c: 
Brass Shot Shells, 45 and 1214 p.c; 
Shot Cartridges, discount same as ball 
cartridges, f.o.b. any jobbing point east 
of Manitoba. Net 90 days. 

"Crown" Black Powder, 30 and 10 
R' 6 '^ "Sovereign" Bulk Smokeless 
Powder, 30 and 10 p.c; "Regal" Dense 
8mokeless Powder, 30 and 10 p c • 
"Imperial" Shells, both Bulk and Dense 
Smokeless Powder, 30 and 10 p.c. Empty 
Shells, 30 and 10 p.c 90 days net. 

Ordinary drop shot. AAA to dust, 
$8.00 per 100 lbs., net list- 
cash discount, 2 per cent. 30 days'; 
net extra as follows, subject to 
cash discount only; Chilled, 40c; buck 
and seal. 80c; no. 28 ball, $1.20 per 100 
!bs.; bags less than 25 lbs., 14c per lb.' 
F.O.B. Montreal, Toronto, Hamilton, 
London, St. John and Halifax, freight 
equalized. 

Augers and Bits. 
PVird'q unirer bits 30 and 10 



Irwin's auger 4714 

Gilmour's auger 60 

Rockford auger 60 and 10 

Gilmour's car 4714 

Clark's expansive 40 

Jennings' Gen. auger, net list. 
Tobin High Speed Bits, 60 and 10. 
Tobin Never Choke, 60 and 10. 
Barn Door Hangers. 

doz. pain. 

Steams wood track 4 60 6 01 

Zenith 199 

Atlas, steel covered 6 00 ( M 

Perfect 8 00 11 M 

New Milo, flexible 6 00 

Double strap hangers, dozen 

sets 6 69 

Standard jointed hangers, 

dozen sets 1 46 

Steel King hangers, doz. set* .... I 40 
Storm King and safety hang- 
ers 6 26 

Storm King rail 4 26 

Crown 4 (6 

Crescent 1 69 

Sovereign 7 26 

Chicago Friction, Oscillating and Big 

Twin Hangers, 6 per cent. 
Steel, track, 1 x 3-16 in. (100 ft), i 26 
Bam Door Latches. 

Challenge, dozen 2 96 

Defiance, dozen 2 76 

Gem, dozen 7 60 

Bells. 
Door bells, push and turn, 46 and 10 

p.c 
Cow bells, 66 p.c. 
Sleigh bells, shaft and hames, pair, 

22c up. 
Sleigh bells, body straps, each, $1.15 

up. 
Farm bells. No. 1, $1.66. 

Belting. 
Extra, 60, 10 and 10 per cent. 
Standard, 60, 10, 10 and 10 per cent 
No. 1, not wider than 6 in., 60, 10, 

10 and 10. 
Agricultural, not wider than 4 in., 76 

per cent 
Lace leather, per side, 80c: cat laces, 

85c 

Bird Cages. 
Brass and Japanned, 40 p.c 

Bolts and Nuts. Per cent 
Carriage Bolts, common, new, 

$1 list 
Carriage Bolts, % and smaller 70 
Carriage Bolts, 7-16 and up 
Carriage Bolts, Norway Iron 

($3 list) 60 

Machine Bolts, % and less. . 60, 10 ft 10 
Machine Bolts, 7-16 and up.. 60 

Plough Bolts 66,6*10 

Blank Bolts 60 

Bolt Ends 60 

Sleigh Shoe Bolts, *4 and 

less 60 and 10 

Sleigh Shoe Bolts, 7-16 and 

larger 56 and 06 

Coach 8crew, new list 7 

Nuts, square, all sizes, 414c per lb. off. 
Nuts, hexagon, all sizes, 4Hc per lb. off. 
Stoye rods, per lb., 614 to 6c 
Stove Bolts. 80. 

Building Paper, etc 

Tarred Slater's paper, per roll.... 8 70 

O. K. paper, No. 1, per roll 75 

O. K. paper. No. 2, per roll 70 

Plain Fibre, No. 1, per 400 ft roll 45 

Plain Fibre, No. 2, " .... 27 

Tarred Fibre, No. 1, per 400 ft 

roll 65 

Tarred Fibre, No. 2 " .. 35 

Tarred Fibre Cyclone, 26 lb„ per 

roll 55 

Dry Cyclone, 15 lbs 46 

Plain Surprise, per roll 40 

Resin sized Fibre, per roll 40 

Asbestos building paper, per 100 

lbs 400 

Heavy straw, plain and tarred, per 

ton 37 56 

Carpet Felt, per 100 lbs 2 60 

Tarred wool roofing felt, per 100 lb 1 80 
Pitch, Boston or Sydney, per 100 

lbs 70 

Pitch, 8cotch, per 100 lbs 65 

Heavy Fibre, 32' tc 60', per 100 lb. 3 00 

2 Ply Ready Roofing, per sq TO 

3 Ply Ready Roofing, per sq 96 

2 Ply complete, per roll 1 15 

3 Ply complete, per roll 1 36 

Liquid Roofing Cement, brls., per 

gal 15 

Liquid tins Cement 20 

Crude Coal Tar, per barrel 3 50 

Refined Coal Tar, tins, per doz... 1 25 

Refined Coal Tar, per barrel 4 60 

Shingle varnish, per barrel 4 50 

Caps, per lb 06 

Nails, per lb 05 

Mop cotton, per lb 15 

Butts. 
Plated, bower barfr & Nickel, No. 241, 

45 per cent. 
Wrought brass, 45 p.c. off revised list 
Cast iron loose pin. 60 p.c 
Wrought steel fast joint and loose pin, 

70 p.c 
Crescent brands, 70 per cent. 

Cement and Firebrick. 
Canadian Portland, bags, per 

bbl 1 55 1 70 

White Bros. English 2 00 2 05 

"Lafarge" cement, in wood 3 40 

Fire brick, Scotch, per 1,000 23 00 28 00 

English 17 00 21 00 

American, low... 23 00 25 00 
high.... 27 50 35 00 

Fire clay (Scotch), net ton 6 60 

Chalk and Pencils. 
Carpenters Colored, per gross 65 80 
" lead pencils, p. gr 2 40 6 76 



Chisels. 

Cold chisels, 5 x 6 In., doz 2 20 

Bevel edge, 1 inch, doz. 2 60 

Chain. 
Proof coil, per 100 lb., 14 in., $6.00; 
5-16 in., $4.85; H in., $4.26; 7-16 in., 
$4.00; 14 in., $3.75; 9-16 in., $3.70; % in., 
$3.66; %, in., $3.60; % in., $3.46; 1 in.. 
$3.40. 

Stall fixtures, 35; trace chain, 45; jack- 
chain, Iron, 60; jackchain, brass, 60; cow 
ties, 40; halter chains, 50 and 6; tie outs, 
75; coil chain, 60 and 6; hammock chains, 
galTanized, 36 and 5. 
Churns. 
No. I, $9; No. 1, $9; No. 2, $10; No. 
3, $11; No. 4, $13; No. 6, $16; f.o.b. To- 
ronto, Hamilton, London and St Marys, 
40 per cent; f.o.b. Ottawa, Kingston 
and Montreal, 3714 and 10 per cent 
Clamps. 

Malleable swivel head, 4 in. 2 60 

adjustable, 4 in. 7 69 

Carpenters, 3 feet 3 60 

Conductor Pipe, 

2 inch, in 10 foot lengths 3 30 

i '• " " 4 00 

4 " " " 6 28 

5 " " " 7 26 

6 " " " 8 89 

Cotter Pins. 
Cotter pins, SO p.c Montreal. 

Copper and Nickel Ware. 
Copper boilers, kettles, 40 and 6 p.c 
Copper tea and coffee pots, 40 & 5 p.c 
Copper pitts, 30 and 5 p.c 
Foundry goods, hollow ware, 46 p.c 

Door Knobs. 
Canadian knobs, 45 and 10 per cent 
Porcelain, mineral and jet knobs, net 
list 

Door Sets. 
Canadian, 45 and 10 per cent 
Door pulls, 60 per cent 

Door Hangers (Parlor) 
Single sets, each (Easy brand) .... 1 80 

Double sets, each 3 26 

Unbreakable rail, 100 feet 6 09 

Door Springs. 
Chicago (coil), 26 per cent 
Reliance (coil). 20 per cent 
Draw Knives. 

Carpenters 6 inch, doz IS 

Folding handles, 8 inch, doz 1 80 

Drills. 

Bit stock drills, 2-32 in., doz. 9 67 

Escutcheon Pins. 
Steel, discount 60 per cent 
Brass, 65 per cent 

Eavetroughs. 

8 inch in 100 foot lengths 2 90 

10 " " " 3 15 

12 " " " 3 68 

15 " " " 5 26 

Add extra 10c per 100 ft O.G. Round 
Bead Trough. 

Factory Milk Cans. 
Milk cans and pails, 36 p.c 
Hand delivery and creamery cans, 40 p.c 
Railways cans, 45 p.c 
Cream cans, 40 p.c. 
Creamery trimmings, 75 and 1214 P-c 

Faucet*. 
Common, cork-lined, 36 per cent 

Farrier Knives, 
Buckworth, 60 p.c 

Files and Rasps. Per cent 

Disston's 70 and 19 

Great Western, American 70 and 10 

Kearney & Foot, Arcade 70 and 10 

J. Barton Smith, Eagle .... 70 and 10 

McClellan, Globe 70 and 10 

Black Diamond 60 and 10 

Delta Files 60 

Nicholson 62 2-3 

Jowett's (English list) 2714 

Spear & Jackson (English list) 36 
Forges. 

Blacksmiths portable, 135 lbs t 86 

Galvanized Ware. 
Dufferin pattern pails, 45 per cent 
Flaring pattern, 45 per cent 
Galvanized washtubs, 45 per cent 

Grindstones. 
Over 40 lbs. and 2 in. thick, per 100 

lbs 110 

Smaller sizes extra. 
Hammers. 

Tack, iron, doz 35 

Ladies claw, handled, doz 60 

Adze eye nail hammer, 10 oz., doz, 1 25 

" hickory handle, 1 lb„ doz. 6 25 

" straight claw, 1 lb., doz. 7 00 

Farriers hammers, 10 oz., doz.... 5 60 

Tinners setting, 14 lb., doz 4 50 

Machinists, 14 lb., doz 3 20 

Sledge, Canadian, 5 lbs, and over. 06 
Sledge, Masons, 5 lbs. and over. 08 

Sledge, Napping, up to 2 lbs 09 

Harvest Tools. 
50 and 5 per cent. 
Sidewalk and stable scrapers, net $2.25. 
Wood hay rakes, 40 and 10 per cent 
Lawn rakes, net 

Halters (Snap and Ring). 

Jute Rope, %-inch, per gross 8 00 

" " 14-inch, per gross .... 10 60 

" " *4-inch, per gross 13 60 

Leather, 1-lnch, per doz 4 00 

Leather, 114-inch, per doz 6 20 

Web 2 45 

Sisal Halters (Snap and Ring). 
9s-in„ $9.00; 7-16-in., $10.20; V4-in., 
$11.40; 9-16-in., $13.20; %-in., $15.00. 

Hinges. 
Blind, discount 50 per cent. 
Heavy T and strap, 4-in., 100 lb. 

net 7 25 

Heavy T and strap, 5-in„ 100 lb. 

net 7 00 

Heavy T and strap, 6-in., 100 lb. 
net 6 76 



Heavy T and strap, 8- in., 100 lb. 
net IR 

Heavy T and strap, 18-in. and 
larger 1 21 

Light T and strap, discount 66 p.c 
Screw hook and hinge- 
under 12 in., per 100 lb 4 99 

over 12 in., per 100 lb. 3 69 

Crate hinges and back flaps, 66 and 6 

p.c 
Chest hinges and hinge hasps, 66 p.c 

Hinges (Spring) 
Spring, per gross— No. 5, $16.19; No. 19, 

$16.10; No. 20, $9.50; No. 60. $17.68; 

No. 61, $7.76; No. 129, $14.11. 
Screen door seta— No. 2260, $14.96; Na. 

2260, $19.66; No. 2275, $21.86; No. 1192, 

$19.55. 
Chicago hold back screen door, Iran, 

gro., $12. 
Chicago spring hinges, 15 p.c 
Triplex spring hinges, 40 p.c 
Chicago surface floor (6,009), 46 p.c 
Garden City fire house hinges, 1214 >.•> 
"Chief" floor hinge, 60 p.c 

Hooka, 
Wrought iron hooka and staples— 

14 x 6, per great 1 96 

6-16 x 6, per gross 8 41 

Bright wire screw eyes. 69 p.c 
Bright steel gat* hook* and staple*. 
Iron screw hooks, 60 and 20 p.c 
Iron gate hooks and ayes, 60 & 29 p.c 
Crescent hat and coat win, 69 p.c 
Stove pipe eyes, kitchen and squars 

hooks, 60 p.c 

Horse Nails. 

M.R.M. cold forged process list, 19th 
January, 1912. Price per 

Size Length 25-lb. box. 

Nos. 3 194-inch $4 19 

4 134-inch 3 75 

5 1 15-16 3 69 

6 2H 3 10 

7 2 5-16 2 90 

8 214 2 76 

9 2 11-16 2 69 

10 2% J (9 

11 3 1-16 2 46 

12 314 2 46 
Horseshoes. 

Iron shoes, light, medium and heavy. 
No. 2 and larger, $3.90; No. 1 and 
smaller, $4,15; snow pattern. No. 2 and 
larger, $4.16; No. 1 and smaller, $4.40; 
"X.L." steel shoes, new light pattern, 

1 to 6, No. 2 and larger, $4.36; No. 1 
and smaller, $4.60; "X.L." steel shoes, 
feather weight, pattern all sizes. No. 9 
to 4, $5.75; special countersunk steel, all 
sizes, 0-4, $6.26; toe weight steel shoes, 
all sizes, No. 1 to 4, $6.75. F.O.B. 
Montreal. 

Toecalks Standard, J.P. * Co., 
"Blunt" No. 1 and smaller, $1.60; No. 

2 and larger, $1.25; "Sharp" No. 1 and 
smaller, $1.75; No. 2 and larger, $1.60 
per box. Put up In 25-lb. boxes. 

Horse Weight*. 
Taylor-Forbes, 414c 

Ice Cream Freezers. 
White Mountain, 6c per lb. 

Knives. 
Hay knives, net list 
Clauss, 60 and 26 per cent 

Kitchen Enameled Ware. 
White ware, 75 per cent. 
London and Princess, 60 per eeat 
Canada, Diamond, Premier, 69 and II 

per cent 
Pearl, Imperial, and granite stoat, II 

and 10 per cent. 
Premier steel ware, 41 per cent 
Star decorated steel and white, 26 per 

cent 
Hollow ware, tinned steel, 46 pec cent 

off. 
Enamelled street signs, 41 per «aat 

Kitchen Sundries. 
Asbestos mats, 50 p.c 

Can openers, per doz 9 49 9 76 

Mincing knives, per dss. ... 9 61 9 91 

Potato mashers, wire, per das. 9 69 9 71 

wood, per do*. 9 69 9 81 

Tegetable slicers, per da* 2 26 

Universal meat chopper, Na. 1 .... 1 15 

Enterprise chopper, each 139 

Spiders and fry pans, 69 and 

5 per cent. 
Star Al chopper, 5 to 32 ... 1 36 4 II 
100 to 103.... 1 36 2 09 

Kitchen hooks, bright I 69 

Toasters, 50 per cent 
Fire shovels, 50. 

Oil stoves and ovens, 69 and II. 
Ladders. 

3 U 6 feet, 12c per foot; 7 to 1 ft.. 18*. 
Extension ladders, 15c per foai ap. 

Lanterns. 
Japanned ware, 45 per cent 
No. 2 or 4 Plain Cold Blast, per 

doz 176 

Lift Tubular and Hinge Plain. 

per doz 6 91 

Japanning, 50e per dozen extra. 
Prism globes, per dozen, $1.89. 
Lamp wick, 60 per cent. 
Lawn Hose. 
Competition grade lawn hose, 79 and I. 
Lawn Mowers. 

D. Maxwell & Sons.— 8-lnch open 
wheel, 3 knives, 12 in., $5.10; do., I 
knives, $6.25; 9-inch wheel, 3 knives, 
12 in. sizes, $6,75; do., 4 knives, $7.26; 
1014-inch wheel, 4 knives, 12 In. size*. 
$8.50; ball bearing do., $10; do., 5 knives, 
$10.50; 50 per cent, f.o.b. factory. 

Locks and Keys. 
Canadian, 45 and 10 per cent. 



54 



HARDWARE AND METAL 




•ALEX/MRTHUR&CF 



A\oMtf^eal. 



F. J. COX, Winnipeg, Western Agent 



Good Profits and Complete Satisfaction 

assured every dealer who recommends and sells our high 
grade 

Black -<!► Diamond 

TARRED FELT 

In fact, we guarantee it to last as long as the building on 
which it is used. 

A strong selling point aside from its durability is that it 
keeps the house cool in summer and warm in winter. Inves- 
tigate at once. Get our prices. 
We also manufacture a full line of wrapping papers. 



RED 



S 



BRAND 

WINDOW 

GLASS 



, , ! 













GLASS 

BENDERS 

TO 

THE 

TRADE 



THE TORONTO PLATE GLASS IMPORTING CO., Limited 

PLATE, WINDOW, FIGURED, STAINED, WIRED, BENT, MIRROR 

and ORNAMENTAL GLASS 

DON ROADWAY TORONTO 



The High Quality of Our 

HEINISCH TINNER SNIPS 



The 
VULCAN" 



has made them the tinners' favorites. This quality is 
due to the great care taken in selecting materials 
and the tempering which is done by experts. 
The " Vulcan " Snip is designed especially for cut- 
ting curves, all irregular shapes, cornice work and 
small circles down to 3 inches in diameter. 

Recommend them to your customers — we guarantee the highest satisfaction. Get them from your jobber. 

R. Heinisch/s Sons Company tailors* 

Newark, N.J., U.S.A. SHEARS 




TRIMMERS' 
SCISSORS 




"WORLD" 
BABBITT METAL 



FOR GENERAL MACHINE SHOP, MILL OR FOUNDRY USE 



or any place where a good metal is required. 



25c.netperlb. 



Freight paid on 100. lb lots to 
your nearest railway station. 



We know "World" Brand to be a good Babbitt 
and will give you satisfaction, even if you are pay- 
ing a higher price. 



T. McAVITY C& SONS, Limited 

ST. JOHN, N. B. and WINNIPEG 



LARD WARE AND METAL 



Lumbermen's Supplier 

Cant hook*, 4*zen, from 12 00 

Axel, dozen, fMm 6 60 

Axe handles, dozen, from 1 15 

Cross cut saws, per foot .... 25 43 

Axe wedges, dozen 25 

BaU and heel calks 4 00 4 25 

Mallets, 
Tinsmiths', 2%x5% in., per doz.. 1 25 
Carpenters', round hickory, C in., 

per doz 1 05 

Lignum Vitae, round, 5 inch, per 

doz. 2 40 

Caulking, No. 8, oak, per doz.... 15 00 

Mats. 
Wire door mats, standard, 10x24, 

doz »00 

Metal Polish. 

Tandem metal polish paste 00 

Axoline brass cleaner, 100 in pkge 50 

Miners Supplies. 
Mattocks, 6 lb., 18 inch, $6 dozen. 
Picks, 6 to 7 lb., $4.65 dozen. 
Pick handles, $1.85 dozen. 
Prospectors' hammers, 16%e per lb. 
Drilling hammers, 6 cents per lb. 
Crowbars, 3% cents per lb. 

Mops and Ironing Boards. 

Mops, per doz 1 20 1 50 

Folding ironing boards 16 25 18 00 

Nails. Wire 

1— 1% inch 3 30 

1% inch 3 00 

1%— 1% inch 2 75 

2-2% inch 2 65 

214—2% inch 2 50 

J-3% inch 2 45 

J%— 4 inch 2 40 

4% inch 2 35 

5, 5%, 6 inch (base) 2 30 

Cut nails— Montreal, $2.40; Toronto, 

$2.60. 
Miscellaneous wire nails, 75 per cent. 
Coopers' nails, 33 1-3 per cent. 
Pressed spikes, % diameter, per 100 

lbs 2 85 

Oakum. 

Plumbers.. ..per 100 lb 4 50 

Oilers. 
Kemp's Tornado and McClary's 

Model galvanized oil can, with 

pump, 5 gallon, per dozen 10 01 

Davidson oilers, 40 per cent. 
%inc and tin, 50 per cent. 
Coppered oilers, 50 per cent, «ff. 
Brass oilers, 50 per cent. 
Malleable, 25 per cent. 

Plated Goods. 
Holloware, 40 per cent, discount. 
Flatware, staples, 40 and 10; fancy, 10 

and 50. 
Hutton's "Cross Arrow" flatware, 42% 

per cent. "Singalee" and "Alask," 

Nevada silver flatware, 42 per cent. 
Pieced Ware. 
Discount, 35 per cent. 
10-qt. flaring sap buckets, 35 p.c. 
S, 10 and 14-qt. flaring pails, 35 p.c. 
Copper bottom tea kettles and boilers, 

35 per. cent. 
Coal hods, 40 per cent. 
Boiler and tea kettle pitta, 35 p.c. 

Planes. 
Wood bench, Canadian, 40, American, 

25 per cent. 
Wood, fancy, 30 to 35 per cent. 
Stanley planes, $1.55 to $3.60, net lilt 

prices. 

Pliers and Nippers. 

Button's genuine, 37% to 40 per cent. 

Plough Lines. 

Russian snap per gross 30 00 

Indian snap " 25 00 

Pumps. 
Berg's wing pump, 75 per cent. 

Razors. per doz. 

Boksr's 7 60 11 00 

Boker's King Cutter 15 00 

Benckel's 7 60 20 00 

Gillette Safety, each J 75 

Star Bafety Razor, 33 1-3 p.c 
Rope and Twine. 

Sisal rope 09% 

Pure Manila Rope 13% 

"British" Manila 10% 

Cotton, 3-16 inch and larger 24 

Russia Deep Sea line, % in. diam. 

and over, 17; under % in., 18. 
Jute, % and upwards, 10c; under %, 

10%c. 

Lath yarn, single 08% 

Lath yarn, double 08% 

Sisel bed cord, 48 feet, per doz.. 65 
Sisel bed cord, 60 feet, per doz. 80 
Sisel bed cord, 72 feet, per doz. (5 
Cotton clothes line, 18 per cent, off. 

Bag, Russian twine, per lb 8 27 

Wrapping, cotton, 3-ply twine... 26 
4-ply twine... 30 

Mattress twine, per lb 45 

Staging " " 35 

Refrigerators. 
Sanderson-Harold, 40 per cent. 
Galvanized, 45 per cent. 

Rivets and Burrs. 
Iron Rivets, black and tinned, 60, 10 

and 10. 
Iron Burrs, 60 and 10 and 10 p.c. 
Copper Rivets, usual proportion burrs, 

35 and 7% per cent. 
Copper Burrs only, 22% per cent. 
Extras on Coppered Rivets, %-lb. pack- 
ages lc per lb.; %-lb. pkgs., 2c lb. 
Tinned Rivets, net extra, 3c per lb. 
Coppered Rivets, net extra, 2%c per lb. 

Rivet Sets. 
Canadian, 35 to 37% per cent. 
Rules. 

Boxwood, No. 68, 2 foot, doz 1 16 

Ivory, No. 1282, 2 foot, each .... 3 50 

Sad Irons. 
Mrs. Potts, No. 65, polished, per 

set .:."." 80 

Mrs. Potts, No. 50, nickel-plated, 

per set 85 



Mrs. Potto, handles, japanned, per 

gross 8 40 

Common, plain 4 25 

plated 6 60 

Asbestos, per set 1 60 

Sand and Emery Paper. 
Sand and emery paper, 40 per cent. 

Sash Weights. 
Sectional, 1 lb. each, per 100 lb... 2 25 
Sectional, % lb., each, per 100 lbs 2 40 

Solid, 3 to 30 lbs 166 

Sash Cord. 

No. 8, per lb 33 

Saws. 
Atkins Hand and Crosscut, 25 p.c. 
Disston's Hand, 15 per cent, 
Simonds Hand, 15 per cent. 
Shurley & Dietrich, 40 and 36 p.c. 
Spear & Jackson, 40 per cent. 

Saw Sets. 
Canadian discount, 40 per cent. 

Screen Doors and Windows Doz. 
Common doors, 2 or 3 panel, wal- 
nut stained, 4-in. style 7 80 

Common doors, 2 or 3 panel, grain- 
ed only, 4-in. style 8 10 

Beaver window screens, 14x18, open 

28% inohes 160 

Perfection window screens, 14x15, 

open 22% inches 1 80 

Model window screens, 14x22, open 

56% inches 2 25 

Scales. 
Guroey Standard, 35; Champion, 60 
per cent. 

Burrow, Stewart & Milne — Imperial 
Standard, 36; Weigh Beams, 35; Cham- 
pion Scales, 45. 

Fairbanks Standard, 30; Dominion, 
50; Richelieu, 50. 

Warren new Standard, 35; Champion, 
45, Weigh Beams, 30. 

Scythe Snaths. 
Canadian, 40 per cent. 

Screws. Per cent. 

Wood F.H., bright and steel.85 10 15 2% 

R.H., bright 80 10 15 2% 

F.H., brass 75 10 15 2% 

" R.H., brass 70 10 15 2% 

" F.H., bronze 70 10 15 2% 

R.H., bronze 65 10 15 2% 

Drive screws 85 10 15 2% 

Set, case hardened 60 

Square cap 50 and OS 

Hexagon cap 45 

Bench, wood, per doz $5 00 

" iron, per doz 4 25 

Screws (Machine). 

Flat head, iron and brass, 35 per cent. 

Fillister head, iron, 30; brass, 26 p.c. 

Screw Drivers. 

Sargent's, per dozen 65 100 

North Bros., No. 30, per doz 16 80 

Scissors and Shears. 
Clauss, nickel scissors and shears, 60; 
Japan, 65; tailors, 40; pruning, 70. 
Seymour's, 50 and 10 per cent. 
Acme Shear Co., nickel-plated and 
Japanned, 40 per cent. 

Shelf Brackets. 
No. 140, 65 and 10 per cent. 

Skates and Hockey Sticks. 
Starr skates, 37% per cent. 
Boker, hockey, 30c upwards; spring 
Empire hockey sticks, $3.00, $3.60. 
Micmac and Rex sticks, $4.00, $6.00. 
Pucks, net, $1.50. 

Shovels and Spades. 
Canadian No. 1 grade, 60 and 2% p.c 
off; No. 2 grade, 65 and 2% p.c off; 
No. 4 grade, 45 and 5 p.c. off. 
Canadian, No. 1 and 2 grade, 60 and 
2% p.c; No. 3 and 4 grade, 50 and 
2% per cent. 

Scoops. 
Grade 1, 2, 3, 60 and 5 per cent, off. 
Grade 4, 60 per cent, off. 
Squares. 
Disston's, 60 and 10 per cent. 
Stanley Try Squares, size 7%, doz. 

net $2 86 

Snaps. 
Harness, 25 per cent. 

Soldering Irons. 
Base, per lb., 28 cents. 

Stamped Ware. 
Plain, 75 and 12% per cent, 
Retinned, 75 and E per cent. 
Tinners' trimmings. 75 and 5 p.c 

Sap Spouts. 
Bronzed iron with hooks, per 1,000 7 60 
Eureka tinned steel, hooks, per 

1,000 8 00 

Staples. 

Poultry netting, 100 lb 6 70 

Bed, 100 lbs., No. 14 6 75 

Blind, per lb 12 

Coopers' staples, 45 per cent. 
Bright spear point, 75 per cent. 

Stable Fittings. 
Dennis Wire & Iron Co., 33 1-S p.c 

Stove Boards. 
Lithographed, 60 and 10. 
Stovepipes. 

5 and 6 inch, per 100 lengths 7 62 

7 inch, per 100 lengths 8 18 

Nestable, 40 per cent. 

Stovepipe Elbows. 
b and 6-inch, common, per doz... I 22 

7-inch, per doz 135 

Polished, 15c per dozen extra. 
Thimbles, 70 per cent. 

Stocks and Dies. 

No. 20 Beaver Die Stock 18 75 

Stones — Oil and Scythe. 

Washita per lb. 25 37 

Hindostan " 06 10 

slip " 18 20 

" Axe " .... 10 

Deer Creek " .... 10 

Deerlick " .... 25 

Axe " .... 15 

Lily white " 42 

Arkansas " .... 1 50 



Water-of-Ayr " .... 10 

Bcytue per gross A 6U 6 uu 

Tacks, Brads, Etc 
Carpet tacks, blued, 80 and 10 p.c; 
tinned, 85; (in kegs), 40; cut tacks, 
blued, in dozens only, 80 and 10; % 
weights, 60; Swedes cut tacks, blued and 
tinned, bulk, 85 and 5, in dozens, 75 
and 10; Swedes, upholsterers', bulk, 90; 
brush, blued and tinned, bulk, 70 and 
10; Swedes, gimp, blued, tinned and 
japanned, 82%; zinc tacks, 35; leather 
carpet tacks, 36; copper tacks, 45; cop- 
per nails, 50; trunk nails, black, 65 
and 10; trunk nails, tinned and blued, 
65 and 10; clout nails, blued and tinned, 
65 and 10; chair nails, 35 and 10; 
patent brads, 40 and 10; fine finishing. 
40 and 10; lining tacks, in papers, net; 
lining tacks, in bulk, 15; lining tacks, 
solid heads, in bulk, 75; saddle nails, in 
papers, 10; saddle nails, in bulk, 15; 
tufting buttons, 22 line in dozens only, 
60; zinc glaziers' points, 5; double point- 
ed tacks, papers, 90 and 10; double 
pointed tacks, bulk, 65; clinch point 
shoe rivets, 45 and 10; cheese box tacks, 
87%; trunk tacks, 80 and 20; strawberry 
box tacks, 80 and 10. 

Tape Lines. 
Universal, ass skin, N». 714, M ft., 

doz. 3 00 

Lufkins, linen, No. 404, 66 ft,, ea. 94 
steel. No. 264, 66 ft., each 3 60 
Chesterman's linen, No. 1822, (6 ft, 

each 1 10 

Chesterman's Metallic, No. 1821.. 1 95 

Steel, No. 1840, H ft 

Trowels. 
Disston's, 10 per cent. 

Thermometers, 
Tin case and dairy, 75 t* 75 and II p.*. 

Tinners' Snips. 
Discount 35 per cent. 

Tinners' Trimmings. 
Discount, 45 per cent. 
Plain and retinned, 75 and 11%. 

Traps (Steel Game). 
Newhouse, 30 per cent. 
Hawley & Norton, 40, 10 and S p.*. 
Victor, 60 and 5 per cent. 
Oneida Jump (Star), 50, II and i p.e. 
Traps (Rat and ifause) Doz. 

Out O' Sight Mouse Traps to 

" " Rat Traps 1 20 

Easy Set Mouse 45 

" " Rat 96 

Blizzard Mouse Traps 45 

Rat Traps 95 

Hold-Fast (formerly Devil) Mouse 

Traps 26 

Hold-Fast (formerly Devil) Rat 

Traps 80 

5-Hole Tin Chokers 80 

Vises. 

Per pound 1 11 12% 

Hinged pipe vise, 25 lbs 3 65 

Saw vise 4 50 8 00 

Blacksmiths', 60; parallel, 46 per cent. 
Washing Machines. 

New Ontario 4125 

Round, re-acting, per dos 81 25 

Square, re-acting, per doz 77 60 

Dowswell 52 60 

New Century, Style A 101 25 

Ideal Power 180 00 

Daisy 73 26 

Stephenson 74 00 

Puritan Motor 165 00 

Connor, improved 62 60 

Ottawa 65 00 

Connor Ball Bearing 112 50 

Connor Gearless Motor Washer... 180 00 
20 per cent. 

Wringers. 

Royal Canadian, 11 in., doz 47 75 

Eze, 10 in., per doz 46 75 

Bicycle, 11 inch 60 60 

Trojan, 12 inch 100 00 

Challenge, 3 year, 11 inch 63 25 

Ottawa, 3 year, 11 inch 68 25 

Favorite, 5 year, 11 inch 6175 

20 per cent. 

Wheelbarrows. 

Navvy, steel wheel, dozen 21 20 

Garden, steel wheel, dozen 32 40 

Whiffletrees. 

Tubular steel whiffletrees, 28 in... 70 

34 in... 100 

36 in... 125 

" ' neckyokes, 36 in,... 1 05 

" " doubletrees, 41 in.. 95 

" " lumbermen*, 44 in.. 1 15 

Wood Handles. 

Second growth ash fork, hoe, rake and 

shovel handles, 40 per cent. 
Extra ash fork, hoe, rake and shovel 

handles, 46 per cent. 
Nos. 1 and 2 ash fork, hoe, rake and 

shovel handles, 50 per cent. 
Carriage neckyokes and whiffletrees, ash 

35, hickory, 40 per cent. 
Team neckyokes, oval and round whiffle- 
trees, hickory and ash, 35 per cent. 
All other ash goods, 40 per cent. 
All hickory, maple and oak goods. 35 
per cent. 

Wrenches. 
Agricultural, 67% per cent. 

Wrought Iron Washers. 
Canadian, 50 per cent 



WINNIPEG HARDWARE 
QUOTATIONS. 

Ax Handles— Oval and octagon, s.g. 
hickory, $3.50; No. 1, $2.40; 2, $1.95; 
p.g. oak, $2.90. 

Augur Bits— "Irwin" bits, 47%; other 
lines, 70 and 10 per cent. 

Barb Wire— Lyman 4 pt., $1.86 f.o.b. 
Fort William; $2.26 per spool of 80 rods 
f.o.b. Winnipeg; Guidden 2 pt., $1.74 
f.o.b. Fort William; $2.12 per spool of 
Wl rods f.o.b. Winnipeg; Baker 2 pt.. 



$1.73 f.o.b. Winnipeg; Waukegan 2 pt,, 
$1.74 f.o.b. Fort William; $2.12 per spool 
f.o.b. Winnipeg; Alberta 2 pt., $1.73 
f.o.b. Fort William, $2,05 per spool 
f.o.b. Winnipeg; American special, 2 
pt., $1.45 f.o.b. Fort William; $1.73 
per spool f.o.b. Winnipeg; plain twist, 
$2.80 f.o.b. Fort William, $3.20 per 100 
lb., f.o.b. Winnipeg; coil spring wire. 
No. 9, $2.07 per 100 lbs., Fort William; 
$2.50 at Winnipeg. 

Bolts— Carriage, % and smaller, 66; 
7-16 and larger, 65; machine, % and 
under, 60 and 5; 7-16 and over, 55; ma- 
chine set screws, 65; plough bolts, 50; 
square and hexagon nuts, cases, 3 
small lots, 2%; stove bolts, 77%. 

Bar Iron— Bar iron, $2,50; Swedish 
iron, $4.25; sleigh shoe steel, $2.<i5; 
spring steel, $3.40; machinery steel, 
$3.50; tool steel, Black Diamond, 100 
lbs., $8.50; Jessop, $15. 

Blocks— Steel, 50 per cent.; wood, 60 
per cent. 

Cut Nails— $3.15 per keg baa*. Wire 
nails, base, $2,80 Winnipeg; $2.35 Fort 
William. 

Copper— Sheet and planished copper, 
30c per lb. Tinned, 24c. Copper wire. 
3-inch gage, 24c to 20-inch gage, 29c. 

Crowbars— 4%c per lb. 

Corrugated Iron and Roofing, etc.— 
Corrugated iron, 28 gauge, $3.87; 26 
gauge, $4.18; pressed standing seamed 
roofing, 28, painted, $2.84; 26, $3.24. 

Canada Plates— Half-polish, 6 and 7- 
inch, $3.40; 8-inch, $3.60; full polish, 6 
and 7-inch, $4.25; 8-inch, $4.60. 

Clevices— 7%c per lb. 

Enamelware— Canada, 50 ; Imperial, 
60; Premier, 50; Colonial, 60; white, 70 
and 5; diamond, 50; granite, 60 per 
cent. 

Files— American, 75 p.c; Black Dia- 
mond, 60 p.c. ; Nicholson's, 66 p.c. 

Galvanized iron — Apollo, 16 gauge, 
$3.80; 18. $3.85; 20, $3.90; 22 and 24, 
$4; 26, $4.20; 28, $4.60; 30 gauge or 
10% oz., $4.80; Queen's Head, 20, $4; 
24, $4.20; 26, $4.60; 28, $4.80. 

Galvanized Ware— 37% per cent. 

Grindstones— Per 100 lb., $1.65. 

Horseshoes— "M.R.M." and "Bell" 
iron. No. to 1, $4.90; No. 2 and larg- 
er, $4,65; snowshoes. No. to No. 1. 
$5.15; No. 2 and larger, $4,90; steel No. 
to 1, $5.35; No. 2 and larger, $5.10; 
featherweight, $6.60. 

Horse Nails — "M.R.M." cold process 
—No. 3, $4.30; 4, $3.80; 6, $2.75; 6, 
$3.30; 7, $3.05; 8, $2.85; 9, $2.75; 10, 11 
and 12, $2.65, in 25-lb. boxes. 

Harvest Tools— 50, 5 and 5 per cent. 

Hinges— Light T and strap, 66 per 
cent. 

Hooks— Brush, heavy, per dozen, $8.75; 
grass, $1.70. 

Iron Washers— Full box, 40 per cent,; 
smaller lots, 36 per cent. 

Iron Pipe, Black-%, $2.25; %, $2.30; 
%, $3.10; %, $3.66; 1. $5.30; 1%, *,..-..: 
1%, $8.60; 2, $10.90; 2%, $17.40; 3, $22.85; 
3%, $30; 4, $34.35; 4%, $38.80'; 6, $43.30; 
6, $56.10. 

Galvanized -%, $3.10; %. $3.20; %, 
$4.10; %, $4.90; 1, $7.05; 1%, $9.60; 1%, 
$11.50; 2, $14.80. 

Logging Chain— % in., $7.50; 5-16 in., 
$6; % in., $5.50. 

Lanterns— Cold blast, per dozen, $7; 
coppered, $9; dash, $1, 

Poultry Netting—57% per cent. 

Pig Lead— $6. Lead Pipe— Full coil, 
$7.00 per cwt. ; cut coil, $8.00 per cwt. 

Lead Waste— $7.00. 

Rivets and Burrs— Iron rivets, 55 per 
cent.; copper, No. 8, 32c; 10, S4e; 12, 
36e; copper burrs, No. 8, 44e; 10, 47c; 
12, 51c; copper rivets and burrs. No. 8, 
44c; 9, 32c; 10, 47c; coppered. No. 8, 
17c; 9, 17%c; 10, 18c. 

Rope — Sisal, 9%c; Pure Manila, 15%c; 
British Manila, 10%c; lath yam, 9c. 

Staples— Bright wire, $2.50 f.o.b. Fort 
William; $2.90, Winnipeg. 

Steel Squares— 40 off new list. 

Shovels— Discounts on No. 1, No. 2, 
60 and 2% per cent.; No. 3, No. 4, 50 
and 2% per cent.; No. 1 scoops, 50 and 
6 per cent. ; all other grades, 45 and 
6 per cent. ; fifty cento per dozen net 
is added to equalize eastern freights. 

Solder— Half and half, $32 per cwt. 

Screws— Bright iron round head, 82% 
and 10 p.c; flat head, 87% and 10 
per cent, ; round head, brass, 72% and 
10 per cent.; flat head, brass, 77% and 
10 per cent.; coach, 65 per cent. 

Staples— Bright wire per cwt., $2.50 
at Fort William; $2.90, Winnipeg. 

Linseed Oil— Raw, per gal., $1.05; 
boiled, per gal., $1.08. 

Turpentine— Per gal., barrel lots, 80c 

Dry Colors— White lead in ton lots, 
decorators' pure $8.00; decorators' spe- 
cial, $7.50; in small lots advance price 25 
cents per cwt. ; red lead, kegs, $6.50 ; 
yellow ochre, in barrel lots, 2%c; less 
than barrel lots, 3c; golden ochre, bar- 
rels, 3%c; less than barrels, 4c; Vene- 
tian red, barrel, $2.50; less than bar- 
rels, $3.00; American vermilion, 15c; 
English vermilion, $1.00 per lb. ; Cana- 
dian metallic oxides, barrel lots, 3a, 
3%c; English purple oxides, in casks, 
3%c; less quantities, 4c per lb. 

Putty— Casks, $2.90 per cwt. ; blad- 
ders, in barrels, $3.15; bladders, 100-lb. 
cases, $3.40. 

Paris Green— 22 cento per 112-lb. 

Paris Green— 21% cents per 112-lb. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



JAMIESON'S 

CROWN 
and ANCHOR 



S&RNiSH STAIN 



.'"JIN AND VARNISH IN ONE MW*£ 
IM I S WILL HAKE A DARKER BUT B»* 



• "STAIMED SHOULD BE CltAN AND F«t"r;. ; 
'"""OISWIIH SAND PAPER TO TMIH USE OMl' 

^CdAMIESONaCOW^ 



VARNISH 

STAINS 

LOOK so well and WEAR 
so well that they delight every- 
one who uses them. 

We would like you to test 
them against any other stain 
on the market of whatever 
name or price. If you will do 
so we are certain that you 
will agree with us that they 
are in every respect 
THE BEST 
and the price helps too. 



R. C. Jamieson & Co. 



LIMITED 



Established 1858 



Owning and Operating 

P. D. Dods & Co., Limited 
Montreal and Vancouver 



MURESCO 

30,000,000 POUNDS SOLD IN 1911 

WHY? 



BECAUSE 



It covers more surface and covers it better with 
one coat than any other similar material on the 
market. 

Of the nature of its ingredients it is highly sanitary. 

It does not rub off, crack, peel, blister or show laps 
when properly applied. 

It is so easily applied. 

Every lot manufactured is carefully tested before 
shipping. 



Send for Color Cards and Literature. 



Benjamin Moore & Co., Limited 



TORONTO 



NEW YORK 



CLEVELAND 



CHICAGO 



You Can Make Your Paint Department the 
Busiest of All 

This is what every dealer is doing who sells our 

"SILKSTONE" 

(COPYRIGHT) 

FLAT WALL COLOURS 



These colors have become ex- 
tremely popular with house- 
wives, because they can be wash- 
ed with Castile, or any soap not 
containing lye, without losing 
any of its beauty. 

Smooth as Silk 

Hard as Stone 

Is sanitary, beautiful and dur- 
able. Is more economical than 
distemper colors and can be 
used where distemper cannot. 
Send us a trial order at once 
and be convinced as to its sell- 
ing qualities. 

G. F. STEPHENS & CO. 

WINNIPEG, 




LIMITED 



CANADA 



Branch at Calgary, Alta. 



57 



HARDWARE AND META 



Condensed or "Want" Advertisements 



Those who wish to sell or buy businesses or stocks, obtain 
competent help, connect with satisfactory positions or secure 
aid in starting new enterprises, should not fail to use the 
Want Ad. Advertisement Page of HARDWARE AND METAL. 

It is the central market place of the hardware trade 
throughout Canada. 



There is always someone somewhere looking for just 
such proposition as you have to offer. 

RATES (payable in advance : — 

2c. per word first insertion. 

lc. per word subsequent insertion. 

5c. additional each insertion when Box Number is required 



BUSINESS CHANCES 

FOR SALE— ONE NO. 6 OXFORD HOT 
water boiler, second-hand, $50.00. T. A. 
Cowan, Brantford, Ont. (35) 

A THRIVING HARDWARE AND TINSMITH 
business for sale, in a town of 400 of a 
population. Stock about $2,000. Box 696, 
Hardware & Metal, Toronto. (34) 

FOR SALE— ONE NO. 18 TAYLOR-FORBES 
Western steam boiler. Gross rating 1,000 
square feet. In good condition. Used 3 sea- 
sons. $90.00. T. A. Cowan, Brantford, Canada. 

FIRST-CLASS HARDWARE BUSINESS FOR 
■ale — on C.P.R. main line, Eastern Alberta. 
Stock $8,000.00. Yearly profits $6,000.00 to 
$7,000.00. Apply Box 1661, Saskatoon, Sask. 
(35) 

SPLENDID WHOLESALE AND RETAIL 
business for sale, in one of the finest dis- 
tricts of Western Canada. Write for par- 
ticulars. H. H. Pigott & Co., Ltd., Winnipeg, 
Canada. (35) 

OLD ESTABLISHED HARDWARE, STOVES 
and plumbing in Eastern Ontario city ; steady 
increase of sales at good prices; business al- 
ways showing a good return on investment; 
exceptional opportunity, stock being particu- 
larly well bought. Box 693, Hardware and 
Metal. 

THRIVING HARDWARE BUSINESS FOR 
■ale, consisting of shelf and heavy hardware, 
stoves, etc. Located in central part of On- 
tario; three railroads; turnover $50,000; stock 
$10,000, which is being reduced. Excellent 
chance to buy at rate on dollar. Retiring 
from business. Box 618, Hardware and Metal, 
Toronto. (52tf) 

FOR SALE.— A. 1 HARDWARE BUSINESS 
in good Manitoba town on two lines of rail- 
way. Stock $7,000. Terms to suit. Good reas- 
on for selling. Apply to Box 692, Hardware 
and Metal. (32) 

H. H. PIGOTT & CO., LTD., BUSINESS 
Brokers and Financial Agents, 286 Bannatyne 
Ave., Winnipeg, Man. Businesses bought, sold 
and traded. Locating advice free. Many 
years in wholesale trade give us practical 
knowledge and strongest connections. 

HARDWARE— IN THRIVING SASKATCHE- 
wan town on main line of C.P.R. Stock car- 
ried $8,000. Turnover $25,000. Will take one- 
third cash and balance on easy terms, or 
one-half in good city property. Will rent or 
sell the store. H. H. Pigott & Co., Ltd. 

HARDWARE— IN SOUTHERN MANITOBA 
town of 1,500 population. Stock $11,000. Fine 
fixtures, brick store which can be rented. 
Owners have made their pile and wish to 
retire. Cash required $6,000, balance arrang- 
ed. H. H. Pigott & Co., Ltd. 

HARDWARE— ON KINDERSLEY BRANCH 
of C.N.R. Turnover $52,000 on $12,000 stock, 
with net profit of $8,000. Sales almost en- 
tirely cash; $4,000 cash will give you posses- 
sion of stock, and balance arranged on easy 
terms. H. H. Pigott & Co., Ltd. 

HARDWARE AND CHINA— IN SASKAT- 
chewan, on main line of C.N.R. Stock $7,000. 
Turnover $26,000. Net profits $4,000. No bet- 
ter opening in the West. It will pay you to 
investigate at once. H. H. Pigott & Co., 
Ltd. 

HARDWARE, FURNITURE AND UNDER- 
taking — Manitoba business. Stock $7,000. 
Turnover $30,000, mostly all cash. Owner will 
rent store. $4,000 will handle stock, and 
balance can be arranged on easy terms. H. 
H. Pigott & Co., Ltd. 

WRITE US IF YOU WANT TO BUY OR 
sell. Our booklet, "Business Opportunities 
and Investments in Western Canada," will 
interest you. H. H. Pigott & Co., Ltd., Win- 
nipeg, Man. (33) 



BUSINESS CHANCES 

FOR SALE— A LONG AND WELL ESTAB- 
lished hardware business on the best busi- 
ness street in Toronto ; good lease of pre- 
mises; stock and fixtures $9,000.00 to $10,- 
000.00. Satisfactory reasons for selling. Box 
695, Hardware & Metal, Toronto. (35) 

SITUATIONS VACANT 

WANTED— A MAN CAPABLE OF INSTAL- 
ling furnaces. State wages required. Jno. H. 
McEwan, Radisson, Sask. (34) 

WANTED — RELIABLE EXPERIENCED 
hardware clerk ; good wages and steady em- 
ployment. A. S. Worthen, Zealandia, Sask. 
(35) 

WANTED — HARDWARE BUSINESS IN 
Ontario, stock about $5,000.00, in growing 
town. Box 694, Hardware & Metal, Toronto. 
(33) 

WANTED— GOOD ALL ROUND TINSMITH, 
will hire or give the tinshop on a percentage. 
State experience, wages expected, married or 
single. Steady job to the right man. A. 
■M. Carscadden, Fort Saskatchewan, Alberta. 
(33) 

SALESMAN OF BUILDERS' HARDWARE— 
must have had some previous experience of 
estimating from architect plans. Apply by 
letter, stating experience, age, salary, etc. The 
James Walker Hardware Co., Ltd., Montreal. 
(34) _ 

WANTED— A RELIABLE, AMBITIOUS MAN 
in every town to look after the entire circu- 
lation of our thirteen publications. Work 
very remunerative. Mac-Lean Publishing Com- 
pany, 143-149 University Ave., Toronto, Ont. 
(tf) 

WANTED— A YOUNG MAN OF ABILITY TO 
take charge of a store in Ontario city of 
twenty-five thousand, handling electric and 
gas fixtures, gas ranges and plumbing goods; 
must be capable of organizing and taking 
charge of retail portion of business; good 
chance for advancement. Apply Box 695, 
Hardware & Metal, Toronto. (33) 

IMPORTANT BRITISH COMPANY MANU- 
facturing high grade protective paints, enam- 
els, varnishes and coatings, contractors to 
British Admiralty, and leading shipbuilders 
and engineers, desire to be represented in 
the Dominion. Director will be in Canada 
about September, and could interview persons 
or companies who might do business or take 
up agencies. Apply XX, care of Hardware 
& Metal, Montreal. (35) 



SITUATIONS WANTED 

CLERK SEEKS SITUATION WITH 

wholesale and retail hardware store; 7 years' 
sound experience; ambitious, good salesman 
and stockkeeper. First-class references. Ap- 
ply Box 697, Hardware & Metal, Toronto. 
(33) 

TRAVELLER HAVING PROVED HIS ABIL- 
Ity by greatly increasing his firm's business 
in the territory covered and being an aggres- 
sive salesman wishes to secure a position with 
manufacturing concern. Box 668. Hardware 
and Metal, Toronto. 18— 21 1 

WANTED — MANUFACTURERS' AGENT 
calling upon hardware and plumbing supply 
houses in Ontario, Quebec, and Eastern 
Canada, to handle, on commission basis, the 
exclusive sale of a high class specialty with 
an established trade. Former representative 
engaged in business for himself. In answer- 
ing, advise age, experience, lines now han- 
dling, territory covered, etc. X100, Care of 
Hardware & Metal, Toronto. (34) 

58 



MISCELLANEOUS 



ADDING TYPEWRITERS WRITE, ADD OR 
subtract in one operation. Elliott Fisher, 
Limited, Room 314, Stair Building, Toronto. 

COPELAND - CHATTERSON SYSTEMS — 
Short, simple. Adapted to all classes of busi- 
ness. Copeland-Chatterson Co., Ltd., Toronto 
and Ottawa. (tf) 

DOUBLE YOUR FLOOR SPACE— BY IN- 
stalling an Otis-Fensom hand-power elevator 
you can use upper floors as stock room or 
extra selling space, and increase space on 
ground floor. Costs only $70. Write for cata- 
logue "B," Otis-Fensom Elevator Co., Traders 
Bank Building, Toronto. 

FIRE INSURANCE — INSURE IN THE 
Hartford. Agencies everywhere in Canada. 

THE NATIONAL CASH REGISTER COM- 
pany guarantee to sell a better register for 
less money than any other house on earth. 
We can prove it. Make us. The National 
Cash Register Co., 285 Yonge Street, Toronto. 

WAREHOUSE AND FACTORY HEATING 
systems. Taylor-Forbes Company, Limited. 
Supplied by the trade throughout Canada. 

(tf) 

YOU CAN 

from us. 
writers of 
built and 
and $20.00 
of better 
Write for 
Co., Ltd., 
Canada. 



BUY A REBUILT TYPEWRITER 
We have about seventy-five type- 
various makes, which we have re- 
which we will sell at $10.00, $15.00 
each. We have also a large stock 
rebuilts at slightly higher figures, 
details. The Monarch Typewriter 
46 Adelaide St. West, Toronto, 
(tf) 



TECHNICAL BOOKS 

HINTS FOR PAINTERS, DECORATORS, 
and paperhangers — Practical and useful book 
treating on the preparation of surfaces, ma- 
terials used, mixed paints, operations, taste 
in color, graining, paperhanging, estimating 
cost of work, useful recipes, etc. Price 15 
cents postpaid, or two sets for 25c while they 
last. MacLean Publishing Co., Technical Book 
Dept.. 143-149 University Ave.. Toronto. 



PRICE TICKETS 



PRICB TICKETS FOR WINDOW SHOW 
tro«d«. Black lettering on white card marked 
25e, 5«c, 75c, $1, $1.25, $1.59, $1.75, $2, $2.5», 98, 
$S.5#, $5. Dosen in set, per set 25 cents post- 
paid. Technical Book Dept., 143 University 
Avenue, Toronto. (tf) 



Keep in mind the domin- 
ant fact that mankind from 
its first appearance on the 
earth has been schooled by 
nature to look for signs ; 
for invitations to taste; for 
suggestions as to what to 
wear. Tell your story 
briefly, forcibly, truthful- 
ly, and address it through 
the proper media and you 
can successfully apply ad- 
vertising as a means to 
increased distribution. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Merchants 

and 

Salesmen ! 



Would you be willing to pay 
$2.00 to hear some of the lead- 
ing authorities on salesmanship 
express their opinions on this 
all-important subject? In 

BRAIN-POWER BUSINESS 
MANUAL 

125 Presidents, Vice-Presi- 
dents, General Managers, Sales 
Managers and Star Result Get- 
ters, have contributed of their 
knowledge and experience on 
such phases of the subject as: — 
The Selling Profession. 
Education and Training. 
Before the Interview. 
Getting Interviews. 
The Approach. 
Selling Talk. 
Answering Objections. 
Selling Tactics. 
Closing Sales. 
Cash with Order. 
Samples. 

Getting the Price. 
Credits and Terms. 
Cancelled Orders. 
Territory. 

Long vs. Short Trips. 
Finding New Customers. 
Salesmen's Relation to House. 
Salesmen and Advertising. 
Expense Accounts. 
Promotions. 
Bribes. 

Conduct Toward Customer. • 
Special Tactics. 
Character and Conduct. 
183 pages, 5% x 8% inches. 

PRICE $2.00 

TECHNICAL BOOKS. 

143-149 University Ave. 

TORONTO 



"RUSSWIN" 

BUILDERS 1 HARDWARE 

We are jobbing agents for the famous "RUSSWIN" 
line of builders' hardware. Our stock contains the lat- 
est and most artistic designs on the market to-day. By 
selling "RUSSWIN" LOCK SETS you will be in the 
best position to get the CONTRACTORS' business in 
your town. 

COAL CHUTES 

Agents for Manitoba and Saskatchewan for the DOWN 
DRAFT COAL CHUTE. A large stock always on 
hand. 



^THE 



rx 



WINNIPEG MlNfGlM 



EVERYTHING FOR A BUILDING 






WINNIPEG 



EDMONTON 



NEW 

ERA 

PAINT 



If you are looking 

for a paint that will give satisfaction under all conditions, sell NEW ERA PAINT. 
You will find it lasts longer, covers more surface, and holds its color better 
than any other prepared paint. 
There's a steady demand for NEW ERA everywhere its merits are known. 

WRITE FOR PRICES 

Standard Paint and Varnish Co. 

WINDSOR, ONT. 



LIMITED 



TWO CENTS PER WORD 

You can talk across the continent for two cents per word 
fgg with a WANT AD. in this paper J$f 



«W 



59 



HARDWARE AND METAL 






Concerning 

Fall Painting 

The old idea that the paint trade is a 
Spring trade has been exploded by the fact 
that paints now move as easily in the Fall. 
Be prepared this year with a stock of 

Ramsay's Paints 

and be ready with a line of quality paints that mean 
repeat orders from every user. Ramsay's Paints are 
satisfaction makers. 

Lot's get together on an agency basis. 



Write us early. 



A. Ramsay & Son Co., Montreal 

Paint Makers Since '42 

^Western Distributors— Revillon Wholesale, Limited, 
Edmonton; A. McBride & Co., Limited. 
Calgary ; F.1R. Begrg & Co., Limited, 
['Vancouver. 



THIS IS THE ORIGINAL 

NEWMARKET CLIPPER 




[Ymade by BURMANS 

Horse Clippers 
Barber Clippers 
Power Clippers 
Sheep Shearing Machinery 
Clippers of All Kinds 



STOCKED BY 
ALL JOBBERS 



B. & S. H. THOMPSOH & CO., 

LIMITED 

Sole Agents for Canada MONTREAL 




60 



HARDWARE AND METAL 




There are good materials in 
Sherwin-Williams Varnishes 

The best varnish makers that live cannot make good varnish from 
poor materials. Quality varnish must be made from the best ma- 
terials, in the right way, by men who know how. 

The superiority of S-W Varnishes is due in part to the materials 
we use. Take, for instance, the varnish gums. We are not depend- 
ent upon the local markets for our supply, but import varnish gums 
direct, unsorted. We are thus always sure of the quality. By 
sorting them ourselves, we establish our own grades and are able to 
use at all times the same quality and grade for each varnish. 

Such advantage means much to you, as quality is of supreme import- 
ance in building a varnis h trade that endures. Write to-day for 
further particulars. 




Sherwin-Williams 

Paints & Varnishes 

Address all inquiries to The Sherwin-Williams Co. oi Canada., Limited, Montreal, Toronto, Winnipeg, Vancouver. 




61 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



THE 

Pratt& Lambert 

PROPOSITION 




Weigh the Pratt & Lambert proposition with other 
varnish propositions from every standpoint. 

Weigh, quality. Consider what Dexter Bros. Co., Boston, Mass., say. 
"We have given you the benefit of the larger portion of our varnish business 
for more than forty years, and naturally would not have done so, if your 
goods were not of such uniformly hi gh quality that they have always given 
our customers that satisfaction which they have a right to expect." 

Weigh, co-operation — every conceivable kind of varnish selling assistance. Waggener 
Paint & Glass Co., Kansas City, Mo., say, "Your splendid advertising has made 
your goods easy to sell. 

Weigh, sales. Consider what Fred Nesemann & Co., Baltimore, Md., say, "The 
number of gallons of your goods sold during 1911 far exceeded our expectations." 
Ainslie Martin Co., Inc., Lynchburg, Va., say, "During 1911, we more than 
doubled our former annual varnish sales." 

And, it's on large annual sales that the real profits on Pratt & Lambert Varnishes 
come in — not an exorbitant profit once in a while, as on unknown, inferior 
varnishes, but a fair profit on sale after sale. Weigh, profit. 

Write for our interesting selling proposition. 

PRATT & LAMBERT, INC. 

VARNISH MAKERS 
24 COURTWRIGHT STREET, BRIDGEBURG, ONTARIO 

Factories : 
NEW YORK BUFFALO CHICAGO 

LONDON PARIS HAMBURG 

BRIDGEBURG. CANADA 



62 



HARDWARE AND METAL 







Petint Store Ma.n 




oftpe 



"If you would succeed you 
"Quality" and "Profit" trip 
They get profit too high, 
der what was wrong 



MARTIN 
SENOUR 



is a real business insur 
a reasonable profit will 
The dealers who know say so. 
and our proposition to insure your 




must mind your Ps and Qs." 

up too many business men. 

quality too low, and won- 

when the crash comes. 



PAINT 

00%PURE 



ance. Its quality and 
make your business boom. 
Write today for the proof 
business the same way. 



THE MARTIN-SENOUR CO., Limited 



MONTREAL 



Pioneers of Pure Paints 
CHICAGO WINNIPEG 



LINCOLN 



IT MAT SEEM STRANGE 

But it is none the less true, that no dealer ever gives up hand- 
ling DOUGALL VARNISH. 

It does not take long to prove that Dougall Varnish will 
please your customers and bring increased business to your 
store. This is because it is scientifically made from pure 
materials and properly aged. 

Another reason is that it is 

THE VARNISH THAT LASTS LONGEST 

The Dougall Varnish Company, Limited 

305 Manufacturers Street, Montreal, Canada 



J. S. N. DOUGALL, President. 



Associated with MURPHY VARNISH CO., U.S.A. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



The name "YALE" helps make the sale 

<yalT) 




This book will tell you 
about many ways to in- 
crease sales, and if you 
haven't a copy, ask us to 
send it to you. It is free. 



F)ROBABLY 
no other man- 
ufacturing com- 
pany in the world 
gives its dealers so 
much direct sales- 
building help as 
do the makers of 
Yale Products: 

Yale Locks and Latches 
Yale Padlocks 
Yale Door Checks 
Yale Builders' Hardware 



Fi*»of" • Through our extensive advertising in the 
* ** «!•• national magazines, we awaken a real 
public interest in the Yale Products you sell. 

Q? — _ rxY% -J # We give you newspaper advertise- 
UvLUIlU • ments, all set up and ready to print, 
for you to use in your local papers, telling your own 
immediate buying public that your store is the place 
for them to find the Yale Products which they have 
seen advertised in the magazines. 



TPl- *„ J # We give you carefully designed and 

* 1111 vl • attractive window-displays — displays 
that are proven sales-makers. 

P ■'L # We give you booklets and leaflets 

* wULI 111* for distribution on your counters'or 
mailing to prospective customers. These booklets 
describe and illustrate the Yale Products you have 
in stock. 

And all this service costs you noth- 
ing, if you stock Yale Products in 
sufficient quantity to justify its use. 
Write our Dealers' Advertising 
Service for booklet, "On getting 
yours," which contains a little 
timely talk on "Your local paper" 
and other matters. 

Canadian Yale & Towne Limited 

Makers of YALE Products in Canada: Locks, Padlocks, 
Builders" Hardware, Door Checks and Chain Hoists 

General Offices and Works, St. Catharines, Ont. 



C84-2 



FROM STOCK 




Only 20 lbs. Pressure Required 

The 

Supreme Test 

The supreme test of a Washer's worth 
is the way the Washer washes. Try it 
out with the Dirty Shirt test. Take an un- 
usually dirty but originally white shirt, 
run it through the Portland Water Power 
Washer, and you'll find that the shirt itself 
is not only perfectly clean (provided, of 
course, that the dirtiness of the shirt isn't 
due to paints, etc.), but that the neck and 
wrist bands too are spotless. 

The Portland is a trouble-less washer — 
it relieves all washer worries. 

Made complete in our own factories — 
washer, motor, and furniture finished tub. 

If you're looking for a quality washer 
that's really worth while get after your 
hardware jobber, or write direct to us. 

HENDERSON & RICHARDSON 

Formerly J. A. HENDERSON 
Board of Trade Building, MONTREAL 

SOLE CANADIAN AGENTS FOR 

PORTLAND MFG. CO., Portland, Mich. 

The Largest Manufacturers of Washing Machines 
in the World 



HARDWARE AND METAL 




HIGHEST IN PUBLIC FAVOR 

A quarter of a century of favorable 
service has made 

"BANNER" BURNERS 



the recognized standard of excellence. 

Many burners with so-called improve- 
ments are a positive menace to their 
users. 

Can you afford to be identified with 
these? Your stove is judged by what 
you sell. Banner Burners ensure safety 
and satisfaction to your customer, and 
a good profit to you. 



LOOK FOR THE COVERED BASE 

A sure prevention from fire arising 
from the oil-soaked collection of dead 
insects, charred wick ends, etc., found 
in other burners. 

SOLD UNIVERSALLY AND BY ALL JOBBERS 



Ontario Lantern & Lamp Co., Limited 



HAMILTON, 

MONTREAL. P.O 
30 St. Dizier St. 



BRANCHES: 



ONTARIO 

WINNIPEG. MAN. 
56 Albert St. 





Jl ii®MiiiY 





by featuring the line of varnishes that 
has made good the world over — 



Varnish and Varnish Specialties 

Sterling Quality is put into every "In- : 
ternational ' ' Can before the label is 
attached, and the 
dealer is assisted by 
our co-operation in 
the form of original 
and forceful selling 
helps. 

Here are some of 
our leading lines 
that have been re- 
cognized as the 
standards of good 
quality for over 40 
vears : 




HARDWARE AND METAL 




ONE MINUTE" Washers and Wringers 

Imitated in Construction — Unequalled in Quality 

This machine will increase your washer profits. It 
contains all the qualities that are essential to make 
it the most satisfactory to both dealer and user. 

Communicate with us NOW and get full particulars— it will pay you 

ONE MINUTE WASHER CO., TORONTO 

MacKENZIE BROS., Winnipeg, Man., Sask. and Alberta 
CANADA STOVE AND FURNITURE CO., Montreal 



THE LOOP-LOCK ROPE BUCKLES 

Best for Horse or Cattle Ties, Rope Traces, Hay 
Ropes, Tow Ropes, Tent Ropes, Hammock Ropes 

Canadian Rope Buckle Company, Hamilton, Ont. 

If Your Jobber Cannot Supply You Write Us Direct 




CrtlCAC 



jaMOKW*** 



Mechanical 
Drawing 

By Ervln Kenison, S.B. 

Instructor in Mechanical Drawing. Mas- 
sachusetts Institute of Technology 

176 pp., 140 illus. Cloth binding. Gives a 
course of practical instruction in the art of 
Mechanical Drawing, based on methods that 
have stood the test of years of experience. 
Includes orthographic, isometric and oblique 
projections, shade lines, intersections and 
developments, lettering, etc., with abundant 
exercises and plates. 

Price, $1,00 

MacLean Publishing Co. 

Technical Book Dept. 
143-149 University Ave., Toronto 



STANDARD CHAIN COMPANY 




COIL, RAILROAD, LOGGING, DREDGE, SI EAM SHOVEL, WAGGON and 

BRIGHT CHAIN of all kinds. 
EVERYTHING IN WELDED CHAIN. 

Write for prices Prompt shipment. 

ELECTRIC WELDED TRACES A SPECIALTY 

Selling Agents: ALEXANDER GIBB, St. Nicholas Building, MONTREAL 



THE 



MORRIS & BAILEY STEEL CO 

PITTSBURG, PA. 



Manufacturers of 



COLD ROLLED STRIP STEEL 

For Deep Drawing, Blanking, Forming, all kinds of Bending. Has Bright Finish 
for Nickel Plating, Rolled accurate to Gauge. Made in all tempers and in any 
thickness from .002" to .250. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 




MAPLE CITY 
OILERS 



-bub- 



No. 600 A A 

Wide Mouth 



We manufacture the 
most complete line of 
oilers made in America, 
including Pump, Engin- 
eers', Machinists', Mow- 
ing Machine and Rail- 
road Oilers, Tallow Pots, 
Engineer Sets, Torches, 
Lamps, etc. 



MAPLE CITY MFG. CO. 

MONMOUTH, ILLINOIS, U.S.A. 



THE CORONA ROASTER 

Is a splendid YEAR ROUND SELLER 




JUST WHAT EVERY HOUSEWIFE NEEDS 

The hard, glossy enamel is as easily kept clean as a dinner plate— no 
seams or creases. The double jacket is made all of the single piece of 
Steel. .Stock a few of these roasters — display them in your window and 
see how quickly you will sell them. Our card guaranteeing it to the 
purchaser goes with every roaster. We help sell them by supplying you 
with advertising matter. 



Stock a trial order at once. 



The Enterprise Enamel Co., 



Bellaire, 
Ohio 





£?, vz*-^>'V: 



tit?-. 





WRITE us to-day about 
our NEW SELLING- 
PLAN . It means bigger varnish 
profits for you. 



Make Berry 
Brothers' Label 
one of your own 
business assets 
by carrying a 
representative 
stock. 

Some one dealer in 
every business center can 
get the bulk of the 
varnish trade and add a 
real asset to his business 
by taking hold of Berry 
Brothers' line in the 
right way. 

The right way is to 
make every can on your 
varnish shelves a Berry 
Brothers' Can. 

Concentrate. 

Specialize. 

Carry the one good 
line and know it perfect- 
ly, as you can with Berry 
Brothers' Goods. From 
Shellac all the way 
through, each item has 
the quality, uniformity, 
reliability and reputation 
you need. 

BERRY BROS. Ltd. 

The World's Largest Varnish Makers 

WALKERVILLE, - ONTARIO 



WRITE us to-day about 
our NEW SELLING- 
PLAN. You ought to know 
what it means for you. 



II A R DWARE AND M E T A L 




GOODS THAT LAST 

WHEN YOU ARE IN THE MARKET FOR 

Wire Cloth 

Perforated Sheet Metals 
General Wire and Iron Work 

Consult us. We have goods that 
have a clean record, ensuring the 
buyer his money's worth and the 
dealer a good profit. 



Do not hesitate about 
sending us your order or 
specify our goods when 
ordering through your 
Jobber. 

Have you a copy of our 
new catalogue ? 



'wMMmmm 
■ ■ 



■ ■■■■■■■ 



Canada Wire and Iron Goods Company 

HAMILTON, ONT. 

We Specialize in all kinds of Steel Cells, Steel Work. Etc.. for Prisons. 
Jails and City Lockups. 



Choice Chafing Dishes 



ALWAYS MAKE ACCEPTABLE PRESENTS 




Made in Silver and Nickel Plate, capacity 
three pints. Patent asbestos forced draught 
lamp with each dish, or peerless regulating 
lamp. Handles of rubberoid or staghorn. 
Ask for Catalogue. 

The Buffalo Mfg. Co., Buffalo, N.Y. 

Canadian Representatives 

H. F. Mcintosh & Co., 28 Toronto Street, Toronto 



En t h usi asm 



To sell goods and make profit 
you must develop this quality. 
Home made goods always did 
make you feel that way. That 
is why so many hardwaremen 
throughout Western Canada are 
selling our 

METAL CEILINGS, SHINGLES, 
SIDINGS ANB COBRUGATEB IRON 

and making nice profits. 

They have seen them made. They 

know they are right. They can 

get them in a hurry. 

All these things will be at your 

service when you hook up with us. 

WRITE TO-DAY . 

Winnipeg Ceiling and Roofing Co. 



P.O. Box 2186 H. 



Winnipeg, Man. 



MAKE MONEY FROM GOOD 
PUMPS— PROFIT 

Unless a metal pump is made just right 
it will leak at joints or valves. 

"Aremacdee" pumps do not give deal- 
ers who sell them 
trouble and loss from 
defective service in 
"Aremacdee" pumps 
sold customers. 

Pumps for every 
use — hand or motor — 
force or lift — every 
type a dealer can sell. 

All in the big catalogue. Ask for it — 
for dealer prices — for dealer terms. 

The 

R. McDougall Co., Limited 

GALT, CANADA 




68 



HARDWARE AND METAL 




Show your Cus- j ^ 
tomers This Up- g x 3 



V. 



to-Date Bit Ex- 
tension 



The Ford Bit Exten- 
sion is not to be class- 
ed with the ordinary 
Extension — Clumsy, 
hard to work and in 
general unsatisfactory. The 
Ford is a model of simplio- 
ity — simple in construction, 
simple to adjust and simple 
to use. It embodies the 
best points of other makes, 
and has several exclusive 
features that make it paramount 
No other Bit Extension contains 
so many practical features. No 
other can do the work so easily 
nor as well as the Ford and 

No other is as easy 
for you to sell 

For the Ford has more selling 
poiuts than any other Extension 
and each Ford feature affords a 
convincing selling argument. You 
can hand a man a Ford and tell 
him positively and convincingly 
that no other extension equals 
the Ford in simplicity of con- 
struction, number of practical 
advantages, facility of operation, 
tlinp mid labor saving features, 
convenience, wearing qualities, 
and in the ultimate satisfaction 
desired through better results. 
The Ford comes to you highl.\ 
recommended, fully guaranteed, 
and with a steadily increasing 
demand. We have an excellent 
proposition. Will you write for 
circulars, prices, etc? 

FORD AUGER BIT CO. 

Holyoke, Mass. 




NICKEL 

The Canadian Copper Co, 

NICKEL FOR 
NICKEL STEEL 

The Orford Copper Co. 



WRITE US FOR 
PARTICULARS AND PRICES 



General Offices 

43 EXCHANGE PLACE 

NEW YORK CITY 




Trade 




Mark 



4&! 





Wringer 



WHITE MOP 
WRINGER CO. 

FULTONVILLE, 
N.Y. 




OAKEY'S 

The original and only 
Genuine Preparation 
for Cleaning' Cutlery, 
6d. and is. Canisters. 

'WELLINGTON' 

KNIFE POLISH 

JOHN OAKEY & SONS, Limited 

Manufacturer* of 

Emery, Black Lead, Emery, Glass 
and Flint Cloths and Papers, etc. 

Wellington Mills, London, England 




HARDWARE AND METAL 



High Grade Cutlery— Electro-Plate and Solid 

Nickel-Silver Flatware 




A most artistic design that will afford you some conception of the choice lines that we 
manufacture. Every dealer is authorized to make good our guarantee. 



McGLASHAN, CLARKE CO., LIMITED 



Niagara Falls, Ontario 



AGENTS : J. MACKAY ROSE, 88 McGill St., Montreal. Que. N. F. GUNDY. 61 Albert St.. Toronto, Ont. BENJ. ROGERS. Charlottetown, P.E.I. 



Dealers! 



HERE'S YOUR CHANCE 
TO MAKE A SPLASH. 



This Mantel or any of our "70" different designs, fitted with our Electric Grate 
requires no chimney, therefore anyone building a house can have a Mantel 
complete for less than the actual cost of a chimney. 

Write for the "dope" — Your contractors will fall for it. 
Don't forget — We have the best line of Gas and Coal Grates in the country. 

The Barton Netting Co., Limited 

38 Ouelette Avenue, Windsor, Ont. 



Our Motto— "QUALITY' 



44 



» 



THERMO! 

The Washer 



Easy to Sell 




That makes the Washday Bright 

Its improved motion absolutely elim- 
inates washday drudgery caused by 
hard working ma- 
chinery. It is the 
easiest washer to op- 
erate and washes 
clothes thoroughly in 
shortest time. 
The Thermo Washer 
is built to last and is 
solid and substantial. 
Working parts are 
simple and cannot 
get out of order. 
Thermo Washers are 
attractively designed 
and well finished and 
find ready buyers 
everywhere. 
Before restocking 
your washer depart- 
ment get full descrip- 
tive matter and 
prices. 

Drop us a card NOW. 



THE LONDON FOUNDRY CO., LTD., {£K 

F. J. Schuch (Western Ontario Agent), 19 Jarvis Street. Toronto: 
MacPherson & Teetzel, Vancouver, B.C. (British Columbia Agents.) 




FIX UP YOUR CHIMNEYS 



Even the best stove or furnace will be unsatisfactory if the 
chimney does not draw well. But the 

"Zephyr Ventilator" 

will give a good draft to any chimney. It will even allow the 
burning of soft coal in the stove, with good results. 

We want you to sell the "Zephyr 
Ventilator" in your town. There is 
money in it, and the satisfaction that 
it gives will bring you new custom- 
ers. The "Zephyr" cannot be 
excelled for ventilating the rooms 
of Clubs, Steam Laundries, etc. 
The "Zephyr" makes high chim- 
neys unnecessary. 

Brockville, Ont, Jan. 23rd, 1910. 
Messrs. J. W. Harris Mfg. Co., Ltd., 

129 Sanguinet St., Montreal. 
Dear Sirs : 

Enclosed you will find my cheque 
to cover account of the last of the 
many of your "J. W. Harris Rotarv 
Ventilators," which I have installed 
here, and I have much pleasure In 
saying that in every case they have 
given perfect satisfaction. 
Yours truly, 

W. H. HARRISON. 

Made by 

7/ie J. W. Harris Mfg. Co., Ltd. 

Contractors 

Montreal 




70 




WILL uuitfCMK ANY WARE" 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



"OAKVILLE" PURE ALUMINIUM 
COOKING UTENSILS 

Each article made from a single piece of Aluminium. No cracks or seams, will not scorch 
or burn. Heat passes through aluminium two or three times as fast as through tin or 
iron, cooking food more quickly. Highly polished finish, making excellent displays on 
shelves or windows. Their fine appearance, backed by their finer quality, make them 
quick sellers. 



Our Guarantee — If the goods are not satisfactory, return them at our expense and we will return your money, or credit your account. 
WRITE FOR TERMS AND FULL PARTICULARS. PROMPT SHIPMENT. 

THE WARE MFG. CO., LIMITED, Offices: 220 King St. W., Toronto Factory at Oakville, Ont. 



AMERICAN 8RINDERS Are Real Trade-Winners 

This Grinder is particularly adapted for purposes where a very compact yet 
powerful grinder is needed. Just the thing for a carpenter's tool chest and private 
shops, as well as hundreds of occasions of like nature. 

When the grinder is assembled a quantity of high grade oil is placed into 
the case so that the machine can be used indefinitely without oiling. 

The gears run in this oil path, further causing them to operate noiselessly 
without friction, and with elimination of excessive wear. 

Stock it at once — we guarantee good results. 

A card will bring circulars and prices by return mail. 

Three sizes. 4-6-7-Inch Wheels, Corundum or Carboiundum. 

The American Grinder Mfg. CO., "JBffi? 



Merchants' Hardware Specialties Co., Ltd. 



CALGARY 

ALTA. 



AGENTS WESTERN CANADA 







W. & B. Wrenches Give 
Longer Service Economy 

In manufacturing '' W. & B." Wrenches we begin right by using only 
carefully selected steels for this special purpose. 

Then the various manufacturing processes of forging, milling and 
finishing are given the most critical attention. 

The result is true wrench economy that may be found in the most com- 
plete line of wrenches in the world. 

Just ask your jobber for " W. & B." Wrenches and see that 
"W. & B." Diamond Trade Mark is stamped on each one. 

The Whitman & Barnes Mfg. Co. 

Established 1854 

ST. CATHARINES, - - - ONTARIO 

Stocks carried at Winnipeg and Montreal 



Tools of Quality 

Trade 




Mark 
Bear These Marks 




Tools of Quality 

Trade 



W8B 




Mark 
Bear These Marks 



71 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



BLACK DIAMOND FILE WORKS 



ESTABLISHED 1863 

Twelve Medals of 
Award at 

INTERNATIONAL 

Expositions. 




INCORPORATED 1895 
Special Grand 
Prize 

GOLD MEDAL 

Atlanta, 1895 



Copy of Catalogue will be sent free to any interested File User upon application. 

G. & H. BARNETT COMPANY, - PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

Owned and operated by Nicholson File Co. 




I 



Chorus of Plumbers 

Then let thy fragrant incense be 

An inspiration sweet to me 
And I will sing my songs to thee; 
FLUX1TE. 



Anyone can use it. Plumbers and other mechanics will have 

FLUZITE 

the paste flux that 

SIMPLIFIES SOLDERING 

and lead jointing 
Easy to use. Easy to sell. 

Of the Jobbers and Factors in small and large tins. Remember it in your indents. 

Made by the AUTO-CONTROLLER CO., 211 Vienna Rd., Bermondsey, Eng. 

General Representatives: SAYWELL'S SALESMEN. 61 Albert Street. 'Winnipeg. 



r " 






i 


VjT$ 






BB 1 


3?™ 






' -QT^^^^^^BJr^ m 


! f 







MAXWELL'S "BLUE BELLE" 

is a remarkably quick-acting, easy-working, reciprocating 
washer. When the tub moves in one direction the rubber 
board revolves the opposite way. This double action, which 
is found only on Blue Belle machines, is a great time saver. 
Double re-acting springs and ball-bearings assist in making 
easy motion. Tub is oak grained and angle-steel frame is 
finished in aluminum. 

Write for Catalogue of Washers 

DAVID MAXWELL & SONS, ST. MARY'S, Ont. 



McKinnon 

Electric-Welded 

Coil Chain 




McKinnon 
Swell -Weld 
Coil Chain 



25% 
More "Weld 



25% 
More Strength 



25% 
More Wear 



Perfect 
Stock 



Sales Office : 
BUFFALO, N.Y. 



+ 



Perfect 
Welding 



Perfect 
Product 

MADE BY 




^ 

MADE IN 
CANADA 



See The 
Swell? 



McKINNON CHAIN COMPANY 



Factory : 
ST. CATHARINES, ONT. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Quality Did It. 

Back in 1864 the Nicholson File 
Co. started making files with an 
output of 100 dozen a day to 
supply a local market. At the 
present time the files made by 
the Nicholson File Company sell 
at the rate of 16,000 dozen a day, 
and the market is the whole civ- 
ilized world. 

These are the well-known brands 
made by the Nicholson File Co. 
in Canada. 



"American" 

T Arcade" 

"Great Western" 

"Globe" 

"Eagle" 

"McClellan" 

Kearney & Foot 

"J. B. Smith" 



r 



PORT HOPE 



ONT. 



I 



All steel used in Nichol- 
son Files is made strict- 
ly according to our own 
specifications w h i c h 
have been adopted after 
many years of experi- 
ment. And we use dif- 
ferent grades of steel for dif- 
ferent kinds of files. As a re- 
sult Nicholson-Made Files are 
the fastest cutting tools of 
their kind in the world. 

Your Jobber Can Supply You 

NICHOLSON 
FILE CO. 




^v 



Thinkers Decide 
in Favor of The 



IMPROVED 
BREAST DRILL 

No. 12 

a durable tool nicely finished. Of the many hand 
and breast drills manufactured by this firm, the 
picture here shows one that has proven most popular 
wherever used. 

It is made of the best selected material throughout, 
and is a tool unequalled in its class for efficiency and 
durability. 

It is ball bearing with cut gears, changeable from even to a 
speed of about 3 to 1. 

The handles are of cocobola, and the stock and chuck are 
nickel-plated. 

It has an adjustable crank and above the handle there is 
a level attachment which shows when" the tool is being 
held true. 

A thoroughly efficient tool in every respect, and one that 
will give long, satisfactory service. 

Have vou read our instructive book, "Tool Practice"? 
Send for a FREE copy. 

MILLERS FALLS CO. 

28 Warren Street, New York 



W 




KJ 






Now is the Time 

to Stock 

Fruit Picking 
LADDERS 

This is a splendid single ladder 
built especially so as to meet the 
requirements of all fruit growers. 
It is easily placed in the branches 
of the trees, making the gathering 
of fruit more pleasant. 

Made from clear, well seasoned 
stock with Rock Elm rounds, by 
skilled workmen, with the aid of 
the latest improved machinery. 
These ladders have the holes 
bored at the proper angle to con- 
form to the spread of the ladder, 
removing all strain and danger of 
springing the ladders. 

Made in 8, 10, 12, 14, 16, 18, 20, 
and 22 ft. lengths. 

The Stratford Mfg. Co. 



Limited 



STRATFORD 



ONTARIO 



73 



HARDWARE AND METAL 





The best advertisement for your store is a satisfied 
customer. The carpenter who buys a 

SIMONDS SAW 

and is pleased with his purchase returns again to 
give you more of his trade. This is one sure way 
to gain friends among the best buyers. Each Simonds 
Hand Saw is fully warranted, and you are absolutely 
protected against loss in selling it. 



Simonds Canada Saw Company, Limited 



Strike 



Double Claw Hammer 



Nails Higher Without Strain. 
Worth ten times more than 
the Common Hammer, costs 
three times more to make. 
Spend a little more for the tool 
and Save Money. 

Get it of your Canadian Jobber 



Start 



Out 



St, John. N.B. 



MONTREAL, P. Q. 

Vancouver, B.C. In the U.S. — The Simonds Mfg. Co. 




Pulls the 

nail out 

straight 

without 

a block 





If you 
want to 
handle 

WIRE 
NAILS 

of superior 
q u a 1 ity, 
consult us 
at once. 



We are in a position to meet every re- 
quirement, as we have the latest machin- 
ery, which turns out perfect nails — these 
nails are guaranteed to be full weight. 
For baling purposes, we recommend our 
Baling Wire and Bale-Ties as the best that 
can be secured on the market. 

SEND US A TRIAL ORDER. 

THE LAIDLAW-BALE TIE COMPANY, LIMITED 
HAMILTON - ONTARIO 



HARRY F. MOULDEN. Winnipeg. Man. 
GEO. W. LAIDLAW, Vancouver, B.C. 



THE AYLMER STOCK 
AND TOWN PUMP 

Extra Heavy Set-Length Reversible Spout 

Six-Inch Stroke 



This pump is designed to meet a 
demand for use with cylinders of 
large capacity. 

In wells not over twenty feet 
it has an easy capacity of over a 
barrel a minute when fitted with 
5 or 6-inch cylinders. When used 
in tubular wells, the buckets can 
be withdrawn through the top, 
same as illustrated by Fig. 41, 
Page 34, of our catalogue Number 
14, and for stock, town or factory 
purposes we cannot recommend it 
too highly. 

WRITE FOR OUR 
BIG FREE CATALOGUE. 

The Aylmer Pump & 
Scale Co., Limited 

AYLMER, ONTARIO 




74 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



GET THE GENUINE 



DOES THE REPUTATION of GARLOCK 
PACKING mean anything to you ? 

Does the fact mean anything to you that 
GARLOCK PACKINGS are giving eminent 
satisfaction the country over and everywhere 
Engineers who know insist on the installation 
of Genuine GARLOCK? 

This big and insistent demand for GARLOCK 
PACKING is the demand for quality. 

Imitators are making Packings that look like 
GARLOCK and are trying to sell them because 
they look like GARLOCK. 

Sometimes these imitations are sold as being 
"just as good as GARLOCK." If they were as 



good, they would be sold on their own merits 
and not on the established reputation of 
GARLOCK. 

Sometimes these imitations are substituted 
when "GARLOCK" is asked for. To prevent 
you getting an imitation and assist you in 
identifying the genuine, we have marked every 
piece of Spiral Packing with this mark of quality 



TRADE 




MARK 



The GARLOCK Catalogue tells all about Genuine 
GARLOCK Products. WRITE FOR IT TO-DAY. 



THE GARLOCK PACKING COMPANY 

HAMILTON, - ONTARIO 

PIONEERS IN THE PACKING BUSINESS 



Tinned Sheets 

ALL GRADES 



M. & L. Samuel, Benjamin & Co. 

CORNER KING STREET AND SPADINA AVENUE 

Toronto 



75 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



BEAR BRAND 
LAMP BLACKS 



r We are the largest manufacturers of LAMP 
BLACKS, IVORY BLACKS, BONE BLACKS. 
DROP BLACKS, MINERAL BLACKS and 

CEMENT BLACKS in the world. 

This has been entirely due to the CONSISTENT 

HIGH QUALITY of our products. 

WRITE FOR SAMPLES AND PRICES. 

SOLD BY MOST WHOLESALE HOUSES 



Whenever 
you see 
this mark 
on LAMP 
BLACK 
there is 
ABSO- 
LUTE 
PURITY 






WILCKES MARTIN WILCKES CO. 

NEW YORK. N.Y., U.S.A. 

Wm. H. Evans, 232 James St., Montreal; E. 
Fielding, 31 Yonge St., Toronto; H. W. Glassco, 
Winnipeg. 



$gerrnanlour}% 

% A \ 

| m^^s 



'^Zmis&r 



MODERN WIRE MACHINERY 

COMPLETE PLANTS FOR WIRE DRAWING. NETTING. WEAVING 

Complete Plants for making ELECTRIC WELDED CHAIN 

Up-to-date AUTOMATIC MACHINES for 

making: 

BOLTS, COTTER PINS. CUT NAILS and 

TACKS. FURNITURE 

SPRINGS. 

HINGES. NAILS. 

RIVETS. SCREWS 

STAPLES. WIRE NAILS 

QUADRANGULAR 

MESH WIRE NETTING 

WIRE STRAIGHTENING 

and CUTTING MACHINES ETC 

Send Your Enquiries. 

ED. BRAND 

Specialist in Wire Machinery, 

472, Moss Lane, East 
Manchester - England 

Cable Ad: 'Filieres, Manchester' 
Code used— A. B.C., 5th Edition 




RIVET PRESS 



BLACK JACK 



QUICK 

CLEAN 

HANDY 



Vi-\h. tins- 
3 doz. in case 




TRY IT 



SOLD BY 

ALL 
JOBBERS 



JOSEPH RODGERS & SONS 

SHEFFIELD, ENG. limited 

Avoid imitations of our -<cQED TRADF" t 

CUTLERY ^ J^ fjd** 

By seeing that this exact § ^j/^ 

mark is on each blade. ^TyflAITm \€>^** 

SOLE AGENTS FOR CANADA 

James Hutton £§* Company 

MONTREAL 



TANft LUGS 




For Round Rods, also Flat Bands on Silos, Tanks, Pen- 
stocks, etc. Malleable Iron, best quality, all sizes. 

OTTERVILLE MANUFACTURING CO., LIMITED 

OTTERVILLE, ONTARIO 



Cap Screws, Set Screws, Studs 

Special Milled Work 

Cold Pressed Nuts 

Uniform Product, Accurately Machined 

Canada Foundry Company 



MONTREAL 

HALIFAX 

OTTAWA 



LIMITED 

HEAD OFFICES 
TORONTO 
CANADA 



WINNIPEG 

VANCOUVER 

ROSSLAND 



BRASS TUBING, BRASS RODS, 

SHEET BRASS, SHEET COPPER, 

METAL SPINNINGS 

150,000 Pounds 
We carry the Stock. You draw from it. 






orsj 



ARE 
YOU 
ALIVE 



To the possibilities which a Want 
Ad. in Hardware and Metal 

holds for you ? Do you know that 
for a few cents you can gain the 
attention of every hardware re- 
tailer, wholesaler, manufacturer and 
clerk in Canada ? 

RATES : payable in advance. 
2C. per word first insertion, 
ic. per word subsequent insertions. 
5C extra if box number is desired. 

Hardware and Metal 

TORONTO - MONTREAL -WINNIPEG 



76 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



LOOK AT THIS CAN OPENER 



Strongly made 

from the best 

materials. 




KNIFE FOR SQUARE CAMS 



SLIOINGKHIFE FOR ROUND CANS, 




SMITH HARDWARE CO., Limited 



The very latest 

pattern and 

very easy to 

sell. 



240 LEMOINE STREET 
MONTREAL 



" NEW IMPERIAL " CYCLES AND MOTORS 




World's best value. Over 2,000 
"New Imperial" cycles being 
now ridden in Canada. Write 
for full particulars. 



Special 

Models for 

Canada. 



Sole 

Makers : 



Wholesale Agents : Humphries Bicycle and Motor Co., Toronto. 
Henderson & Richardson, Board of Trade Bldg., Montreal. 

New Imperial Cycles, Ltd., Birmingham, Eng. 

Established 25 Years. 



A Strong Selling Point 




This combination Nut and Pipe Wrenah has a 
"""fllliilk. ~~" very strong selling point— Double Efficiency. 

Its handiness and strength at once appeal to the good mechanic to 
save him time and trouble. You can sell a lot of these Wrenches- 
make a start by writing to-day for our catalog. 

BEMIS & CALL HARDWARE & TOOL GO. 

Springfield, Mass., U.S.A. 




SCREW AND STRAP HINGES 

for Barn Doors, Gates, etc. 

Ours have GIMLET-POINTED Hooks, with CUT Coach-Screw Thread. 
Get our prices. 

NUTS 

We can ship immediately from stock, Square and Hexagon 
Sizes for bolts up to 1 1-2 inches thick. 

Send us your orders 




LONDON, CANADA 



O.K. TMIIVI 




These Thimbles are easily adjusted and cannot get out of order because 
they have no springs. They are the only real good Stove Pipe Thimbles 
inthe market. For sale by leading jobbers, and manufactured exclu- 
sively by 



METAL 5H/MGLE <9 SIDING C° LTD. 

PRESTON £ MONTREAL 



Not an Enterprise for the "Quitter" 

"If "If there is one enterprise on earth," says John Wanamaker, "that a 'quitter' should leave 
severely alone, it is advertising. To make a success of advertising one must be prepared to stick 
like a barnacle on a boat's bottom. 

Tf "He must know before he begins it that he must spend money — lots of it. 

If "Somebody must tell him that he cannot hope to reap results commensurate with his expendi- 
ture early in the game. 

\ "Advertising does not jerk; it palls. It begins very gently at first, but the pull is steady. It 
increases day by day and year by year, until it exerts an irresistible power." 



77 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



DIRECTORY OF MANUFACTURERS 

Hardware and Metal receives, almost daily, enquiries for the names of manufacturers of various lines. 
These enquiries come from wholesalers, manufacturers and retail dealers, who usually intimate they 
have looked through Hardware and Metal but cannot find any firm advertising the line in question. 
In many cases these firms are anxious to secure this information at once. This page enables manu- 
factures to keep constantly before the trade lines which it would not pay to advertise in larger space. 



BATTERY ZINCS. 



EMERY WHEELS. 



Battery Zincs, Fuse 
Wire, Wire Solder 

The CANADA METAL CO., LTD. 
Fraser Arenue, Toronto. 



BABBITT METAL. 



SPOOLERS No Hot BoxeS 

- fc &HINERY BEARING METAL 



Coppj; 



CANADIAN MADE. 

1 WORLD 



arattffi¥fl 



BUILDERS' SUPPLIES. 



Bell Phone 3033 



P.O. Box 367 



Bosse 6& Banks 

Steel Beams. Columns, Plates Gas 

and Water Pipes, Contractors', 

Municipal and Builders' Supplies 

Machinery and Specialties. 

Board of Trade Building 

36 ST. PAUL STREET, - QUEBEC 



CHAPLETS. 




tRIE GREY IRON 
CHAPLETS 

Ml Foundry Supply 
Jobbers. 

S. Cheney & Son, Manliis.N.Y. 



CLIPPERS. 



f ri£si\ p turre 
THAT'S 
SUFFICIENT 

SEND FOR CATALOGUE TO 

American Shearer Mfg. Co. , Nashua 
WlebQBCh & miger, Ltd., special New 
Representatives. Mfi-110 LnTirptte St i 





NH.US 

York 

■pet 



COAT HOOKS. 



Ask your Jobber for 

GOLD COIN WIRE HAT and COAT HOOKS 



Made by 



JAMES & REID 
Perth, Ont. 



— Hr 



^ 





Canadian 

Hart Wheels 

443 Barton t>». Eaat. Hamilton 

Corundum and Binary Whaala 

Orlndlnt Maohints, Baavar 

Oil Stonaa. 



FLOOR SPRINGS. 



The Best Door Oloser la 

Newman's Invincible Floor Spring 

Will close a door silently against any pressure of wind. 
Has many working advantages over the ordinary spring 
and has twice the wear. In use throughout Great Britain 
and the Colonies Gives perfect satisfaction. Made only by 

W. NEWMAN & SONS 
Hospital Street Birmingham 



HOUSE NUMBERS. 



STEEL 



STAMPS 

LETTERS 

FIGURES 



HAMILTON STAMP & STENCIL WORKS, LTD., 
HAMILTON, ONT. 



COAL BAGS. 



Coal Bags made of No. 2 or No. 6 
heavy duck, well sewn with heavy twine 
and riveted. 
Waterproof Horse and Wagcn Covers. 

WRITE FOR SAMPLES AND PRICES 

Raymond Bros., London, Ont. 



IRON. 



IRON and STEEL 

OF ALL DESCRIPTIONS 
Brass, Coppe r, Zinc, etc. 

David C. Mitchell & Company, 

118 Queen Street, Glasgow, Scotland. 



MANUFACTURERS' AGENT. 



Western Distributors, Limited 

CUSTOMS BROKERS 
Wholesale Commission Merchants and 
Manufacturers' Agents. Cars Distributed, 
Warehoused and Forwarded. Warehouse 
on Transfer Track. Business solicited. 
OUR POSITION IS YOUR OPPOR- 
TUNITY. 

SASKATOON, WESTERN CANADA 

78 



ALEXANDER GIBB 

Manufacturers' Agent and Metal Broker, 
St. Nicholas Bldg., Montreal 



Representing Canadian, British and Ameri- 
can Manufacturers. Correspondence in- 
vited from firms wishing to be represented. 



RIVETS AND STEEL PRODUCTS. 



The PARMENTER BULLOCH CO., Ltd. 
GANANOQUE, ONT. 

Iron and Copper Rivets, Iron and Copper Burrs, 
Bifurcated and Tubular Rivets. Wire Nails, 
Copper and Steel Boat and Canoe Nails, 
Escutcheon Pins, Leather Shoe and Overshot 
Buckles, Felloe Plates, 



Keep in mind the dominant fact that 
mankind from its firs' appearance on the 
earth has been schooled by nature to 
look for signs; for invitations to tas'.e; 
for suggestions as to what to wear. Tell 
your story briefly, forcibly, truthfully, 
and address it through the p.op«>. media 
and you can successfully apply advertis- 
ing as a means to increased distribution 



BRACKETS. 




The Atlas Bracket 

This bracket brings you a 
larger profit and is better 
than any on the market. Our 5x7 
has withstood a test of 500 lbs. 
Write us for samples and prices to-day. 

Atlas Manufacturing Company 

121 Water St., New Haven, Conn. 



HARDWARE SHELF BOXES 




I Goods WeD Displayed are Half Sold ! 

• The most alfxactive.most dur- 
able and most serviceable shelf 
bo> on the market is the 

BENNETT STEEL 

HARDWARE SHELF BOX 

<S*rtaXO%3totfli>om 

over * A c4 n Ami 

write far Catalog* tnittiu list. 

Cr7ME*tO/Y «V CAMtBELL 



A want ad. in this paper will 

bring replies from all 

parts of Canada. 



@ 



4 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



__ Send For Our New Catalog 

/ / ^^ * \ Most compleic line of 

Pj^ SCREW DRIVERS AND 
^=^ SMALL TOOLS 

PIONEER TOOLS 

The Southinfton Mfg. Co., - Southington, Conn. 



TOOL HOLDERS 

ARMSTRONG UNIVERSAL 
B _ RATCHET 

5_ 'wo Inches of motion 
st end of handle, In 
any direction, 
will drive the 
drill 





Armstrong 
Bros. Tool Co. 

106 N. Francisco 
Ave., Chicago, U. S. A 



A want ad. in this paper 



will bring replies from 



all parts of Canada. 




Reproduction of 

NEW SEYMOUR SHOW CARD 

12-in. by 15-in , in Handsome Colors. 

Shear and Handstand out in high relief, being cut 

out. A show card will be sent to every dealer 

sending his business card with request to 

Henry T Seymour Shear Co. 

Selling- Aijents, W1EBUSCB & DILGER, Ltd.. New York 




BUY THE BEST 

r ^ M t Star Brand Cotton Rope 

H FRC II I F S star Brand Cotton clothes Lines 



SASH CORD 



Star Brand Cotton Twine 

For Sale by All Wholesale Dealers 



The INFALLIBLE GLAZIER'S DIAMOND 

Just the Tool for Inexperienced Glass Cutters 





Made by 

A. SHAW & SON, London, Eng. 

GODFREY S. PELTON & SON, Canadian Agents, MONTREAL 



Sharratt & Newth's Glaziers' Diamonds 

are unequalled for cutting and wearing qualities. 




To be obtained from Dealers in Glass, Hardware and 
Painters' Supplies. 

GALVANIZED FENCE HOOK %r£ a ?£2lV Woot,en p,cketa 

fENCE KOOK^ 



WIRE NAILS, OILED SPRING 
BARB and PLAIN FENCE WIRE. 
OILED and ANNEALED CLOTHES 
LINE WIRE, STAPLES, etc 



The Western Wire and Nail Co., Limited, 



London, Ont. 



k« Af^MMl? " are the strongest and sharpest low-priced Shears and Scissors 
i\\ J ill £j on the market. 

Why were 15,000 pairs of Acme Shears sold daily 5 years ago; and why are 30,000 pairs of Acme 
Shears sold daily to-day ? 

Because "Acme" on a shear or scissor spells satisfaction to the customer at a low price and a 
handsome profit to the dealer with greatly increased sales. 
Special Representatives, Wiebnsch & Bilder, Ltd., New York City. 
MR. DEALER: Write your jobber to-day for prices on the "Acme" line, supple- 
ment your high-priced shears with "Acme" shears and scisso s and watch the 
gratifying results. 
Jobbers should write 
for our W-2 Cata- 
1 o g u e , illustrating 
themost completeline 

ofshearsandscissors The No. 701 Oval Steel Screw Straight Trimmer 

manufactured. is one of our newest patterns. 

THE ACHE SHEAR CO., (125-195 Hnowlton St.,) BRIDGEPORT, CONN., U.S.A. 






WRITE FOR CATALOGUE & PRICES 

PEASE WALDON CO., A/wfted PEASE FOUN DR Y COMPAKf PEASE PACIFIC FOUNDRY, Limited 
WINNIPEG """" VANCOUVER 

TORONTO 

79 



HARDWARE AND METAL 

Peterboro Hardware 




Door Knockers add greatly to the appearance 
of a door. They are rapidly coming into 
vogue. Peterborough Door Knockers sup- 
plied to match any of our designs. A sample 
on your show cases will interest customers. 

Peterborough Lock Mfg. Co., Ltd. 

PETERBOROUGH, ONT. 



WINDOW GLASS 



Prompt import from 

Belgium, Chancel 

Glass, Plate Glass, 

Colored Glass 



B. & S. H. Thompson & Go. 



LIMITED 



MONTREAL, QUE. 



B: 



m 



Why not make 1912 the most profitable saw year in 

your history? 




ATKINS STERLING SAWS 

MADE IN CANADA 

THEY are Quality Saws. They appeal to the best 
mechanics and are backed up by an aggressive 
advertising campaign that pays. Write us for 
full information. It will cost nothing to at least investi- 
gate the merits of this important line; Address 

E. C. ATKINS & CO., 



Vancouver Branch, 109 Powell St. 



m 



MAKERS OF STERLING SAWS 

HAMILTON, ONTARIO 

U.S. Factory, Indianapolis, Ind. 



80 



:ffi 



NOVA SCOTIA STEEL 

6 COAL CO., Limited, 

NEW GLASGOW, N.S. 

Manufacturers of 

FERRONA 
PIG IRON 

and SIEMENS-MARTIN 

OPEN HEARTH STEEL 



HARDWARE AND METAL 

MYERS 

F»UM 

We manufacture all kinds of 
PUMPS.HAY UNLOADING 
TOOLS and BARNDOOR 
HANGERS that are service- 
able, durable and reliable. 
You never fail to get 
QUALITY when buying 
"THE MYERS." 

F. E. MYERS & BRO. 

ASHLAND, OHIO 

J.H. ASHDOWN HARDWARE CO. 
Winnipeg, Calgary and Branch Houses 



Jardine Universal Ratchet 
Clamp Drill 

Died in factorlea of all kindi for 
hurried machine repairs. 

All machine shops and railway 
shops should have It. 

Bridge builders, track layers, 
and structural metal workers 
hare constant use for It. 

Sand for Description. 



A. B. JARDINE & CO. 

HESPELER . • • ONTARIO 



Steel Sheets for Deep Stamp- 
ing and Enamelling Purposes 

"Comet Brand" 

Also Dark Blue, P.C.R. and C.A. 

Sheets, also Galvanized Canada 

Plates. 

Makers 

W. Gilbertson & Co., Limited 

Sole Canadian Sales Agent 

ALEXANDER GIBB 

St. Nicholas Bldg. - Montreal 



Knowledge 
Is Power 



Every hardwareman can get valuable pointers and make his business a 
more profitable proposition if he will study the experiences of experts 
who have 'made good.' Our Technical Books for hardwaremen cover a 
wide range of subjects, among which may be mentioned Metal Working 
Books, Hardware Window Dressing, Store Business Methods, Paints and 
Painting, Salesmanship and Sales Plans and Advertising. We have also 
the very latest books on the plumbing and heating problems. 

TECHNICAL BOOKS, 143-149 University Ave., TORONTO 




SCHRAMBERGER UHRFEDERNFABRIK G.m.b.H. 

Manufacturers of Safety Razor Blades 

Made from the finest grade of Sheffield Crucible Cast Steel. 
Highest Quality as regards Cutting Power and Durability. 

Agents Wanted SCHRAMBERG (Wurttemberg) Germany 



81 



ERMALINE 

COOKING 

BAGS 

Render 

the Food 

More Tasty 

and 

Cut the 

Cook's Work 

in Half 



Lay in a Stock 
To-day 

Samples Free 

EDWARD LLOYD 
Limited 

508 EASTERN TOWNSHIPS BANK BLDG. 

MONTREAL 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Every page of Hardware and Metal's Annual Fall 
Number, from cover to cover, will have ideas that 
will help you in your buying, selling, or general 
business methods. 

We are sparing no pains to make it the most at- 
tractive and instructive Special Number we have 
ever issued. 

This number will be mailed August 31 — in good 
time to help you organize your Fall campaign. 
Read it carefully and keep it for frequent reference. 

Advertisers ! Our readers will be largely guided in 
their Fall purchases by the impressions gained from 
Hardware and Metal's Fall Number. 

See that your advertisement in this timely special 
does credit to your proposition. 

Write us for quotations on extra space. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 

Canada's Only Weekly Hardware Paper 

Montreal Toronto Winnipeg New York Chicago 

London, England 



S2 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Western Agents 

Jas. Stewart Mfg. Co:, Ltd. 

Winnipeg Man. 



AN ALL-YEAR ROUND SELLER! 

ARE YOU SELLING 

BUSTER BROWN 

Children's Express Wagons ? 

They are the strongest and handsomest line 
of Toy Wagons on the market. In four sizes 
at popular prices. Handy around the store, 
farm or home. Just the thing for boys. 




IT WILL PAY YOU 



to watch our Condensed 
Ad columns. There 
are many money-making 



positions there. You may find just what you want. 



PATENT 



LEAD 
HEAD 




Roofing 

NAILS 



Wherever Corrugated Iron is used these are wanted. 



Galvd. Cone Head Roofing; Nails and Washers, 

Galvd. Hoop Iron or Steel, Galvd. Plates, 

Bars, Angles. 

LEAD COATED SHEETS AND HOOP IRON 



McHUTCHEON & CO., 

82-94 Lance field St., Glasgow 

83 



THE 



"DELTA 



ft 



MILL FILE 

SATISFIES THE MOST CRITICAL 
OF BUYERS AND USERS 




YIELDS A 
SPLENDID 
PROFIT 

If you are not sell- 
ing the Delta Mill 
File you are not sell- 
ing the best trade- 
winner. 

Delta Files have 
been endorsed and 
recommended by all 
mechanics who know 
them. 

You run no risk 
when selling these 
high grade files — 
every genuine Delta 
is trade marked and 
backed by our iron 
clad guarantee. 

GIVE THEM A TRIAL 

If not satisfied with 
the results we will 
make it right with 
you. 

Write for Full 

Particulars and 

Prices. 




DELTA FILE WORKS 

PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

CANADIAN AGENTS: 
H. S. Howland. Sons & Co., Toronto; 
Stark, Sey bold, Montreal ; Wm. Stairs, 
Son & Morrow, Halifax. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Books for the Metal Workers 

Any of the following books sent prepaid on receipt of price 

WRITE FOR CATALOGUE 



THE NEW METAL WORKER PATTERN BOOK. 

A treatise on pattern cutting as applied to all 
branches of sheet metal work. By George W. Kit- 
tredge. 430 page*; 744 illustrations; site 10x13 
inches. Cloth hound. Price $5.00. 

ART OF COPPERSMITHING. 

A practical treatise on working sheet copper into 
all forms. By John Fuller, Sr. 827 pages; 474 
engravings; size 10 x 6$ in. Cloth bound. Price 
13.00. 

SHEET METAL WORK. 

A manual of practical self-instruction in the art of 
pattern drafting and construction work in light and 
heavy-gauge metal, including 6ky-lights and roofing, 
cornice work, etc. By Wm. Neubecker. 267 pages; 
358 illustrations; 6i x 9| inches. Half -Morocco 
binding. Price $3.00. 

A PRACTICAL WORKSHOP COMPANION. 

For tin, sheet iron and copper plate workers. By 
LeRoy J. Blinn. 296 pages; 170 figures. Sixe 5 x 
7i inches. Price $2.50. 

SHEET METAL WORKERS' INSTRUCTION. 

By Joseph H. Rose. 300 pages. Profusely illus- 
rated. Price $2.00. 

THE ROOFING, CORNICE & SKYLIGHT MANUAL. 

175 pages; 170 illustrations and 13 plates; size, 6 
x 9J inches. Cloth bound. Price $1.50. 

BAUGHMAN'S BUYER & SELLER COST TABLES. 

A cost book for everybody having cost to figure by 
the piece, pound, foot or ton, from 2ic per hundred 
to $ a hundred. Leather bound. Price $1.50. 

TINSMITHS' HELPER & PATTERN BOOK. 

With useful rules, diagrams and tables. By H. K. 
Vosburgh. A new revised edition; 120 pages; 53 
figures; size 4£ x 6} inches. Cloth bound. Price 
11.00. 



TWENTIETH CENTURY SHEET METAL WORKER. 

By H. E. Osborne. Gives short, concise explan- 
ations which should be easily understood by the young 
apprentice, and are sufficiently scientific for the prac- 
tical use of the journeyman. 86 pages; sice 6» x 
, 7| ; illustrated. Cloth bound ; Price $1.00. Paper 
Cover; Price 60c. 

PRACTICAL METAL PLATE WORK. 

By Paul N. Hasluck. 247 illustrations; 160 pages. 
Price 75c. 

TREATISE ON THE GEOMETRICAL DEVELOPMENT 
OF ROUND AND OVAL CONES. 

With easy examples of their application. For the 
use of beginners and practical sheet-iron and tin- 
plate workers. By John Fuller, Sr. 52 pages; 87 
figures; size 4J x 6 J inches. Cloth bound. Price 
75c. 

MENSURATION FOR SHEET METAL WORKERS. 

As applied in working ordinary problems in shop 
practice. By W. Neubecker. 51 pages; 70 figures; 
5 J x 7$ inches. Cloth bound. Price 60c. 

TABLES GIVING THE LENGTH OF BARS FOR SKY- 
LIGHTS, AND RAFTERS FOR ROOFS. 

84 pages; bond paper; handy pocket size. Cloth 
bound. Price 50c. 

THE METAL WORKER SHOP CARDS. 

Made of Manila Board; 11 x 14 inches; eyeletted 
for hanging up in the shop. No. 1. — Table of the 
quantity of tin required for roofs. No. 2. — Table 
of the diameters, areas and circumferences of circles. 
Price 25 cents each. 

EASY LESSONS IN ROOF MEASUREMENTS. 

By W. Neubecker. Twelve lessons on figuring the 
amount of material required to cover a given sur- 
face in flat, hipped or irregular shaped roofs. 31 
pages, 5£ x 8 inches; 12 illustrations. Paper cover. 
Price 25c. 

HOUSE CHIMNEYS. 

A series of articles on chimney tioubles and their 
remedies. 62 pages; 5$ x 8inches; 40 illustrations. 
Paper cover. Price 25c. 



MACLEAN PUBLISHING COMPANY 

TECHNICAL BOOK DEPARTMENT 
143-149 University Avenue - TORONTO, ONT. 



84 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



INDEX TO ADVERTISERS 

Occasionally advertisements are inserted in the paper after the index has been printed. The insertion of the Adver- 
tiser's name in this index is not part of the advertising order. The index is inserted 
solely for the convenience of the readers of the paper. 



Acme Shear Co 

American Shearer Co 

Armstrong Bros. Tool Co. 
American Grinder Mfg. Co. 

Angle Mfg. Co 

Atkins & Co., E. C 

Atlas Mfg. Co 

Auto Controller Co., The . 
Aylmer Pump & Scale Co. . 



Barber Asphalt Paving Co 

Baraett, G. & H 

Barker, D. J„ & Son 

Barton Netting Co 

Berry Bros., Ltd 

Belleville Hdw. & Lock Co 

Bemis & Call Hdwe. & Tool Co. 

Bosse & Banks 

Bowser, S. F., & Co., Ltd 

Brand, Ed 

Brandram-Henderson, Ltd 

Brown, Boggs Co., Ltd., The 

Buck Stove Co., Wm 

Buffalo Mfg. Co 

Burmans Clippers 

Burrow Stewart & Milne 



Cameron & Campbell 

Canada Foundry Co 

Canada Glue Co 

Canada Metal Co 

Canada Steel Goods Co 

Canada Wire & Iron Goods Mfg. 

Co 

Canadian Copper Co 

Can. Fairbanks-Morse Co.. Ltd 

Canadian Ferrosteel Co 

Canadian Hart Wheels 

Canadian Tube & Iron Co 

Can. Heating & Ventilating Co.... 

Canadian Rope Buckle Co 

Caverhill, Leannont & Co 

Cheney & Sons, S 

Chicago Spring Butt Co 

Corbin, P. & F 

Crawford Co., W. C 

Cowan & Britton 

Cummer-Dowswell, Ltd 



Davidson, Thos., Mfg. Co 24 

Delta File Works 83 

Directory of Manufacturers 78 9 

Dominion Cartridge Co 30 



Dorken Bros 26 

Double Claw Hammer Co ' 74 

Dougall Varnish Co 63 

Dreis, Edward 12 



Ely Mfg. Co., Theo. J. 
Enterprise Enamel Co. 



Ford Auger Bit Co. 
Fox Supply Co 



12 



Gait Art Metal Co 

Garlock Packing Co 75 

Gibb, Alexander 81 

Gilbertson & Co., W 78 

Gillette Safety Razor Co 

Inside front cover 

Goodell-Pratt Co 5 

Greening, B., Wire Co 20 

Gutta Percha & Rubber Mfg. Co., 

Inside back cover 

Hall Zryd Fdry. Co 15 

Hamilton & Son, C. J 23 

Hamilton Stamp & Stencil Wks... 78 

Hamilton Cotton Co 79 

Harrington & Richardson Arms Co. 14 

Harris, J. W., Co 70 

Heinisch, R. . Sons Co 55 

Henderson & Richardson 64 

Howland, H. S., Sons & Co 7 

Hutton, Jas., & Co 76 

Imperial Varnish & Color Co 49 

International Varnish Co 65 



James & Reid , 

Jamieson & Co., Ltd., R. C. 
Jardine, A. B., & Co 



Laidlaw Bale Tie Co 74 

Lewis Bros., Ltd 3 

Lloyd, Ed 81 

London Bolt & Hinge Works 77 

London Foundry Co 70 

London Rolling Mill Co 69 

Lowe Bros., Ltd 49 

Lundy Shovel & Tool Co 13 

Lufkin Rule Co Inside back cover 



McArthur, Alex., & Co. 



McAvity & Sons, T. 



55 



McClary Mfg. Co 26 27 



McDougall, R., Co. 
McGlashan-Clarke Co., Ltd. 

McHutcheon Bros 

McKinnon Chain Co 



Magnolia Metal Co 10 

Maple City Mfg. Co 67 

Martin-Senour Co 63 

Maxwell. D., & Sons 72 

Meakins & Sons 22 

Metal Shingle & Siding Co 21 77 

Millers Falls Co 73 

Mitchell & Co,, David 78 

Moore & Co., Benjamin 57 

Morris & Bailey Steel Co 66 

Morrison Brass Mfg. Co., Jas 28 

Myers & Bro., F. E 81 



National Acme Mfg. Co 

National Hardware Co 

New Imperial Cycles, Ltd 

Newman, W., & Sons 

Nicholson File Co 

Nickel Plate Stove Polish 

Norsworthy & Co., C 

North Bros. Mfg. Co 

Nova Scotia Steel & Coal Co.. 



Oakey, John, & Son 69 

Ohio Foundry Co 18 

Oneida Community, Ltd 

Outside back cover 

Ontario Lantern & Lamp Co., Ltd. 65 

One Minute Washer Co 66 

Otterville Mfg. Co 76 



Parmenter Bullock Co., The 78 

Pease Fdry. Co 79 

Peterborough Lock Co 80 

Pittsburg Lamp, Brass & Glass Co., 

The 4 

Pinchin-Johnson & Co., Ltd 53 

Pink, Thos 19 

Pratt & Lambert, Inc 62 

Ramsay. A., & Sons Co 60 

Raymond Bros 78 

Renfrew Scale Co 10 



Remington Arms Union Metallic 

Cart. Co 30 

Robertson Mfg. Co., Ltd., P. L... 88 
Rogers, Alfred, Ltd. Outside front cover 
Ross Rifle Co 88 



Samuel, M. & L., Benjamin & Co. 75 

Seymour, Henry T., Shear Co 79 

Schramberger Uhrpdenifabrik 81 

Sharratt & Newth 79 

Shaw, A., & Son 79 

Sherwin Williams Co 61 

Sheet Metal Products Co 2 

Shurly-Dietrich Co., Ltd 25 

Simonds Canada Saw Co 74 

Smith Hardware Co 77 



Southington Mfg. Co, 

Spear & Jackson 17 

Spooner, Alonzo W., Ltd 78 

Standard Paint & Varnish Co 59 

Standard Chain Co 66 

Stanley Rule & Level Co 9 

Steel Co. of Canada, Ltd 6 

Stephens, G. F., & Co 57 

Stevens Hepner & Co 28 

Still, J. H Inside back cover 

Stratford Mfg. Co 73 



7G 



Tallman Brass & Metal Co. . 

Thompson. B. & S. H 80 

Toronto Plate Glass Importing Co. 55 

Townsend & Co., S. P 23 



Utica Drop Forge Co 77 



Want Ads 

Ware Mfg. Co 

Western Distributors. Ltd 

Western Wire & Nail Co 

Wheeler & Bain 

White Mop Wringer Co 

Whitman & Barnes Mfg. Co 

Wilckes-Martin- Wilckes Co 

Winnipeg Ceiling & Roofing Co... 
Winnipeg Paint & Glass Co., Ltd. 59 

Woodstock Wagon & Mfg. Co 83 

Wright, E. T., & Co 25 



Yale & Towne 



IT'S QUALITY AND ADVANTAGES THAT MAKE 



CANADIAN HOWARD 



DOUBLE 
RADIATOR 



FURNACES 




THE CHOICE OF MOST BUILDERS 



The "HOWARD" Furnace means an enormous economy in fuel to the user, 
as the heat and gases have to pass through two radiators, thereby greatly 
reducing the heat by the time it reaches the smoke pipe, which, in the ordinary 
furnace woulo. go up the chimney. 

We employ only the most skilled mechanics and use only the best materials in 
the manufacture of this furnace. 

Mr. Dealer, if you want to handle a line that will prove completely satisfactory 
to your customers, and a money-maker for yourself, investigate the HOWARD. 
Remember it is absolutely guaranteed. Write us for particulars. 

The C. NORSWORTHY CO., Ltd., St. Thomas, Ont. 



TWO CENTS PER WORD 

You can talk across the continent for two cents 
per word with a Want Ad. in this paper. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



CLASSIFIED LIST OF ADVERTISEMENTS 



Abrasive Wheels 

London Emery Works, London, Eng. 

Carborundum Co., Niagara Falls, N.Y. 

Canadian Hart Wheels. Hamilton. 
Aluminum Ware 

Hero Mfg. Co., Philadelphia. 

Northern Aluminum Co., Toronto. 

Stover Mfg. Co., Freeport, 111. 

Ware Mfg. Co., Toronto. 

Wondershine [limited, Toronto. 
Ammunition 

Dominion Cartridge Co., Montreal. 

Remington Arms Union Metallic Cart- 
ridge Co., New York. 

Animal Traps 

Oneida Community Ltd., Oneida, N.Y. 
Anchors 

Henderson & Richardson. Montreal. 

Star Expansion Bolt Co., New York. 
Auger Bits 

Ford Auger Bit Co., Holyoke, Mass. 

Spear & Jackson, Sheffield, Eng. 

Tobin Arms Mfg. Co., Woodstock. 

Babbitt Metal 
Canada Metal Co., Toronto. 
Magnolia Metal Co., Montreal. 

Alonzo W. Spooner, Ltd., Port Hope, 

Ont. 
Tallman Brass A Metal Co., Hamilton. 

Bar Iron 

Henderson A Richardson, Montreal. 
Steel Co. of Canada, Hamilton. 
London Rolling Mills Co., London. 

Bale-Ties 

Laidlaw Bale-Tie Co.. Hamilton, Ont 
Bar Urns 

Buffalo Mfg. Co., Buffalo. N. Y. 
Bath Boom Fitting;* 

Buffalo Mfg. Co.. Buffalo, N.T. 

8. Stemau A Co., Brooklyn. N.T. 
Belting; 

Dominion Belting Co.. Ltd., Hamilton 

Sadler A Haworth. Montreal. 

Belting, Hose, etc. 
Qutta Percha and Rubber Mfg. Co., 
Toronto. 

Bird Cages 

E. T. Wright A Co., Hamilton. 
Binder Twine 

Plymouth Cordage Co., N. Plymouth, 



Mass. 
Bolts and Nats 

London Bolt and Hinge Works, Lon- 
don, Ontario. 

The Steel Co. of Canada, Ltd., Ham- 
ilton. 

National Acme Mfg. Co.. Montreal. 

Boilers and Radiators 
Peas* Foundry Co., Toronto. 
Gumey Foundry Co., Toronto. 

Bolts — Expansion 
Star Expansion Bolt Co., N*w York. 

Bracket* Shelf 

Atlas Mfg. Co., New Haven, Conn. 
P. A F. Oorbin. New Britain, Conn. 
Stanley Works, New Britain, Conn. 
Brass Goods. 
J as. Car tl and A Son, Ltd., Birming- 
ham, Eng. 
Evered & Co., Smethwick, Eng. 
Henderson A Richardson, Montreal. 
Tallman Brass & Metal Co., Hamilton 
Stover Mfg. Co., Freeport, 111. 

Brass, Sheets, Tubes and Bods. 
Henderson A Richardson, Montreal. 
Tallman Brass A Metal Co., Hamilton 

Brashes. 

Meakins & Sons, Hamilton. 
8tevens-Hepner Co., Port Elgin. 

Bridle Rings — Galvanized, Brass 
and Plain. 
Star Expansion Bolt Co., New York. 
Builders' Tools and Supplies. 

Canada Wire & Iron Goods Mfg. Co., 

Hamilton. 
Caverhill, Learmont A Co., Montreal. 
Howland, H. S. Sons A Co., Toronto. 
Lewis Bros. & Co., Montreal. 
Lufkin Rule Co., Saginaw. Mich. 
North Bros. Mfg. Co., Philadelphia. 

Pa. 
Stanley Rule A Level Co., N. Britain 

Builders' Hardware. 
Belleville Hardware A Lock Mfg. Co., 

Belleville. 
Canadian Yale A Towne, St. Cath- 
arines. 
P. A F. Corbin, New Britain, C. 
May A Padmore, Birmingham, Eng. 
National Hardware Co., Orillia. 
Peterborough Lock Mfg. Co., Peter- 
borough. 
Butts. 
Canada Steel Goods Co., Hamilton. 
P. A F. Corbin, New Britain, C. 
Cans 

Thoa. Davidson Mfg. Co.. Montreal. 
McClary Mfg. Co., Toronto. 



The Sheet Metal Product* Co. of Can- 
ada, Ltd., Montreal, Toronto, 

Winnipeg. 

Carriers, Cash and Parcel 
Hamilton Brass Mfg. Co., Hamilton. 

Carpet Sweepers 
Bissell Carpet Sweeper Company, 
Grand Rapids, Mich. 

Carriage Heaters 

Chicago Flexible Shaft Co., Chicago. 
Carriage Springs and Axles 

Guelph Spring and Axle Co., Guelph. 

Cartridges 

Dominion Cartridge Co., Montreal. 

Cash Registers 

National Cash Register Co.. Toronto. 
Cattle and Trace Chains 

Greening, B., Wire Co., Hamilton. 

McKinnon Chain Co., St. Catharines 

Oneida Community Limited, Niagara 
Falls, Ont. 

Cement 
Canada Cement Co., Montreal, P.Q. 
Alf. Rogers, Ltd., Toronto. 
B. A 8. H. Thompson A Co., Montreal 

Churns 
Connor, J. H., A Son*. Ottawa, Ont. 
Cummer-Dowswell Ltd., Hamilton, Ont 
Maxwell, David, A Sons. StMary'*, Ont 



Chafing Dishes 
Buffalo Mfg. Co., Buffalo. 
8. Stemau A Co., Brooklyn. N.Y. 

Chaplets 
8. Cheney A Son, Manlius. N.Y. 

Chicken Coops. 

Triangle Mfg. Co., Freeport, Dl. 

Clippers — Ail Kinds 
American Shearer Mfg. Co., Naahua.NH 
Chicago Flexible Shaft Co., Chicago. 
Goates Clipper Mfg. Co., Worcester, 
Mass. 

Clocks 
The Western Clock Mfg. Co., La Salle. 
111. 

Clothes Reels and Lines 
Cummer-Dowswell Ltd., Hamilton, Ont 
Hamilton Cotton Co., Hamilton. 

Clothes Wringers 
Cummer-Dowswell Ltd., Hamilton, Ont 
American Wringer Co., New York City 
Lovell Mfg. Co., Erie, Pa. 

Cold Rolled Strip Steel 
The Morris A Bailey Steel Co., Pitts- 
burg, Pa. 

Cordage 
Hamilton Cotton Co., Hamilton. 
Plymouth Cordage Co., N. Plymouth, 
Mass. 

Cow Ties 
Greening, B„ Wire Co., Hamilton. 
McKinnon Dash and Metal Co., Bt, 

Catharines. 
Oneida Community, Ltd., Niagara Falls 
Cuspidors 
Buffalo Mfg. Co., Buffalo, N.Y. 
Thos. Davidson Mfg. Co., Montreal. 
McClary's, London, Ont. 
The Sheet Metal Products Co., of 
Canada, Ltd., Montreal, Toronto, 
Winnipeg. 

E. T. Wright A Co., Hamilton. 
Cutlery — Razors, Scissors, etc. 

Caverhill, Learmont & Co., Montreal 
Crookes, Jonathan A Son. 
Dorken Bros. A Co., Montreal. 
Oreeff, Bredt Co., Toronto. 
Henderson A Richardson, Montreal. 
Heinisch'8, R„ Sons Co., Newark. N.J. 
Howland, H. 8., Sons A Co., Toronto 
Hutton, Jas., A Co., Montreal. 

F. W. Lamplough & Co., Montreal. 
McQlashan, Clarke Co., Ltd., Niagara 

Falls. 

Door Bolts. 

Montreal Hdwe. Mfg. Co., Montreal. 
Door Checks. 

Wm. Keating, Toronto. 

Canadian Yale & Towne, St. Cath- 
arines. 

P. A F. Corbin, New Britain, C. 
Door Hangers. 

F. E. Myers A Bro., Ashland, O. 

Richard Wilcox Mfg. Co., Aurora, 111. 
Door Springs. 

Stover Mfg. Co., Freeport, 111. 
Drawer Pulls. 

P. A F. Corbin, New Britain, C. 

Stover Mfg. Co., Freeport, 111. 
Drills, Brick and Stone. 

Star Expansion Bolt Co., New York. 

Whitman A Barnes Mfg. Co., St. 
Catharines. 

Drills— High Speed 

Alexander Gibb, Montreal. 

SG 



Drinking Cnps 

Hero Mfg. Co., Philadelphia. 
Dry Batteries 

Canadian Carbon Co., Winnipeg. 
Eavetroughs 

Thos. Davidson Mfg. Co., Montreal. 

McClary's, London, Ont. 

The Sheet Metal Products Co. of Can 
ada, Ltd., Montreal, Toronto, Win- 
nipeg. 

E. T. Wright A Co., Hamilton. 

Metal Shingle & Siding Co., Preston. 

Wheeler A Bain, Toronto. 
Emery or Corundum Wheels 

The Carborundum Co., Niagara Fall*, 

Canadian Hart Wheels Limited, Ham- 
ilton, Ont. 
London Emery Works, London, Eng. 
Electric Fixtures 

The Barton-Netting Co., Ltd, Windsor 
Ont. 

Jas. Morrison Brass Mfg. Co., Tor- 
onto. 

Emery Cloth 

London Emery Work*, London, Eng. 
Jno. Oakey & Sons, Ltd., London, 
Eng. 

Emery Wheels. 

London Emery Works, London, Eng. 
Jno. Oakey & Sons, Ltd., London, 
Eng. 

Enameled Ware 

Thos. Davidson Mfg. Co.. Montreal. 
The 8heet Metal Products Co.of Canada 
Ltd., Montreal, Toronto, Winnipeg 
McClary'*, London, Ont. 

Escutcheon Pins 

The Parmenter A Bulloch Co., Gana- 

oque, Ont. 
Steel Co. of Canada, Ltd., Hamilton. 
Fencing — Woven Wire 

The Steel Co. of Canada, Ltd., Ham- 
ilton. 

Banwell-Hoxie Wire Fence Co., Ham- 
ilton. 

McGregor, Banwell A Co., Walker- 
ville. 
Files and Rasps 

Bamett Co., G. A H., Philadelphia, Pa 

Delta File Works, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Diiston, Henry. A Sons, Philadelphia, 

Nicholson File Co., Port Hope. 
Simonds Canada Saw Co., Ltd., 

Montreal. 
Spear A Jackson, Sheffield, Eng. 
Firearms and Ammunition 
Harrington A Richardson Sons Co., 

Worcester, Mass. 
O. J. Hamilton A Son, Plymouth, 

Mich. 
Tobin Arms Mfg. Co., Woodstock. 
Fire Escapes 
Canada Foundry Co., Ltd., Toronto. 
Dennis Wire A Iron Co., London. 
Fire Grates. 
Ohio Foundry A Mfg. Co., Steuben- 
ville, O. 
Fine Irons 

Stover Mfg. Co., Freeport, m. 
Fire Place Furnishings 
The Barton-Netting Co., Ltd., Wind- 
sor, Ont. 

Flint Paper 

London Emery Works. London, Eng. 
Jno. Oakey & Sons, Ltd., London. 

Eng. 

Food Choppers 

Enterprise Mfg. Co., Philadelphia. 

D. Maxwell A Son*. St. Mary's. 
Foot Warmers 

Chicago Flexible Shaft Co.. Chicago. 

Forgings 

Steel Co. of Canada, Limited, Hamil- 
ton. 

Furnaces, see Stoves 

Galvanizing 

Canada Metal Co., Toronto. 
Tho*. Davidson Mfg. Co., Montreal. 
The Steel Co. of Canada, Ltd, Ham- 
ilton. 

Galvanized Iron 
W. Gilbertson A Co., Ltd., Alex, 

Gibb, Montreal, Agent. 
Henderson A Richardson, Montreal. 
John Lysaght, Ltd., Bristol, Newport 
and Montreal. 
B. A 8. H. Thompson A Co., Mont- 
real. 

Gas Fixtures 

The Barton-Netting Co., Ltd., Wind- 
sor, Ont 

Jas. Morrison Bras* Mfg. Co., Toronto 
Glass 
Hobbs Mfg. Co., London. 
Toronto Plate Olass Imp. Co., Toronto 
Winnipeg Paint A Glass Co., Winnipeg 
Consolidated Plate Glass Co., Tor- 
onto. 

A. Ramsay A Son, Montreal. 

B. A S. H. Thompson A Co., Mont- 
real. 



Glass, Ornamental 

Consolidated Plate Glass Co., Toronto 

Hobbs Mfg. Co., London. 

Toronto Plate Glass Importing Co., 
Toronto. 

Winnipeg Paint A Glass Co., Winni- 
peg. 

Glass Paper 

London Emery Works, London, Eng. 

Jno. Oakey A Sons, Ltd., London, 

Eng. 

Glass, Wired 

Hobbs Mfg. Co., London. 

Toronto Plate Glass Imp. Co., Tor- 
onto. 

Winnipeg Paint A Glass Co., Winni- 

_ Peg- 
Consolidated Plate Glass Co., Toronto 
Glaziers' Diamonds 

Pelton, Godfrey S. 

Sharratt A Newth, London, Eng. 

Winnipeg Paint A Glass Co., Winni- 
peg. 

Glue 

The Canada Glue Co., Ltd., Brant- 
ford. 

Henderson A Richardson, Montreal. 
Grinding Machinery. 

London Emery Works, London, Eng. 
Grindstones 

Richards-Wilcox Mfg. Co.. Aurora. 

American Grinder Mfg. Co., Mil- 
waukee. 
Guns 

Harrington A Richardson Arms Co. 

Worchester, Mas*. 
Tobin Arm* Mfg. Co., Woodstock, Oat 
0. J. Hamilton A Boa, Plymouth. 

Mich. 

Hammers 
Stover Mfg. Co., Freeport, m. 
Whitman A Barns* Mfg. Co., ft 

Catharine*. 

Handles 

Still, J. H., Mfg. Co., Bt 

W. C. Crawford Co.. Tilbury. 
Hardware, Metal Window. 

Canadian Yale A Towne, 8t. Cath- 
arines. 

P. A F. Corbin, New Britain, Conn. 
Hay Unloading Tools 

F. E. Myers A Bra., Ashland, Ohio. 
Hinges 

Canada Steel Goods Co., Hamilton. 
Cowan A Britton, Gananoque. 
Montreal Hardware Co.. Montreal. 
The Stanley Work*, New Britain. 
Conn. 

Hinges, Spring 

Chicago Spring Butt Co., Ohleago. 

Standard Mfg. Co.. Shelby, Ohio. 
Hockey Sticks 

Still, J. H. Mfg. Co., Bt Thomas. 

St. Marys Wood Specialty Co., Bt 
Marys. 

Hooks 

P. A F. Corbin, New Britain, Conn. 
Henderson A Richardson, Montreal. 
Steel Co. of Canada, Limited, Ham- 
ilton. 
Stover Mfg, Co., Freeport. m. 
Hoop Iron 

The Steel Oo. of Canada, Ltd., Ham- 
ilton. 

Hoops — Steel and Wire 

Laidlaw Bale-Tie Co.. Hamilton, Ont 
Horseshoes and Nails 

Steel Co. of Canada, Ltd., "«~1 tTs 
Ice Cream Freezers 

North Bros. Mfg. Co., Philadelphia. 

The Sheet Metal Products Caof Canada 
Ltd., Montreal, Toronto, Winnipeg 
Ice Cutting Tools 

North Bros. Mfg Co., Philadelphia, Pa 
Iron and Steel Bars 

Henderson A Richardson, Montreal. 
Steel Co. of Canada, Limited, BjmfltM 

London Rolling Mill Co., London. 

Iron Pipe 

Steel Co. of Canada, Ltd., Hamilton. 

Canada Tube A Iron Co., Montreal. 
Iron Pumps 

Aylmer Pump A Scale Co., Aylmer. 
R. McDougafi Co.. Gait ■»*"■■ 

5 ed » Jl ^ et Mfg - 0o - D»venport, Iowa 
F. E. Myers A Bro., Ashland, Ohio. 

Knife Polish 
London Emery Works, London, Eng. 

Jno. Oakey & Sons, Ltd., London, 
Eng. 

Ladders, Step. 

ptterville Mfg. Co., Otterville, Ont. 
Stratford Mfg. Co., Stratford, Ont 
Ladders — Shelf 
Hamilton Brass Mfg. Co., Hamilton. 
F. E. Myer* A Bro., Aahland, Ohio. 
Bichard»-Wiloex Mfg. Co., Anwri; 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Lamps, Acetylene 

Htple City Mfg. Co., Monmouth, I1L 

Lampblack 

The L. Martin Co., New York. 
Wilekes Martin Wilekes Co., New York 

Lanterns 

Thos. Davidson Mfg. Co., Montreal. 
The Sheet Metal Products Co.of Canada 
Ltd., Montreal, Toronto, Winnipeg 

E. T. Wright * Co., Hamilton. 

Lawn Fencing- 
Canada Wire ft Iron Goods Mfg. Co., 

Hamilton. 
B. Greening Wire Co., Ltd., Hamil- 
ton. 
McGregor Banwell ft Co., Walkerrille 
Banwell Hozie Wire Fence Co., Ham- 
ilton. 

Lawn Mowers 
D. Maxwell ft Sons, St. Mary's, Ont 
Supplee Hardware Co., Philadelphia 
Clipper Lawn Mower Co., Dixon, DL 
S. P. Townsend ft Co., Orange, N.J. 
Whitman ft Barnes Mfg. Co., St. 
Catharines. 

Lawn Swing;* 

F. E. Myers ft Bro., Ashland, Ohio. 
Stratford Mfg. Co.. Stratford, Ont. 

Lightning Rods 
Hamilton Brass Mfg. Co., Hamilton. 
Out 
Locks, Knobs, Escutcheons, etc. 
BellcTills Hdw. and Lock Mfg. Com- 
pany, Belleville. 
Canadian Yale ft Towne, St. Cath- 
arines. 
P. ft F. Corbin, New Britain, Conn. 
May ft Padmore, Birmingham, Eng. 
National Hardware Co., Orillia. 
Peterborough Lock Mfg. Co.. Peter- 
borough, Ont. 
Lumbering Tools 

Pink, Thos., ft Co., Pembroke, Ont 
Manufacturers' Agents 
Gibb. Alexander, Montreal. 
Mcintosh, H. F., ft Co., Toronto. 
Western Distributors Ltd., Saskatoon. 

Mantels and Grates 

The Barton-Nettiag Co., Ltd., Wind- 
sor, Ont. 
Hatch Boxes 

Stoxer Mfg. Co., Freeport, 111. 
Metals 

Canada Metal Co., Toronto. 

CaTerhill. Learmont ft Co.. Montreal. 

Gibb, Alexander, Montreal. 

Henderson ft Richardson, Montreal. 

Leslie, A. C, ft Co., Montreal. 

Lysaght, John, Bristol, Eng. 

Magnolia Metal Co., Montreal. 

MeKechnlt Bros., Birmingham, Eng. 

Nora Scotia Steel and Coal Co., New 
Glasgow, N.S. 

Samuel, Benjamin ft Co., Toronto. 

Alonzo W. Spooner, Ltd., Port Hope, 
Ont. 

The Sheet Metal Products Co.of Canada 
Ltd., Montreal, Toronto, Winnipeg 

Tallman Brass ft Metal Co., Hamilton 

Thompson, B. ft 8. H. ft Co., Montreal 

Metal Lockers 
Canada Wire ft Iron Goods Mfg. Co., 

Hamilton. __ 

Dennis Wire ft Iron Co.. London, Ont. 

Metal Shingles, Sidings, Etc. 

Gait Art Metal Co., Gait. 

Metallic Roofing Co., Toronto. 

Metal Shingle and Biding Co., Preston. 
Metal Polish, Emery Cloth, Etc. 

Oakey, John, ft Sons, London, Eng. 

John C. Wilson, Ottawa. 

Metal Store Fronts 

Canada Foundry Co., Ltd., Toronto. 
Mop Holder 

Theo. J. Ely Mfg. Co., Erie, Pa. 
Mop Wringers 

Theo J. Ely Mfg. Co., Girard, Pa. 

White Mop Wringer Co., Fultouville, 
N.Y. 
Nail Pollers 

The Bridgeport Hdw. Corp., Bridge- 

JDort, Conn. 
th Hardware Co., Montreal. 
Nails, Wire 

Laldlaw Bale-Tie Co., Hamilton, Ont 

Parmenter ft Bulloch Co., Gananoque. 

P. L. Robertson Mfg. C, Milton, Ont 

Steel Co. of Canada, Limited, Ham- 
ilton. 
Oilers 

Thos. Davidson Mfg. Co.. Montreal. 

Hero Mfg. Co., Philadelphia. 

Maple City Mfg. Co., Monmouth, in. 

The Sheet Metal Products Co.of Canada 
Ltd., Montreal, Toronto, Winnipeg 

Wright, E. T. ft Co., Hamilton, Ont 
Oil Stones 

Canadian Hart Wheels, Hamilton, Ont 

Carborundum Co., Niagara Falls, N.Y. 
Oil Stoves 

McClary Mfg. Co., London. 

Queen City Oil Co., Toronto. 
Oil Tanks 

Bowser, B. F., ft Co., Toronto. 



Ornamental Iron and Wire 

Canada Wire ft Iron Goods Mfg. Co., 
Hamilton. 

Dennis Wire ft Iron Co., London, Ont 
Packing 

Garlock Packing Co., Hamilton, Ont 
Paints, Oils, Varnishes 

Berry Bros., Limited, Walkerrile, Ont 

Brandram Henderson, Montreal. 

Canada Paint Co., Montreal. 

Canadian Oil Companies, Ltd., Tor- 
onto. 

Dougall Tarnish Co., Montreal. 

Glidden Varnish Co., Toronto. 

Imperial Tarnish and Color Co., Tor- 
onto 

International Tarnish Co., Toronto. 

R. C. Jamieson ft Co., Ltd., Montreal 

Lowe Bros., Ltd., Toronto. 

Martin-Senour Co., Montreal. 

Moore, Benjamin & Co., Toronto. 

Pinchin, Johnson Co., Toronto. 

Pratt ft Lambert Inc., Bridgeburg, 
Can. 

A. Ramsay ft Son Co., Montreal. 

Sherwin-Williams Co., Montreal. 

Standard Paint and Varnish Co., 
Windsor, Ont 

G. F. Stephens ft Co., Winnipeg, 
Man. 

Winnipeg Paint ft Glass Co., Winni- 
peg. 
Paint and Tarnish Remover 

Chadeloid Chemical Co., New York. 

Dougall Tarnish Co., Montreal. 

Imperial Varnish ft Color Co., Tor- 
onto. 
Perforated Sheet Metals 

Canada Wire and Iron Goods Mfg. 
Co., Hamilton. 

Greening, B„ Wire Co., Hamilton. 
Pig Iron 

Henderson ft Richardson, Montreal. 

Steel Co. of Canada, Limited, Ham- 
ilton. 

Samuel Benjamin ft Co., Toronto. 

A. C. Leslie ft Co., Montreal. 
Pipe, Wrought Lead and 
Galvanized 

Steel Co. of Canada, Limited, Ham- 
ilton. 

Canadian Tube ft Iron Co., Montreal. 
Pliers 

Henderson ft Richardson, Montreal. 

Smith Hardware Co., Montreal. 
Poultry Netting 

Greening, B., Win Co.. Hamilton, 
Ont. 

John Lysaght, Ltd., Bristol, Newport 
and Montreal. 
Pruning Knives 

International Tool Co., Detroit 
Pnmps 

Canada Foundry Co., Ltd., Toronto. 

R. McDougall Co., Gait, Ont 

F. E. Myers ft Bro., Ashland, Ohio. 

Red Jacket Mfg. Co., Davenport, Iowa. 
Pnmps, Power 

Canadian Fairbanks-Morse Co., Ltd., 
Montreal. 
Putty 

Brandram-Henderson Co., Montreal. 

Canada Paint Co., Montreal. 

Sherwin-Williams Co., Montreal. 

Pinchin- Johnson ft Co., Toronto. 

Steel Co. of Canada, Ltd., Hamilton. 
Rat Traps 

Canada Wire ft Iron Goods Mfg. Co., 
Hamilton. 

Lovell Mfg. Co., Erie, Pa. 

Oneida Community. Ltd., Niagara 
Falls. 
Razors 

Gillette Safety Razor Co., Montreal. 

Greeff-Bredt ft Co., Toronto. 

Jonathan Crookes ft Son, Sheffield, 
Eng. 

Dorken Bros, ft Co., Montreal. 

Jas. riutton ft Co., Montreal. 

Kampfe Bros., New York. 
Razor Blades. 

Schramberger, Dhrfedemfabrik, 
Schramberg, Germany. 
Razor Hones 

Canadian Hart Wheels, Ltd., Ham- 
ilton. 

Carborundum Co., Niagara Falls, N.Y. 
Razor Strops 

J. R. Torrey ft Co., Worcester, Mass. 
Registers 

Jas. Stewart Mfg. Co., Woodstock, 
Ont. 

Canadian Ferrosteel Co., Bridgeburg. 
Rivets 

Steel Co. of Canada, Hamilton. 

Parmenter ft Bulloch Co., Gananoque. 

P. L. Robertson Mfg. Co., Ltd., Mil- 
ton West, Ont 
Roofing Supplies 

Barber Asphalt Co., Philadelphia. 

Brantford Roofing Co., Brantford. 

Canadian Supply Co., Toronto. 

Dominion Roofing Co. of Canada, 
Ltd., Toronto. 

Gait Art Metal Co.. Gait, Ont 

McArthur, Alex., ft Co., Montreal. 

Metal Shingle ft Siding Co., Preston. 
UnU 

Metallic Roofing Co., Toronto. 

United Roofing ft Mfg. Co.. Phila- 
delphia, Pa. 

Winnipeg Paint ft Glass Co., Winni- 
peg. 



Rope 

Independent Cordage Co., Toronto. 
Rules and Gauges 

Jas. Chest erman ft Co., Ltd., Shef- 
field, England. 
Lufkin Rule Co., Windsor. 
Saws 

Atkins, E. C, & Co., Indianapolis. 
Ind. 

Disston, Henry, ft Sons, Philadelphia. 

Drabble & Sanderson, Sheffield, Eng. 

Shurley Dietrich Co., Ltd., Gait, Ont. 

Simonds Canada Saw Co., Montreal, 

Spear ft Jackson, Sheffield, Eng. 
Scales 

Aylmer Pump ft Scale Co., Aylmer, 
Ont 

Burrow, Stewart & Milne Co., Ham- 
ilton. 

Renfrew Scale Co., Renfrew, Ont 
Screen Door Sets 

P. ft F. Corbin, New Britain, Conn. 

Stanley Works, New Britain, Conn. 
Screws, Nuts, Bolts 

National Acme Mfg. Co., Montreal. 

Steel Co. of Canada, Limited, Ham- 
ilton. 
Screws, Wood 

P. L. Robertson Mfg. Co., Milton, 
Ont. 

Steel Co. of Canada, Hamilton. 
Scythe Stones 

The Carborundum Co., Niagara Falls, 
New York. 
Shears, Scissors 

Acme Shear Co., Bridgeport, Conn. 

R. Heinlsch's Sons Co., Newark, N.J. 

Henry T. Seymour Shear Co., New 
York. 

J. Wiss ft Sons Co., Newark, N.J. 
Shelf Boxes 

Cameron ft Campbell. Toronto. 
Shellacs 

Berry Bros., Walkerrille. 
Shovels and Spades 

Spear ft Jackson, Sheffield, Eng 
Sieves and Screens 

Canada Wire ft Iron Goods Mfg. Co., 
Hamilton. 

B. Greening Wire Co.. Ltd., Hamil- 
ton. 
Silverware 

McGIashan, Clarke Co., Niagara Falls. 

Oneida Community. Ltd., Niagara 
Falls. 
Sporting Specialties. 

Marble Arms & Mfg. Co., Gladstone. 
Mich. 
Sprayers 

Cavers Bros., Gait, Ont 

T. Collins Mfg. Co., Toronto. 

Thos. Davidson Mfg. Co., Montreal. 

The Sheet Metal Products Co.of Canada 
Ltd., Montreal, Toronto, Winnipeg 

E. T. Wright ft Co., Hamilton. 

Spramotor Co., London. 
Springs 

B. Greening Wire Co., Ltd., Hamilton 

Henderson ft Richardson, Montreal. 
Spring Hinges, Etc. 

Chicago Spring Butt Co., Chicago, ni. 

Standard Mfg. Co., Shelby, Ohio. 
Stains, Shingle 

Berry Bros., Walkerrille. 
Stains, Wood 

Berry Bros., Walkerrille. 
Staples 

B. Greening Wire Co., Ltd., Hamilton 

Steel Co. of Canada, Ltd., Hamilton. 
Steel — High Speed 

Alexander Gibb, Montreal. 

Henderson ft Richardson, Montreal. 
Steel — Cold Rolled Strip 

Morris ft Bailey Steel Co., Pittsburg. 
Steel Wire Hoops 

Steel Co. of Canada, Ltd., Hamilton. 
Stencils 

Hamilton Stamp ft Stencil Co., Ham- 
ilton, Ont 

McClary's, London, Ont 

The Sheet Metal Products Co.of Canada 
Ltd., Montreal, Toronto, Winnipeg 

E. T. Wright ft Co., Hamilton, Ont 
Herod Machine ft Stamping Co., 

Brantford. 
Store Ladders 
Hamilton Brass Mfg. Co., Hamilton, 
Ont. 

F. E. Myers ft Bro., Ashland, Ohio. 
Stoves, Furnaces 

Burrow, Stewart & Milne Co., Ham- 
ilton. 

Findlay Bros., Carleton Place. 

Clare Bros. & Co., Preston. 

Holland Furnace Co., Holland, Mich. 

Thos. Davidson Mfg. Co., Montreal. 

McClary's, London, Ont 

Pease Foundry Co., Toronto. 

D. J. Barker ft Co., Pieton. 
Stoves, Gas. 

Burrow, Stewart ft Milne Co., Ham 
ilton. 

McClary Mfg. Co., London, Ont 
Tacks 

The Steel Co. of Canada, Ltd., Ham- 
ilton. 
Tapes 

Jas. Chest erman ft Co., Sheffield, Eng. 

Lufkin Rule Co., Windsor, Ont 
Tiling — Wail and Floor 

The Barton-Netting Co., Ltd., Wind- 
sor. Ont 



Tin PUta 

Henderson ft Richardson, Montreal. 

A. C. Leslie ft Co., Montreal. 

B. ft S. H. Thompson ft Co., Moat- 
real. 

M. ft L. Samuel, Benjamin ft Co., 
Toronto. 
Tools 

The Ch'apln Stevens Co., Pine Mead- 
ow, Conn, 
The Good ell Pratt Co., Greenfield, 

Mass. 
Spear ft Jackson, Sheffield, Eng. 
Allan lulls Edge Tool Co., Gait 
Armstrong Bros. Tool Co., Chicago. 
Robt. Soihy ft Sons, Sheffield. 
Stanley aula ft Level Co., New 

Britain. 
International Tool Co., Detroit 
Tools — Metal Workers' 

Brown-Boggs Co., Hamilton. 
Tool Grinders 

American Grinder Mfg. Co., Milwaukee 

Wis. 
Luther Grinder Mfg. Co.. Milwaukee. 
Richards-Wilcoi Mfg. Co., Aurora, 

Trucks 

Aylmer Pump ft Seals Co., Aylmer. 
Ont. 

Burrow, Stewart & Milne Co., Ham- 
ilton. 

Renfrew Scale Co., Renfrew, Go. 
Varnishes: See Paints 

Berry Bros., Limited. Walkerrille. Oat 

Dougall Tamiah Co., Montreal. 

Glidden Tamiah Co., Toronto. 

International Tamiah Co., Toronto. 

Pratt ft Lambert, Bridgeburg. 
Ventilators 

Harris, J. W„ Co., Montreal. 
Vises 

Henderson ft Richardson, MeatreaL 

Hollands Mfg. Co.. Erie. Pa. 

Chaa. Parker Co., Meridea, Coma. 

Prentiss Tlss Co., New York. 
Washing Machines, Etc. 

J. H. Connor ft Bon.. Ottawa, Oat 

Oummer-Dowswell Ltd.. Ti.»n L» Oatf 

Henderson ft Richardson, Montreal. 

p. Maxwell ft Bon, 8t Mary's, Oat 

One Minute Washer Co., Toronto. 

London Foundry Co., London, 
Wall Plaster 

Manitoba Gypsum Co., Winnipeg. 
Waffle Irons 

Stover Mfg Co., Freeport, 111. 
Wagons — Children's 

Wodatoek Wagon Co., Wosdstosk, 
Washers 

P. L. Robertson Mfg. Co.. MUto*. 

Ont. 
Steel Co. of Canada, Limited, HamOtsa 
White Lead 

Brandram-Henderson Co., Montreal. 
Steel Co. of Canada, Limited, Hamiltaa 

Wholesale Hardware 
Caverhill, Learmont ft Co., Montreal 
Howland, H. 8., Sons ft Co., Toronto 
Lewis Bros, ft Co.. Montreal. 

Window Guards 

Canada Wlrs ft Iron Goods Mfg. Oa» 

Hamilton. 
B. Greening Wire Co., Ltd., Hamtflia i 

Wire Guards 
B. Greening Wire Co., Ltd., Hamilton 

Wire Door Guards 
B. Greening Wire Co., Ltd., Hamilton 

Wire — Iron, Steel, Brass and 
Copper 
B. Greening Wire Co., Ltd., Hamilton 
Henderson ft Richardson, Montreal. 
Laldlaw Bale-Tie Co., Hamilton, Ont 
P. L. Robertson Mfg. Co., Milton, Oat 
Steel Co. of Canada, Limited, Hamilton 

Wire Mats 

Andrews Wire Works of Canada. Ltd.. 

Watford, Ont 
Canada Wire ft Iron Goods Mfg. Oa.. 

Hamilton. 
B. Greening Wire Co., Ltd., Hamilton 
Wire Goods, Bright 

Steel Co. of Canada, Limited, HaaUla aa 
Wire Goods 
Canada Wire ft Iron Goods Mfg. Co., 
Hamilton. 
Wire Machinery 

Ed Brand, 471 Moss Lane., Maneheeta* 
Eng. 
Wire Products 

Andrews Wire Works, Watford, Oat 
Wire Rope. 
The B. Greening Wire Rope Co., Ltd. 
Hamilton. 
Wire Springs 
B. Greening Wire Co., Ltd., Hamilton 
Henderson ft Richardson, Montreal. 
Jas. Steele Limited, Guelph, Ont 
vVood Finishes 
Berry Bros., Walkerrille. 
Wrenches 
Cochran Pipe Wrench Co. 
Whitman ft Barnes Mfg. Co., St 

Catharines. 
Bemis ft Call Hdws. ft Tool Oa>, 
Springfield, * 



87 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



No Time Wasted When You Sell 

ROSS RIFLES 



*%*#*" 



So good is their repu- 
tation that all you need 
to do is to show your 
customer your samples 
of "Ross" Rifles, and if 
he really is in the mar- 
ket his choice is soon 
made. 

By the way, many dealers have not y et any Ross .280 (High Velocity) Rifles. 

Don't forget that not only is this rifle absolutely the best sporting rifle made 

and the best rifle value offered, but moreover every sale means a tidy profit 

to YOU. 




• 280 Calibre 
HighVeloerty 



WRITE US FOR DISCOUNTS, ETC. 



ROSS RIFLE CO. 



QUEBEC 






PAT. FEB. 2, 1909 



ROBERTSON s ggg T 

WOOD SCREWS 

. Have a decided advantage over other styles of wood screws. By 
having a square hole, into the centre of which a specially designed 
screwdriver fits snugly, it does away with all possibility of slipping, 
which often proves disastrous to the screw, and wastes a consid- 
erable amount of the workman's time. 

They will sell on sight — get our prices at once. 

We also manufacture high-grade Hand Drivers, Yankee Bits, 
Brace Bits, Rivets, Burrs, Washers, Nails and Wire. 

SEND FOR CATALOG. 
The P. L. Robertson Manufacturing Co., Limited, Milton, Ont. 

TORONTO WAREHOUSE, 19 JARVIS STREET - F. J. SCHUCH, Agent 





© 




i 



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i*S/»S 



88 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



"Absolute Quality" 

is a thing to be considered when buy- 
ing axe handles. 

STILL'S 

AXE HANDLES 

are now specified by leading hard- 
waremen who have given them a trial. 

"Still's" Handles have been time- 
tried, and have not been found lack- 
ing in quality or durability. 

The selection of the wood is made 
by skilled workmen — men who know 
their business. 

Before placing your order, write us. 

J. H. STILL MFG. CO., Ltd. 



ST. THOMAS, 



ONT. 



MAYMORE 




OUR NEW 
_ CATALOGUE 

at <sr 

„^ > BUILDERS' 
tesal HARDWARE 

IS JUST BEING ISSUED 
APPLY NOW FOR A COPY 

THOMAsV*3RBy 

48. YONGE ST. ARCADE TORONTO. 

WePADMOlft-Bi™™ 



THE "HANDY ANDY" FORCE CUP 

FOR HOUSEHOLD USE 

Enables anyone to keep the waste pipes of sinks, basins, 
baths, tubs, etc., free and clear, and in a safe and 
sanitary condition. 

THERE'S A GOOD SALE FOR THEM 

MANUFACTURED SOLELY BY 

The Gutta Percha & Rubber Mfg. Co. of Toronto, Limited 

Toronto Montreal Halifax Winnipeg Calgary Vancouver 




CUP N! & 



MEASURING TAPES 

MUST BE ACCURATE 

To sell well they must also be of the most improved design ; particularly adapted 
to the work they have lo do; durable and reliable. 



Those that bear 
this Trade-Mark 



fUFKIN 



are the leaders of the field because they have always given satisfaction. THEY 
ARE DOMINION MADE. 




sale by m E/i/FKiN Ri/LEfio. of/?anada*£ti>. 

Windsor, ont. 



FOR 

All JOBBERS. 



CATALOGUE 
ON REQUEST 



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■■'^HffllfesiS 



CANADA'S ONLY WEEKLY HARDWARE PAPER. 

HARDWA1»METAL 

Published Weekly by 

THE MACLEAN PUBLISHING COMPANY, LIMITED 



Vol. XXIV. 



Publication Office: Toronto, Canada 
Aug. 24, 1912 



No. 34 




JiA^S^ W^ip-" -•'-^ BBH- 









:-J; 



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;.>r.- 



ftf? 



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fe; 



a 




>.$gtfR* 




DOMINION 



^ 






INGOT 
METALS 



CANADA PLATES 

" Dominion " Crown — Highest Grade Polished 
Canada Plates — nice dark finish — easy working- 
qualities. 

"Canada" Crown — Standard Quality 
Half Bright, of superior finish. Good 
working qualities. 

"Trym" — A good ordinary 
plate suitable for general 
work. 



. : 'i? 



i'>'-l 



:-".1 



Aluminum,' 
Antimony, 
Copper, Spel- 
ter, Lead, Tin. 

All highest qualities. Lowest 
prices to wholesale buyers. 



Iron and Steel — Pig 

Iron, Bars, Hoops, 

Plates, Anvils, 

Vises, Structural 

material. 



TIN 
PLATES 



Lowest prices 

for reliable 

goods. 




"Dominion" Crown 

Special High Grade 
Charcoal Plates. 
Heavily tin coated. 

"Allaway" Standard 

Charcoal Plates — this is 

the genuine. 

"Canada" Crown Best 

Grade Ordinary Charcoals. 

"Trym Best" Best Quality Cokes. 




??. 






PS; 

'■i-.i 



CV'" 

■*-:- 



MONTREAL 




HARDWARE AND METAL 




Big Ben Store Helps 



In order to enable Canadian dealers to 
get the maximum benefit from the Big Ben 
campaign now running in Canadian mag- 
azines, we are packing Big Ben specially 
for Canadian trade, six in a carton with a 
full set of store selling helps (two posters, 
two show cards, two metal signs. ) 

On an order for 12 we add a solid ma- 
hogany display stand. On an order for 24 

In broken and dozen lots, $2.15 less 



or more, we print your name on dials, give 
the posters, display stand, and a beautiful 
metal sign lithographed in five colors. 

Big Ben and his selling helps are being 
carried in stock by 54 wholesale Canadian 
distributors. We will be glad to let you 
have their names upon request. Any will 
tell you Big Ben is the best made and the 
best selling alarm that's ever been put out. 

In lots of 24, $2.05 less 2%. 



'C' 



The Western Clock Co., La Salle, 111. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 




The Carpenter — The Mechanic — The Farmer — The Man of the House- 

All users of edged tools want the 

CARBORUNDUM SHARPENING STONES 

And they are going to get them from the Carborundum Dealer 

The demand is increasing every day — the story of Carborundum — why it is the hardest and sharpest 
material — why Carborundum Sharpening Stones cut faster, give a better edge and last longer — is being 
thousands, the market is being brought to the doors of the hardware dealer. 

The one way to get your share — to make your sharpening stone account show up well on 
your books, is to be a Carborundum dealer. 

Write us now about complete stock — ask us about tbe Carborundum trade 
helps. Are you on tbe mailing list for "At the Sign of the Indian Head ?" 



known 
told to 



THE CARBORUNDUM COMPANY 



Niagara Falls, N.Y. 




Made by 

North Bros. 
Mfg. Co. 

PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



A New Line 

"Yankee " Plain Screw Drivers 

Strong, durable, well balanced tools, of the same high 
quality of material and workmanship as other "Yankee" 
Tools, which to-day are without equal. 

The blade and ferrule are highly polished, the 
handle of hardwood, finished in dull black, 
making a handsome appearance. 

Each tool is thoroughly tested and the 
blades positively guaranteed not 
to turn in the handle. 

Your Jobber Will Supply You 

No. 90, Standard Style, Four- 
teen Sizes, 2 to 30 in. 

No. 95, Cabinet Style, 
(Slim Blade) 
Eleven Sizes, 2} 
to 15j in. 




HARDWARE AND METAL 



More Reliable Than the Windmill 

Every Farmer is a Prospective Buyer 

At one time the farmer endorsed the windmill as a convenience and necessity. Since 
then times have changed. New things are constantly taking the place of the old. Such 
is the case with 

The "ECLIPSE" Pumper 

With it the farmer does not have to depend on the wind or the weather — 
he has pumping power when he needs it. 

The "Eclipse" will pump as much water as a 10 or. 12 ft. windmill run- 
ning in a 20 mile wind. It uses about one pint of gasoline per hour, and 
pumps over 1,000 gallons of water. 

This small operating cost will appeal to every farmer. 

Put an "Eclipse" in stock and get after the farmers. You will get surprising results. 

Write for full particulars. 

The Canadian Fairbanks-Morse Co., 

LIMITED 





MONTREAL 
ST. JOHN 
OTTAWA 



TORONTO 

WINNIPEG 

CALGARY 



SASKATOON 

VANCOUVER 

VICTORIA 



The Sheet Metal Products Company of Canada,Limited 



Extend a cordial invitation to all their friends and customers 
attending the Canadian National Exhibition to call at their 
office and sample rooms, corner of Gerrard and River 
Streets. 

N. B. — Parliament Street cars from the Depot, or from 
corner of Queen and Yonge, bring you to the door. 



THE SHEET METAL PRODUCTS COMPANY OF CANADA, LIMITED 

Successors to 

KEMP MANUFACTURING COMPANY 

TORONTO Winnipeg 



MONTREAL 



HARDWARE AND METAL 




SAVAGE 

HIGH POWER REPEATING RIFLES 
For Big Game 





In this Arm the Feature of a Small Bore, Pointed Bullet and High Velocity are 
Brought to the Greatest Degree of Effectiveness Attained with any Arm or Cartridge. 

Its Accuracy is so great that with Metallic Sights and without the use of a Sling it 
has scored 23 Consecutive Bulls Eyes on a 500-yard Military Target. 

The Recoil is so slight as to be scarcely perceptible. The Bullet will penetrate a 
Pine Block 7% inches with the grain, or pass entirely through %-inch Boiler Plate. 

No. S 622 — 6 Shot Repeater, 22 caliber; Take-down; 20 inch High-pressure Steel 
Barrel, Highly Finished Walnut Stock; Rubber Butt Plate; White Metal 
Bead Front Sight and Sporting Adjustable Rear Sight, weight 6*4 lbs. each 
Net $26.10 




Per 1000 



SMOKELESS CARTRIDGES 

No. 600 HP— 22 Metal Patch; For Penetration and Clean Cutting. Factory List. $38. 00 

No. 600 SP — 22 Soft Point; For Mushrooming, Tearing and Shock Producing. 

Factory List . 38 . 00 

LEWIS BROS. Limited, Montreal 




OTTAWA TORONTO 

WHOLESALE DISTRIBUTORS 



VANCOUVER 




HARDWARE AND METAL 




It's Our House Party 

In the next two weeks Toronto will entertain thousands of visitors 
who come to the exhibition, partly for recreation and partly to pick 
up the very latest in the business world. In a word, many a 
Canadian merchant makes this annual trip to find out newer and 
better ways of making his store the centre of trade for his district — 
making it known as the depot for good values, good service and 
good goods. 

For the hardware dealer, the Gurney-Oxford people have a propo- 
sition that will certainly interest every live dealer. The " Gurney- 
Oxford Man " in the past has always had the best in selling and 
business-getting helps ; this year he will get the benefits of even more 
extensive help — something larger and better in the way of advertis- 
ing and co-operation for the sale of stoves. 

Why not plan your trip to the Exhibition so as to spend an hour 
with us and hear what we have to say ? It certainly will not in- 
volve the slightest obligation, for we want the pleasure of shaking 
hands with every Canadian hardware dealer. At the same time 
we will gladly show you our proposition ; our ideas on stove selling 
will pay you to absorb. 

Our Ontario travellers join us in the invitation to call in. They 
want to see you and will be here to meet you. And finally, to all 
our friends in the trade, come in and talk things over. We will ap- 
preciate a confab with you, and will promise not to talk business all 
the time. 

Our Exhibit this year is at the head office. 
We will have a much better chance to talk 
things over here than in a big crowd at the 
Fair. Make our office your headquarters 
while in town — remember, 



Our Latch String's Out! 



The Gurney Foundry Co., Limited 

Toronto Montreal Hamilton Winnipeg 
Calgary Vancouver 




HARDWARE AND METAL 







:.= i «s^ 



539 



540 



541 



Plumb Bobs 

In offering Goodell-Pratt's Plumb Bobs 
to your trade you can rest assured that 
they are all we claim them to be. 

Users have come to us for the main 
purpose of telling how practical they were 
and wondering how we could put so much 
value in them for the moderate price 
which we charge for them. 

One advantage they have over the old 
style which was very wide at the top taper- 
ing down to a point is the fact that they 
are narrow, thereby getting into places 
that the old style could not do. 

Each Bob is furnished with six feet of 
laid twine; they are made in three sizes, 
and weigh 8, 12, and 16 ounces each. 

Get acquainted with these Plumb Bobs 
as well as the other 1,200 tools and devices 
which make up the Goodell-Pratt line by 
asking for our No. 10 Catalog. 

Goodell-Pratt Company 



GREENFIELD 



MASS., U.S.A. 




PRINT NO. 1 



Your Trade Will Increase 

If you make your store more attractive and more 
systematic by installing 

Berlin Hardware 
Display Cabinets 

These cabinets are designed to meet every 
dealer's requirements. They are made of oak, 
and excellently finished. 

Goods are displayed behind glass doors or 
display front compartments, thus keeping the 
stock in good condition, instead of being cover- 
ed with dust. 

Remember, the trade appreciates a nice look- 
ing store. 

Print No. 1 illustrates the fourth section of 
a large case. 



Did you cut print from issue before last ? 

If not it will pay you to do it now, if possible. 
Save all the prints with numbers for reference 
in designing a case to meet your particular re- 
quirements. Then write us for specifications 
and prices. 

Write for circulars on complete line of store 
fixtures or any special line in which interested. 



The Walker Bin & Store Fixture Co. 



Manufacturers and Designers of 

Modern Store Fixtures 



LIMITED 

BERLIN, ONTARIO 



HARDWARE AND JNiETAL 



THE 

STEEL COMPANY OF CANADA 

LIMITED 



Our Mills 

Can Ship Immediately 

From Stock 

BOLTS and NUTS, 
PRESSED SPIKES, STOVE 

BOLTS, STOVE RODS, 
TACKS, HAY BALING 

WIRE 



DISTRICT SALES OFFICES : 

HAMILTON, TORONTO, MONTREAL, WINNIPEG 

W. A. MacLennan, Vancouver, B.C. H. G. Rogers, St. John, N.B. 

J. B. H. Rickaby, Victoria, B.C. Geo. D. Hatfield, Halifax, N.S. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 




GUNS 




High grade Guns and Rifles that will satisfy 
the most ardent sportsman. 

Gun Tools, Powder, Ammunition and many 
other lines on which you can depend as being 
good value and of the best possible quality. 

Our business has been built up on a basis of 
honest value and good service, and we know 
that every merchant appreciates this method of 
doing business. 

Let Us Have Your Orders 



H. S. Howland, Sons & Co., Limited 

Wholesale Hardware 



WE SHIP PROMPTLY 



TORONTO 



OUR PRICES ARE RIGHT 



GRAHAM NAILS APE THE BEST 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Creicent 




Brand 




Crescent Brand HARDWARE 



Butt Hinges Strap Hinges Tee Hinges 

Barn Door Hangers Parlor Door Hangers 

Trolley Hangers Hinged Hasps Shelf Brackets 

Wrought Staples Rollston Pulleys 

Gate Hooks Wagon Hardware Etc. Etc. Etc. 

Steel Sheets Bands Bars 



Rods 



Wire 



CANADA STEEL GOODS CO., Limited 

HAMILTON - - - CANADA 



<<r pHE oil hog" is a child of the Oil 
A Trust. The Angle Lamp was de- 
signed, and is manufactured and 
sold by those who have no interest 
in any oil company. With less oil 
it gives better light with no undershadow, 
no odor, heat or dirt. It cannot explode. 

It is a trade builder, as well as a profit 

maker. It is a lamp 
you can recom- 
mend. 3,500 dealers 
now guarantee it. Our 
"Protective Dealer 
Policy" keeps the pro- 
fits for the man who 
becomes our exclusive 
agent. Let us tell you 

about it. 

All Styles, 1 to 8 Burners. 

Angle Manufacturing Co. 

244-246 West 23rd Street 
New York City 




Now's 
the 
Time 

to start your trade 
ON OIL LAMPS 



EVERY home in your town, Mr. Merchant, needs at least 
one good oil lamp. And right now, when folks ate fix- 
ing up for evenings indoors, is the time for you to turn that 
need into sales. 

Success Lamps 

are dandy pullers for home furnishing trade. For they're big, 
strong, serviceable. They give the best reading light you ever 
saw, and taking it by and large, they're just the lamps to build 
business for you. 

How's Your Stock? 

The Pittsburgh Lamp, Brass & Glass Co. 




119 Wortley Road, 
London, Ont. 




R. E. Davis 

Special 
Representative 



General Offices and Factories: PITTSBURGH. Pa., U.S.A. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



These Mills Grind Coffee 
R i g h t— That's Why 
Women Buy Them 

In following the line of least re 
sistance by offering your cus- 
tomers the best known articles, 
you are building a business 
on rock. Sterling quality, 
efficiency and persistent ad- 
vertising have put Enter- 
prise Coffee Mills away 

the lead---women 
put a very pronounced 
value on the name 
Enterprise, and we 
take good care 
to maintain the 
confidence of 
American 
housewives 
by keep- 
ing the 
quality 
up. 




grind 
coffee as 
it should 
ground 
—that's why 
women buy 
them. The il- 
lustrations 
shown are the re- 
gular Enterprise 
family size Coffee 
Mills. The top one 
can be screwed to the 
wall, dresser, or other 
handy place — the lower 
one can be clamped to 
table or bench. A thumb- 
screw regulates fineness of 
grinding. 

Enterprise Coffee Mills are 
strong, durable, and easy to 
operate — features that have also 
made famous the Enterprise Meat 
and Food Choppers, Sad Irons, Saus- 
age Stuffers, Coffee Mills, etc. — all 
of which you can handle with profit. 

Write to-day jor illustrated catalogue showing 
complete Enterprise Line. 

The Enterprise Manufacturing Co. of Pa. 

Patented Hardware Specialties 



21 Murray St., 
New York City, N.Y. 
9 



PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

530 Golden Gate Ave., 
San Francisco, Calif. 



176 North Dearborn St. 
Chicago, III. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 




YOUR customers get the goods for which 

they pay. You should be as sure of 

getting the money for the goods you sell. 



Whether you do or not depends entirely on the system you 
use in conducting your business. 

The old way was to depend on memory and habit. 

With our new system, you depend on machinery which en- 
forces accuracy and stops mistakes in your store. 

The National Cash Register will systematize your business, 
so that you will be as sure of getting all your profits as your 
customers are of getting their goods. 

It will pay you to investigate, call or write. 



The National Cash Register Co. 



Headquarters 
for Canada: 



285 Yonge St. Toronto 



Canadian Factory 
TORONTO 



10 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



:*■$& 



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lg$$p> i ~'-^ ™ * ™ L,fl ^^fflE 


5jjlj|^j|||jg 


| W.WGREENER^ 




i^^^Bl 


>mBBHH| 





Your guarantee lies just there— 

it's the name carried by the World's Best Gun and means end- 
less wear combined with lasting satisfaction. The name itself is an all- 
powerful selling point — every sportsman knows the Greener gun, but 
of course the gun itself is an attraction in any store. There are many 
features which make the Greener just the gun for your trade. 

All the old " sports" will remember Dr. Carver's "Old Widow", the gun with 
which he created his world famous records, while to the younger generation such 
men as Brewer, Elliott and Fulford, each of whom made their reputations with 
Greener guns, will be household words. 

The Greener system of choke boring ensures that perfect regularity of pattern 
combined with penetration which are absolutely necessary to the perfect gun. 

No gun in the world has gained so many honors and international awards as the 
Greener; they were first in '51 and are easily first to-day for high-class finish, 
sound workmanship and long wearing qualities. 

Our catalog describes 38 grades ranging from $56.00 to $1,000.00; and we can give 
you prompt delivery from our Montreal stock if you order now. 



W. W. GREENER 

GUN AND RIFLE MAKER 

63 and 65 Beaver Hall Hill, - - Montreal, P.Q 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



NEW LINE 



UNIVERSAL CLOTHES WRINGERS 

Plain Bearings and Steel Ball Bearings \ 

Spiral Pressure Springs Enclosed Cog Wheels 



PLAIN BEARINGS 

No. 310E— - Rolls, lOxlf inches 

No. 31 IE— ... - Rolls, llxlf inches 

STEEL BALL BEARINGS 

No. 317E— .... Rolls, lOxlf inches 
No. 31 8E— - Rolls, 11 x If inches 

SAME STYLE MADE IN FOLDING BENCH 




Packed 3 in a case 



SEND FOR CATALOGUE "F" 

THE AMERICAN WRINGER COMPANY 

99 CHAMBERS STREET, NEW YORK 



Oct After the Farm Trade 

And Procure A Profit Worth While 




STEEL JACKET FEED COOKER HEAVY CAST 
IRON CALDRONS 

MADE IN 7 SIZES 
Nos. 20.30,40.60. 75, 90 and 120 



Heavy Galvanized Steel Hog 
Feeding Troughs 

Clean, Sanitary 
Easily Handled 
Strong, Durable 

Ledge each side to prevent pushing 

or pulling of food to the floor. Cast 

Iron ends secured by our patented 

device. 

Stock Lengths — 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 

12 ft. Odd lengths made to order. 





These Cookers are indispensable to Farmers, Butch- 
ers or Stock Men. Grains that are useless for other 
purposes, by the use i f these cookers are made as 
valuable as the best marketable products. 



Heavy Galvanized Steel Stock 
Watering Troughs 

Standard size holds about 10 
imperial gallons to foot. Other 
sizes made to order. 

Regular Stock Lengths, 
6, 7, 8, 10 and 12 ft. 

Made without rivets. Heavy Cast 
Iron end fastened by our patented 
device. 



These are articles that appeal to every farmer, as they assure real value for money invested. Let 

us have your inquiry at once. Our proposition means money to you. 

We guarantee absolute satisfaction. Hot, dry weather does not injure them; no leak, no rusting. 

Erie Iron Works, Lim ted, makers St. Thomas, Ont. 

Come and see us in the Manufacturers' Annex, under the Grand Stand at Toronto Exhibition. Every hardware dealer attending 

the Fair will be made welcome at our booth. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



A NEW HECLA FURNACE CATALOGUE 

is just off the press, and if you have not already received a 
copy, send a card and we shall mail you one immediately. 

The catalogue explains in detail the value not only to 
the dealer but to the consumer of those distinctive features 
of HECLA Furnace construction, such as Fused Joints, 
Steel Ribbed Fire Pots, Circular Water Pan, Cast Iron 
Combustion Chamber, Individual Grate Bars, etc., and 
shows how their advantages can be clearly and convincingly 
explained to a prospective buyer. 

The present popularity of the HECLA Furnace is 
founded on its success in operation — a success that is general 
from the Atlantic to the Pacific. The good will created by 
the many thousands of HECLA heated homes all over the 
country and the influence of the widespread and systematic 
advertising which we are doing in the newspapers and 
magazines throughout Canada is of inestimable value to 
the men who install HECLA Furnaces. 

Moreover, we carry large stocks of HECLA Furnaces 
not only at Preston, but at convenient shipping points 
throughout Canada, from which prompt delivery can be 
made. 

There are still some points where we have no agencies. 
If there is no HECLA dealer in your town, write for a cata- 
logue and get our proposition. We can not only help you 
sell furnaces, but help you sell them at a profit. 

Clare Bros. & Co., Limited, Preston, Ont. 

Branches : 

Clare & Brochest, Limited, Winnipeg. Reynolds & Jackson, Calgary. 

Race, Hunt & Giddy, Edmonton. J. M. Kains & Co., Vancouver. 

The Mechanics Supply Co., Quebec, Que. 



13 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



NOW— There's good business in this! 

MTIar/s 

k "PERFECTION" ROASTER 




Will be wanted by every customer of yours — when 
you show them its wonderful advantages. 



Prevents loss of meat by shrinkage. Cooks all kinds of meats perfectly. 
Retains all the natural juices in the meat. 

Food cooked in the Perfection is more nourishing and strengthening. 

NO BASTING. NO GREASY SPLUTTER ALL OVER THE OVEN. 
NO BURNT FOOD. 



'• t, y wy . »lr-» ^ 



Cut Shows Roaster Open. 



ORDER NOW — We will send you some beautiful and effective 
window display cards got up in colors. 



McClary 

on goods is a 

Quality name. 



MXIaryS 



London, 
Ontario 



Me Clary's 
Ship Quick 



Toronto Montreal London Vancouver St. John, N.B. Hamilton Winnipeg Calgary Saskatoon 



Quick Action Means Business in These 




McClary's 

Grain Scoops 



and 



Grain^Baskets 




will be in demand by your Farmer Friends — but they must 

get quick service — 

McClary Grain Scoops are made from heavy gauge and 

strongly handled. 

The grain Baskets are made from heavy gauge galvanized 

iron — strong and lasting in quality. 




MXIarys 



London, 
Ontario 



McClary's 
Ship Quick 



Toronto Montreal London Vancouver St. John, N.B. Hamilton Winnipeg Calgary Saskatoon 

~14 



H A R D W ARE AND METAL 



YOUR FURNACE PROFITS 

will rapidly increase if you make a specialty of 



The Pilot 



S 



uccess 



Fu 



rnace 




It has an extra long fire travel which completely absorbs all heat 
— none goes to waste up the chimney, as is a common occurrence 
with most furnaces. 

Constructed of only the highest grade materials and is nicely 

finished. 

It is certain to attract prospective buyers. 

Let us send you full particulars at once. 

The Hall Zryd Foundry Co., Ltd 

HESPELER, ONTARIO 



15 



HARDWARE AND METAL 











f. 




"GOOD CHEER" Sidewall Registers 




A line In four size*, of uniform design throughout. Neat and tasteful pattern, and 
supplied In black Japan, ordinary oxidised or full oxidized finish, with enamelled green 
fan. Our ordinary oxidized will about equal the more expensive full oxidised finish 
of other makes. 

Positive acting: fan — stays exactly where set, and when closed locks tlrhi No 
spring's, etc., to weaken or loosen. 

The price? It will pay you to Inquire. 

A full line of the above carried by The Ja* Stewart iltg. Co., Limited, Winnipeg, Man. 

The Jas. Stewart Manufacturing Co., Ltd. 






" pATF'!"-' 




■ 


Woodstock, Ontario 




The Barker Fuel Saver 

Is Another Important Feature Of Our Ranges 



We have recently added this new attachment to 
our ranges. It has been thoroughly tested and 
proved to be a valuable addition. With it the 
housewife can save from 15 to 25 per cent, of the 
fuel, by keeping the fire under perfect control. Tins 
is a very strong selling point and a feature that the 
trade' is quick to recognize. 

Write for descriptive catalog on our High Grade 
Ranges. You'll be interested. 

D. J. BARKER & COMPANY - Picton, Ontario 




Here is YOUR Chance 

to make your range department more 
profitable and more satisfactory. 

Happy Thought "Ranges 

are known from one side of the 
continent to the other and re- 
commended by every house- 
wife who ever used them. 

The "HAPPY THOUGHT" 

works equally well with coal 
or wood and gives a longer 
and more reliable service 
than any other. 

This is not a claim, but a 
fact, and we can prove it. 

Get a "HAPPY THOUGHT" 

Catalog at once. Each sale 
brings a good profit. 

The William Buck 
Stove Co., Limited 

Calgary Saskatoon Vancouver Brantford Montreal Winnipeg 



H A K DWARE AND META L 



#> 



YOUR HEATING CONTRACTS SHOULD BE CLOSED EARLY 

THIS IS POSSIBLE WHEN YOU SPECIFY 

SUNSHINE FURNACES 



^ 




'McClary" on Goods 
is a Quality Name. 



% 



THEIR INSTALLATION BRINGS MORE 
BUSINESS AND BIGGER PROFITS TO YOU 

THE ADVICE OF OUR HEATING DEPARTMENT IS AT YOUR DISPOSAL 

McClarys 



Order from our near- 
est branch to-day. 



Toronto, Montreal, London, Vancouver, St. John, N.B. 
Hamilton, Winnipeg, Calgary, Saskatoon 



17 




HARDWARE AND METAL 



For Quick and Satisfactory Sales Try 

"EMPIRE" 

HOT AIR REGISTERS 

These are two popular and very neat designs that are sure 
to attract those who are interested. 

The "Empire Special" Register meets the demand for a 
register with a large opening. Has all the qualities that are 
required to assure the complete satisfaction of the user. 




□□□□□DnnnnnnDanDDi/l 



hqco 



uQQTOQQQCp 

DDQQLiDaaanaDanaaDD 



i — 



EMPIRE SPECIAL 
New design, made in full sizes from 7 x 10 
to 12 x 15 * 

Made in Japanned, nickel-plated and oxidized 

Write us to-day for full particulars, catalogue 
and discounts. 

Other dealers are making good profits by handling 
this line — you can do the same. We guarantee to 
please you. Do not Delay. 

THE 

Canadian Heating & Ventilating 
Company, Limited 



OWEN SOUND 



ONTARIO 



MOORISH DESIGN CAST REGISTER 
Made in full sizes from 7 x 10 to 12 x 15 



Or The Canadian Heating and Ventilating Co. Branch : 
521 Henry Avenue, Winnipeg, Man. 




ALL YOUR CUSTOMERS WILL WANT THIS 

Here Is What Has Been Needed to Make Perfect 
the Equipment of Fireless Cookers 

"IDEAL" TRIPLICATE PAILS 
OF PURE ALUMINUM 

For cooking several things at one time 
in one compartment of a Fireless Cooker. 

Freight Prepaid on First Order for one Dozen or More Sets 

BIG DEMAND FOR THIS ARTICLE 

TRIPLICATE PAILS OF ALUMINUM is what has been lacking to make the equipment 
of Fireless Cookers perfect. As always we lead with the latest and best cooking devices — 
things the peorle want. These pails are made from heavy seeets of PURE ALUMINUM, 
seamless and have self-locking covers. Each pail has capacity for two quarts. Three 

together 9J inches in dia- 
meter. Same diameter as 
8-qt. kettle. 

Not only the IDEAL 
equipment for a Fireless 
Cooker (any make) but 
also splendid for cooking 
several things at one time 
over one burner of a GAS 
or OIL STOVE. 

Prices : Retail $3.00 per set 

Dealers $24.00 per Dozen 
Sets. 

Made Exclusively by 

THE TOLEDO COOKER CO., 1319 W. Bancroft St., TOLEDO, OHIO 

LARGEST MANUFACTURERS OF COOKERS IN THE WORLD 




SPECIAL OFFER COUPON 
FOR TRIPLICATE PAILS 

TOLEDO COOKER CO., Toledo, Ohio: 

I understand as a Special Introductory Offer 
to dealers on your Triplicate t ."His ol Pure 
Aluminum, you will PREPAY trensi^: on first 
order for one dozen or more seta. 

Send me doz. Sets 

doz. "Lifters" 

Name 

Address 

TERMS : 30 days, net : 2% cash, 10 days. 




" IDEAL " Fireless Cook Stove 

The Cooker with the "Water Seal" top. 
Pure aluminum lining . vulcanized solid 
oak outer casting. 

Finest built. Best Cooking, Handsomest 
Cooker on the Market. 
Send for our catalogues and prices on Steam 
and Fireless Cookers. Write to-day. 



18 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Galvanized Cornices 




Skylights 



Ventilators 



Curved Eavetrough 

Special Galvanized Iron Work of All Kinds 

WRITE US FOR ILLUSTRATED CATALOGUE AND PRICE LIST 

THE METALLIC ROOFING CO. OF CANADA, Limited 



TORONTO, ONT. 



MANUFACTURERS 



WINNIPEG, MAN. 

C 92 




Pink's 
Lumbering 

Tools 

MADE IN CANADA 



The Standard Tools in every province of the Dominion, New Zealand, Australia, Etc. 
We manufacture all kinds of lumber tools. Light and Durable. 

Send for Catalogue and Price List. Long Distance Phone No. 87. 

Sold throughout the Dominion by all Wholesale and Retail Hardware Merchants. 



Manufacturers 
of 



The Thos. Pink Company, Ltd., 

PEMBROKE, ONT. 



Lumber Tools 



19 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



New Process Steel Wire Trace Chains 



Tie Out Chains 
Halter Chains 



Dog Chains 
Cattle Chains 



THE MOST SATISFACTORY CHAIN TO HANDLE 




TIE OUT CHAINS 





CATTLE CHAINS— Close Ring 



CATTLE CHAINS— Open Ring 



MANUFACTURED BY 



THE B. GREENING WIRE CO., Limited 

HAMILTON, Ont. MONTREAL, Que. 




WHICH KIND DO 
YOU USE? 



THE reputation of NAMCO milled nuts was built up on 
the smooth quality and uniform accuracy that cannot 
be produced in the ordinary punched or pressed nut. 
In addition, cap and set screws with "V" or U.S.S. threads 
are carried in stock at the factory. 

Inquire into our contract proposition. Send for the "Stan- 
dard Product" Booklet. See the variety carried in stock 
for immediate delivery. 

NAMCO special milled products are made on the latest type 
machines that facilitate rapid and accurate production. Parts 
to specifications completed on short notice. Let us make 
you a quotation on your samples. 

"Special or Standard" Products Booklet sent on request. 



The National- Acme Mfg. Co., 

Montreal, St. Henri andJG.T.R. 



20 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Preston Metal Garages 



have met with such favor among automobile owners that 
they are becoming known all over the country. In order to 
handle inquiries coming in we want agents all over the 
country. 

Every auto owner is a prospect. Write to-day for full infor- 
mation in regard to the agency for your territory. 



MENTION HARDWARE AND METAL 



Metal Shinole&SidinqC 

PRESTON ONT. MONTREAL QUE 



mi 



m 



i 
m 






You Can Sell These Machines NOW! 

They're hot weather washers because they wash clothes thoroughly without any labor 

They Run Themselves 





MADE BY 



Agents : 

W. L. Haldimand & Son, 

MONTREAL 

H. F. Moulden & Son, 

WINNIPEG 



mer-Dowswellj Limited 

HAMILTON, ONTARIO 



21 



HARDWARE AND METAL 




ALL STEEL 

DOOR LATCHES 



This latch is made from pressed steel 
throughout and is fully guaranteed. 

We also manufacture a full line of 

BUTTS, HINGES, LIGHT T AND STRAP HINGES, 
DOOR BOLTS, HITCHING RINGS, Etc. 

of high quality. 

Our prices are right. 
Send for Catalogue and Price List. 



The Montreal Hardware 
Manufacturing Co., T .imited 

Montreal, : : : : Quebec 



IMPERIAL --- STANDARD — SCALES 

400 Varieties Accurate, Durable, Well Finished 
Send for the large 128 page catalog and prices, No. 66 



Butchers' Scales 

Bathroom Scales 

Confectioners' Scales 

Dairy Scales 

Druggists' Scales 

Foundry Scales 

Grain Warehouse Scales 

Grain Elevator Scales 

Grocers' Scales 

Tea Scales 



Platform * 
Scales 


I 


ifiS 




All Capacities 








300 Lbs. to 
3000 Lbs. J 


Hi 


J*2^l^ ^^^^^ 


ilia 


V^3#^ ___^_ 


_3-*^' 



Letter and Postal Scales 

Railway Depot Scales 

Railway Track Scales 

Rolling Mill Scales 

Salt, Meat and Fish Scales 

Stock Scales 

Steelyards 

Weigh Beams 

Union Scales 

Etc. 



The Burrow, Stewart & Milne Co., Limited 

HEAD OFFICE AND WORKS : HAMILTON 
Offices and Warehouses at Toronto, Montreal and Winnipeg 



22 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Sell Bur- Nor Hatchets 

For Customer Satisfaction 




They have strongly reinforced handles, can't 
shrink and are fifty per cent, stronger than 
second growth hickory. Blades carefully temp- 



All parts riveted under tremendous 

American 
Screen Door Catches 

are steady sellers during fly time. They make a good addition in 
profits with every screen door set o r piece of wire cloth sold. Right 
now is the time to get these catches. Get our prices and catalogue on 
these lines before buying elsewhere. 



BURGESS-NORTON MFG. CO. 

Geneva, Illinois, U.S.A. 




No. 3 

(Showing Door Open) 



J.HCONN0R&S0N 



OTTAWA. ONT 




1812 



WASHING MACHINES 
CLOTH ES WR I NGERS 



J. H. Connor & Son 

Limited 
Ottawa - - Canada 



Dealers Greatly 
Interested In Our 
New Catalogue 

Alert, progressive dealers are greatly in- 
terested in our new catalog, illustrating as it 
does the very latest improvements in washing 
machine construction. After reading and 
studying this catalog you'll get many new 
ideas about washing machines. You'll see 
the value of taking hold of Connor Washers 
and Wringers energetically. Drop us a card 
for a copy. We want every progressive deal- 
er to get a copy whether or not he handles the 
Connor Line. 



23 



HARDWARE AND METAL 




THE 4 CARDINAL 
VIRTUES OF THE 
FOX FLOOR SCRA- 
PING MACHINE 

1. Simple of Construction. 

2. Easy to Operate. 

3. Leaves a Perfect Finish. 

4. Inexpensive. 

Every Fox Scraper is guaranteed 
to do perfect work. 

Manufactured by 



FOX SUPPLY CO 

112 King Street 
BROOKLYN, WIS. 



THE FOX FLOOR SCRAPER IS SOLD BY :— 



Th< 



E. Cavanagh Co., 
Ltd. 
Montreal 

Durand Hardware Co. 
Montreal 



The James Walker Hardware 
Co., Ltd. 
Montreal 

Frothingham & Workman, Ltd. 
Montreal 



Prompt deliveries will be made. 
Write for Catalogue and Prices. 



NATIONAL 



Steel Rim Locks 




If you do not 
know the Nation- 
al Lock, get ac- 
quainted, as i t 
means more 
money for YOU. 
Order from your 
jobber. 

National Hardware 
Company, Ltd. 

OR IUA, ONTARIO. CANADA 



have, through their past service, 
proved that they are the easiest 
operated, most durable, and abso- 
lutely the safest on the market. 

They cannot get out of order, as 

they are extremely simple and 

extra strong where strength is 
most needed. 




Davidson's Cleveland Filter 



Enameled Royal Blue Outside 
with a Snowy White Interior 

CAPACITY— 12 QUARTS 

Filters through a natural stone making it impossible for the 
typhoid germ to get belcw into the drinking water. They are 
easy to clean and keep sanitary as all that is necessary is to 
scrub off the sediment collected on the top of the stone and the 
filter is again in perfect condition and ready for good service. 
The top vessel of filter is furnished with a bail handle and the 
base has side handles and a nickel plated faucet. New stones 
can easily be refitted when needed. 




DIMENS!ONS-llxl8 



The Thos. Davidson Manufacturing Company, Limited 

MONTREAL WINNIPEG TORONTO 



24 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Push 

and 

Pull 




Richards- 
Wilcox 
No. 21 

Trolley Barn 
Door Hanger 



Push and pull 
doors equipped 
with Richards- 
Wilcox Door' 
Hangers— as of ten 
as you wish, for 
scores of years — 
they will always run smooth, easy and sure — al- 
ways move straight, without wobbling. Richards- 
Wilcox Door Hangers will last for years under 
hard use, because they are the result of thirty 
years Hanger building experience — they're made 
right — from right materials and by right men. 

You, your customers and clients can depend 
on Richards- Wilcox Door Hangers. Get catalogs 
and prices to-day. 

A Hanger for Any Door That Slides 



fcchards Wilcox* 



Manufacturing Co. PisF 
AURORA.ILL.US.A. & 



HEADQUARTERS 



Sixty-two Years 
In Business 

Sixty-two years' experience, 
enabling us by dint of superior 
quality in building up the 
largest business of bulk and 
package Blacks, not only in 
England and America, but in 
the world. 

In order to be sure of the 
best and most economical, look 
for the Red Seal on every pack- 
age. 

Manufacturers of Old Stand- 
ard, Eagle, Globe and Pyramid 
Germantown Brands. 

WHYBUYTHENEARBRAND 
WHEN THE BEST IS PRO- 
CURABLE ? 



L.MARTIN CO 

51 FULTON STREET 

NEW YORK U.5.A 



Add This MEAT CHOPPER To Your Stock 



You Will Get Splendid RESULTS 



Our Eclipse Double Gear Attach- 
ment has proved a great improve- 
ment on food choppers. It requires 
about one-third as much power as 
an ordinary hand chopper, and be- 
ing more compact and durable 
should last an age, with proper at- 
tention. Can be placed in a con- 
venient position for operating, is 
easy to adjust and separate for 
cleaning'. Constructed of the very 
best material by expert mechanics. 
Display this chopper in your win- 
dow and you will soon procure ex- 
cellent results. 

Write to-day for catalogue and 
prices. 

We also manufacture Refriger- 
ator Door Fasteners, Refrigerator 
Hinges, and various other articles 
that are a necessity to the butcher. 



Bernard Gloekler Co. 

PITTSBURGH, PA., U. S. A. 




25 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



plSSTo^ 




AMs- 



The mechanic using 



DISSTON 

SAWS, TOOLS and FILES 

obtains those full and satisfying results which make him an 
earnest advocate of the DISSTON BRAND. 



HENRY DISSTON & SONS 

INCORPORATED 

Keystone Saw, Tool, Steel & File Works 
Established 1840 PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



THE WEST 
APPROVES 

of X CELL Dry Batteries. Made 
right in Winnipeg, they reach cus- 
tomers fresh and full of vitality. 
Our No. 8 — for engine work — is 
furnishing reliable ignition to 
thousands in Western Canada. The 
standard dry cells of the West to- 
day are 

X CELL 

Dry Batteries 

Guaranteed to reach the trade under six days old. 

Made so that dealers need fear no shelf depreciation. 

Highest in initial amperage, highest in recuperative 

powers. 

LET US PUT YOU IN TOUCH 
WITH THE NEAREST JOBBER 

Canadian Carbon Company 

OF WINNIPEG, LIMITED 

Bury and Irish Ave., - - Winnipeg 

E. W. HANNA, President and Managing Director 




WINDOW GLASS 



Prompt import from 

Belgium, Chancel 

Glass, Plate Glass, 

Colored Glass 



B. & S. H. Thompson & Co, 

LIMITED 

MONTREAL, QUE. 



26 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



n 







STEEL BASEBOARD REGISTER 

ALL STEEL 

LIGHT SHIPPING WEIGHT 



MR. FURNACE MAN 

THE ONLY WAY TO MAKE MONEY 

IS BY USING "THE FERROSTEEL LINE" 

OF REGISTERS 

Our reputation is unequalled for highly 

finished goods — complete satisfaction 

guaranteed. 

BASEBOARD and FLOOR REGISTERS 

FACES and BORDERS 

ALL SIZES— ALL FINISHES 



■I! 




TORONTO BASEBOARD REGISTER 

CAST IRON 
WRITE FOR CATALOG and PRICES 



CANADIAN FERROSTEEL COMPANY, LIMITED, BRIDGEBURG, ONTARIO 




TOWNSEND MOWERS 

HAND MOWERS and HORSE MOWERS 

All Our Hand Mowers 
Are Ball Bearing 



SENT ON THEIR MERITS 

Write for Catalog 

S. P. Townsend ®L Co. 

ORANGE. N. J. 




"Good Profits" 



The Straightest 
Aim 

at YOUR success is the handling of quality goods. When it comes to quality, the 

HAMILTON RIFLE 

cannot be beaten for the price. It is a marvellous 22 calibre rifle with few working parts. These can be 

easily kept clean. Its safety, strength and accuracy give it an unlimited popularity with every user. The finish and design make 

it very attractive. The good profits will appeal to you. Get our circulars. 

For Sale by all Jobber* 

C. «/. Hamilton & Son Plymouth, Mich. 




CORRUGATED IRON— Straight or Curved 

Every sheet is stamped absolutely straight and uniform. 

Conductor Pipe Eavetrough Elbows Skylights 

Ridge Roll Valleys and Ventilators 



WHEELER & BAIN 



The Quick 
Shippers 



TORONTO 



27 



HARDWARE AND METAL 





ROUNDWAY 
STEAM COCK 





J. M. T. VALVE 



J.M.T. CHECK 
VALVE 




THREE WAY 

STEAM COCK 



EJECTOR 

SELL OUR GUARANTEED 

ENGINEERS' SUPPLIES 

We believe we have the largest line of En- 
gineers' Supplies in Canada. You run no risk 
when selling our products, they are guaranteed 
to completely satisfy YOU and the engineeer. 

Our line is strictly up-to-date, finely finished 
and very durable. 

If you want to procure the Engineers' patronage 
recommend OUR GOODS onlv. 



Give Them a Trial — Write for Catalog. 

The James Morrison Brass Mfg. Co., Ltd. 




INJECTOR 



93-97 Adelaide Street West 



TORONTO 



MR. HARDWARE DEALER 



Don't wait till the hunting season is on but order 
now and be prepared to meet the demand for this 

FIVE SHOT REPEATING RIFLE 

"MAUSER" MODEL 71 84 CONVERTED 




Bolt Action. Caliber 11 m/m or 43. GUARANTEED SATIS- 
FACTORY and e tirely unused. Length 42 inches. Length 
of Barrel 24 inches. Weight 8% lbs. 

This Rifle is a very powerful and strong Repeating Rifle for 
hunting Deer and Larger Game. Correctly sighted. Perfect 
safety device. Easily kept in order and preferable to any 
other Repeating Rifles of same Caliber. 

FOR SALE BY ALL LEADING WHOLESALE HARDWARE HOUSES 



28 



HARDWARE AND METAL 




No 1700. — Fine Damascus finish steel barrels, left barrel choke bored, flat extended 
rib, case hardened frame, top snap action, triple bolted, walnut stock and fore-end. 

GAUGE 10 12 16 

SELLS RETAIL FOR $13.75 $13.00 $13.00 EACH 




No. 110. — A new American Hammerless Gun, 
with decarbonized steel barrels, choke bored, 
flat hollow rib, case hardened frame, heavy 
lateral bolt through extension rib, walnut stock, 
full pistol grip, rubber butt plate, automatic safety 12 gauge. Retails for $21.00 each. 



No. 822— New boys' Rifle for 22 cal. Cartridges, 20 inch 
round barrel, new lever action, walnut stock and fore-end 
takes down at frame in two parts. Sells retail at $5.00 each- 



DISCOUNT TO DEALERS 




$mMl cSewmonti te 



MONTREAL 



29 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Shooters who use 

* «*/ DOMINION AMMUNITION 

have complete confidence of the best results at 
the trap or in the field. 

You can depend on the regularity of Dominion 
loads, because everything entering into the 
manufacture of Ammunition is made in our own 
factory, except the Smokeless Powder, which is 
made specially for us. 

Don't forget to ask for Dominion 
gr Shells and Cartridges. 

Look for the box bearing our Trade Mark, which insures 
your success. Every box is absolutely guaranteed. 

DOMINION CARTRIDGE CO., Limited 

MONTREAL - CANADA 



Tell Your Customers That 



ANTI-DUST 



SWEEPING 
POWDER 



MEANS 

FLOORS CLEAN CARPETS BRIGHT 

ALL DISEASE GERMS KILLED HOME FRESH AND SWEET 

NO DUST WHILE SWEEPING 

EVERY HARDWARE DEALER CAN SELL ANTI-DUST — IT BRINGS A GOOD PROFIT 



MacLaren Imperial Cheese Co., Limited 



DISTRIBUTORS FOR ONTARIO 



Sapho Mfg. Co., Limited 



Montreal 



30 



The Value of Special Publicity Efforts 

And the Limitations, Particular Attention Being Given to the Question of 
Parade Floats — Two Attractive Floats by Hardware Firms Described — Special 
Efforts Should be Used in Conjunction with the Regular Campaign. 



The publicity efforts of the hardware 
dealer are confined pretty largely to 
newspaper advertising and window dis 
plays. These are the staple, every-day- 
in-the-year features of the campaign and 
it is from these two sources that the re- 
sults come. A permanent business of 
any size could not very well be built up 
if the store windows were neglected and 
no use made of newspaper advertising. 

Some dealers have found ways and 
means of securing business by original 
publicity methods. They get out of the 
beaten track; and probably succeed for 
that reason. For instance, a hardware- 
man whose shop is located in an out- 
lying ward of one of Canada's biggest 
cities and who, accordingly did not feel 
that the scope of his business warranted 
him in using space in the daily papers, 
has made good use of blotters with ad- 
vertising matter printed on them. Last 
year he sent out a number bearing a 
talk on lawn mowers and his sale of 
lawn mowers was a record breaker. This 
year he did not send out any blotters 
but the lawn mower sales kept up just 
the same. Thus the effort made the pre- 
vious year had helped to build up what 
looks like a permanently good connec- 
tion in that line. 

Some dealers send out souvenirs and 
depend on the distribution of printed 
matter from door to door. Generally 
speaking, these methods have little prac- 
tical value unless worked in conjunction 
with regular advertising and window dis- 
plays. They are probably just as ex- 
pensive in the long run. Circulars and 
bills are not the most economical form 
of advertising if persisted in regularly. 

Of course, there are cases where the 
dealer is compelled to resort to such 
means if he desires to make any kind 
of bid for publicity. This is sometimes 
the case in a large city where the dealer 
has a business confined to one section or 
in a small place where there is no local 
newspaper. 

Personal Letters Help. 

As an adjunct to a live advertising 
campaign, the sending out of letters and 
literature is generally found effective. 
For instance, the mailing of personal 
letter's or circular literature to store 
prospects has been found a most ef- 
fective method of stirring up trade in 
stores. It is doubtful, however, if a 
dealer who confined his efforts to that 
one feature, would get results to any 
marked desree. 



SPECIAL EFFORTS. 

There are times when the 
hardivareman gets out of the 
beaten track of well organiz- 
ed publicity and indulges in 
what might be termed a spe- 
cial effort. The fall fair ex- 
hibit and the parade float are 
good examples of special ef- 
forts. They have their value 
but no effort of a temporary 
nature can reap fullest re- 
sults unless worked in con- 
junction with a publicity 
campaign based on well- 
tried lines. 

The imminence of Labor 
Day makes this article one of 
especial interest to hardware- 
men. 



There are some methods in less gen- 
eral use which have little if anything to 
recommend them. Giving yard articles 
was once a very common form of adver- 
tising ( ?) and the results were generally 
of a very negligible quantity. The yard 
stick is such a commonly used article 
that people use it without giving a 
thought to what may be printed on it. 

As for advertising on church pro- 
grammes, or on any kind of programmes 
for that matter, there is nothing to re- 
commend it. If a dealer feels that he 
must indulge in this sort of misplaced 



philanthropy, he should charge it up to 
charity, not advertising. 

This Pays Well. 

Making exhibits at fall fairs may be 
classed under the head of special pub- 
licity efforts. This question has been 
most thoroughly dealt with, however, in 
recent issues. The advisability of ex- 
hibiting at fall fairs seems to be pretty 
generally conceded. Some dealers have 
undoubtedly reaped golden results. 
The Value of the Float. 

Somewhat similar to the fall fair ex- 
hibit as a means of publicity is the 
parade float. It is not by any means ef- 
fective but it lias, nevertheless, a cer- 
tain value. 

Civic patriotism enters to a certain 
extent into the preparation of a float. 
A. certain amount of value attaches to 
it for that reason alone. The people 
who turn out to see the parade — and 
that means everyone — appreciate the 
fact that the firms, who have placed 
floats, have voluntarily gone to a great 
deal of trouble and some expense for 
their (the public's) amusement. This 
creates a feeling of friendliness toward 
each firm represented. Even if no busi- 
ness resulted directly, the establishment 
of this cordial sentiment would well re- 
pay the dealer for his time and ex- 
pense. 

However, a good float has undoubt- 
ed value from the advertising stand- 
point. People go to see a parade with 
the intention of seeing everything and 
each float that passes gets close attention 
from thousands of pairs of eyes. If a 




Original float entered by McLellan & Co., Perdue, Sask., in field day 

parade. 



31 



HARD W ARE AND METAL 



novel idea has been introduced or a par- 
ticularly attractive display of goods ar- 
ranged, the float will come in for a 
great amount of attention and will be 
discussed in practically every home af- 
terward. 

Of course, the impression is in one 
sense a transitory one. The float soon 
passes and is succeeded by others. There 
is no opportunity afforded the people to 
step up and look at the goods and thus 
give the salesman a chance to secure 
business. In this respect, the float is 
far inferior as a business measure to 
the fall fair exhibit. As said before, 
however, it has a value of its own. 

An Attractive Float. 

The second illustration shows the float 
entered by A. B. Bourne of Grimsby in 
last year's Labor Day Parade. Quite 
a little time was consumed in arrang- 
ing- this float and there was some ex- 
pense attached. It proves, however, a 
good publicity measure and resulted in 
quite a little business. Mr. Bourne was 
well satisfied with his venture. 

As will be noted, the centre of the 
float was used for a display of tools 
while the sides were draped in with 
paint advertising matter. The display 
of tools was particularly a propos in 
view of the fact that the parade was 
arranged and carried out very largely 
by merchants. 

Used Stove Pipes. 

The first illustration shows the 
float entered by McLellan & Co. of 
Perdue, Sask., on sports day in that 
town. They are making a specialty of 
.highly polished stove pipes and, as will 
be seen, the stove pipe enters largely 
into the make up of this very original 
float. Half way between a pipe organ 
and a Grecian temple in appearance, the 
float would impress stove pipes on the 
minds of every person who watched the 
parade wind past. 



But stove pipes were after all only 
one part of the exhibit. Stoves, coal 
and gas, were prominently displayed and 
other lines, such as tools and paint, were 
shown. The float was an original one 
and had a good measure of sales making 
force. 

There does not seem any reason for 
doubting that efforts of this nature are 
tesultful. 

Special publicity efforts have their 
place in the conduct of the modern store. 
They can, however, be overdone. There 
are some hardwaremen who are so con- 
/inuously engaged in special efforts that 
they have neither time nor money left 
to engage in the more legitimate, sub- 
stantial and valuable forms of publicity. 
Their exertions are applied exclusivelj 
to freak schemes or untried mediums, 
and their name never appears on the 
advertising page of the local newspapers. 
They get results'? Undoubtedly they get 
some ; but the steady volume of business 
which comes from the regular adver- 
tising appeal is lacking. Special and 
seasonable efforts can be made beneficial 
and effective but they should not 
be allowed to interfere in any degree 
with the regular publicity campaign of 
the store. 



HELD SUMMER SALE. 

Gladstone, Man. — W. H. Squair & Son, 
have been holding a hot weather goods 
sale. The firm decided to clear out their 
stock of screen doors, window screens, 
hammocks, refrigerators, etc., for two 
reasons. The first was the obvious one 
that they did not desire to carry a large 
stock over until next year. The second 
was that they are intending to make 
extensive alterations to the store. The 
alterations are being proceeded with at 
once. 




The sale was heavily advertised and 
resulted in the clearing out of a large 
stock. 

The firm are using large advertising 
space and have entered upon a progres- 
sive publicity propaganda. They have 
adopted the slogan, "If it's from 
Squair 's it's good." 




Float entered by Grimsby hardware man in last year's Labor Day parade. 



The following items were taken from 
I he issue of Hardware and Metal of 
August 27, 1892: 

"A great deal of interest is being- 
taken in Brantford and Brant Coun- 
ty with reference to the Farmers' 
Cordage Co., which it is expected 
will start operations there shortly." 
Editor's Note. — The company started 
and continued in business until just re- 
cently when the plant was wiped out by 
fire. 

"While in Belleville last week, a 
representative of Hardware made 
an inspection of the store and work- 
shops of the firm of W. W. Chown 
& Co., who do one of the largest 
businesses outside of Toronto." 
Editor's Note. — The announcement 
was made last week that the business in 
Belleville is to be disposed of. The mem- 
bers of the firm are removing to Edmon- 
ton, where the Chown Hardware Limited 
has been formed. 

ip * * 

"The Montreal bankers have made 
a move in the way of lessening what 
they call the American currency evil 
in Canada. At the next meeting of 
the Dominion Bankers' Association 
a motion will be made proposing a 
discount of from iy 2 to 2 per cent. 
There is about four millions of the 
stuff at present in Canada. ' ' 
Editor's Note. — American currency is 
more welcome now. In fact, most any 
kind of currency is provided that it is 
not counterfeit, is acceptable. There is 
considerably more than four millions of 
the stuff in Canada. 

* * * 

"Geo. Nicholson, bookkeeper at 
M. & L. Samuel, Benjamin & Co. 's 
Toronto, was married to Miss M. A. 
W. (Polly), youngest daughter of 
W. G. Edmonds." 

Editor's Note. — Mr. Nicholson remain- 
ed with M. & L. Samuel, Benjamin & 
Co. until a year ago, when he severed 
his connection. 



32 



A New Line Gives General Impetus to Trade 

Scope of the Hardware Store Widenin g More and More, so That Leather Shop- 
ping Bags are Now Being Sold — How Su ch a Class of Goods May Bring Benefits 
— It Appeals to the Women, and Draws Attention to Other Lines Which Are 
of Interest to Women. 



There was a time when hardware lines 
consisted entirely of articles for build- 
ing — either tools, necessary to execute 
the work, or articles to be installed in 
a structure. But that was in the old 
days. Things are different now. Why, 
to-day a hardware store has something to 
appeal to all classes. The days when 
women found nothing much to interest 
them there, except cooking utensils, are 
long since past ; and fortunate it is that 
such is the case. 

Every little time sees some new line 
added to the hardware stock. Indeed it 
is in these lines, according to the experi- 
ence of a good many dealers, that the 
profits are to be secured. This being so, 
there is small wonder that those fortun- 
ate enough to have stores large enough 
are ever on the watch for new articles of 
the right kind. It is not alone for the 
added profits that the new goods bring, 
that they are popular 5 but they draw a 
new class of patronage. Any way they 
make the store more attractive, and so 
bring about sales in other lines. 

Showing Leather Goods. 
W. H. Thorne and Co., St. John, have 
made a specialty of carrying these spe- 
cial lines — and with good results. Late- 
ly a new feature has been added, leather 
goods being shown prominently. Some 
window trims featuring these lines have 
been prepared, and generally business in 
these specialties has been stimulated. 

What is a Hardware Line? 

Everyone has seen the leather shop- 
ping bags, now so popular with the 
ladies. Tapestry bags, too, it will be 
known, are in great favor. Yes, but 
those are not hardware lines, it may be 
said. Perhaps they aren 't. But what is 
a hardware line anyway? There may be 
a hard and fast definition, but in an age 
when dealers in other classes of mer- 
chandise are slipping over into the hard- 
ware field it is only just that the hard- 
ware dealer should retaliate. From a 
• practical standpoint, indeed, a hardware 
line is anything which a hardware mer- 
chant may well add to his stock, so that 
it increases the general profitableness of 
his business. 

Now what lines this includes differs 
widely in different cases. Some men 
have limited room. They naturally keep 
the goods which pay best and leave all 
others. Others there are who deal en- 
tirely with men. They perhaps have 
their store in a district where this is the 
only class of trade open to them. Or 
they may have found this pays them 



best. Whatever the space at their dis- 
posal these merchants would be foolish 
to add goods which would appeal only 
to women. 

Which Lines Pay Best? 

But the majority of hardwaremen to- 
day count upon woman 's trade to a large 
extent. The lines which will appeal to 
these buyers, therefore, are of great 
value, and what of these lines they will 
carry depends largely upon the space 
they can afford to devote. It is not a 
case of which lines would pay, but which 
would pay best. All cannot be carried - 
which then will best recompense a man 
for his efforts? 

As has been said, W. H. Thorne and 
Co., have added leather and tapestry 
bags. Space is available in that store. 
Moreover, a number of lines are already 
carried which sell largely to women, and 
by adding this new class of goods some- 
thing is done to stimulate the sales in 
the other goods which appeal to similar 
people. How this works is easily seen. 

Women Look About Them. 

Displays of the leather and tapestry 
bags have been arranged, as stated. 
These displays have appealed greatly to 
the women. Many have come inside to 
examine the bags. Many have bought, 
and thus a profit has naturally boon 
made. But while examining the bags 
the ladies have also looked about them. 
Did you ever see a woman who would not 
look about her ? There may be men who 
stand still, and see only what they came 
to see, but not women. They want to 
observe all that is to be seen, so they 
look about. 

In this inspection — hurried though it 
may be — a lady customer can hardly fail 
to see some other article which appeals 
to her. China, brass goods, and copper 
ware have all been handled in Thorne 
and Co., for some time. It is in the part 
of the store where these goods are shown 
that the leather shopping bags have been 
displayed. So, anyone coming to pur- 
chase one of these, naturally sees that 
china, those brass goods, that cut glass, 
and that copper ware. What is the nat- 
ural result? Why, in many cases direct 
sales will come. The bag once purchas- 
ed the customer will look about. The 
articles which struck the eye will be 
examined. A bit of china will be picked 
up — how china does appeal to women. 
Perhaps this will be bought immediately. 
Perhaps the choice will fall upon some 
bit of cut glass or some brass or copper 
article. It may be that the bag will be 
33 



the only immediate purchase, but the 
fact that the other goods have been in- 
spected is exceedingly valuable. That 
makes future sales likely. 

A new line, such as has been added in 
this St. John store, is useful in many 
ways. It provides an attractive feature 
for the tourist trade. It is a line which 
appeals to those who want to make some 
present. It is a line which will be a bus- 
iness bringer at the Christmas season. 
But perhaps it is even more valuable be- 
cause it keeps the store favorably before 
the public. The addition of a new line 
means comment, and comment of the 
right kind is what brings trade and 
makes large stores. There can be no 
doubt that the introduction of new lines 
is a valuable step in very many cases, 
but the dealer must bear his own special 
needs in mind when making his selection. 



STEEL IMPORTS INCREASE. 

The following figures, contained in a 
report issued at Ottawa, are well worth 
close study: — 

Steel rails are imported into Canada 
under the general tariff at a duty of $7 
per ton, and under the preferential tariff 
at a duty of $4.50. In spite of this 
heavy duty the enormous total of 45,781 
tons have been imported in the three 
months from the two countries with a 
total value of $1,187,910. 

How Totals are Distributed. 

These totals are divided as follows: 

Under the general tariff — From Great 
Britain, 56 tons, value $1,202; from tht 
United States, 45,668 tons, value $1,185,- 
345. Preferential — From Great Britain, 
57 tons, value $1,363. By simple calcu- 
lation the figures would indicate that 
$320,324.50 of duty had been collected. 

For the corresponding three months in 
1911 the figures are as follows: — 

From the United States, under general 
tariff, 14,547 tons, value $428,054; from 
Great Britain, under preferential, 609 
tons, value $14,576. 

This gives a total import of 15,156 
tons, with a total value of $442,630, and, 
according to computation, a total duty 
collected of $104,569.50. 

Increase 200 Per Cent. 

Thus the imports for the first three 
months of the fiscal year 1912-13 show 
an increase over the corresponding 
period's imports last year of $30,625 
tons, or an increase of 200 per cent. ; an 
increase in value of $745,280, and an in- 
crease in duty collected of $215,755. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



HARDWARE AND METAL 

(ESTABLISHED 1888.) 

THE MACLEAN PUBLISHING CO., LIMITED 

JOHN BAYNE MACLEAN - President. 

Publishers of Trade Newspapers which circulate in the Provinces 
of British Columbia, Alberta, Saskatchewan, Manitoba, Ontario, 
Quebec, Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, P. E. Island and New- 
foundland. 

CABLE ADDRESSES 
CANADA: Macpubco, Toronto. ENGLAND: Atabek, London, Eng. 

OFFICES 

Montreal - 701-702 Eastern Tp. Bk. Building 
Toronto - - 143-149 University Avenue. 
Winnipeg - - 34 Royal Bank Building. 
Vancouver, B.C. - - - H. Hodgson, 18 
London, Eng. - E. J. Dodd, 88 Fleet St. E.C. 
New York E. B. Huestis, 115 Broadway, N.Y. 
Chicago A. H. Byrne, 140 South Dearborn St 
France John P. Jones & Co., 31bia Faubourg 



Phone Main 1255. 

Phone Main 7324. 

Phone Garry 2313. 

Hartney Chambers 

Phone Central 12900 

Phone 2009 Rector 

Phone Rand 3234. 
Montmartre, Paris. 



SUBSCRIPTION 

Canada, $2; United States, ?2.50; Great Britain and Colonies, 8s 
6d ; elsewhere, 12s. 

PUBLISHED EVERY SATURDAY. 



UNIFORM DATES DESIRABLE. 

Why should there not be uniformity in the matter of 
civic holiday ? Under the present order of things, trade 
is very much unsettled and the travelling man suffers. 
The holiday is fixed according to local conditions and the 
result is that the date of observance is different in prac- 
tically every municipality. For instance, here are some of 
the dates observed this year: Toronto, Aug. 5; Belleville, 
Aug. 7; Napanee, Aug. 7; Ottawa, Aug. 9; Peterboro, Aug. 
12; Lindsay, Aug. 13; and Trenton Aug 14. 

If uniformity cannot be obtained then the next best 
thing would be the compilation of an official provincial 
list. Let each city or town send notification of holiday 
date to the department of the provincial secretary, prior 
to August 1 of each year. Then a complete official list 
could be issued in the Ontario Gazette or advertised in 
a number of papers with provincial circulation. 



ADVANCES IN MOTHER-0 'PEARL. 

Reference was made in Hardware and Metal some 
time ago to an advance in the price of Mother-o '-pearl. 
Since then the price on the primary markets has taken 
an unprecedented bound. At the last auction sales in 
London, the price for the best quality was shoved up to 
£29-5-0 per cwt. This is the highest price ever paid, the 
previous high water mark having been £24-2-6, this price 
being paid in 1903. At that time the price was regarded 
with such astonishment that the transaction was referred 
to as a "panic sale." 

It is believed, however, that the present unprecedent- 
ed price is permanent. The advance is due almost solely 
to the heavy demand for ware with mother-o '-pearl 
handles and the vogue for buttons and fancy goods of 
that material. 

It is interesting to note that the class of shells which 
brought the record price of £29-5-0 per cwt. sold for less 
than £10 six years ago. 



BOGUS BILLS ABROAD. 

The authorities have given out that counterfeit bills 
are again in circulation. One and two dollar bills have 
been passed at various points in Ontario. 

The counterfeiters apparently have made their spuri- 
ous paper money by photographing real bills with the 
result that the output is a weak imitation. The colors 



are so weak that there should be little difficulty in de- 
tecting the bills. 

Nevertheless, the retail merchant will have to be on 
his guard. In making change even the sharpest will ac- 
cept bills without even a cursory examination. With 
bogus bills in circulation there is always the danger that 
some of them may be taken in. Look at every bill you 
get. 



LIKE BREEDS LIKE. 

"Birds of a feather flock together," states the old 
saw. Modern scientists go a step further, and state that 
people who live long together, sharing their interests and 
emotions, come to look alike. However this may be in 
the natural world, it would certainly seem that something 
similar holds for the hardware field. 

Have you ever noticed that wh